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NYPRESS.COM

COMMUNITY NEWS BELOW 14TH STREET • OCTOBER 31, 2013 P.9

Bouncing Back After Sandy One year after the storm forced many Lower Manhattan businesses to close, owners reflect on the devastation -- and how they recovered

Grace Shulman, 78, has spent her life writing poems about the wild world of downtown Manhattan

By Helaina Hovitz

By Veronica Andreades

Clinton Hall 90 Washington Street (corner of Rector Street) Abraham Merchant’s eponymous cafe at the corner of Washington and Rector Streets was completely destroyed by Sandy. But Merchant, undeterred, decided to open a brand new beer garden in his old space to replace the business the storm took away. Clinton Hall now serves craft beer and German food, as the only beer garden in the neighborhood. “Coming back after Hurricane Sandy’s devastation for us was neither a choice nor a question. The only question was how soon could we come back,” said Merchant. He credits his ability to come back with the community’s continued support.

Village Poet Reflects the City

“We wanted a place for neighbors to gather and regain a sense of normalcy. We wanted to help our neighbors, even though it turned out that they helped us much more than we could have ever helped them,” he said. “The community supported local businesses and made an extraordinary effort to come visit our establishments. Even during the times that we did not have heat, our guests continued to come in.”

Salty Paw 38 Peck Slip This “pet emporium and groom spa” was ruined by floodwaters but has returned to its former space. “I am thrilled that The Salty Paw is back home and open again, after almost a year, at 38 Peck Slip, but its bitter sweet,” said owner Amanda Byron, “Until ALL my colleagues are back open, I am not 100 percent satisfied. Plus we still have an uphill battle to get some city funding our way.” Byron said that she and other small businesses affected by the storm still need significant support, both in terms of customers and in help from the city. “I have to think about what’s next for my Continued on page 4

“There he is, outside the subway entrance/ where sunlit figures race down steps into darkness/ their hearing, like mine, dulled by traffic whines,” writes Greenwich Village poet Grace Schulman in her poem, “Street Music, Astor Place.” In her upcoming poetry book, Without a Claim (Houghton Mifflin), Schulman captures everything from the lost world of the Montauk Indians to the everyday, unpolluted ambiance of Greenwich Village. She digs deep into the soil and concrete and represents them in a simple way, yet with so much history. The book has been called a “Modern book of psalms,” by Pulitzer Prize winner and fellow Village author Philip Shultz. A Brooklyn born, Polish-Jew, Schulman, 78, grew up a city kid. Her father was an executive at an advertisement agency which his wife helped him run. After college, Schulman hoped to become a journalist; however none of the newspapers would hire a woman. She

worked for Harper’s Bazaar, Glamour and, in 1972 was invited to be the poetry editor for the Nation. She came to Greenwich Village in 1957, meeting her husband, Jerome, now a virologist, in Washington Square Park while playing her guitar. Now a professor at Baruch College and author of six other poetry books, Schulman came to be a poet gradually. Influenced by the word games she played with her mother and encouraged by her friend and idol, Marianne Moore. Among Schulman’s muses, the village is prominent. Continued on page 7

ALSO INSIDE ELIZABETH ST. GARDEN P.5

RESTAURANT INSPECTIONS P.16

NEIGHBORHOOD CHATTER Taste of the Seaport By Helaina Hovitz A year after Hurricane Sandy, the fourth annual Taste of the Seaport took place on Front Street on Sunday, October 27th. Local merchants came together to raise money for P.S.237, the Spruce Street School, enjoying food, music, and arts and crafts. “The turnout is wonderful, it’s a beautiful day, you cant beat this,” said Sammy O’Connor, owner of the Trading Post at 170 John Street. “We sold out of food by 2 p.m. today, so we are feeling optimistic about going into the winter, there are people who live here who still walk to Tribeca, when they could walk 5 minutes to us.” According to Learan Kahanov, chair of the Taste of the Seaport 2013 and PTA Co-President of the Spruce Street, even though there were half as many restaurants participating as there were last year, they surpassed their sales from 2012. “While many of the restaurants in the Old Seaport district still have not re-opened, some in the neighborhood have gone away for good. What we have proven is that we have an amazing community who came out to support our local businesses and our kids at the Spruce Street School (next year we plan to include the new Peck Slip School),” he said. “I have been chairing this event since its

Downtown Doorman Winner

inception and it is wonderful to see the yearly return of participants and sponsors without whom the event couldn’t happen and our school would be lacking much needed funds.” Participating restaurants included Acqua, Barbalu, Bin 220, Cowgirl Seahorse, Fresh Salt, Jack’s Coffee, Keg 229, Made Fresh Daily, Mark Joseph Steakhouse, Pasanella and Son, Suteishi, and The Trading Post. The event was sponsored by the Howard Hughes Corporation, Historic Front Street, Radeberger, the Downtown Express, and Nova Graphics. “It’s great to see so many kids and parents out and having a good time,” said Calli Lerner, co-owner of the newly re-opened restaurants Bin 220 and Keg 229, both on Front Street. “It’s always amazing to see people showing up to show support for our community!”

Photo by Dave Sanders

Hurley Jones, center, accepting his award for Downtown Doorman of the Year. Jones, who works at 270 Broadway and 80 Chambers, received the honor at a ceremony held last week at the office of 32BJ SEIU in Manhattan. Jones was photographed with 32BJ President Hector Figueroa and Jeanne Straus, president of Straus Media Manhattan, publisher of Our Town Downtown, which helped present the awards.

To the Editor: While your article “Congregation vs. Community” by Megan Bungeroth captured very well the complexity of the issue of landmarking and religious congregations, the cover at least on the West Side Spirit may have created serious misunderstanding in a very delicate time. The large photo of West-Park under those dramatic words would leave anyone who only glanced at the cover with the impression that West-Park was still in a contentious relationship with our

community. Since the official designation of landmarked status and our commitment to return and renew our mission in our historic space, we have sought and at some points received collaboration and support from our neighboring community. Our long range survival and success depends on a close working relationship with our neighbors which we sincerely desire. There should be no perception that the contentiousness of the landmarks struggle days continues. Thank you so much, The Rev. Dr. Robert L. Brashear

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

CRIME WATCH By Jerry Danzig

Porch Snatch Someone stole a woman’s handbag from the porch of a downtown hotel. At 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, October 19, a 55-yearold woman from Van Nuys, California placed her handbag next to her on the table at which she was sitting, on the porch of a Spring Street hotel. An unknown perpetrator grabbed her bag and fled on Dominick Street. Police searched the area but could not find the thief. Video may have captured the incident, and a witness said he has seen the perpetrator in the neighborhood and could identify him. The items stolen were David Yurman earrings valued at $3,500, a Bloomingdale’s gift card worth $2,000, $1,000 in cash, a Louis Vuitton wallet priced at $550, a Furla purse priced at $500, and a driver’s license and credit card. The total of the handbag haul amounted to $7,550.

Furloined Two men and a woman shoplifted merchandise from a clothing boutique on Greenwich Street. A 37-year-old female

employee at the store reported that at 4:48 p.m. on Sunday, October 20, a 25-year-old man and a 32-year-old woman entered the store and removed property without permission or authorization before fleeing northbound on Greenwich Street. Video is available of the incident. The stolen items were a green Doma fur jacket valued at $940 and a large gold lucky star necklace, costing $240. The total take amounted to $1,180.

Coming Back for More A woman was arrested after stealing two credit cards from a gym club member’s locker. At 6 p.m. on Wednesday, October 16, a 30-year-old woman put her bag in the locker of a gym on Reade Street. When she returned to the locker at 6:50 p.m., she noticed that she was missing two credit cards from her wallet. She called her credit card company to cancel the cards and was informed that her card had been used at an apparel store on West Broadway. She then called the store and asked for a description of the person who had used her card. olice officers were taking her report at the gym when the victim saw a 25-year-old woman matching the store’s description walking

Packing Air

back into the gym. hen the suspect spotted the police in the gym, she turned around to leave and was stopped by one of the officers. Upon questioning, she admitted that she had just come from the apparel store and had used someone else’s cards to pay for her purchases. The defendant was found in possession of the victim’s two credit cards and the items she had purchased with them. She was arrested and charged with grand larceny.

Vamoosed on Varick A thief on a bicycle snatched a cell phone from a woman’s hand. At 8 p.m. on Sunday, October 20, on the northeast corner of Varick Street and Spring Street, a 40-yearold woman was walking to a concert when an unknown bicyclist zoomed past and grabbed her cell phone out of her hand. It was dark, and she did not get a good look at the robber, who fled northbound on Varick. The woman canceled her cell service and was unsure if tracking software was installed on the phone. The stolen phone was a Samsung Note 3 valued at $798.

A man was arrested for shoplifting merchandise from a store on West Broadway. At 2:15 p.m. on Thursday, October 17, a 55-year-old man was observed removing merchandise from the store without permission. He was arrested and charged with grand larceny, and an air pistol was recovered from his back right pocket. He had stolen sunglasses valued at $1,650.

Illustration by John S. Winkleman

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Get Your Paper Ballot.

Pick up your paper ballot and privacy sleeve at the sign-in table from the poll worker.

Mark Your Paper Ballot.

Use a pen or ballot-marking device (BMD) to mark your choices on your ballot. Fill in the ovals above or next to the names of the candidates/proposals of your choice with the pen provided. BMDs can be used to enlarge the font size of the ballot. Please see our Election District signs for an enlarged sample ballot you can view prior to voting

To correctly mark your ballot, fill in the ovals above or next to the names of the candidates or proposals of your choice using the pen provided.

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Accessible ballot marking devices (BMDs) are available.

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Sign up to receive the latest news and information from Board of Elections in the City of NY, by visiting the Board’s website: www.vote.nyc.ny.us

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

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PAGE 3

Biz Bounces Back Continued from page 1

.com STRAUS MEDIA  MANHATTAN PRESIDENT Jeanne Straus EDITOR IN CHIEF Kyle Pope

SUteiShi

EDITOR Megan Bungeroth • editor.otdt@strausnews.com CITYARTS EDITOR Armond White • editor.cityarts@strausnews.com STAFF REPORTERS Joanna Fantozzi, Daniel Fitzsimmons FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS Alan S. Chartock, Bette Dewing, Jeanne Martinet, Malachy McCourt, Angela Barbuti, Casey Ward

shop, and how I can bring it back to the business pre-Sandy, considering all we have lost and all we have been through,” she said. “Grants and small interest loans could help me navigate these waters over the next two years as I rebuild business.”

BLOCK MAYORS  Ann Morris, Upper West Side Jennifer Peterson, Upper East Side

24 Peck Slip SUteiShi was destroyed by 6 feet of flood water, and it took almost a full year of work before it could reopen this October 18. President Victor Chan said that the restaurant stayed afloat during the past year through a combination of creative efforts and support. “We overcame by getting a commissary to continue our delivery services, raising $50,000 pre-selling

meals on www.indiegogo.com, and having a culture of caring [that enabled] the core SUteiShi team to help the reopening process become much easier.” Chan also credits his wife and two children for understanding when the family had to cut back on expenses and vacations. One positive outcome was the perspective he gained, Chan said. “All is not that bad when we have each other and our health,” he said. “It has been the hardest challenge I have to overcome in my life. I now truly understand the power of perseverance.”

PUBLISHER Gerry Gavin • advertising@strausnews.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERS Seth L. Miller, Ceil Ainsworth, Kate Walsh

Pasanella and Son 115 South Street Marco Pasanella was one of the relatively lucky ones - he was able to get his wine shop back up and running in a short period of time after the storm. “We completely re-built and re-stocked our store in three weeks after the storm,” Pasanella said. “But that wasn’t the hard part: re-building our store was much quicker than re-building the whole neighborhood, which has taken up to now. And you can’t have a viable neighborhood store with no one in your neighborhood!”

ADVERTISING MANAGER Matt Dinerstein CLASSIFIED ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Stephanie Patsiner DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Joe Bendik OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN is published weekly Copyright © 2013 by Straus Media - Manhattan, LLC 212-868-0190 • 333 Seventh Ave, New York, NY. Straus Media - Manhattan publishes Our Town • The West Side Spirit • Our Town Downtown Chelsea Clinton News • The Westsider To subscribe for 1 year, please send $75 to OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN, c/o Straus News 20 West Ave., Chester, NY 10918 PREVIOUS OWNERS HAVE INCLUDED: Tom Allon, Isis Ventures, Ed Kayatt, Russ Smith, Bob Trentlion, Jerry Finkelstein

Do you have a news tip, story idea, nomination for “mayor of your block,” complaint or letter to the editor? We want to hear from you! Please contact us at News@strausnews.com. PAGE 4

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The Paris Cafe 119 South Street Peter O’Connell remembers all too clearly what it was like to have 11 feet of seawater come crashing through his tavern’s front door. “The seawater permeates and corrodes everything, and a residual of this is the presence of mold and the danger of it spreading throughout the building,” he said. Because of the damage and the danger, he was forced to get rid of many fixtures and furniture, and had to replace flooring, windows and doors. “Our antique bar imported from Holland in 1873 was damaged and had to be painstakingly restored,” O’Connell said. They also had to install new plumbing and electrical systems, replace bathrooms and stairs, and refurbish the basement. O’Connell said that they received a $10,000 grant from Small Business Solutions, but that they also had to rely on loans and credit extended by the contractors who did the repair work. “I must mention our wonderful support from the local community and patrons,” O’Connell said. “It’s a joy to be back and serving.”

Keg No. 229 229 Front Street After staying closed for almost a year, the owners of Keg No. 229 just reopened their newly renovated restaurant, as well as their sister location next store, wine bar Bin No. 220. “The decision to come back was easy,” said coowner Calli Lerner. “We had to see if it was financially feasible. The biggest challenge was getting the key from the landlord, which took until July, and then we had to deal with Landmarks and Department of Buildings.” Lerner said that the biggest hurdle now that they’ve reopened is spreading the word. “It’s scary that nobody knows the block is reopened. It would be nice if everyone reopened,” she said. “We’d like to see more people, it’s a little quiet. But we love the neighborhood and always knew we’d be back. We have faith.”

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

Elizabeth Street’s Secret Garden Downtown neighbors oppose plan to take over plot for affordable housing By Caroline Anderson Erica Riha, originally from Iowa, eyes a group of toddlers digging up dirt in a Manhattan flowerbed. “We grew up on a farm,” Riha said. “Kids in the city, they don’t know how to play in a park.” Riha, 23, is hoping to change that. She’s a volunteer at the Elizabeth Street Garden in NoLita, part of a group that formed this summer when the neighborhood caught wind that the city was eyeing the 20,110-square-foot lot between Elizabeth and Mott streets for affordable housing. Supporters of the garden will have a chance to make their case at a community board hearing on Nov. 4. Few people dispute that the city needs more affordable housing. But some residents say that the Elizabeth Street Garden provides another much-needed resource: open green space. More than 775 people have signed a Change.org petition to Councilmember Margaret Chin to “Save the Elizabeth Street Garden.” “I see all these kids and their parents and it’s clear to me that they’re hungry for a space like this,” said Aaron Booher, 41, watching a group of children paint and glue feathers and eyes to small pumpkins at the garden’s Harvest Festival on Oct. 20. Booher, a landscape architect, is in charge of planting seeds and cultivating plants in the garden. His goal is to have it turned into

permanent greenspace. Although on city land, the lot has been leased by the owner of the adjoining Elizabeth Street Gallery on a month-to-month basis since 1991. Booher points to the low ratio of open space per person in the neighborhood as a reason to preserve the lot. According to the New York City Department of Planning website, 2.8 percent of the district’s land is used for open space/recreation. That’s the second lowest percentage of all the districts in Manhattan. “As someone who lives and works around here, I think it would be great if they could keep it like this,” said Antonio Biagi, 30, owner of A.B. Biagi, a gelato and coffee shop one block north of the garden. Eunice Lee, who owns the clothing shop Unis across the street from A.B. Biagi, and who also volunteers at the garden, says that other businesses in the area have been supportive of the garden. “The business community has stood behind us,” she said. “It’s the kind of thing that brings people together. It feels much more like a neighborhood.” But some residents complain that the space has not always been accessible. “This was never a community garden up until very recently when there was the threat of it being taken away,” said Barbara Barone, 67, who has lived in the neighborhood for 35 years. “It’s only been open in the last six months.” The volunteer crew who keeps the gates open daily from noon to 6 p.m. came together this summer. Previously, the public could visit the garden, but only by entering through the gallery next door.

Allan Reiver, 70, owns the Elizabeth Street Gallery and leases the land where the Elizabeth Street Garden sits. He uses the garden, which he created in 1991 from a vacant lot, to store and display architectural artifacts from his store, such as statues of lions and sphinxes. “By entering through the gallery, as far as my insurance company was involved, we knew when people were coming and going.” The lot was identified for affordable housing during discussions about the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area project, or SPURA, at Essex and Delancey Streets. Although the lot is actually in Community Board 2 and SPURA is in Community Board 3, the lot was mentioned in a larger discussion about affordable housing in the area, according to a staff member from Councilmember Chin’s office. The lot had previously been part of a bigger parcel of land, which was divided in 1983. The other piece was sold to a developer and was made into affordable housing as the Lira Apartments. Tobi Bergman, the chair of the committee which is meeting Nov. 4, said Community Board 2 was never consulted about the

decision to build the affordable housing on the Elizabeth St. lot. “We never evaluated what this represents as an opportunity for the community,” said Bergman, who attended the Harvest Festival. “I didn’t even know it was on city land.” That’s why the community board called the hearing. “We want to take a step back and look at the options,” said Bergman.

The Elizabeth Street Garden: What’s at Stake Issue: The city is eyeing the garden space for affordable housing Residents: More than 775 people have signed a petition to save the garden Hearing: Community board meeting scheduled for Nov. 4

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Residents at the Elizabeth Street Garden Harvest Festival THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

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PAGE 5

OUT & ABOUT Jill Aigrot, who gave her vocals for the song “La Vie en Rose” in the award winning film of the same name, will entertain the audience with the ‘music hall’ period of Edith Piaf ’s career during which Piaf sang her most famous hits. schimmel.pace.edu

The Bolsheviks and the Jews Explored The Village Temple 33 East 12th Street 6:30 p.m. $10 RSVP, $15 at door. The role of the Jews in the 1917 Bolshevik revolution will be explored at a presentation by award-winning journalist, author and lecturer Andrée Aelion Brooks following a special service. 212-674-2340, www.villagetemple.org.

usually associated with building skyscrapers: sticks of dry spaghetti, tape, and gum drops. Ages 8-14. 212-968-1961, www.skyscraper.org

Manhattanville: Old Heart of West Harlem The Municipal Art Society of New York West Harlem $20, $15 members 1 p.m. Manhattanville, a historic West Harlem neighborhood established in 1806, is in continuous flux. With Columbia University’s controversial campus expansion well under way, many of the area’s distinctive landmarks in its development parcel have been demolished. Join for an overview of this area’s

Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts 1 Pace Plaza $25, $35, $45 The evening will begin in Paris’s most famous artistic neighborhood, Montmartre.

Fitness Bootcamps in Seward Park Essex St. & East Broadway (Tennis Courts) Free 7 - 8 a.m. The Educational Alliance presents free Fitness Bootcamp classes in Seward Park to preview the group exercise classes that will be offered at the Manny Cantor Center (MCC), its new Lower East Side community center opening in early 2014. RSVP at mccfit.eventbrite.com

The Space at Tompkins Otto’s Shrunken Head 538 East 14th St. 2:00 - 4:30 p.m. Since 2009 The Space at Tompkins has been providing aid and support to lower Manhattan’s transient homeless community. Join to raise awareness and support for this important cause. www.thespaceattompkins.org

Skyscraper Museum

Edith

Sunday November 3rd

Gratitude And Altitude Fundraiser

Saturday November 2nd Friday November 1

eventful, yet under-appreciated, past. 212 935-2075, www.mas.org

39 Battery Place $5 Learn about super-slim residential towers on the rise in Manhattan during a brief tour of the exhibition SKY HIGH. Participants will then be challenged to design and build their own sky-high structures using materials not

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OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

OUT & ABOUT

Monday November 4th

Wednesday November 6

Bilingual Birdies: Spanish Language

Franciscan Wine Blending

New York Public Library 9 Murray Street 4 p.m. A foreign language and live music program for children ages newborn to five years old with parent/caregiver. The bilingual musicians teach through live music, movement, puppetry and games. Each session ends with a lively bubble dance party! Children learn basic vocabulary and short phrases while playing with instruments and fun props.

Unlabel: Selling You Without Selling Out Barnes & Noble 97 Warren Street 2nd Floor 6 p.m. Free American fashion designer, entrepreneur, investor, artist, and philanthropist Mark Ecko will read his book “Unlabel: Selling You Without Selling Out.” www.barnesandnoble.com

Tuesday November 5 Affective Intensities: An Evening with Mei-mei Berssenbrugge & Charles Altieri Poets House 10 River Terrace $10, $7 students/seniors 7 – 9 p.m. Described as “neither objectivist nor subjectivist but a poet of the whole consciousness,” the native born Beijinger whose artistic influences range from her New Mexican home to the New York scene and beyond, will be joined with UC Berkley scholar Charles Altieris

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

Morton’s The Steakhouse 136 Washington Street $50 Mix, mingle and blend during a Wine Blending Seminar featuring Franciscan Oakville Estate Magnificat and Morton’s signature hors d’oeuvres. opportunity to blend varietals of the five classic grapes – Cabernet, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petite Verdot and Malbec. 212-608-0171, mortons.com/newyorkwtc/ specialevents

Village Poet Continued from page 1

In “Crossing the Square” she captured the beloved park, “Squinting through eyeslits in our balaclavas, /we lurch across Washington Square Park/hunched against the wind, two hooded figures/caught in the monochrome, carrying sacks.” Schulman’s love for her neighborhood is evident in much of her work. In “Footsteps on Lower Broadway” she shares both her Jewish lens and her villager eyes. Each stanza ends with the words, “immigrant Jew.” It reads, “From here to City Hall you hiked, then on/ to Washington Square’s law school, looking back/ on trees and weed-grown lots—all that you knew/ of what was or would be, an immigrant Jew.” Grace Schulman is not bashful about her Jewish heritage. When asked about whether she was afraid that people

wouldn’t understand when she used Hebrew words or Jewish references, Schulman replied, at first with a serious expression that then broke into a smile: “I never worry about that, everybody I write to is an honorary Jew.” You wouldn’t expect the six foot, slim, black garbed, Jewish poet to be so fiery, but she posseses a strength that is inspiring and beautiful to witness. Spending half her time at 1 University Place and the other in the Hamptons, Schulman presents a book attempting to capture the one-ness of all customs. Symbolizing the city and the country, the noisy and the quiet, somehow Schulman captures both in each other. In “Charles Street Psalm” she conjures up the vision of a city scene: “Downtown, where towers redden after sunrise,/ I heard the singing, more like sobbing, harsh,/ broken measures, out of tune, choked sighs,/ pour from a brick synagogue set between townhouses.”

Downtown Symphony Tribeca Performing Arts Center 199 Chambers Street Free 8 p.m. A community orchestra serving downtown Manhattan. Tonight, hear Berlioz: Benvenuto Cellini Overture, Anderson: In Memoriam, Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491 (with Howard Meltzer, piano), Franck: Symphony in D minor. downtownsymphony.org

Thursday November 7 Good Person of Szechwan The Public Theater 425 Lafayette St. (at Astor Place) 7 p.m. $65 Can we practice goodness and create a world to sustain it? In this comic and complex play, one of Brecht’s most entertaining characters, Shen Tei, the good-hearted, penniless, cross-dressing prostitute, is forced to disguise herself as a savvy businessman named Shui Ta to master the ruthlessness necessary to be a “good person” in a cruel world of limited resources. 212-967-7555

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OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

Turning Patients into Parents The Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

cityArts

Edited by Armond White

New York’s Review of Culture . CityArtsNYC.com

Keigwin on the Canvas Local choreographer gets busy at the Joyce Theater By Valerie Gladstone

N

ew York native, Larry Keigwin stretches himself as a choreographer. In the 10 years since he founded Keigwin +Company, he has staged Fashion Weeks’s opening event, “Fashion’s Night Out: The Show,” won awards for his choreography for the off Broadway productions of Rent and The Wild Party, worked with the Radio City Rockettes, and made the fabulous “Bolero,” for 10 trained dancers and 50-75 ordinary people, which has been a huge success at theaters all over the country. He enjoys working with pros as much as on community projects.  In March, he makes his Broadway choreographic debut, with the show, If/ Then, starring Idina Menzel and LaChanze. At the same time, he has managed to direct one of the most exciting and entertaining dance companies around. “I’m always ready to branch off and explore,” he says in a recent phone call. “I’m interested in all different forms of theater, and working with all kinds of performers.” Keigwin + Company comes to the Joyce Theater October 29-November 3, with an engrossing and varied program, featuring “Canvas,” a dance exploring and contrasting balletic and contemporary styles, set to a cinematic score by Adam Crystal. Opening night it will be performed by his troupe and the New York City Ballet dancers, Tiler Peck, Robbie Fairchild, Daniel Ulbricht and Lauren Lovette. “Girls,” a female trio, to Frank Sinatra songs, and two older, delightfully playful and poignant works, “Natural Selection” to music by Michael Gordon and “Mattress Suite,” set to Bill Withers’ “Ain’t No Sunshine,” Verdi’s “La

Traviata, and “At Last,” sung by Etta James, complete the line up. “Canvas” grew out of his residency at the Vail International Dance Festival in 2010, and the support of the director Damian Woetzel. A dazzling work, it showcases his formidable talents as a constructor of complex and dynamic spatial designs and his genius at showcasing the talents of his remarkable dancers. He describes his technique as, “assembling a collage.” Though it garnered praise from critics and cheers from the

audience at its premiere at Vail last summer, he promises that it will look even better at the Joyce. “We’ll have shimmery curtains in gold, red, purple and blue, and the dancers will play in and out of them,” he says. “It will have lots more pizzazz.” Pizzazz is something you can always count on at a Keigwin performance.

Larry Keigwin appears at the Joyce Theater Oct. 29-Nov. 3 Graciano Photography

Keigwen’s “Canvas” at the Joyce Theater

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

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PAGE 9

CITYARTS BOOKS

Seeing the City as Art How Jan Gehl redesigned New York By Marsha McCreadie

I

f you empty it out, they will come. This is the working premise of Danish architect Jan Gehl. Here is your chance to learn about the chap responsible for all the initial bitching

Admissions Open House Professional Children's School 132 West 60th Street New York, NY 10023 212.582.3116 pcs-nyc.org for more information and to reserve your place, contact Shari Honig Director of Admissions shonig@pcs-nyc.org

Find out what makes PCS the ideal academic  school for children pursuing challenging goals  that may sometimes require time away from school.



November 5,Tuesday 5:30 to 7:00 p.m.

Dancing through Life, Living through Dance PCS alumni, including NYCB principals  Tiler Peck & Robert Fairchild, talk about the  journey from school to careers, in and out of dance

November 18, Monday 6 to 8:00 p.m.

about those silly looking chairs in Times Square when traffic was forbidden and space opened up for--of all things-- people and their ephemeral pleasures like eating and reading. Bike lanes and mandatory greenery followed soon after. But it’s not just New York. His native Copenhagen was the incubator for Gehl’s ideas, and most touchingly and tellingly, Christchuch New Zealand, where his firm was hired for plans to rebuild after the devastating earthquake of 2011. The unprepossessing, mild-mannered Gehl, professor emeritus and head of his own architecture firm, is interviewed in a current film, The Human Scale, about his work. He is also the author of a just-released book, How to Study Public Life. Admitting he was initially skeptical, he has come to believe that if you take away cars, people will come to replace them. A kind of public life, and human connection, will result. The over-all question for him and his acolytes is “What is the way for measuring human happiness in the city?” When was the last time you heard that, or anything even that quaintly idealistic? Opening up space is one approach; another is reducing the height of buildings. Bicycles are a given. While it may have been a natural for Denmark, Janet Sadik-Kahn, Commissioner of the City Department of Transportation, was so impressed she hired Gehl to re-imagine New York City streets. (All this time you thought it was a suddenly creative Bloomberg, right?) Other cities discussed are ChongQung China, and Melbourne, now considered the world’s most livable city. Alleys formerly filled with

garbage are now lined with lively bistros. In the words of a city resident “the streets have become our living room.” India still looks to be a huge challenge though. And you can’t help but wonder how Los Angeles might look or work without its autos. With statistics of coming population booms to give Jane Jacobs nightmares, we learn that in thirty-five years 80 percent of the world’s population will live in cities. Gehl rejected Robert Moses’ solution to build “up” and let cars into the city; he believes that we have gone against the idea of community and extended family in living alone, or in small cramped spaces without a sense of multi-generational roots. The one-family nuclear house of the 1950s was the worst of all: demonstrated to be the most healthendangering with its sedentary car-centric culture, and lengthy commuting to the city for work. In spots the doc, The Human Scale, directed by Andreas Dalsgaard, is just too preachy, earnest, and sometimes tedious. Yet images of Christchurch are poignant, especially letters posted on fences pleading with the re-builders to incorporate bits of the destroyed buildings in the new designs. Memory and buildings are interconnected, the city residents point out, citing first kiss, and so forth. Sounds right. How to Study Public Life, by Jan Gehl and Birgitte Svarre, was published by Island Press. The Human Scale, a documentary directed by Andreas M. Dalsgaard, shows at IFC Center.

Jan Gehl in The Human Scale

PAGE 10

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CITYARTS FILM

The Old Man and the Oscar Robert Redford baits the Academy in tuneless sea chantey By Armond White ne of the major Academy Award bloopers occurred in 1984 when Robert Redford was nominated Best Actor for The Sting and not The Way We Were (both were released in 1983). He seemed miscast and distant in the former but movie-star idolized and emotionally committed in the latter. But maybe the secret to Redford’s appeal for the past 50 years has to do with distance—his smug reticence passed for strong-silent-integrity whether playing gay in Inside Daisy Clover, a clueless politician in The Candidate, a reluctant pitchman in The Electric Horseman, a mismatched lover in The Way We Were. And now, playing distant in All Is Lost—portraying a nameless man stranded in the middle of the Indian Ocean, uttering no more than two words for the entire running time--seems likely to finally get Redford his Best Actor Oscar. Other than that, All Is Lost has no meaning. You can only sell this movie, attempt to justify it, by yelling “Oscar!” at it. It has no other purpose. Writer-director J.C. Chandor attempts middle-brow existentialism and apparently hits the right, obvious keys to make critics curtsy, but other than uninteresting clichés, Chandor gives little to go on. His dull subtlety suits his lead’s uncommunicativeness. Redford often seems to think himself too smart to be a movie star (that was the fascinating irony of his

O

glamorous self-delusion in Inside Daisy Clover—perhaps the key performance of his career) so the All Is Lost stoic is convincing for his closed-off nature. Problem is, Chandor’s mildly competent filmmaking is also closed-off. Though set outdoors (it’s tempting to say “at-sea”), this is actually an interior concept—watching Redford go through the mental and physical efforts of survival (patching up his yacht damaged by a floating cargo box, gathering his life raft and supplies, reading a sextant and charting his course). But Redford’s withholding manner doesn’t unfold this man’s insides: His pantomime (if that’s what you call this mostly silent performance) doesn’t convey thinking—something an actor like Jean-Louis Trintingnant does masterfully. Chandor’s own reserved-caginess suggests that he thinks he’s doing something deeper than an action movie. Not a modest craftsman like John Sturges directing Spencer Tracy in the film version of Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, Chandor’s a Paul Thomas Anderson wannabe. He plants mysteries: A message-in-a-bottle apology (“I tried to be true, strong, kind but I wasn’t”); thirdfinger rings on both left and right hands (inscrutable sexual identity); no Emergency Locator Transmitter onboard (incompetence or agnosticism?). The cynical title suggests inchoate nihilism that turns sentimental— typical of Redford’s political movies. (Dig that destructive cargo box spilling-out sneakers, a damning comment on global Capitalism.) It would take a director like David Lean to validate to this pretense with an eye for nature—the horizon, clouds, climate-that convey mankind’s experience in the elements, facing the ineffable. Chandor lacks the spatial, phenomenological skills and visual imagination to lift his conceit into significance. And Redford, typically, immodestly deflects “significance.” Critics crowding the dinghy for this very minor film indicates real ignorance about the genre of physical and psychological cinema that Lean excelled at and was apparent in this year’s uphyped Kon-Tiki by the gifted team Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberg. It’s Oscar bait mentality. Follow Armond White on Twitter at 3xchair

Robert Redford in All Is Lost

Stop Carrie-ing On DePalma’s classic trashed in remake By Armond White

I

t was impossible for Kimberly Peirce to direct a remake of Carrie that could live up to Brian DePalma’s 1976 original. Two cultural events got in the way.  First, political correctness so dominates our culture that the mythological aspects in Carrie’s reverse-Cinderella story (a repressed, unpopular high school girl goes to the senior prom where vicious students humiliate her) are undermined. The story’s most captivating elements-Carrie’s emerging sexuality, guilt imposed by her mother’s religious pressure, her schoolmate’s moral confusion--are politicized, made into social problems worthy of the TV-series Glee’s insipid “It Gets Better” nostrums, then drained of mystery and imagination.   Second, TV style so dominates our culture that DePalma’s  cinematic sophistication--an essential part of the original film’s modernism, finding meaning in imagery, kinetics and cultural resonance-has been replaced by flat, ordinary technique and the cynical narrative expectations of the dumbed-down 21st century audience.   Peirce directs this remake with a depressing, plot-oriented singlemindedness. That’s what political correctness and TV style have led to: a version of Carrie that is reduced to a few faint lesbian teases and feminist alarum and an anti-bullying message (at an inquest following the prom massacre).

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This desperately commercial, simplistic interpretation of Stephen King’s story offers none of the sensuality or boldness of Pierce’s debut film, Boys Don’t Cry. Stefan Sharff, the great film theoretician, devoted an entire class of his “Analysis of Film Language” Course at Columbia University to DePalma’s Carrie (at my suggestion, and my everlasting gratitude). Sad that Columbia graduate Peirce remakes Carrie using such meager film language. It was DePalma’s satirical sensibility that gave unexpected complexity to Stephen King’s potboiler, plus DePalma’s visual wit added layers of meaning through art and pop cultural references. The PreRaphaelite close-ups (of Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie, William Katt, Amy Irving and Nancy Allen) allowed DePalma to raise the mystical elements of the story to an esthetic richness that resolved the theme of repressed sexuality. (The mother’s lush hair suggested her innate sensuality but is made stringy and witchy here.) Depicting Carrie’s forced closet penitence, DePalma’s great cinephilia reached back to evoke Lillian Gish’s anguish in Broken Blossoms and for the mother’s orgasmic death he reached forward, outdoing Luis Bunuel’s wildest iconography.   All this is why DePalma’s Carrie ranks as one of the great American movies and its characters are cultural archetypes--despite a previous remake, a previous sequel and a Broadway musical, DePalma’s film has had huge influence stretching from P.J. Harvey to the excellent recent Disney film Prom. DePalma’s Carrie is one of those films where everything went right but except for Chloe Grace Moretz’s sweetly vulnerable expressions, everything in Pierce’s remake goes flat. 

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PAGE 11

NEWS

Village Cops Hone in on Unruly Cyclists Residents and officers agree that bikes are creating problems in the neighborhood By Daniel Fitzsimmons At a recent meeting at the 6th precinct, the Community Council President Maureen Remecale said that complaints over bicyclists are far and away the most common she hears when meeting with other council presidents across the city. “We all have problems with bicycles,” said Remecale at the council’s meeting on Oct. 23. “That’s the one we have most in common.” Complaints at the meeting included bicyclists riding on sidewalks, ignoring traffic laws and chaining bikes to private property. “It’s the volume of bicycles in the city and Citi Bike has really added to the calamity,” said 6th Precinct Inspector Elisa Cokkinos. “Truthfully it’s just a growing problem, and eventually there will have to be some sort of legislation,” said Remecale. “We’re also going to lose the bicycle mayor and maybe the next mayor will handle things differently.” One resident present at the meeting floated the idea of having an NYPD division whose sole job it is to give tickets to bicyclists, similar to how parking enforcement is handled in the city. “It should be self-supporting almost,

there’s so many violations with bicycles,” said the resident. Aside from issues surrounding cyclists, Inspector Cokkinos reported an uptick in burglaries, particularly ones that involve commercial establishments not properly securing entrances to buildings they’re located in. “So the porters can go back and forth, they leave the door that attaches the building to the commercial establishment unlocked and then somebody can just open up the door and walk right in and grab a laptop or whatever is handy at the time,” said Cokkinos. She urged representatives from commercial establishments who were present at the meeting to make sure their employees properly lock doors when coming and going. Cokkinos also reported that the 6th Precinct is up over a thousand summonses mainly having to do with quality of life issues - over the same period last year. “The guys and girls are out there, they’re working very hard to increase the quality of life here and keep the bad guys at bay,” said Cokkinos. “I’m quite pleased with the direction we’re going crimewise and quality of life-wise.”

Do you have problems with bicyclists or other lawenforcement concerns in your neighborhood? Email newsreporter@strausnews.com.

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Downtown residents protest plan to move some criminal-justice offices By Daniel Fitzsimmons At a Community Board 1 meeting on Oct. 22, more than 100 Tribeca residents came to protest a city plan to move a criminal summons court to 71 Thomas Street, in a residential neighborhood with a high concentration of schools. Deputy Mayor for Operations Cas Holloway and other city officials attended the meeting to allay residents’ fears, but they addressed the meeting only after the majority of those who showed up to oppose the move had left. This led one board member to ask the officials why they didn’t make their presence known earlier. Holloway said the timing was unintentional. At the same meeting, Holloway said the Department of Probation will be moving from 346 Broadway to 66 John Street. A probation spokesperson later confirmed that the probation department’s Manhattan Adult Operations office would be moving to John Street sometime in early-2014. As part of the move, approximately 200 lower-risk Manhattan probation clients will be checking in on ATM-like kiosk machines every week. The department said the majority of these low-risk probationers are initially arrested for drug possession, larceny and DWI and that no sex offenders will be checking in on John Street. When news of the moves broke, CB1 members expressed anger that they weren’t consulted before the decisions were made and that information about city plans wasn’t given to them sooner. “It’s a very complicated plan and they’re not really interested in disclosing the details unless they have to,” said Michael Connolly, co-chair of CB1’s Tribeca Committee. “The disclosure

of the move to 66 John Street at the meeting the other night was fortuitous and completely unintentional.” Catherine McVay-Hughes, chair of CB1, said she’s reassured that city officials were at the board meeting but that everyone was surprised with news of the Dept. of Probation move to 66 John Street. “The community was blindsided by the information that was revealed on Tuesday night,” said McVay-Hughes. Ro Sheffe, co-chair of CB1’s Financial District Committee, where the probation department will be moving, said the Oct. 22 meeting was the first he’s heard of the move. When asked if there’s been a lack of communication from City Hall on these relocations, Jeffe said, “If we don’t have the information that we need to make an informed decision.” Sheffe said the Financial District Committee will be addressing the probation department move at a meeting on Nov. 6. “At this point we’re operating in somewhat of a vacuum of information,” said Sheffe. “We only know that something is going to move and where it is going to move, and we need a lot more information in order to make an informed decision on how we feel about it.” A city official told Our Town Downtown the relocations are part of the city’s 21st Century Civic Center plan, which seeks to dispose of aging and inefficient city-owned office buildings in lower Manhattan and relocate the agencies within to more modern work environments. The official did not say how many governmental agencies were being moved in total.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

The Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine

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Psychologists Linda Applegarth, Ed.D. Elizabeth Grill, Psy.D. Laura Josephs, Ph.D. The Center for Male Reproductive Medicine and Microsurgery Marc Goldstein, M.D. Director Darius Paduch, M.D. Peter Schlegel, M.D. Philip Li, M.D. Weill Cornell Medical College 1305 York Avenue New York, NY 10021 (646) 962-2764 Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Side 2315 Broadway New York, NY 10024 (646) 962-3767 Northern Westchester 657 Main Street Mount Kisco, NY 10549 (914) 242-3700 Garden City, Long Island 1300 Franklin Avenue Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 742-4100 Flushing Hospital Medical Center 146 -01 45th Avenue Flushing, NY 11355 (646) 962-5626

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

We can help. At the Center for Reproductive Medicine, Dr. Zev Rosenwaks and his outstanding team of physicians offer couples the most advanced and effective treatments for infertility. With multiple ofďŹ ces located conveniently for patients in the tristate area, we provide comprehensive and compassionate care. For more than two decades we have made your desire to build a family our main priority. If you or someone you know is experiencing infertility, contact us at (646) 962-CRMI or visit us on the web at www.ivf.org. We accept UnitedHealthcare, Oxford Health and Cigna insurance plans for most fertility treatments.

Turning Patients into Parents The Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine

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PAGE 13

Healthy y Manhattan

Study: Snacking on almonds keeps weight in check

OPPORTUNITY Motivated and talented low-income public high school students are eager to go to college but can’t afford SAT prep.

1.5 ounces of almonds daily also improved

intake of vitamin E and monounsaturated fat

A IMPACT Every year, New York Cares brings its Kaplan SAT Prep program to public schools throughout the city. In 2012, volunteers worked in 40 schools and helped 1,000 students get into the colleges of their choice, including several admissions to Cornell and New York University.

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PAGE 14

Photo credit: Lauren Farmer

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new study published in the October issue of the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that eating 1.5 ounces of dry-roasted, lightly salted almonds every day reduced hunger and improved dietary vitamin E and monounsaturated (“good”) fat intake without increasing body weight. Ninety-seven percent of Americans eat at least one snack per day, which is a risk factor for gaining weight. But this broad generalization may mask different responses to select foods. The newly published four-week randomized, controlled clinical study, led by researchers at Purdue University, investigated the effects of almond snacking on weight and appetite. The study included 137 adults at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. They were divided into five groups: a control group that avoided all nuts and seeds, a breakfast meal group and lunch meal group that ate 1.5 ounces of almonds each with their daily breakfast or lunch, and a morning snack group and afternoon snack group that each consumed 1.5 ounces of almonds between their customary meals. All almond snacks were eaten within approximately two hours after their last meal and two hours before their next meal. Participants were not given any other instruction other than to follow their usual eating patterns and physical activity. Participants were monitored through selfreported assessments and fasting vitamin E plasma levels. Despite consuming approximately 250 additional calories per day from almonds, participants did not increase the total number of calories they ate and drank over the course of the day or gain weight over the course of the four-week study. “This research suggests that almonds may be a good snack option, especially for those concerned about weight,” says Richard Mattes, PhD, distinguished professor of nutrition science at Purdue University and the study’s principal investigator. “In this study, participants compensated for the additional calories provided by the almonds so daily energy intake did not rise and reported

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reduced hunger levels and desire to eat at subsequent meals, particularly when almonds were consumed as a snack.” Almonds have also previously been shown to increase satiety in both normal weight and overweight people. This may be attributed to almonds’ monounsaturated fat (13 grams/ ounce), protein (6 grams/ounce) and fiber (4 grams/ounce) content. But further research is needed to better understand the underlying mechanisms. Additionally, a recent study measuring digestibility found that whole almonds contain 20 percent fewer calories than the Nutrition Facts Panel states, suggesting that because of their rigid cell structure, not all calories are available for absorption. Further research is needed to better understand how this technique for calculating calories could potentially affect the calorie count of other foods. The new study suggests snacking can be a weight-wise strategy, depending upon the foods consumed. A handful of almonds is a smart snack choice that can help support a healthy weight.

Spiced Almonds Here’s a high-protein predinner snack that takes the edge off your appetite so that you don’t overeat at mealtime. Ingredients 2 cups whole almonds, (with skins) 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 teaspoons curry powder 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper Preparation 1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. 2. Combine almonds, oil, curry powder, salt and cayenne in a small baking pan; toss to coat well. Bake until the almonds are fragrant and lightly toasted, about 25 minutes. Transfer to a bowl to cool. Makes 16 quarter-cup servings. Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

Healthy y Manhattan

Researchers find a new way to grow hair England, and co-director of North East England Stem Cell Institute, who is one of the early founders of the field. “However, once the dermal papilla cells are put into conventional, two-dimensional tissue culture, they revert to basic skin cells and lose their ability to produce hair follicles. So we were faced with a Catch-22: how to expand a sufficiently large esearchers at Columbia number of cells for hair regeneration while University Medical Center retaining their inductive properties.” have devised a hair restoration The researchers found a clue to overcoming method that can grow new hair, this barrier in their observations of rodent rather than simply redistribute hair. Rodent papillae can be easily harvested, hair from one part of the scalp to another. expanded, and successfully transplanted back The approach could significantly expand into rodent skin, a method pioneered by Dr. the use of hair transplantation to women with Jahoda several years ago. The main reason hair loss, who tend to have insufficient donor that rodent hair is readily transplantable, the hair, as well as to men in the early stages of researchers suspected, is that their dermal baldness. The study was published Oct. 21 papillae, unlike human papillae, tend to in the online edition of spontaneously aggregate, the Proceedings of the or form clumps, in National Academy of tissue culture. The team Sciences. reasoned that these “About 90 percent of aggregations must create women with hair loss are their own extracellular not strong candidates environment, which for hair transplantation allows the papillae to surgery because of interact and release signals insufficient donor hair,” that ultimately reprogram said co-study leader the recipient skin to grow Angela M. Christiano, new follicles. PhD, the Richard and “This suggested that Mildred Rhodebeck if we cultured human Professor of Dermatology papillae in such a way and professor of genetics Dr. Angela Christiano as to encourage them to and development. aggregate the way rodent “This method offers the cells do spontaneously, it possibility of inducing large numbers of could create the conditions needed to induce hair follicles or rejuvenating existing hair hair growth in human skin,” said first author follicles, starting with cells grown from just Claire A. Higgins, PhD, associate research a few hundred donor hairs. It could make scientist. hair transplantation available to individuals To test their hypothesis, the researchers with a limited number of follicles, including harvested dermal papillae from seven human those with female-pattern hair loss, scarring donors and cloned the cells in tissue culture. alopecia, and hair loss due to burns.” After a few days, the cultured papillae The source of new hair were transplanted between the dermis and For the first time, researchers have been able epidermis of human skin that had been to take human dermal papilla cells — those grafted onto the backs of mice. In five of the inside the base of human hair follicles — and seven tests, the transplants resulted in new use them to create new hairs. hair growth that lasted at least six weeks. DNA According to Dr. Christiano, such patients analysis confirmed that the new hair follicles gain little benefit from existing hair-loss were human and genetically matched the medications, which tend to slow the rate of donors. hair loss but usually do not stimulate robust “This approach has the potential to new hair growth. transform the medical treatment of hair “Dermal papilla cells give rise to hair loss,” said Dr. Christiano. “Current hair-loss follicles, and the notion of cloning hair medications tend to slow the loss of hair follicles using inductive dermal papilla cells follicles or potentially stimulate the growth has been around for 40 years or so,” said of existing hairs, but they do not create new co-study leader Colin Jahoda, PhD, professor hair follicles. Neither do conventional hair of stem cell sciences at Durham University, transplants, which relocate a set number of

For the first time,

researchers create — not just stimulate — hair follicles to grow new hair

hairs from the back of the scalp to the front. Our method, in contrast, has the potential to actually grow new follicles using a patient’s own cells. This could greatly expand the utility of hair restoration surgery to women and to

younger patients — now it is largely restricted to the treatment of male-pattern baldness in patients with stable disease.” Source: Columbia University Medical Center, http://newsroom.cumc.columbia.edu

R

“This could greatly expand the utility of hair restoration surgery to women and to younger patients.”

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

15 1 4 7

re-use

ways to your old newspaper

Use it as wrapping paper, or fold & glue pages into reusable gift bags.

2

Add shredded newspaper to your compost pile when you need a carbon addition or to keep flies at bay.

5

Use newspaper strips, water, and a bit of glue for newspaper mâché.

8

10

Crumple newspaper to use as packaging material the next time you need to ship something fragile.

13

Tightly roll up sheets of newspaper and tie with string to use as fire logs.

After your garden plants sprout, place newspaper sheets around them, then water & cover with grass clippings and leaves. This newspaper will keep weeds from growing.

Make origami creatures

Use shredded newspaper as animal bedding in lieu of sawdust or hay.

11

Make your own cat litter by shredding newspaper, soaking it in dish detergent & baking soda, and letting it dry.

14

Wrap pieces of fruit in newspaper to speed up the ripening process.

3

Cut out letters & words to write anonymous letters to friends and family to let them know they are loved.

6

Roll a twice-folded newspaper sheet around a jar, remove the jar, & you have a biodegradable seed-starting pot that can be planted directly into the soil.

9

Make newspaper airplanes and have a contest in the backyard.

12 15

Stuff newspapers in boots or handbags to help the items keep their shape. Dry out wet shoes by loosening laces & sticking balled newspaper pages inside.

a public service announcement brought to you by dirt magazine. www.nypress.com

PAGE 15

RESTAURANT INSPECTION RATINGS 10014

October 18-25, 2013

Sha Restaurant

Not Yet Graded (10) - Food not protected from 82 Christopher potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Street Non-food contact surface improperly constructed. Unacceptable material used. Non-food contact surface or equipment improperly maintained and/ or not properly sealed, raised, spaced or movable to allow accessibility for cleaning on all sides.

The Chester

18 9th Avenue

Not Yet Graded (35) - Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Personal cleanliness inadequate. Outer garment soiled with possible contaminant. Effective hair restraint not worn in an area where food is prepared. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Canned food product observed dented and not segregated from other consumable food items.

Charlemagne

679 Greenwich Street

A

Mercadito Grove

100 7th Avenue South

“Grade Pending (36) - Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food not protected from potential source of contamination during storage, preparation, transportation, display or service. Wiping cloths soiled or not stored in sanitizing solution. Facility not vermin proof. Harborage or conditions conducive to attracting vermin to the premises and/or allowing vermin to exist. Accurate thermometer not provided in refrigerated or hot holding equipment.

Restaurant Grades The following listings were collected from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s website on October 28, 2013 and include the most recent inspection and grade reports listed. We have included every restaurant listed during this time within the zip codes of our neighborhoods. Some reports list numbers with their explanations; these are the number of violation points a restaurant has received. To see more information on restaurant grades, visit www.nyc.gov/html/ doh/html/services/restaurant-inspection.shtml. 10010

10014

10014

Ilili Box

Flat Iron A Plaza North

Frank’s Express 127 East Pizza, Inc. 23rd Street

A

McDonald’s

Not Yet Graded (43) - Cold food item held above 41º F (smoked fish and reduced oxygen packaged foods above 38 ºF) except during necessary preparation. No facilities available to wash, rinse and sanitize utensils and/or equipment. Tobacco use, eating, or drinking from open container in food preparation, food storage or dishwashing area observed. Accurate thermometer not provided in refrigerated or hot holding equipment.

26 East 23rd Street

355 3rd Dunkin Donuts/Baskin Avenue Robbins

A

Westville

Grade Pending (40) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Food worker does not wash hands thoroughly after using the toilet, coughing, sneezing, smoking, eating, preparing raw foods or otherwise contaminating hands. Hand washing facility not provided in or near food preparation area and toilet room. Hot and cold running water at adequate pressure to enable cleanliness of employees not provided at facility. Soap and an acceptable handdrying device not provided. Tobacco use, eating, or drinking from open container in food preparation, food storage or dishwashing area observed. Sanitized equipment or utensil, including in-use food dispensing utensil, improperly used or stored. Proper sanitization not provided for utensil ware washing operation.

210 West 10th Street

Famous Joe’s Pizza

7 Carmine Street

Hangar Bar

A 115 Christopher Street

Cornelia Street 29 Cornelia Café Street

PAGE 16

Grade Pending (20) - Appropriately scaled metal stem-type thermometer or thermocouple not provided or used to evaluate temperatures of potentially hazardous foods during cooking, cooling, reheating and holding. Evidence of mice or live mice present. Live roaches present. Facility not vermin proof. Harborage or conditions conducive to attracting vermin to the premises and/or allowing vermin to exist. Toilet facility not maintained and provided with toilet paper, waste receptacle and selfclosing door.

A

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

10014

Hudson Falafel 516 Hudson Not Yet Graded (24) - Food not cooled by an Restaurant Street approved method whereby the internal product temperature is reduced from 140º F to 70º F or less within 2 hours, and from 70º F to 41º F or less within 4 additional hours. Evidence of mice or live mice present in facility’s food and/or non-food areas. Food contact surface not properly washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any activity when contamination may have occurred. Facility not vermin proof. Harborage or conditions conducive to attracting vermin to the premises and/or allowing vermin to exist. Non-food contact surface improperly constructed. Unacceptable material used. Non-food contact surface or equipment improperly maintained and/or not properly sealed, raised, spaced or movable to allow accessibility for cleaning on all sides, above and underneath the unit. Not Yet Graded (14) - Hot food item not held at or above 140º F. Raw, cooked or prepared food is adulterated, contaminated, cross-contaminated, or not discarded in accordance with HACCP plan.

Bubby’s Highline

71 Gansevoort Street

Bread

450 Hudson A Street

www.nypress.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

NEIGHBORHOOD REAL ESTATE SALES Reported October 18-25, 2013 Neighborhood Battery Park City

Address

Apt.

Sale Price

Gramercy Park

BR BA Listing Brokerage

200 Rector Place

#20K

$530,000

30 W St.

#10D

$797,500

1

1

Bond New York

1

1

Charles Rutenberg

2 South End Ave.

#8D

$520,000

333 Rector Place

#201

$309,270

225 Rector Place

#1E

$889,885

1

1

Related Sales

225 Rector Place

#8S

$560,000

0

1

Related Sales

30 W St.

#23E

$1,765,000

2

2

Corcoran

2

2

Nestseekers

30 W St.

#3F

$1,480,000

#1

$2,138,325

223-231 W 21 St.

#5G

$850,000

2

1

Halstead Property

133 W 22 St.

#6H

$1,335,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

170 W 23 St.

#5R

$552,000

0

1

Corcoran

210 W 19 St.

#3A

$575,000

201 W 16 St.

#9B

$855,000

66 9 Ave.

#6N

$1,900,000

85 8 Ave.

#4E

$566,000

1

1

Halstead Property

126 W 22 St.

#7S

$2,850,000

2

2

Sotheby’s International

365 W 19 St.

#2F

$626,500

1

1

Douglas Elliman

125 W 21 St.

#12B

$2,550,000

655 6 Ave.

#5L

$1,590,000

1

2

Corcoran

135 W 16 St.

#337

$600,000

136 E Broadway

#3B

$529,490

135 Division St.

#7B

$540,000

1

1

Stribling

123 Baxter St.

#3D

$1,155,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

7 Essex St.

#14

$1,885,000

30 Orchard St.

#5E

$712,775

1

1

Ogi Management

30 Orchard St.

#2

$1,665,000

2

2

Ogi Management

Civic Center

165 Park Row

#13F

$1,143,000

E Village

123 3 Ave.

#18A

$4,900,000

Brooklyn Chelsea

Chinatown

1

#4J

$870,000

1

1

Halstead Property

#1E

$695,000

1

1

Nestseekers

70 E 10 St.

#17C

$810,000

250 E 7 St.

#13-14

$785,000

1

1

Corcoran

121 E 10 St.

#1A

$380,000

0

1

Corcoran

125 E 4 St.

#28

$650,000

2

1

Corcoran

#2C

$1,525,000

2

2

Corcoran

#626

$550,000

0

1

New York Residence

20 Pine St.

#606

$995,000

0

1

Halstead Property

50 Pine St.

#9S

$1,231,000

2

2

Nestseekers

15 Broad St.

#1122

$725,000

0

1

Synergy Nyc

75 Wall St.

#26E

$814,600

0

1

Douglas Elliman

88 Greenwich St.

#1411

$1,650,000

2

2

Brown Harris Stevens

75 Wall St.

#28M

$1,680,295

2

2

Douglas Elliman

90 William St.

#6H

$880,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

65 Nassau St.

#Coop

$645,000

123 Washington St.

#44D

$1,325,761

1

1

Corcoran

20 W St.

#36B

$555,000

0

1

Town Residential

15 Broad St.

#902

$865,000

1

1

Corcoran

7 E 14 St.

#908

$761,530

1

1

Nestseekers

280 Park Ave. South

#25B

$2,078,797

2

2

280 Park Ave. South Realt

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

Greenwich Villa

Douglas Elliman

226 E 2 St.

425 E 13 St.

Flatiron

1

111 4 Ave.

Financial District 88 Greenwich St.

Flatiron

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

49 E 21 St.

#6B

$2,035,000

2

2

Corcoran

49 E 21 St.

#6B

$2,035,000

2

2

Corcoran

38 Gramercy Park

#4D

$600,000

1

1

Nestseekers

130 E 17 St.

#1B

$745,000

1

1

Town Residential

201 E 21 St.

#7R

$765,000

2

1

Corcoran

205 3 Ave.

#8L

$950,000

1

1

Corcoran

210 E 17 St.

#3C

$689,500

1

1

Halstead Property

145 E 15 St.

#9N

$530,000

0

1

Nestseekers

205 3 Ave.

#5T

$770,000

1

1

Spire Group

24 5 Ave.

#1023

$815,000

1

1

Douglas Elliman

60 E 9 St.

#321

$399,000

0

1

Halstead Property

211 Thompson St.

#Ll

$545,000

11 5 Ave.

#4B

$550,000

0

1

Halstead Property

61 W 9 St.

#1B

$850,000

1

1

Citi Habitats

28 E 10Th St.

#11J

$795,000

79 W 12 St.

#15C

$825,000

25 Minetta Lane

#1H

$440,000

0

1

Brown Harris Stevens

67 E 11 St.

#523

$721,524

1

1

Douglas Elliman

39 E 12 St.

#203

$615,000

1

1

Corcoran

77 Bleecker St.

#604

$1,020,000

1

1

Corcoran

39 E 12 St.

#802/3

$2,888,888

36 E 14Th St.

#6A

$4,150,000

3

3

Douglas Elliman

Little Italy

80 Elizabeth St.

#2G

$885,000

2

2

Corcoran

Lower E Side

455 Fdr Drive

#B1604

$475,000

1

1

Halstead Property

417 Grand St.

#A902

$360,000

0

1

Loho Realty

210 E Broadway

#G1107 $650,000

455 Fdr Drive

#B1101

2

1

Loho Realty

210 E Broadway

#K1504

$695,000

210 E Broadway

#K601

$553,000

1

1

Level Group

$515,000

78 Ridge St.

#2I

$609,280

2

1

Kian Realty

154 Attorney St.

#205

$905,000

2

1

Corcoran

Noho

14 E 4 St.

#823

$1,495,000

0

2

Town Residential

Nolita

14 Prince St.

#6D

$2,352,000

2

2

Town Residential

Soho

22 Mercer St.

#4A

$3,950,000

2

2

Corcoran

22 Wooster St.

#4S

$2,300,000

37 Greene St.

#3

$5,000,000

3

2

Town Residential

Tribeca

2 Charlton St.

#10J

$975,000

1

1

Corcoran

537 Broadway

#5B

$3,500,000

2

2

Brown Harris Stevens

22 Wooster St.

#3C

$3,975,000

3

2

Corcoran

111 Mercer St.

#2

$4,480,300

2

2

Douglas Elliman

90 Franklin St.

#4S

$4,055,000

3

3

Stribling

80 Chambers St.

#11B

$999,000

1

1

Corcoran

52 Laight St.

#R2

$3,309,312

38 Warren St.

#8A

$2,000,000

2

2

Warburg

52 Laight St.

#R4

$2,469,256

200 Chambers St.

#4E

$1,008,000

0

1

Douglas Elliman

288 W St.

#3W

$2,117,000

2

2

Halstead Property

288 W St.

#4E

$2,550,000

2

2

Tungsten Properties

416 Washington St.

#3I

$3,300,000

3

3

Stribling

376 Broadway

#9F

$850,000

StreetEasy.com is New York’s most accurate and comprehensive real estate website, providing consumers detailed sales and rental information and the tools to manage that information to make educated decisions. The site has become the reference site for consumers, real estate professionals and the media and has been widely credited with bringing transparency to one of the world’s most important real estate markets.

www.nypress.com

PAGE 17

CELEBRITY PROFILE

A Front Row Seat to the Ballet New York City Ballet’s Chase Finlay on The Nutcracker, fantasy football, and his company’s new online series By Angela Barbuti The largest ballet company in the country is getting personal. Although the New York City Ballet captivates its audience night after night, not much is known about the dancers’ individual journeys. This is where the new AOL On Original series city.ballet comes in. A camera crew spent this year’s rehearsal season capturing the dancers’ daily lives and conducting one-on-one interviews to get their first-hand perspectives. Principal dancer Chase Finlay finds the series, which premiers on November 4th, to be an honest portrayal. “They’re really showing the dedication and the amount of work it takes to do what we do,” he said. While the 23-year-old’s typical day consists of 12 hours of ballet, he stills find time to play the drums, model, and cheer on the Giants. It’s personalized information like this that the series will convey in the hopes of bridging the gap that exists between the stage and the audience. Finlay agrees, “It will get the audience to start relating to us and seeing us as people on stage, creating that much more of a bond.”

You are currently recovering from breaking your foot on stage! It was in the middle of Swan Lake in the third act. I was out there; it was the opening section. I did a jump and just landed wrong, on the side of my foot. I pretty much knew from the moment it happened that it was bad. I thought it was a sprain, but the ballet masters were already backstage because they heard it from the audience. It was pretty nasty.

Will you be able to dance in the The Nutcracker this year? Umm, I’m keeping my fingers crossed ‘til

PAGE 18

the end, but if it’s not ready, I’m not gonna push it.

lot into the city as a kid.

You’ve said that you knew you wanted to become a dancer after seeing that show. I went to The Nutcracker because my sister was in it. It was the second act when the male dancer in the Chinese role comes out of the box and starts doing all these crazy jumps. I was playing sports at the time and saw the athleticism of it. I barely remember it, but my mom said I told her, “I have to do this.”

I read that you quit your first ballet class because it was all girls. I started in a pre-ballet class, the only guy in there. All they were doing was skipping around, throwing flowers. I was like, “What the hell did I get myself into?” [Laughs] It was just a few months later when the teacher grabbed me and put me in the boys’ class.

What challenges do you face being a male ballet dancer? It’s pretty standard for every young, male dancer to get teased at school. That doesn’t happen to me anymore, especially living in the area that I live in, ballet is becoming more and more common. Now, it’s almost that people congratulate you for being a ballet dancer, which is kind of cool.

Why did you choose New York City Ballet over American Ballet Theatre? I was actually auditioning for the School of American Ballet and American Ballet Theatre at the same time. I got into both, but my decision was based on my watching the two companies with a professional, as opposed to a kid’s, point of view. I just started to see that New York City Ballet Corps dancers get so much experience on stage right off the bat. Whereas with the story ballets, sometimes when you first start off with them, there’s a tendency to be in a costume in the back, waltzing. You train for 12 years to waltz in a big costume? [Laughs]

Being from Fairfield, Connecticut, you must have been commuting a

OUR TOWN DOWNTOWN

I trained at Ballet Academy East on the Upper East Side. I commuted from Connecticut to New York every day until I was old enough to take the train, or have friends in the city I could stay with. For the most part, all of those years it was my mom schlepping me back and forth every day.

Do you think the city.ballet series accurately depicts a professional dancer’s life? There was the Black Swan and other ballet series that are just all oriented on the gossip aspect of it. This series shows the heart and soul that you have to put into it, and focuses on getting to know us as people as opposed to the drama that’s involved in how people get parts. Most of that is left out in this series.

In a preview clip, they ask dancers where they’re from and what kind of music they listen to. As an audience member, you see dancers on stage, but don’t know who we are. This is a cool way to get to the backstage aspect of it all.

How was it taped? Did a crew come to your rehearsals? Yeah, in the period before our season started, they were at almost all of my rehearsals. They were in class every morning. Every time we had a second, they grabbed us and pulled us aside to touch up on what they just filmed.

Every month, me and a few buddies go down to the Old Homestead and get steaks. That’s our guys’-night-out kind of place. For great food, I love going down to Barbuto, on 12th Street.

I heard you’re a Giants fan. Where do you watch their games? There’s a sports bar on 56th and 9th called Lincoln Park. I, embarrassing enough, play fantasy football, [Laughs] so I usually just try to find a place that shows every game if possible so I can keep tabs on all the players.

You’ve also modeled for Abercrombie and Fitch and French Vogue. When do you find the time to fit that into your schedule?

Sarah Jessica Parker narrates the docudrama. Did you have much interaction with her? I’ve had interviews with her specifically; she’s a really nice lady. Yeah, she was around a few times. She wasn’t around as extensively as the camera people obviously, but yes, she was definitely a part of it.

[Laughs] The photo shoot I did for Vogue and Abercrombie was literally 24 hours in South Beach, Miami. On my day off, they flew me there. I finished a show on Sunday, and they flew me out that night. I did a photo shoot all day, and then they flew me back at midnight so I could get back to class the next morning.

What are your future plans?

What is the atmosphere like backstage before a show? It’s fairly hectic before a show, but it’s that five minutes before the curtain goes up, when everybody is in their zone and comes together on stage right before the curtain comes up, that is a really cool experience. I hope that film crew got some of that footage, because that, to me, is almost like a spiritual kind of moment for a dancer.

Since you spend most of your time at the theater, what are your favorite restaurants in the vicinity of Lincoln Center?

I hope to dance as long as my body lets me. A male dancer’s career goes until hopefully about 40. People always ask me this question, and it’s good to think about, but right now I’m just so swamped and focused with my career as it is now. But, later in life, I would love to start my own company and run that. I think there’s nothing cooler than breeding all of your own dancers, putting them to ballets you think they’d be good at, and then watching that product. To learn more about the series, visit www. cityballet.com

The Smith opened up in Lincoln Center. Obviously, [Café] Fiorello’s, Rosa Mexicano.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS Classified Advertising Department Information Telephone:]Fax:Email: classifi FE!TUSBVTOFXTDPN Hours: .POEBZ'SJEBZBNQN]Deadline: .POEBZOPPOGPSTBNFXFFLTJTTVF

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PUBLIC NOTICES

New York City Department of Transportation Notice of Public Hearing The New York City Department of Transportation will hold public hearing on Wednesday November 6, 2013 at 2:00 P.M., at 55 Water St., 9th Floor Room 945, on the following petition for revocable consent, in the Borough of Manhattan: 50 Restaurant Group LLC to continue to maintain and use a sidewalk hatch under the east sidewalk of Clinton St., between Stanton and Rivington Sts. Interested parties can obtain copies of proposed agreements or request sign-language interpreters (with at least seven days prior notice) at 55 Water St., 9th Fl. SW New York, NY 10041, or by calling (212) 839-6550.

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www.chefmireille.com PAGE 19

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Our Town Downtown October 31st 2013