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T H E O H I O STAT E U N I V E R S I T Y M E D I CA L C E N T E R

Heart and Vascular Center Advances in Patient Care, Research and Education

2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

TA B L E O F CO N T E N T S WELCOME . ............................................................................................................................ 3 THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY HEART AND VASCULAR CENTER....................... 4 AWARDS AND RECOGNITION ........................................................................................ 6 YEAR IN REVIEW: DATA AND VOLUMES . .................................................................. 8 OHIO STATE’S DOROTHY M. DAVIS HEART AND LUNG RESEARCH INSTITUTE ......................................................................................... 10 PROFILE: MARTHA TAYLOR .......................................................................................... 12 COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS........................................................................................ 14 NEW FACULTY......................................................................................................................15 LOCATIONS AND REGIONAL PRACTICES ................................................................. 16 ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY .................................................................................................... 17 PERIPHERAL VASCULAR SURGERY AND MEDICINE . ........................................... 20 CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE . ................................................................................... 24 HEART FAILURE AND TRANSPLANT .......................................................................... 26 NEW CLINICS AND PROGRAMS . ................................................................................ 28 FRIENDS OF THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY HEART AND VASCULAR CENTER . ............................................................................. 30 ENCLOSED: FACULTY LISTING & REFERRAL GUIDE . ............................................. 34

Dear Friends and Colleagues, The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center is dedicated to improving lives by advancing research, education and patient care. Our faculty, staff and students are committed to making a difference in the lives of our patients today, while at the same time forging new paths to improve the health of the patients of tomorrow. I’m pleased to bring you the 2011 Heart and Vascular Center Report, which shares examples of how our exceptional people, inspired by possibilities, have made significant achievements and successfully focused their talents to accomplish our mission. In the following pages, you will see that 2011 was a year marked by progress and growth. The Heart and Vascular Center’s innovative, collaborative approach to clinical care and research continues to attract the best and brightest. We proudly welcomed new colleagues and leaders to Ohio State who share our commitment to excellence and our ambition to improve. I hope you enjoy reading about the achievements of this dedicated group of individuals who are driven to make a difference — today and tomorrow. Thank you for your interest and support of the Heart and Vascular Center. We welcome your visit to meet our team and see our programs and facilities. Sincerely,

Thomas Ryan, MD Director, Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center John G. & Jeanne Bonnet McCoy Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine Professor, OSU Department of Internal Medicine

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T H E O HI O STAT E U N I V E R S I TY H E A RT A N D VA SC U L A R C E N TE R

The mission at Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center, comprising the Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, the Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute and 20 outreach clinics, is to continually improve medical care and discover cures for our cardiovascular patients and for patients across the globe.

Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital is a seven-story, 150-inpatient and 23-outpatientbed facility that supports every type of cardiac care, from the latest catheterization techniques to central Ohio’s only adult heart transplantation program. Ross Heart Hospital provides the most current diagnosis and treatment, including advanced cardiac imaging, minimally invasive robotic procedures, pacemaker implantation, surgical bypass, mechanical heart pumps and transplants. After opening in 2004 as one of the nation’s first comprehensive academic hospitals dedicated to cardiovascular care, Ross Heart Hospital built two additional patient care floors in 2008. All inpatient rooms use the Universal Patient Room concept, which reduces patient transfers and has been proven to lessen the need for pain medication and improve patient outcomes. All rooms are located close to a nursing operations desk to facilitate quick response. This personalized approach to health care consistently earns high scores in patient satisfaction surveys conducted by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS).

Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute The Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute (DHLRI), promotes innovative and crossdisciplinary discovery related to complex human disease. The 500+ member Institute represents basic and clinical scientists as well as physicians from 20 College of Medicine Departments and Divisions and 8 University Colleges, including Engineering, Pharmacy, Computer Sciences, Nursing, Nutrition, Veterinary Medicine, Public Health and Arts & Sciences. DHLRI members are active in translational medicine and patient care, and the DHLRI is home to more than 135 active clinical trials related to cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Currently, the DHLRI accounts for approximately $30 million of annual research funding from national agencies including the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Heart Association, US Department of Defense, American Lung Association, as well as numerous private and industry associated groups. Finally, in additional to excelling in research and patient care, DHLRI investigators are actively training the next generation of our nation’s best clinicians and scientists.

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TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center Leadership Team (Front row, from left to right)

(Back row, left to right)

Traci Mignery, BSN, RN Director of Nursing, Heart and Vascular Center

Julie Dials Senior Director of Development

William T. Abraham, MD Director, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine Deputy Director, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute

Patrick Vaccaro, MD Director, Division of Vascular Diseases and Surgery

Thomas Ryan, MD Director, Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center

Robert Higgins, MD Director, Division of Cardiac Surgery Director, Comprehensive Transplant Center

Charles Bush, MD Medical Director, Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital

Marti Taylor, MSN, RN Executive Director, Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital Chief Operating Officer, Heart and Vascular Center Peter Mohler, PhD Director, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute Lorri Fowler, MBA Administrator, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute Ernest Mazzaferri Jr, MD Assistant Medical Director, Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital

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AWA R DS A N D R ECOG N I T I ON

Our goal is to provide each patient with the best possible outcome in the safest possible environment. In 2011 a number of milestones were reached in care delivery, scientific achievement and program development. These are just a few of the honors our facilities and staff achieved in the past year. • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recognized The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) as a leader in heart attack patient survival rates. Ohio State is one of only 95 in the United States and one of only three in Ohio to achieve this level of performance. Our heart specialists follow national guidelines when treating heart attack patients to provide them with the safest, best possible outcomes.

• The Society of Chest Pain Centers awarded Ohio State University’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital designation as an Accredited Chest Pain Center. The accreditation recognizes the facility’s expertise in reducing the time from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis and treatment, quickly treating patients to preserve the heart muscle, and developing an effective process to monitor patients to determine whether or not they are having a heart attack.

• OSUMC received the 2011 University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Leadership Award, recognizing it as one of the top 10 academic medical centers in the nation delivering the highest quality of care. The award was based on results of a 2011 study commissioned by the UHC, which ranked Ohio State ninth among the 100 academic medical centers and health centers in the United States included in the survey.

• U.S. News & World Report ranked The Ohio State University cardiology and heart surgery programs among the nation’s top 25 cardiology and heart surgery programs in 2011. The ranking is part of the publication’s “America’s Best Hospitals” national rankings which are compiled based on a survey of 200 physicians selected from each specialty.

• For the second time, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses awarded the Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery Unit on the fourth floor of Ohio State University’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital their Beacon Award for Critical Care Excellence. The Beacon Award recognizes units that provide patients and families exceptional care, achieving the highest quality outcomes and greater overall satisfaction.

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TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

• Curt Daniels, MD, director of Ohio State’s Adolescent and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program and the Pulmonary Hypertension Program, is president-elect of the International Society for Adult Congenital Heart Disease. The society focuses on advancing education and training in disciplines dealing with adult congenital heart disease.

Curt Daniels, MD

• Robert Higgins, MD, director of Ohio State’s Comprehensive Transplant Center and director of the Division of Cardiac Surgery, serves on the Residency Review Committee of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The council evaluates and accredits the nearly 9,000 residency programs in the United States. Higgins was also elected to the Board of Directors of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Robert Higgins, MD

• Women for Economic and Leadership Development (WELD) selected Laxmi Mehta, MD, clinical director of the Ohio State’s Women’s Cardiovascular Health Program, as one of their “Women You Should Know” in 2011. The award honors women who support the leadership development of other women by giving time, talent and resources to their community. Laxmi Mehta, MD

• David Orsinelli, MD, is the president-elect of the Board of Directors of the Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Echocardiography Laboratories (ICAEL). The ICAEL provides facility accreditation programs for echocardiography to provide standardization of, and improve the quality of, all aspects of echocardiographic laboratories.

David Orsinelli, MD

• Bhagwan Satiani, MD, medical director of Ohio State’s vascular laboratory, served as the president of the South Asian American Vascular Society. The society unites surgeons with a South Asian heritage to promote education and provide members a forum for scientific, educational, cultural, charitable and social interaction.

Bhagwan Satianti, MD

• Jean Starr, MD, medical director of Ohio State’s endovascular services and vascular surgery associate program director, was appointed to the executive council of the Midwestern Vascular Society. The society focuses on advancing the art and science of diagnosing and treating vascular disease and maintaining the high standards of open and endovascular interventions. Jean Starr, MD

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YE A R IN R E V I E W: DATA & VOLUMES

Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center continues to grow and attract experienced talent each year. In 2011, we welcomed 14 new colleagues to our physician group and look forward to welcoming more in 2012.

FACULTY GROWTH 2007

75

2008

75

71

2009

2010 73

87

2011

Since opening in 2004 the Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital has achieved top quartile inpatient satisfaction ratings as reported by HCAHPS. In FY2011, the Ross Heart Hospital was at or above the top decile in patient satisfaction nationally for Overall Rating (97th percentile), Willingness to Recommend (96th percentile), Discharge Information (96th percentile) and Nurse Communication (92nd percentile).

INPATIENT SATISFACTION Ross Heart Hospital Inpatient HCAHPS Overall Rating FISCAL YEAR

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

HCAHPS Overall % 9s and 10s

77.0%

79.9%

81.2%

83.0%

Percentile Rank

90

94

95

97

Response Count

779

2,189

2,111

2,059

ROSS INPATIENT OVERALL ASSESSMENT 90%

Percentile Rank

80%

77.0%

79.9%

81.2%

83.0%

80% 70%

70% 60% 50%

90

94

95

97

60% 50%

40%

40%

30%

30%

20%

20%

10%

10% 0%

0%

FY08 Percentile Rank

8

90%

FY09 HCAHPS Overall

FY10

FY11

HCAHPS Overall %9s and 10s

100%

100%

TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION | FY11

As a major tertiary care center, The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center provides experienced, expert care for the region. We have developed several high volume programs that deliver quality care and excellent outcomes.

1,429 Vascular

DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES FISCAL YEAR

FY08

FY09

FY10

FY11

Hospitals

30,901

31,222

37,955

39,650

Off-site

5,523

8,665

9,940

9,086

36,424

39,887

47,895

48,736

TOTAL Diagnostic Procedures

1,753 PTCAs/ Stents

4,374 Diagnostic Caths TOTAL PROCEDURES

7,556

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY | FY11 Thoracic Surgery* 206

799

Cardiac Surgery * Surgeries performed in the Ross Heart Hospital

YEARLY TRENDING FOR VALVE SURGERY 2008

140

2009

152

2010

138

163

2011

According to the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems with the National Public Health and Hospital Institute, the Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center achieves lower 30 day mortality rates for acute myocardial infarction patients, compared to member hospital and national rates as reported in CMS quality data available at hospitalcompare.hhs.gov. The OSU Heart and Vascular Center ranks second among the 136 member hospitals in this category.

ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION | 30 DAY MORTALITY RATE Actual Rate (Lower Rate Estimates, Upper Rate Estimates

OSU Medical Center

12.3 (10.1, 15) 15.8 (12.5, 19.8)

National Rate

16 (12.4, 20.3)

NAPH Rate 0

5

10

15

Mortality Rate 9

T H E O HI O STAT E U N I V E R S I TY D O ROTH Y M. DAV I S H E A RT A N D LUN G I N ST I TU T E

Linking Discovery to the Community

DHLRI ANNUAL FUNDING (MILLION) 35 30 25 20 15 10

The Ohio State University Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute (DHLRI) is home to an innovative team of more than 500 scientists, clinicians, nurses, fellows, students and staff, devoted to making cutting-edge discoveries and developing strategies to improve the lives of adults and children with heart and lung disease. In 2011, DHLRI members secured more than $29 million in funding and saw a 24-percent increase in publications. However, in only its 11th year of existence, the impact of the collaborative efforts of the Davis Institute is now being measured by far more than just numbers. This past year, the impact of the scientific discovery at DHLRI has forged local and national partnerships as never before, making a true impact in people’s lives.

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2002

2005

2008

2011

0

Turning Tragedy into Life-Saving Research Connor Senn was an Ohio State student/athlete who tragically died from sudden cardiac death (SCD) in September 2001 while playing in a men’s varsity soccer match. The Connor Senn Memorial Fund was created in his memory and now a new partnership among the DHLRI, the Senn Foundation, The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center and the Department of Athletics focuses on raising awareness and research funding for SCD.

DHLRI ANNUAL PUBLICATIONS 500 400 300 200 100

2002

10

2005

2008

2011

0

Last fall, a $50,000 gift from the Senn Foundation provided initial funding to support efforts at the DHLRI for SCD research. Work led by the DHLRI team this past year defined a new genetic mechanism for atrial fibrillation, the most common form of human arrhythmia. The study was featured in Circulation, the American Heart Association’s lead journal. Work from this collaboration is now expanding, with other DHLRI clinicians, pharmacists, genetic counselors, physiologists, pharmacists and molecular physiologists making strides to define new mechanisms and diagnostics for human sudden cardiac death.

TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

Partnership Making Advances in Muscular Dystrophy Treatment DHLRI is working in partnership with BallouSkies to provide more accurate, earlier diagnoses of heart muscle involvement in patients with muscular dystrophies. BallouSkies is a charitable organization dedicated to providing awareness and resources for the prevention of heart muscle atrophy with the ultimate goal of finding a cure for muscular dystrophy. A study conducted by a team of DHLRI physicians and basic scientists found that old drugs traditionally used to treat high blood pressure and advanced heart failure had a remarkable protective effect on the heart and skeletal muscles of mice with genetic changes that cause similar muscle weakening seen in boys with muscular dystrophy. This work was made possible by the generous support of BallouSkies and was published in the August 2011 edition of Circulation. Worldwide response from patients, families, physicians and scientists has resulted in new collaborations with neurologists and cardiologists.

Linking Discovery to Real Lives With each new discovery, DHLRI members continue to push the boundaries of scientific discovery even further. Integrating science, clinical application and community presence empowers the DHLRI to give back and continue to be part of new stories of discovery.

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P R O F I L E

Ross Heart Hospital Welcomes Executive Director Martha (Marti) Taylor, MSN, RN, has been named executive director of The Ohio State University Medical Center’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital and chief operating officer of the OSU Heart and Vascular Center. She will oversee the administrative and operational functions of one of the country’s first full-service academic heart hospitals, which ranks in the top 25 nationally for cardiology and heart surgery in U.S.News & World Report. Taylor’s career began 25 years ago at Duke University. Throughout her career she was instrumental in leading Duke University’s heart program to national prominence, most recently as associate vice president of cardiovascular services and clinical associate with the Duke University School of Nursing. A native of Ohio, Taylor welcomes the opportunity to return to her roots. “This is coming home for me,” says Taylor. “I grew up in Oak Harbor and went to undergraduate at Capital University. Working at a top-ranked academic medical center that is leading the future of healthcare reform is exciting.”

“We are conducting excellent cuttingedge research. The clinical care delivered to patients is extraordinary, and the people are committed and passionate about what they do.” Marti Taylor, MSN, RN Executive Director, The Ohio State University Medical Center’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital Chief Operating Officer, OSU Heart and Vascular Center

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She plans to build upon a program that was founded on outstanding research, education and patient care. “We are conducting excellent cutting-edge research,” she says. “The clinical care delivered to patients is extraordinary, and the people are committed and passionate about what they do.” Taylor served on the board of directors for the American College of Cardiovascular Administrators, and is a member of the American College of Healthcare Executives, the American Academy of Medical Administrators, the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, the American Nurses Association, the American Heart Association’s Cardiovascular Nurses Society and the Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society of Nursing. She has authored five articles in peer-reviewed journals.

TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

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CO M MU N I TY PA RTN E R S H I P

The Heart Partnership Ohio State and Memorial Hospital Expand Commitment to Provide Quality Cardiac Care in Marysville In 2009, The Ohio State University Medical Center joined Memorial Hospital of Union County in The Heart Partnership, a unique relationship that provides expanded cardiovascular care to residents of the Marysville community. Jump forward to October 2011, when community members, members of Memorial Hospital of Union County and representatives from The Ohio State University broke ground for the Surgery and Heart Pavilion, an $11.3-million surgical and outpatient facility dedicated to cardiovascular services in Marysville. This state-of-the-art facility, which will bear a resemblance to the Ross Heart Hospital, takes The Heart Partnership to a higher level, providing area residents a center of excellence for cardiovascular services, including diagnostic testing, interventional cardiology, prevention and rehabilitation.

The Ohio State University Medical Center leadership teamed up with leadership from Memorial Hospital of Union County to officially break ground on the Surgery and Heart Pavilion at the Marysville Hospital.

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NEW FAC ULT Y

Ohio State Welcomes Heart Specialists of Ohio In November 2011, Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center announced that eight experienced Columbus clinicians, formerly members of Heart Specialists of Ohio, joined The Ohio State University faculty. Along with faculty of the division of cardiovascular medicine, these cardiologists provide patients with advanced cardiovascular care close to home. In addition to moving their hospital practice to Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital, this group will continue to offer outpatient services at several sites in central Ohio. Joining Ohio State’s Medical Center gives these experienced cardiovascular specialists access to the resources of one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers and expands Ohio State’s mission to offer advanced cardiac and vascular care locally.

Debbra Debaets, MD, FACC; Lawrence Murcko, MD, FACC; Mary Beth Breckenridge, MD, FACC; Cindy Baker, MD, FACC

Barry George, MD, a founding member of Heart Specialists of Ohio, joins Ohio State’s Medical Center as the director of Advanced Cardiovascular Catheter-Based Therapies at the OSU Heart and Vascular Center. Dr. George, a leading clinician and researcher, will work to develop a peripheral vascular fellowship program that includes catheter-based disciplines. His work in biomedical engineering in the field of vascular medicine will help to shape the development of the next generation of cardiac and peripheral vascular specialists. In addition to Dr. George, we also welcome: CLINICAL CARDIOLOGISTS Debbra Debaets, MD, FACC Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine Timothy Obarski, DO, FACC, FACP Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine Lawrence Murcko, MD, FACC Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine Mary Beth Breckenridge, MD, FACC Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine

CARDIAC AND PERIPHERAL VASCULAR INTERVENTIONISTS Barry George, MD, FACC, FSCAI, FACP Associate Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, Director of Advanced Cardiovascular Catheter-Based Therapies Cindy Baker, MD, FACC Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine Talal Attar, MD, FACC Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine

Timothy Obarski, DO, FACC, FACP; Arsad “Andy” Karcic, MD, FACC; Talal Attar, MD, FACC; Barry George, MD

Arsad “Andy” Karcic, MD, FACC Assistant Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine

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LOCATIO N S AND REG IO N A L P RACTIC ES

Fayette

Findlay Wyandot Bucyrus

Lima

The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center is committed to serving not only the people of central Ohio, but also patients in outlying rural areas who need access to the best cardiovascular care available. Regional clinics allow Ohio State physicians to treat patients close to home in a variety of convenient, comfortable locations.

Ashland Wooster

Marion Mt. Gilead Bellefontaine Mt. Vernon Marysville COLUMBUS

Cambridge

London Lancaster Marietta Chillicothe

Northern Kentucky Portsmouth

Ohio Heart Locations COLUMBUS AREA Ross Heart Hospital: The Ross Heart Hospital provides stateof-the-art facilities for heart and vascular procedures, including: • Cardiac catheterizations • Coronary interventions • Electrophysiology services, including complex ablations and device implants • Open-heart surgery • Heart transplantation • Advanced cardiovascular imaging • Vascular interventions • Minimally invasive robotic procedures • Full range of testing and laboratory services for diagnosing cardiovascular disease. Specialties include: • National leader for implanting ventricular assist devices (VADs)

OSU CarePoint Gahanna: Cardiology consultation, outpatient cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing, vascular consultation, lipid management clinic, arrhythmia monitoring clinic, heart failure clinic OSU CarePoint Lewis Center: Cardiac consultation, arrhythmia monitoring clinic

OSU CarePoint East: Cardiology consultation, cardiac rehabilitation, outpatient cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing, arrhythmia monitoring clinic, heart failure clinic 16

Bellefontaine: Electrophysiology procedures, cardiology consultation, vascular consultation, cardiac catheterizations, outpatient cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing

OSU Heart and Vascular Center at Olentangy: Cardiac consultation, vascular consultation, endovenous treatment, outpatient cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing

Bucyrus: arrhythmia monitoring clinic

Knightsbridge: Vascular consultation, vascular diagnostic testing, imaging and testing, vascular surgery

Lima: Electrophysiology procedures

Martha Morehouse Medical Plaza: Cardiology consultation, outpatient cardiac diagnostic testing, lipid management clinic, cardiac rehabilitation Stoneridge: Cardiology consultation, outpatient cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing, vascular consultation, women’s cardiology clinic, lipid management clinic, arrhythmia monitoring clinic

• Only adult heart transplant program in central Ohio OSU Hospital East: Cardiology consultation, lipid management clinic, cardiac catheterizations, electrophysiology procedures, inpatient cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing

Marysville: Cardiology consultation, cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing, arrhythmia monitoring clinic

SURROUNDING AREAS Cambridge: Cardiology consultation, cardiac catheterizations, arrhythmia monitoring clinic Lancaster: Cardiology consultation, interventional cardiology, arrhythmia monitoring clinic, electrophysiology procedures

Chillicothe: arrhythmia monitoring clinic Findlay: Electrophysiology procedures Marietta: Arrhythmia monitoring clinic Marion: Electrophysiology procedures Wooster: Electrophysiology procedures Ashland: Vascular consultation Fayette: Vascular consultation Wyandot: Vascular consultation Mt. Vernon: Cardiology consultation, cardiac and outpatient diagnostic testing, vascular consultation Mt. Gilead: Cardiology consultation, cardiac diagnostic testing, vascular consultation London: Cardiology consultation, vascular consultation Portsmouth: Electrophysiology procedures Northern Kentucky: Heart failure clinic

E LECTRO P H YSIO LO GY

Ohio State’s Trailblazing EP Program Opens Doors to Regional Partnership and Groundbreaking Research Ohio State’s Electrophysiology (EP) Program has undergone major expansion over the past few years, with the addition of an innovative new facility that provides a superior patient experience, greater coordination of care and improved efficiencies and outcomes in the management of patients with arrhythmias. Features of Ohio State’s EP Services include: • A $20-million lab expansion at the Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital, which increases the number of invasive heart rhythm laboratories and places all the labs in the same location • Six state-of-the-art invasive heart rhythm procedure labs, all equipped with sophisticated imaging and mapping technologies and linked by integrated technology • A dedicated 30-bed inpatient unit for arrhythmia management • Twenty-five recovery units staffed by nurses who specialize in pre- and post-op management of arrhythmia patients • Specialty clinics for genetically related arrhythmias, with patient access to genetic counseling, gene therapy and testing to identify genetic tendencies toward arrhythmias • Outpatient subspecialty care through cardiac device and antiarrhythmic medication specialty clinics Many healthcare facilities do not have the capability to provide a comprehensive level of EP care. To make high-level electrophysiology more widely available, physicians from Ohio State travel to multiple regional sites to deliver Ohio State’s expertise to the surrounding communities.

The Largest Group of EP Specialists in Ohio Delivers State-of-the-Art Arrhythmia Management Services Ohio State’s Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital houses the largest group of EP specialists in Ohio. When the heart goes into an abnormal rhythm, Ohio State’s unique team responds immediately to determine and perform the most appropriate procedure to restore proper rhythm. Catheter ablation therapy, which involves burning, deadening, or freezing the specific source of the abnormal rhythm, is the primary means to treat such rhythm abnormalities. The Program also is a Center of Excellence for robotic navigation into the heart to correct rapid heartbeat.

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E LECTRO P H YSIO LO GY

TOTAL

EP LAB PROCEDURES

4,732

FY08

4,794

FY09 FY10

4,704 4,787

FY11

EP LAB PROCEDURES FY11 Breakdown by Type

1,181 Ablations

2,403 Other EP (studies, leads, pocket procedures, etc.)

1,203 Devices

State-of-the-art technology is always a key component of heart care. Treatment may involve implantation of a pacemaker or defibrillator. New devices being reviewed will offer such benefits as better memory, greater processing capability and monitoring of physiological changes — and then alerting physicians to intervene and prevent an event from occurring. Ohio State’s EP Program is also expert at removing devices that have failed or otherwise reached the end of their working life. The OSU Medical Center is among the best in managing implantable lead complications and one of the world’s largest-volume lead-extraction centers.

Ohio State’s Leads Investigational Device Trials in Field of Electrophysiology Ohio State’s Medical Center is deeply involved in creating and testing the latest EP devices and technologies. Ohio State physicians act as principal investigators on many of these trials, design or contribute to study protocols, consult with device makers, enroll patients in clinical trials, conduct the studies and monitor results. As a leader in investigational device trials, Ohio State participates in significant studies that evaluate the safety and efficacy of various devices and technologies, including: • A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible pacemaker

TOTAL EP Lab Procedures

4,787

• A catheter-embedded pressure monitor that measures pressure against the heart wall to help electrophysiologists determine the appropriate energy-delivery setting for the device

YEARLY TRENDING FOR

ABLATIONS 2008 2009

1,065 1,085 1,098

2010 2011

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• Innovative pacemaker lead wires that combat the problems of breakage and infection

1,181

• An implantable defibrillator with no wires inside the heart On the horizon are trials for a percutaneously implanted pacing lead that is attached externally to the heart, an injectable loop recorder and a medication to suppress abnormal heart rhythms. Additional investigations explore new ways to use existing devices. These important trials give Ohio State patients access to cutting-edge technologies and life-changing therapies that often are not available elsewhere.

TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

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P E R IP H E RA L VA SC U L A R S U RGE RY A N D ME D I C I N E

Excellence Leads to Accelerated Growth for Ohio State’s Peripheral Vascular Surgery and Medicine Program The Peripheral Vascular Surgery and Medicine Program at The Ohio State University Medical Center is renowned for its excellent treatment of vascular diseases and now, more than ever, is positioned for expansion through research, education and patient care. As part of that expansion, 2011 saw the development of Ohio State’s Aortic Center, a center of excellence dedicated exclusively to the management of thoracic aortic conditions. Patients seen at the Center benefit from the combined expertise of vascular surgeons, cardiac surgeons and cardiologists who are trained in both open and endovascular repair of thoracic aortic conditions. The Aortic Center houses everything under one roof, including 24-hour imaging facilities, cath labs and an operating room equipped with radiographic devices that allow for both open procedures and stent grafts in the same setting. The Center also facilitates ongoing consultation and monitoring of patients with descending thoracic aortic disease, including those with connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome. Accessibility is the emphasis for everyone, from patients with the most straightforward problems to those with the most complex issues. Excellence has led to growth: this team of top physicians continues to expand with the addition of four distinguished physicians. With a focus on the future, Ohio State is now developing an advanced fellowship program. Targeting the best and brightest from a variety of disciplines, the fellowship program stresses the evolving fields of endovascular and hybrid approaches in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease. Ohio State’s Heart Center has several scientific peripheral vascular studies under way, including an important phase I clinical trial studying the safety and efficacy of marrowderived stem cell therapy in the treatment of patients with critical limb ischemia not treatable by any other technique. Specialists at Ohio State’s Peripheral Vascular Surgery and Medicine Program treat patients at Ohio State’s University Hospital, University Hospital East and six satellite sites.

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TH E O H I O STATE U N I V E R S I TY ME D ICAL C EN TER

Ohio State Welcomes Barry George, MD as Director of Advanced Cardiovascular Catheter-Based Therapies In 2011 Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center expanded its long-established peripheral vascular disease program when Barry George, MD, joined the faculty. Dr. George’s vast experience includes training with the first two physicians to perform coronary angioplasty in the United States. He was involved in early investigative and clinical work that helped shape today’s cardiac and endovascular techniques. “Those early days of catheter-based therapies were very ‘heady’ times,” says Dr. George. “I felt very fortunate to be exposed to all the new ‘toys and gadgets’ we developed. Some are actually still used today.” He began performing catheter-based interventions in 1982. Now, more than 18,000 interventional procedures later, he has returned to his medical school alma mater as director of Advanced Cardiovascular Catheter-Based Therapies, where he will help educate the next generation of healthcare leaders.

Barry George, MD, FACC, FSCAI, FACP

“It was at [Ohio State] where I was inspired by several cardiologists to pursue the study of heart disease,” Dr. George says. “I can’t believe almost 30 years later I have the opportunity to teach and inspire other young physicians at such a prestigious place.” At Ohio State, Dr. George will help to develop a unique fellowship program that combines endovascular medicine, peripheral vascular surgery, interventional cardiology and radiology — all the disciplines in the field of catheter-based practice. His background in biomedical engineering and cardiology has led to his participation in numerous landmark studies, including: • The Thrombolysis and Angioplasty in Myocardial Infarction (TAMI) Trial, where he was a principal investigator • Early investigative stent and atherectomy clinical trials • Renal angioplasty and peripheral artery angioplasty, including subclavian, brachial, ulnar, radial digital and vertebral artery and carotid angioplasty and stenting • Percutaneous therapies for valvular and congenital heart disease in adults • Percutaneous left ventricular assist devices for complex coronary interventions In addition to his clinical work, Dr. George also plans to continue to participate in and initiate new research in catheter-based therapies and biomedical engineering.

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P E R IP H E RA L VA SC U L A R S U RGE RY A N D ME D I C I N E

Phase I Clinical Trial Evaluates Stem Cell Therapies for CLI Patients The Ohio State University Medical Center may be helping to forge a new path for critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients who are not candidates for revascularization. Researchers and clinicians are in the early stages of a phase I clinical trial designed to study the safety and efficacy of marrow-derived stem cell therapy for CLI patients. This is one of the first such trials using an autologous platelet separator device approved by the FDA. The first patient was enrolled in April 2011. Combining basic science cell-based therapy with vascular surgical expertise, principal investigator and Ohio State vascular surgeon Michael Go, MD, and Vincent Pompili, MD, director of Ohio State’s cardiovascular cell-based therapies, are collaborating on the trial. They hope to enroll 15 patients who have reached the end of efficacy with other therapies provided through Ohio State’s Medical Center. In the trial, researchers isolate and prepare stem cells specific to angiogenesis (generation of new blood vessels). New technology can isolate and process stem cells from bone marrow in the surgery suite or cath lab and deliver them to the patient within 15 minutes. Ohio State researchers conducted much of the basic science behind this process. Investigation continues to validate the safety and efficacy of this approach. In a simple procedure, the stem cells are infused in the patient’s affected limb. The body responds by creating alternative new channels for blood to flow around blocked arteries. A similar phase I trial is set to begin in early 2012 using stem cells to improve heart muscle in patients who have had coronary events. Looking forward, Ohio State researchers hope to move quickly on a phase II randomized trial for CLI patients.

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CO N G E N I TA L H E A RT D I S E A S E

A Leader of the Pack in Treating Disease with Unanticipated Demand Today, due to improved pediatric cardiovascular care, more children are surviving to adulthood with congenital heart disease. This has created a shift in the population— there are now more adults than children with congenital heart disease. However, undergoing childhood congenital heart disease surgery is not a cure. Once individuals reach adulthood, there await major residual cardiovascular problems, leading to significant morbidity and risk for early mortality. Several issues account for these concerning findings. Cardiovascular medicine has not been well prepared to care for this influx of adult congenital heart disease patients. Not enough physicians have trained to treat adult congenital heart disease, and patients have not been well educated about the need for lifelong care. This is not an ideal situation, but it is a challenge that The Ohio State University Medical Center has met head on.

Partnership with Nationwide Children’s Hospital Ohio State began developing an Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program in alliance with Nationwide Children’s Hospital a decade ago. This Columbus-based partnership represents one of the largest adult congenital heart disease programs in the United States in terms of patients, providers and research. Although the two hospitals are not formally affiliated, they collaborate for the benefit of patients. Providers and patients move between the two facilities as needed to access the best possible care, drawing upon the rich resources of each institution. Almost 3,000 patients are cared for in the program each year, with an adult congenital heart disease clinic offered daily. Patient outcomes from the program are outstanding and among the best in the country. (Crumb, et al. Quality outcomes of ACHD patients undergoing cardiovascular procedures and hospital admissions in a free-standing children’s hospital, International Journal of Cardiology, 146 (2011) 326-329.) Comprehensive care is provided by Ohio State’s three full-time adult congenital heart disease specialists, fellows, three dedicated nurse practitioners, nursing staff, psychologists and social workers. Specialists from Nationwide Children’s are closely involved in care, including involvement in procedures such as interventional congenital heart disease catheterization. Among the highly specialized therapies available in the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program are trans-catheter valve replacement, complex arrhythmia management and treatment, and heart-lung transplant surgery. Unique to the Ohio State – Nationwide Children’s partnership in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) care is the Transition Program. All patients age 15 and older at Nationwide Children’s are provided with an educational session about the need for lifelong cardiac care by the ACHD team. The aim of this unique program is to actively

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transition pediatric patients into adult care and to emphasize the need for this routine care to prevent future problems. As patients transition into adulthood, pregnancy is a complication many will encounter. Ohio State offers a Pregnancy and Heart Disease Program for congenital heart disease patients. The program provides care from cardiologists, high-risk obstetricians and anesthesiologists. To date, more than 400 women with congenital heart disease have been treated in the program, with zero maternal mortality.

Interventional Trans-catheter therapeutic cardiac catheterizations have revolutionized cardiac care for adults with acquired coronary and valvular disease, and children and adults with complex coronary heart disease. Since 2002, when The Cardiac Center at Nationwide Children’s Hospital was formed and the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program began to flourish, virtually every trans-catheter procedure has been available for adult congenital heart disease patients, including new device therapy protocols and compassionate-use devices. Each year, approximately 100 adult congenital heart disease patients are treated in the cardiac catheterization suites at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Ohio State’s Medical Center. • Approximately 50 percent of these patients receive a closure device to close holes in the heart’s upper chambers and avoid cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. • Another 25 percent of these patients receive stents to open obstructed blood vessels. Some of the stents are on an FDA protocol offered only in select centers in the United States. • More recently, approximately 10 percent of patients who have already had a complex open-heart surgical procedure receive a new cardiac valve delivered by a catheter. Some of these procedures are available in the United States only at Ohio State and Nationwide Children’s Hospital, making it a unique destination medical center for adult patients with this disease. These complex procedures require dedicated teams experienced in this patient population: • Percutaneous catheter-based therapy, including a new pulmonary valve procedure— Ohio State and Nationwide Children’s are among the only three sites in the world involved in this clinical research protocol • Hybrid procedures involving a combination of surgical and interventional procedures to minimize incisions, re-operations, open-heart surgery and time on the cardiopulmonary bypass machine—Ohio State and Nationwide Children’s are among the few institutions with specially designed Hybrid Suites and protocols for adults and children with congenital heart disease. As demonstration of its dedication to furthering the understanding of adult congenital heart disease, Ohio State is one of only a handful of institutions that provides fellowship training in this specialty.

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H E A RT FA I LU RE A N D T R A N S P L A N T

Heart Failure & Transplant: Comprehensive Care Coupled with Continuous Innovation The Ohio State University Medical Center specializes in providing comprehensive treatment for advanced heart failure in one of the larger heart failure programs in the United States. The Medical Center was among the first to dedicate an entire floor in its Heart and Vascular Center to treating these very ill patients.

Research Ohio State’s national and international leadership and track record for innovation in heart failure therapy attracts important clinical trials. Ohio State co-led the landmark national multi-center Phase III CHAMPION (Cardio MEMS Heart Sensor Allows Monitoring of Pressure to Improve Outcomes in NYHA Class III Heart Failure Patients) trial. The results, published in The Lancet, represent a breakthrough in heart failure management. The pulmonary artery pressure device was implanted in 550 moderate heart failure patients at 63 sites. Patients in the trial experienced a 30 percent reduction in heart failure-related hospitalizations at six months, and a 39 percent reduction in yearly heart failure-related hospitalization. Ohio State also co-led the C-Pulse Heart Assist System trial studying the feasibility of a cuff that wraps around the ascending aorta to improve cardiac performance. The North American multi-center pilot trial included 20 patients with moderate to severe heart failure. Patients in the trial improved in a number of indicators and, based on the preliminary results, Ohio State is helping to design a larger pivotal trial to test the safety and benefits of the device.

Transition Clinic Ohio State has focused energies on treating heart failure patients in the outpatient setting whenever possible. Toward that end, the Heart Failure Program developed points of contact to monitor patients and optimize the transition from hospital to home. This includes a nurse contacting patients within days after an inpatient stay, and nurse practitioners specializing in heart failure seeing patients within a week or two in a new outpatient transition clinic. In the last year, the 30-day readmission rate for these heart failure patients has improved—to 16.7 percent from 21 percent. With a base of approximately 2,000 patients in the Heart Failure Program, a moderate reduction in hospital readmissions is significant.

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Another development to treat “congested” heart failure patients outside the hospital is outpatient ultrafiltration therapy. Ohio State is the only facility in central Ohio providing this therapy in the outpatient setting.

PATIENT SURVIVAL

100% 90%

Transplant Ohio State offers one of only two comprehensive heart transplant programs in Ohio. In the last several years, an average of 12 patients have been transplanted each year. Patient survival at one year after transplant averages 83 percent for January 2008 – June 2010. Survival at three years for July 2005 – December 2007 is 86 percent. Since the program was founded in 1986, surgeons have performed more than 350 heart transplant operations. The Ohio State team dedicated to caring for heart failure patients excels in providing the medical, pharmacologic and psychosocial support necessary to optimize the health and well-being of these complicated patients while they await the extraordinary—a lifesaving heart transplant. In keeping with its strong commitment to advance education and training, Ohio State offers a fellowship in heart failure and transplantation.

83%

86%

80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

One-year Post Transplant

Three-years Post Transplant

TOTAL TRANSPLANTS (since 1986)

350

Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) Only 10 percent of patients referred for evaluation for transplant are determined to be suitable candidates. Some patients awaiting transplant (bridge to transplant) and some who are not appropriate for transplant (destination therapy) are candidates for mechanical circulatory support with ventricular assist devices or VADs. The VAD program at Ohio State currently cares for more than 70 end-stage heart failure patients on long-term support, making it one of the busiest programs in the region. Ohio State’s VAD program was one of the first to be certified by The Joint Commission accrediting body and recently received recertification. The current one-year survival in the program is 80 percent for patients with chronic VAD support.

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Creating Opportunities for Collaboration To provide the best care for our patients and streamline processes for their referring physicians, Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center has introduced two new programs. The Heart Valve Clinic and Aortic Center of Excellence formalized collaborative relationships across specialties that were already in place. Now, referring physicians and patients have one point of contact to access all these services.

Heart Valve Clinic Paves Way for Groundbreaking Clinical Trials Early in 2011, Ohio State completed the first CoreValve aortic valve replacement as part of a groundbreaking clinical trial. Led by a principal investigator at Ohio State’s Medical Center, the CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial offers hope for patients with aortic valve stenosis who may not be candidates for traditional surgery. Ohio State is one of 40 centers involved in the trial nationwide. Area candidates are evaluated for CoreValve through the Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital’s Heart Valve Clinic, a relatively new program that has demonstrated doubledigit growth over the past year. Built from the ground up, the Heart Valve Clinic at the Ross Heart Hospital provides comprehensive, patient-centered care to area residents with heart valve conditions. In a single visit, patients have access to state-of-the-art care in one convenient setting. For those with advanced disease, a multidisciplinary approach yields the most effective treatment plans. Evaluation begins with an entire team of specialists. Cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons collaborate to determine the best course of treatment for every patient, taking into account comorbidities such as PVD, COPD and renal failure. Heart failure specialists, EP specialists, interventionalists, ARNPs and imaging experts are available around the clock, providing supportive care and consultation when needed. The experts at Ohio State’s Heart Valve clinic provide a wide range of services, including catheter-based, minimally invasive, hybrid, robotic and conventional procedures as well as surgical and nonsurgical interventions for adults with congenital heart disease. A noninvasive diagnostic lab provides timely access to echocardiography and complementary diagnostics such as cardiac CT and cardiac MRI. Specialists at the clinic are always available for phone consultations to review test results, discuss concerns or evaluate whether a patient may be a candidate for a specific procedure. The Heart Valve Clinic allows for quick access to the most comprehensive care in the region.

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Aortic Center of Excellence Offers Innovative Solutions for Patients With Complex Diseases of the Aorta The Ohio State University Medical Center continues to expand, refine and improve its services for patients with heart and vascular diseases. The recent addition of the Aortic Center of Excellence to the Richard M. Ross Heart Hospital is a case in point. Dedicated exclusively to the management of complex diseases of the aorta, this important stateof-the-art resource offers the expertise of a uniquely experienced clinical team with specialized training in the latest technological advances. The multidisciplinary team at Ohio State’s Aortic Center of Excellence includes vascular and cardiac surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists and anesthesiologists who collaborate to provide the best approach for every patient. Innovative techniques such as endovascular repair result in better outcomes for this complex patient population. Hybrid procedures — which combine open and endovascular repair — offer hope for patients who had previously been considered high risk.

Advanced techniques offered at Ohio State’s Aortic Center of Excellence include: • Aortic aneurysm and dissection repair • Aortic valve-sparing surgery • Homograft root replacement • Bentall aortic root replacement • Replacement of ascending aorta • Hybrid elephant trunk procedure • Open thoracic and thoracoabdominal aneurysm repairs with spinal cord protection • Endovascular grafting for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms, which reduces morbidity, mortality and risk for open procedures

The Center has 24-hour imaging services available, including round-the-clock access to MRI, CT and cath labs for timely angiogram assessment. In addition, an advanced endovascular operating room allows for open repair and stent graft placement to be performed in the same setting. Surgeons are available 24 hours a day for consultation. Elective consultation for patients with chronic stable aneurysms and other aortic pathology can be scheduled for evaluation. Plans for 2012 include the installation of a hybrid operating suite.

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D E VELOPME N T

Friends of Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center Highlights of 2011 Philanthropic Support for the Heart and Vascular Center Generous support in 2011 to The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center demonstrates a continued commitment to advancing cardiac research, care and education.

THE GERARD KAKOS, MD, AND THOMAS WILLIAMS, MD, PROFESSORSHIP IN CARDIAC HEART SURGERY Dr. Gerard Kakos of Columbus has established the Gerard Kakos, MD, and Thomas Williams, MD, Professorship in Cardiac Surgery, with a generous $1 million gift. This gift will enable the Division of Cardiac Surgery to attract outstanding leadership and recognize the scientific achievement and prominence of a renowned expert in cardiac surgery. Dr. Kakos (’67), Faculty Emeritus, spent 35 years as a cardiothoracic surgeon at The Ohio State University Medical Center. Dr. Williams (’63), clinical associate professor of Surgery, has spent 41 years at Ohio State’s Medical Center.

THE MARY AND J. CHURCHILL HODGES PREVENTION PROGRAM Mary and Churchill Hodges of Huntington, W. Va., provided a $500,000 gift to create the Mary and J. Churchill Hodges Prevention Program in Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital. This program will focus on creating a cardiovascular disease prevention program for Ohio State Medical Center patients. The noninvasive outpatient testing area has been named The Mary and J. Churchill Hodges Noninvasive Imaging Center in recognition of their gift. Mary and Churchill (Churchill passed away in September 2011, soon after naming the imaging center) were grateful patients of the Medical Center and long-time supporters of The Ohio State University.

THE WOMEN’S CARDIOVASCULAR PROGRAM Sarah and Dan Kay of Bexley gave a $100,000 gift to support the Women’s Cardiovascular Program at OSUMC. A long time supporter of the Heart and Vascular Center, Sarah is the daughter of Sarah “Sally” Ross Soter and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Ross and the late Richard M. Ross, for whom the Ross Heart Hospital was named.

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Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Medicine: Steven Gabbe, MD; Jonathan Seidman, PhD; Christine Seidman, MD; E. Gordon Gee; Jay Schottenstein; Jeanie Schottenstein; Thomas Ryan, MD

Charles and Barbara Webb

ROBERT J. FREEDY, MD, AND LUCY R. FREEDY, MD, ENDOWED CARDIOVASCULAR EDUCATION FUND Lucy Freedy, MD, of Columbus created the Robert J. Freedy, MD, and Lucy R. Freedy, MD, Endowed Cardiovascular Education Fund in memory of her husband, Dr. Robert Freedy (MD, ’60). The endowment will support education of house staff, residents, fellows and/ or medical students in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine in Ohio State’s Ross Heart Hospital.

CHARLES AND BARBARA WEBB CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Dr. Jianjie Ma, chair of the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, joined us Sept. 30, 2011, for the first Charles and Barbara Webb Cardiovascular Research Symposium. Charles and Barbara Webb and Family created an endowment in 2010 that supported this symposium. Dr. Ma presented on translational cardiovascular research to The Ohio State University Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute faculty, staff and students.

JAY AND JEANIE SCHOTTENSTEIN PRIZE IN CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCES In May, 2011, the Heart and Vascular Center presented the second Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Sciences to Dr. Christine “Kricket” Seidman, the Thomas W. Smith Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The Schottenstein Prize in Cardiovascular Sciences is awarded biennially to a nationally recognized cardiovascular physician or researcher.

VIGODA FAMILY LECTURER On Sept. 13, Dr. Anthony DeMaria of the University of California, San Diego, joined us as the 2011 Vigoda Family Lecturer. In 2007, Dr. Philip and Louise Vigoda made a gift to create a visiting lectureship, which brings internationally renowned cardiovascular researchers and clinicians to Ohio State to provide educational opportunities for faculty and students. 31

D E VELOPME N T

Donate Today Visit giveto.osu.edu to learn about the Heart Center Annual Fund, which supports the priorities of the Heart and Vascular Center. (Fund Number: 312269) For more information on how to become a friend of Ohio State’s Heart and Vascular Center, please contact: The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center Development Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 110V 473 W. 12th Ave. Columbus, OH 43210 614-247-7857

Julie Dials Senior Director of Development Julie.Dials@osumc.edu Kelly Stevelt Assistant Director of Development Kelly.Stevelt@osumc.edu

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Use our referral and resource guide to quickly reach our expert physicians.

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glue reference guide here

The Ohio State University Medical Center Ross Heart Hospital 452 W. 10th Ave Columubus, OH 43210 medicalcenter.osu.edu/heart

Š 2012 The Ohio State University Medical Center ROSS20110102


The Ohio State University Heart and Vascular Center 2011 Year in Review