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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2011

Steve Tobin’s

Natural

H I S T O RY AT T H E PAT T Y & J AY B A K E R

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART

CONTENTS October/November

2011

Vo l . 2 , N o . 4

ON THE COVER : STEVE TOBIN, STEELROOT SERIES, UNTITLED, 2008, STEEL RIGHT: STEVE TOBIN, EXPLODED EARTH SERIES, UNTITLED, 2007, CERAMIC AND GLASS

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OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2011

Steve Tobin’s

Natural

H I S T O RY AT T H E PAT T Y & J AY B A K E R

NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART

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42 Naples

STEVE TOBIN’S NATURAL HISTORY

The Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art is hosting a retrospective exhibition celebrating the career of nature-centric artist, Steve Tobin, through a diverse range of works reflecting Tobin’s prolific vision and his unique ability to transform natural wonders into monumental sculptures in bronze, steel, glass and ceramics. g a z i n e

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Fe a t u r e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

50 Daytona Beach

62 Jacksonville

74 Daytona Beach

86 Ocala

WILDLIFE:

THE SEMINOLE

LAND: 50 YEARS OF

HEPBURN: DRESSED

FLORIDA AND ITS THROUGH THE

LENS OF HARRY MOULIS, MD

A uniquely intimate portrayal of Florida’s wildlife is presented in this delightfully captivating exhibit at the Museum of Arts & Sciences.

EUGENE SAVAGE: PAINTINGS

The beauty and simplicity of Seminole life is portrayed in an enchanting display at the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens.

DOUGLAS KIRKPHOTOGRAPHY

This star-studded retrospective at the Southeast Museum of Photography reflects Kirkland’s lifelong love affair with the camera.

KATHARINE

FOR STAGE AND SCREEN

The Appleton Museum of Art presents a rare glimpse into Hepburn’s private collection of performance clothes and ephemera spanning her six-decade career from stage to screen.

On View Destination: Sarasota

THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART

110 Preview a rich celebration of arts and culRIGHT: THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART

ture surrounding the Ringling International Arts Festival, October 11-16, as On View tours the picturesque estate of the Ringling Museum of Art. OnV

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TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): DR. HARRY MOULIS, MID-BLINK, 2007; EUGENE SAVAGE, ORCHID TRAIL, 1935; DOUGLAS KIRKLAND, AUDREY HEPBURN, PARIS, 1965; KATHARINE HEPBURN, PUBLICITY SHOT

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CONTENTS October/November

2011

Vo l u m e

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No.

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COMMENTARY

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An eye-opening exhibition brings to light—through art— the profound thoughts and emotions of survivors of domestic violence.

Robert creates surprising and innovative sculpture in turned wood, transcending the usual techniques of those who turn functional bowls and forms.

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GALLERY

still images from the single channel video

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Spotlight

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JANET BIGGS

Fade to White, 2010,

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Mark’s work combines an interest in the contemporary urban landscape, a Minimalist’s emphasis on simple forms, a penchant for surreal effects and a playful, Pop-Art sensibility.

ROBERT F. LYON

Museum exhibitions

PICTURED:

MARK HANDFORTH

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CALENDAR

janet biggs,

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Craft

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A selection of gallery artists

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Profile

New York-based video artist, Janet Biggs, has earned an international reputation for her daring work. She travels the globe to record on film, humans testing their limits— and in the process, often tests her own. .

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RENE VON RICHTHOFEN

Rene’s smart, amusing— and at times, erotic— creations are inspired by all things associated with the automobile.

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Fall Views

M A G A Z I N E

T h e n e w f a l l l i n e u p i s h e r e ! Let’s take a peek, shall we?... Our cover story, Steve Tobin’s Natural History, on pg. 42, features the works of a prolific visionary who transforms nature’s wonders into mesmerizing sculptures in bronze, steel, glass and ceramics. Florida and its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD, on pg. 50, stunningly portrays intimate moments in nature as witnessed by awardwinning photographer, Dr. Harry Moulis. The beauty and simplicity of Seminole life is artistically documented in Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings, on pg. 62, an enchanting display of works reminiscent of Art Deco and Surrealist dreamscapes. Renowned photographer, Douglas Kirkland, creates personal connections with his subjects in this star-studded collection of portraits and iconic stills taken on the sets of acclaimed films in Douglas Kirkland: 50 Years of Photography, on pg. 74. And, Katharine Hepburn: Dressed For Stage And Screen, on pg. 86, offers a rare glimpse into the First Lady of Cinema’s private collection of performance clothes created for her by some of the greatest designers of the 20th century. In addition, On View Destination, on pg. 110, tours the picturesque estate of the Ringling Museum of Art while previewing the Ringling International Arts Festival, a 6-day cultural extravaganza which takes place October 11-16.

Editorial

Publisher & Creative Director

Diane McEnaney Contributing Editor

Paul Atwood Editorial Assistant

T h e r e s a M av r o u d i s Adver tising Marketing & Sales Director

Paul McEnaney

Marketing Intern

Abigail Adkins Contact Editorial

editorial@onviewmagazine.com Advertising

advertising@onviewmagazine.com On View is published on-line, six times per year, by On View Magazine, LLC. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publisher.

Diane McEnaney

www.onviewmagazine.com

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Survival Guide

A

T H E PAT H T O F R E E D O M

ART OFFERS

the opportunity to express without words. Inner Worlds of Domestic Violence Survivors II is an eye-opening exhibition presented by the Naples Art Association in partnership with The Shelter for Abused Women and Children that coincides with National Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October. The exhibit, which runs through October 12th, brings to light—through art—the profound thoughts and emotions of survivors of domestic violence. Domestic violence is one of the most traumatic experiences a human being can endure. When women arrive at The Shelter for Abused Women and Children in Naples, they have experienced pain, fear, humiliation and despera-

MUSE

Through art and counseling, women can find self-love and empowerment. tion—many are hopeless. But once they walk through the doors of the shelter, they are on a path to freedom. The goal of the Healing Arts Program at The Shelter for Abused Women and Children is to guide them along this path—to help these women move forward from trau-

ma to healing. The healing arts program also promotes social change. Art can help transform a person’s life—it makes a silent statement for those who are willing to look and to see. When a survivor’s artwork is viewed by an audience, there is confirmation and acknowledgement of the traumatic events in her life. Her involvement is confirmed and the process helps her to understand the depth of her experiences as well as the changes needed. The arts facilitate the transition from victim to survivor. Through art and counseling, women can find self-love and empowerment. Through art, they are able to give meaning to the events in their lives. With paper, canvas, pastels and paint, domestic violence survivors give shape and form to

PICTURED (TOP TO BOTTOM): Anonymous,
 Let Me Go! Set Me Free!,
 construction paper, soft pastel,
21.5 x 28.5”; Anonymous,
 My Feelings,
 tempera,
 25.25 x 31.75” images courtesy of the artists and naples art association: www.naplesart.org

extreme emotions and begin the process of turning their present into a brighter future. O n V iew OnV

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CALENDAR Current

Exhibitions

BOCA RATON Thru 01.08.12

www.bocamuseum.org

A veritable feast of more than 75 captivating works by selftaught artists, this exhibition presents rare and fascinating works from the collection of Ted and Ann Oliver, who have spent more than 30 years studying,

B Y

Colombian conceptual artist, Federico Uribe, is known for his fascinating transformation of everyday objects into art. Included in the exhibition are works from Uribe’s 2008 Animal Farm and the debut of his new creations. (See story in the August/September 2011 issue on pg. 64.)

08-09.2011

Outsider Visions: Self-taught Southern Artists of the 20th Century Boca Raton Museum of Art

C O M P I L E D

collecting and writing about southern contemporary folk art. Thru 12.04

The World According to Federico Uribe Boca Raton Museum of Art

CORAL GABLES 11.12-01.15.12

www.bocamuseum.org

China: Insights Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www6.miami.edu/lowe

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This exhibit brings together the work of 7 photographers from mainland China— Chen Yuan Zhong, Hua Er, Jia Yu Chuan, Li Nan, Yang Yan Kang, Yu Haibo and

Zhang Xinmin—each has undertaken the long-term documentation of one or more aspects of Chinese culture that reflects something vital about China now—whether emerging or vanishing.

1. Mose Tolliver, Siamese Twins, 1980s, house paint on plywood, 24 x 21”, courtesy of Ann and Ted Oliver 2. Federico Uribe, Bull, 2008, wood and shoe soles, 96 x 72 x 36”, courtesy of Now Contemporary Art 3. Yu Haibo, image courtesy of Lowe Art Museum

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Coral Gables continued...

Thru 04.22.12

Women, Windows and the Word: Diverging Perspectives on Islamic Art Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www6.miami.edu/lowe

The complex theme of Islamic art is examined in 3 intertwining themes: Muslim women as creators and subjects of art, Western views of the Islamic world, and decoration and the written word. Thru 10.23

Sacred Stories, Timeless

Tales: Mythic Perspectives in World Art from the Permanent Collection Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami

DAYTONA BEACH Thru 02.27.12

10.08-09.23.12

www6.miami.edu/lowe

Featuring some 100 paintings, drawings, ceramics, glass and sculptures, this exhibition explores thematic connections between

Saintly Blessings from Mexico: The Joseph D. and Janet M. Shein Collection of Retablos Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami www6.miami.edu/lowe

mythic traditions in world art.

Painted, devotional images of saints, called retablos, used primarily by Mexican peoples as objects of veneration and to seek favors, are on exhibit for the first time.

Audubon! Selections from John James Audubon’s Birds of America Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

John James Audubon painted nearly threequarters of the North American species of birds, of which the Museum holds more than 30 superb examples. The beauty of his Birds of America is

1. Lalla Essaydi,
Converging Territories #30 2. Japan, Edo Period, 1615-1868, 
Shoki and Oni, 18th century,
ivory and stain, 2-1/4 x 1-5/8 x 7/8”,
 gift of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Kurstin 3. El Alma de Maria, image courtesy of Lowe Art Museum 4. John James Audubon, Ruby-throated Hummingbird

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equaled by its scientific value as a part of our nation’s natural heritage. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 62.)

of its dusk and dawn, including those that wing across its rosy sunrise and burrow ‘neath the surface of the ground. (See story on pg. 50.)

Thru 12.11

Florida and its Wildlife:

Ashcan, Regionalism, Modernism and varieties of Abstraction.

11.13-03.11.12

Reflections II: Watercolors of Florida 18352000, from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Arts & Sciences www.moas.org

A stunningly beautiful Through the follow-up to ReflecLens of Harry tions I, which debuted Moulis, MD at MOAS in 2009, Museum of Arts Reflections II presents & Sciences a broad, full-color www.moas.org survey of watercolors This exhibition highof Florida in a range lights Harry Moulis’ of styles, including love of Florida’s examples within Realwetlands and waterism, Impressionism, ways and the creatures Post-Impressionism,

10.21-02.19.12

Douglas Kirkland Retrospective: Fifty Years of Photography Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

Renowned for his work in photojournalism,

celebrity portraiture and film photography, Douglas Kirkland’s retrospective is a compelling look into a career spanning over 5 decades. With just under 200 images, this exhibition features portraits of celebrities alongside iconic stills taken on the sets of acclaimed films. (See story on pg. 74.) Thru 12.16

In the Light of Darkness: A Photographer’s Journey after 9-11 by Kate Brooks Southeast Museum of Photography www.smponline.org

In the Light of Darkness includes a collection of images that chronicle Brooks’

1. Harry Moulis, MD; Morning ‘Do, 2011; Species: Yellow-Crowned Night Heron; Location: Ormond Beach, FL 2. Laura Woodward, Royal Poinciana at Lake Worth, Florida, 1889 3. Douglas Kirkland, Elizabeth Taylor, 1961, ©Douglas Kirkland

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Daytona Beach continued...

10-year passage from the mountains of Tora Bora to the uprisings in the Arab world in early 2011. ((See The Power of the Image in the August/September 2011 issue on pg. 44.) Thru 12.16

Portraits from Afghanistan by Khalid Hadi

Featured in this exhibition are paintings, calwww.morikami.org ligraphy and ceramics www.smponline.org On display are more by Zen masters of the Portraits of wounded than 40 exquisite 17th to the 20th cenfighters, orphans and examples of Japanese turies. The works are children, injured by snuff bottles, produced examples of the genre land mines and bombs, during the Meiji Period of Japanese art called form a moving visual (1868–1912) for export zenga, which originatrecord of the toll taken abroad. These small, ed in the 17th century on the population of intricately designed Afghanistan during bottles exemplify the Soviet occupation. the superb technical (See The Power of the virtuosity and artistic Image in the August/ sensibility of late 19th September 2011 issue and early 20th century on pg. 46.) Japanese craftsmen. as spiritual exercises, 10.18-01.22.12 aids to meditation and DELRAY BEACH Zenmi—A Taste visual sermons show10.18-01.22.12 of Zen: Paintings, ing the path to Zen Small Wonders: Calligraphy and enlightenment. Southeast Museum of Photography

and Japanese Gardens

Japanese Snuff Bottles from the Trammell and Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art Morikami Museum

Ceramics from the Collection of Riva Lee Asbell Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

DUNEDIN Thru 12.23

Believe It or Not?
 Dunedin Fine Art Center

www.morikami.org

www.dfac.org

1. Image (detail) ©Kate Brooks 2. Image ©Khalid Hadi 3. Image courtesy of Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

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Dunedin continued...

www.dfac.org

This international show features contemporary artists whose creations are quite simply—unbelievable! Included are works by Carrie Ann Baade, Cheryl Coon, Cynthia Holmes, Jennifer Lederhouse, Jennifer Maestre, Carol Prusa, Brian Ransom, Jason deCaires Taylor and collaborative artists, Comenius Roethlisberger and Admir Jahic. Thru 10.16

Sideshow 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center

Fresh interpretations of the ‘sideshow’ are presented by artists Lori Ballard, Bryan Cunningham, Amy Johnquest, Daniel Mrgan, Chris Rush, John & Lynn Whipple and Kreg Yingst. (See story in the August/

curators put together the best art, with a gift-giving perspective in mind, resulting in a collection of works from around the country that any of your friends or relatives would be delighted to find under their tree! FORT LAUDERDALE 11.19-04.08.12

September 2011 issue on pg. 94.)

Offering of the Angels: Old Master Paintings and Tapestries from the Uffizi Gallery

Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale, Nova Southeastern University www.moafl.org

Featuring tapestries and paintings by some of the greatest artists of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, this highly-acclaimed exhibition includes paintings by Sandro Botticelli, Parmigianino, Alessandro Allori, Luca Giordano and Lorenzo Monaco, selected by Antonio Natali, director of Florence’s famous Uffizi Gallery.

11.09-12.23

Thru 05.27.12

The Greatest (Holiday) Show on Earth! 
 
 Dunedin Fine Art Center

Primordial: Paintings and Sculpture by Isabel De Obaldía, 1985–2011 Museum of Art / Fort Lauderdale,

www.dfac.org

Each year, DFAC

1. Cynthia Holmes, Friends, oil on panel 2. Amy “Banner Queen” Johnquest, It’s Here We Have It, 2005, approx. 39” x 3’, casien & acrylic on brown cotton mesh 3. Alessandro Di Mariano Filipepi (called Sandro Botticelli), Madonna with Child (Madonna della loggia), ca. 1466-1467, oil on panel, Collection of the Uffizi Gallery, Florence, Italy

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Fo r t L a u d e r d a l e c o n t i n u e d . . .

Nova Southeastern University

Harn Museum of Art

www.moafl.org

www.harn.ufl.edu

Demons, gods, ghosts and beasts are the subjects of this midcareer retrospective of the work of Pana-

manian-based artist, Isabel De Obaldía, who explores the art of ancient cultures. GAINESVILLE Thru 05.27.12

Sebastião Salgado: World Witness

www.harn.ufl.edu

Considered one of the most highly recognized photojournalists in the world, Salgado focuses on people who are politically, economically and culturally excluded from the promise of global development. In this exhibition, Salgado documents famine in Africa and manual labor around the world.

Open Engagement represents 25 international artists who explore, recreate and imagine the nuances of love and war artists becoming recog- across time and place. nized in an artistic realm traditionally held HOLLYWOOD by men. This exhibit features 87 works by 10.29-01.29.12 25 exceptional women Artist Unknown/ artists who reflect JaThe Free World pan’s rich and innovative ceramic culture.

10.16-12.31.12

Thru 08.2012

Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists Harn Museum of Art

Open Engagement: Strategies in Art, Love and War
 Harn Museum of Art

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

This US premiere of a first-of-its-kind exhibition features hundreds of images of vernacular photography found online by artists John

www.harn.ufl.edu

Soaring Voices demonstrates the shift in Japanese society toward individual women

1. Isabel De Obaldía, Blue Idol (Idolo azul), 2008, sand cast glass, 17 x 8 x 5”, Mary-Anne Martin Fine Art, NY 2. Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 03-III, 2003, stoneware and glass, photo ©Taku Saiki 3. Sergio Vega, Tropical Rococo (detail), 2002, RC print, Museum Purchase, funds provided by the Caroline Julier and James G. Richardson Acquisition Fund 4. Photograph from the exhibition Artist Unknown/The Free World “pairings”, anonymous images collected by John D. Monteith and Oliver Wasow

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D. Monteith and Oliver Wasow. From the bizarre to the sublime, these anonymously sourced amateur photographs provide a fascinating view of American culture through the new frontier of social media.

presents a site-specific installation of his labor-intensive drawings on paper. 10.29-01.29.12

Giannina Coppiano Dwin: Nothing We Call Our Own

10.29-01.29.12

Freddy Jouwayed: Forks in the Wave Function Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Miami based artist, Freddy Jouwayed,

a site specific installation, performance and photography. JACKSONVILLE Thru 01.08.12

Larry Clark: The Tulsa Series Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood artandculturecenter.org

Ecuadorian native, Giannina Coppiano Dwin, expresses in her work a desire to transform simple materials into symbols of life’s basic needs. For her exhibition Nothing We Call Our Own, Dwin presents

A harrowing account of the aimless drug use, violence and sex activities of Clark’s circle of friends is depicted in this searing photo documentary. Taken in 3 protracted series between 1963 and 1971, the Tulsa photographs combine the documentary style and narrative sequencing of a Life magazine photo essay with startling

intimacy and emotional intensity. Thru 11.06

No Place in Particular: Images of the American Landscape Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

www.mocajacksonville.org

Since the end of World War II, developing

1. Freddy Jouwayed, Sensesinfission, 2011, pigment pen, marker and acrylic on paper 2. Giannina Coppiano Dwin, Untitled (Bra), 2009, sugar 3. Larry Clark, Dead 1970, 1970, courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, NY 4. Steve B. Smith,
Interior Landscape #1, Ivins, Utah, 2006,
archival inkjet print, 22 x 17”

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Ja c k s o nv i l l e c o n t i nu e d . . .

suburbanization has homogenized the landscape, fragmented vast amounts of natural habitat and exacerbated dependency on the automobile. The photography presented in this exhibition encourages contemplation regarding modern land-use practices and the particulars of place.

replete with art historical references. Thru 11.06

Project Atrium: Melanie Pullen Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville

11.19-03.11.12

Project Atrium: Gustavo Godoy Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

Known for his unconventional and large sculptures, this Los Angeles-based artist creates interactive constructions made of plexiglass, plywood and wall polish, simultaneously playful and

photographs are based on vintage crime-scene images she mined from the files of the Los Angeles Police Department, the County Coroner’s Office and other primary sources. Thru 01.08.12

Shared Vision: The Sondra Gilman and Celso GonzalezFalla Collection of Photography Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville www.mocajacksonville.org

The Sondra Gilman www.mocajacksonville.org Collection presents For her series, High a selection of modern Fashion Crime Scenes, and contemporary Pullen focused on the violent past of her adopted city, Los Angeles, during the tumultuous years of the 1940s and 1950s. Her

photographs by such celebrated figures as Eugène Atget, Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Weston. 10.07-01.08.12

Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

In the 1930s, Eugene Savage became enchanted with the Seminole Indian tribe and began to depict them in paintings and works on paper—each presents Seminole tra-

1. Gustavo Godoy, Fast-formal Object: Big Blue, 2010, mixed media construction, 18 x 32 x 19’ 2. Melanie Pullen, Dorothy (Barrel Series) [detail], 2003, 
 C-print, plexi face mount, 
Ace Gallery, Beverly Hills, 2005 3. William Eggeleston, Memphis (Tricycle), ca. 1969-70, dye transfer print 4. Eugene Savage, Orchid Trail, 1935, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 13 x 13”

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ditions in a very artistic manner, reminiscent of Art Deco and Surrealist dreamscapes. (See story on pg. 62.)

the hot spot for movie executives. First Coast native and silent filmmaker, Richard Norman, gained national recognition by proThru 11.02 ducing popular films Jacksonville’s made with African Norman Studios: American casts, inMovie Posters cluding Black Gold, from the Perma- The Flying Ace and nent Collection The Crimson Skull.

the compelling challenges and successes of local students.

a restored Tudor Room gallery, incorporating paneling, flooring, furnishings, a fireplace and a selection of art from the Cummers’ home, to recreate the domestic sphere in which their collection was originally displayed. Thru 12.31

Thru 12.20

Thru 12.31

One in Three: Let’s Solve Our Dropout Crisis The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

Re-opening of the Tudor Room The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens

www.cummer.org

The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

Before Hollywood dominated the film industry, Florida was

Serving as an anchor for several campaign initiatives spreading awareness of the dropout crisis, this exhibition features photographs by Jacksonville artist, Ingrid Damiani, chronicling

www.cummer.org

As part of its 50th Anniversary season, The Cummer has unveiled

The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens www.cummer.org

More than 3 years of planning and research have culminated in a new reinstallation of The Wark Collection of Early Meissen Porcelain, recognized as the most important

1. Norman Film Manufacturing Company, poster for Black Gold, 1928, lithograph on paper, 41 x 27-5/16”, purchased with funds from the Morton R. Hirschberg Bequest, Mr. Moselle C. Bruton, Ms. Janet R. Johnson, Mr. Michael Lewis, Dr. Emma Moran, Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Anello, Ms. Thelma Geiger and Mrs. Gloriden J. Norris 2. Photograph by Ingrid Damiani 3. Interior of Cummer Home (detail), ca. 1958, gelatin print, The Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens Archives

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collection of Meissen in the US. LAKELAND

oscillates between realism and abstraction, combining brushwork with thick globs of color, forced directly onto the canvas. (See story in the August/ September 2011 issue on pg. 116.)

consists of compelling slivers of her experience with the country’s culture. 10.15-01.21.12

The Blues

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Included in this exhibition are artworks from the Museum’s Permanent Collection that exemplify how drawing remains a fundamental basis for fine arts and an important component of the creative process.

Jessica Lange: In Mexico Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

Thru 12.10

“EN PLEIN” SIGHT: Paintings by Lilian Garcia-Roig Polk Museum of Art

Thru 11.13

The (Lost) Art of Drawing Polk Museum of Art

Thru 12.10

Through Lange’s photography, we witness a fusion of intimacy and curiosity. In Mexico

blue is a major component.

Polk Museum of Art www.polkmuseumofart.org

In conjunction with its annual Red, White & The Blues celebration, Polk Museum of Art pays homage to the cool color by displaying works from its Permanent Collection wherein

www.polkmuseumofart.org

Garcia-Roig transcends the typical definition of a landscape painter. Her style

1. Tea Caddy from the Queen Marie of Hanover Coffee and Tea Service, ca. 1730, porcelain with painted decoration Johann Gregorius Höroldt, 4-1/3” 2. Lilian Garcia-Roig, Rapid Waters, 2010, oil on canvas 3. Jessica Lange, Mexico, ed. 2/20, 2008, silver gelatin print, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection, gift of Robert and Malena Puterbaugh 4. Margaret Ross Tolbert, Juniper Springs, 1993, oil on canvas, 72 x 48”, Polk Museum of Art Purchase Award: 1993 All-Florida Biennial 5. Ummarid “Tony” Eitharong, Attempt to Speak Clearly, 1987, graphite on paper, Polk Museum of Art Permanent Collection

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www.foosanerartmuseum.org

MAITLAND 11.18-01.22.12

Dialogue: Camilo Velasquez Maitland Art Center www.artandhistory.org

Camilo Velasquez is an outstanding visual

Thru 11.01

Maitland History Illustrated: Works by Dawn Schreiner Maitland Art Center www.artandhistory.org

artist whose work combines imagery, text and assemblage in a sophisticated network of juxtapositions. Both poetic and sublime, Velasquez’ art is a series of monologues and dialogues on life and death.

Dawn Schreiner’s images marry fact with whimsy in this ode to Maitland’s beginnings.

Author and artist, David Macaulay, has helped us to understand the workings and origins of everything from gadgets to gargantuan buildings. He has an extraordinary gift for conveying complex concepts in ways that are fun and engaging. The artist’s classic books, which bring together the worlds of art, history and science, include The Way Things Work, Cathedral, Castle, City, Mill, Pyramid, Ship and Building Big.

MELBOURNE Thru 10.02

Building Books: The Art of David Macaulay Foosaner Art Museum

10.30-01.08.2012

Treasures Revealed: Selections from the Permanent Collection Foosaner Art Museum www.foosanerartmuseum.org

Explore the Museum’s extensive and diverse Permanent Collection, which includes prints and drawings from the Ernst Oppler archive, Chase Art Deco objects from the Enrique and AnaMaria Conill Mendoza Collection of American Industrial Design, and works by

1. Camilo Velasquez, image courtesy of Art & History Museums, Maitland 2. Dawn Schreiner, image courtesy of Art & History Museums Maitland 3. David Macaulay, from Cathedral, ©1999 David Macaulay, courtesy of Norman Rockwell Museum 4. Ernst Oppler, Untitled (Dance of Bacchantes), ca. 1900, oil on canvas, 18 x 14-5/8”, gift of Susan Wood, Permanent Collection, Foosaner Art Museum, Florida Institute of Technology

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important 20th century women artists, including Alice Aycock, Miriam Schapiro and Louise Nevelson. Thru 12.17

Interwoven: Contemporary Textile Art by Alejandrina Cué, Andrea Donnelly and Jennifer Glass Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts at FIT

http://textiles.fit.edu

Interwoven showcases the work of 3 contemporary fabric artists, Alejandrina Cué, Andrea Donnelly and Jennifer Glass, whose visual imagery exploits the inherent quality of fabric materials to portray both the fragility and depth of the human psyche. MIAMI 10.05-10.28

How I Lost My Accent by Cecilia Moreno-Yaghoubi ArtCenter/ South Florida www.artcentersf.org

Cecilia Moreno-Yaghoubi presents How I Lost My Accent: Caged Identity, a popup exhibition about the Colombian artist’s repressed and unearthed

memories. Reconstructing and romanticizing the past with found objects and twodimensional works, Moreno-Yaghoubi creates tangible reflections of her life experiences for viewers.

poralities in his conceptual art practice. For his project at the Bass Museum of Art, Grasso selects and juxtaposes historical works from the Permanent Collection with his own series of paintings, sculptures, videos and neons to form unexpected connections that become reflections on the

10.29-02.12.12

Laurent Grasso Bass Museum of Art

past from a contemporary viewpoint.

www.bassmuseum.org

Laurent Grasso often explores shifting and multiple tem-

Thru 10.16

Sandra Gamarra:

1. Alejandrina Cué, Restauradora de Sueños, 2011, textile collage with oil paint 2. Cecilia Moreno-Yaghoubi, image courtesy of ArtCenter/South Florida 3. Laurent Grasso, 1610, 2011, neon tubes, transformer, edition of 5 & 2 A.P., 98-7/16 x 137-13/16”, courtesy of Sean Kelly Gallery, NY

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At the Same Time (al mismo tiempo) Bass Museum of Art

Miami Art Museum www.miamiartmuseum.org

www.bassmuseum.org

Peruvian artist, Sandra Gamarra, takes images from well-known contexts and makes them her own. Included in this exhibit are paintings based on photographs she has taken of visitors looking at works of art in the Museum’s galleries. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 96.)

Thru 10.30

Vanishing Points: Paint and Paintings from the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection Bass Museum of Art www.bassmuseum.org

Vanishing Points explores how we perceive painting today as it relates to the history and continued viability of the medium. 11.06-01.01.12

American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960s

10.14-01.08.12

Anchor Gallery: Enrique Martinez Celaya Miami Art Museum

Faith Ringgold is well known as the progenitor of the African American story quilt www.miamiartmuseum.org revival that began in Schneebett is a twothe late 1970s. Orga- room installation inspired by Beethoven’s convalescence and death in 1827. The title, Schneebett (Snow-bed), is from a poem by Holocaust survivor, Paul Celan— a meditation on death. Schneebett was crenized on the occasion ated for the Berliner of her 80th birthday, Philharmonie in 2004, the works presented accompanied by a in this exhibition program of Beethoven represent an unprecworks. This is its first edented artistic explo- appearance in the US. ration of the intersections of race, gender and class, made in direct response to the social upheavals of the 1960s.

1. Sandra Gamarra, At the Same Time 5, 2011, oil on canvas, 10-5/8 x 8-11/16”, courtesy of Galería Leme, São Paulo, Brazil 2. Jim Lambie, Zobop Colour, 1999, colored vinyl tape, variable dimensions, courtesy of the Debra and Dennis Scholl Collection, Miami, Florida, image courtesy of The Modern Institute, Glasgow, Scotland, installation view, Days like these: Tate Triennial, Tate Britain, London, 2003 3. Faith Ringgold, American People, Black Light: Faith Ringgold’s Paintings of the 1960’s 4. Enrique Martinez Celaya,
Schneebett (Snow-bed), 2003-4,
mixed media installation (detail),
dimensions variable,
Collection Miami Art Museum, promised gift of Dieter and Si Rosenkranz

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Thru 11.06

Thru 10.16

11.30-02.19.12

Focus Gallery: Joel Meyerowitz Miami Art Museum

Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other Miami Art Museum

Mark Handforth: Rolling Stop Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami

www.miamiartmuseum.org

www.mocanomi.org

www.miamiartmuseum.org

MAM presents a recent acquisition of 24 photographs by

the only photographer granted right of entry into Ground Zero after the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center in NYC. Armed with a worker’s badge and a large-format wooden camera, Meyerowitz spent 9 months photographing Ground Zero and the over 800 people a day that were working in it.

Rivane Neuenschwander’s practice merges painting, photography, film, sculpture, installation and participatory actions. The exhibition surveys Neuenschwander’s work of the past decade and includes 3 of her incredibly immersive, viscerally beautiful installations. (See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 94.)

Ongoing

Biscayne’s Underwater Secrets Miami Science Museum www.miasci.org

On exhibit are 23 photographs by National Park Ranger, Thomas Strom, who has photographed most of Biscayne National Park’s underwater nooks and crannies. In many cases, Strom’s pictures are the general public’s best view of the hidden beauty that makes up Biscayne National Park.  

Mark Handforth was the first Miami artist to receive a solo show at MOCA, North Miami in March 1996. He has since achieved major international recognition and has become an

important role model for Miami artists. (See story on pg. 104.) Thru 11.13

Modify, as Needed

1. Joel Meyerowitz, Searchers in Rubble, 2001, vintage contact print, 8 x 10”, Collection Miami Art Museum, gift of Steven E. and Phyllis Gross, ©Joel Meyerowitz, courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery 2. Rivane Neuenschwander, I Wish Your Wish (detail), 2003, silkscreen on fabric ribbons, dimensions variable, from Rivane Neuenschwander: A Day Like Any Other, courtesy New Museum, NY, photo: Benoit Pailley 3. Image by Thomas Strom 4. Mark Handforth,
Rolling Stop, 2008,
aluminum, vinyl and acrylic,
96 x 96”, courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise

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Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

The artists portrayed in this exhibition use playful tactics to confront, alter and make use of structures typical to various cultural industries. Employing a variety of practices, the artists rearrange, edit and present preexisting materials and

references to create textual, spatial and visual vocabularies.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Color on Color presents works by different artists in which the use of color is not used as a representation, but as the essence of the artwork. The exhibition includes pieces by Ilya Bolotowsky, Alexander Lieberman, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Karina Peisjovich and Joel Stein. 10.12-01.08.12

11.09-02.19.12

Color on Color The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

Magdalena Fernández: 2iPM009 The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Over the past decade,

Venezuelan-born artist, Magdalena Fernández, has developed a body of kinetic sculptures and videos. In her video installation, 2iPM009, Fernández brings Geometric Abstraction to a new level of expression, incorporating Modern Meals explores how technology and design remade the places where food was produced, sold, cooked and eaten, from the turn of the century into sound and movement the post-1945 period. of lines and colors. The more than 3 dozen items on display 10.12-01.08.12 include posters, prints Modern Meals: and advertisements Remaking as well as objects such American Foods as toasters, cookware from Farm to and tableware, all Kitchen of which invite visiThe Patricia tors to consider how & Phillip Frost commercialization Art Museum has shaped modern http://thefrost.fiu.edu American foodways.

1. Nina Beier, from The Demonstrators (detail), 2011, courtesy of the artist and STANDARD (Olso) 2. Karina Peisjovich, Color Making Machine (Eight-Movement Suite), 2010, light projection, installation view at Theories at Recoleta Cultural Center, courtesy of MACBA 3. Magdalena Fernández, 2iPM009, 2009, video installation with sound, 1 minute, 56 seconds on loop, dimensions variable, digital animation: Marcelo D’Orazio, sound effects, corporal percussion: courtesy Perpetuum Jazzile, installation view at Periférico Caracas, Caracas, 2011, photographer: Ángela Bonadies, courtesy of the artist and Faría+Fábregas Galería, Caracas 4. Poster, Corn. The Food of the Nation, 1918, designed by Lloyd Harrison (dates unknown), published by the US Food Administration, commercial color lithograph, The Wolfsonian–FIU, gift of Henry S. Hacker

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in Florida’s Private Collections The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

10.12-01.08.12

The Florida Artist Series: Humberto Calzada—The Fire Next Time The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum http://thefrost.fiu.edu

Cuban-American artist, Humberto Calzada, presents an exhibition of recent works on the idea of “fire”— the fire of war, the fire of light and the fire of passion and emotions—with its metaphorical properties that are both destructive and regenerative.

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

11.09-12.04

Tirzo Martha: Afro-Victimize The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum

In collaboration with the Consulate General of France and the France-Florida Foundation for the

11.25-03.26.12

Liberty, Equality and Fraternity: French Design for Living The Wolfsonian– Florida International University www.wolfsonian.org

http://thefrost.fiu.edu

The Frost Art Museum hosts a video installation by Tirzo Martha, who recently participated in the 1st international Triennial Arts, this exhibition of the Caribbean in the features paintings Dominican Republic. by French artists Christian Boltanski, 11.09-03.18.12 Sophie Calle, Annette Tour de France/ Messager and Bernar Florida: ConVenet—many of which temporary Arthave never before been ists from France presented to the public.

This exhibition examines the changing political, economic and cultural contexts in which French design is created and disseminated. Approximately 150 objects will be exhibited, including furniture, industrial design and craft, created by some of the most celebrated French designers of the past and present.

1. Humberto Calzada, Untitled, 2011, from the exhibition The Fire Next Time, acrylic on canvas, 47 x 47”, courtesy of the artist 2. Tirzo Martha, Afro victimize, 
video, 2009, site specific performed at
“Licht Aan Zee”, Kunsthall 52, Den Helder, The Netherlands 3. Christian Boltanski, Untitled (Reserve), 1989, clothes, black and white photographs and lights, 111 x 64 x 7”, ©Christian Boltanski / ADAGP, Paris, courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection 4. Martin Szekely, chaise lounge, Pi, 1984, Galerie Néotù, Paris (producer), steel, aluminum paint, leather, foam, Centre national des arts plastiques, France, © Martin Szekely/CNAP/photo: Jean Tholance/Les Arts décoratifs, Paris

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10.01-01.15.12

10.01-06.30.12

Edgar Degas: The Private Impressionist— Works on Paper by the Artist and His Circle Naples Museum of Art

Leaders in American Modernism Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

An exciting new selecThru 10.12 tion of works from the Inner Worlds www.thephil.org Museum’s American of Domestic This captivating exhi- Modernism Collection Violence bition of 90 rare works are on display—many Survivors II by French master, Naples Art Edgar Degas, includes Association at drawings, prints, phoThe von Liebig tographs, etchings, a Art Center sculpture and a letter, www.naplesart.org in addition to works The Naples Art on paper by artists in Association has partDegas’ circle, includare from the Ahmet nered with The ing Mary Cassatt, Paul Ertegun Collection, Shelter for Abused Cézanne and Henri de representing all of the Women and Children Toulouse-Lautrec. important movements to present an eyein American art during opening exhibit that the first half of the coincides with Nation20th century. Artists al Domestic Violence include Marsden HartAwareness Month ley, Oscar Bluemner, in October. (See Muse Arthur Dove, Jackson on pg. 6.) Pollock and more.

10.01-06.30.12

Modern Mexican Masters Naples Museum of Art www.thephil.org

This new installation reflects the colors, vibrancy, beauty and mystery of Mexico and includes works by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Miguel Covarrubias and José Clement Orozco. 10.01-06.30.12

Selections from The Patty & Jay Baker Naples Museum of Art Permanent Collection

1. Anonymous,
Longing for Wholeness,
watercolor,
17 x 20-3/4” 2. Edgar Degas, Before the Race, ca. 1895, color lithograph (collaboration with the printer Auguste Clot), image courtesy of Landau Traveling Exhibitions 3. Arthur B. Davies, Facades, oil on canvas, 23 x 28”, Collection of the Naples Museum of Art, Museum Purchase 4. Pedro Friedeberg, Cualquier Lado Por Arriba (Any Side Up), 1975, acrylic on board mounted on wood, 29 x 29”, Collection of the Naples Museum of Art, gift of Harry Pollak, ©Pedro Friedeberg

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Na p l e s c o n t i n u e d . . .

Naples Museum of Art

from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection Naples Museum of Art

www.thephil.org

Throughout the season, the Museum will feature rotating exhibitions of selections from the Permanent Collection, including new and recent acquisitions and art never

www.thephil.org

11.19-01.22.12

www.thephil.org

For more than 3 decades, iconoclastic sculptor, Steve Tobin, has transformed the wonders of nature into monumental sculptures in bronze, steel, glass and ceramics. This remarkable retrospective includes Tobin’s cast glass Doors, detonated Exploded Earth vessels, cast glass and bronze before displayed in the Torsos and signature museum. bronze Roots, along with his Steelroot 10.01-12.30 series. (See story on Steve Tobin’s pg. 42.) Natural History Naples Museum of Art

OCALA

10.01-06.30.12

The Mouse House: Works

Olga Hirshhorn’s The Mouse House is a treasure trove of intimate-sized artworks from some of the giants of 20th century art—Picasso, Calder, Giacometti, de Kooning, O’Keeffe, Dubuffet and many others. This delightful exhibition recreates the environment of Hirshhorn’s artpacked home in

Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen

Appleton Museum of Art www.appletonmuseum.org

From Kent State University Museum, this exhibition showcases an extensive collection of the screen legend’s performance clothes, which include stage Washington, known as and film costumes “The Mouse House.” spanning Hepburn’s

1. Alfred Eisenstaedt, Premiere at La Scala, Milan, gelatin silver print, 25-1/2 x 21,” Collection of the Naples Museum of Art, bequest of Herbert and Ruth 2. Steve Tobin, Steelroot series, Untitled, 2010, steel 3. Installation view of The Mouse House: Works from the Olga Hirshhorn Collection exhibition 4. Katharine Hepburn, publicity photograph

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Ocala continued...

6-decade career as well as apparel she wore for publicity purposes. (See story on pg. 86.)

ORLANDO 11.12-11.20

Festival of Trees Orlando Museum of Art

10.01-11.06 10.01-11.20

Tradition/ Innovation: American Masterpieces of Southern Crafts & Traditional Art Appleton Museum of Art

www.omart.org

The Festival of Trees, which is organized by the Council of 101, is the premier holiday event in Central Florida and is enjoyed www.appletonmuseum.org by more than 20,000 people each year when www.appletonmuseum.org the Orlando Museum Featuring the works of Art is transformed of 30 master craftsinto a “winter wonpeople and tradiderland” with beautitional artists from ful designer trees the South, Tradition/ and vignettes. Special A long-standing mem- Innovation examines events include an ber of Ocala’s arts the remarkable conOpening Night Gala, community, Jackie nections and differa family friendly Schindehette presences between tradients 35 of her finest tional art and conlandscape paintings temporary craft as that capture Florida’s well as the stories natural beauty in all and voices of living seasons of the year. master artisans. Painted Poetry: The Landscapes of Jackie Schindehette Appleton Museum of Art

Reindeer Romp and trendy Holiday Stroll. Thru 10.30

Tony Robbin: A Retrospective Orlando Museum of Art www.omart.org

Tony Robbin: A Retrospective includes

25 paintings, works on paper, a sculpture and video animations depicting fourdimensional objects and spatial configurations through layers of geometric forms animated by patterns of color. (See story in the August/September 2011 issue on pg. 74.)

1. Jackie Schindehette, Last Minutes of Splendor 2. Indian Chief Suit, image courtesy of the Appleton Museum of Art 3. Image courtesy of Orlando Museum of Art 4. Tony Robbin, 1980-13, 1980, acrylic on canvas, 56 x 70”, collection of the artist

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Orlando continued...

literal implications of sociopolitical culture.

ORMOND BEACH Thru 11.01

PENSACOLA

Image & Abstraction Ormond Memorial Art Museum & Gardens 10.14-01.01.12

Eight from Florida The Mennello Museum of American Art

Thru 11.06

Drawn to the Storybook Pensacola Museum of Art

www.ormondartmuseum.org

This exhibit presents the artistry of Adele

www.mennellomuseum.com

Eight from Florida features works by Florida in the Museum’s Collection or The City of Orlando’s Collection. Included are works by Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Jose Bedia, Margaret Tolbert, Sandy Winters, Dan Gunderson, Leslie Neuman and John Chamberlain.

of the Magpie; Color, Color, Where Are You, Color?; and the Kissimmee Pete, Ocean Commotion and Pirate Pink series.

Wayman and Neil Jussila. Patterns of nature—her seasons and cycles and our place in them—are the primary themes of Wayman’s work. Jussila’s abstract works are poetic, sensitive and nonobjective, reflecting his ability to transcend the

11.03-12.30

E. J. Manton: 3 Hots and a Cot

www.pensacola museumofart.org

Color and imagination collide in this exhibition of whimsical work by awardwinning children’s author and illustrator, Janeen Mason, whose writing and illustration credits include Gift Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org

Manton’s photography explores the daily lives of homeless individuals and families in moments of rest, reflection, joy and sorrow.

1. Dan Gunderson, Toys Are Us, mixed media 2. Adele Wayman, Daylillies, blue Hydrangea with Purple 3. Janeen Mason, Gift of the Magpie book cover 4. E. J. Manton, Off to Play

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Pe n s a c o l a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Kimonos, Clothing and Culture from Early 20th Century Japan Pensacola Museum of Art www.pensacola museumofart.org Thru 11.13

Joan Miró: Order and Chaos Pensacola Museum of Art

A wide sampling of kimonos explores the

www.pensacola museumofart.org

This survey of Miró’s original prints traces the art movements of much of the 20th century and highlights Miró’s importance to the graphic medium, revealing his influence on the development of modern art. Thru 11.11-02.12.12

Woven and Wrapped:

history, styles and symbolism of the traditional Japanese garment—still popular today. PONTE VEDRA BEACH

Asian Export Ceramics The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Asian export ceramAesthetic ics were created in Connections: areas that are now Works by Diane known as Thailand, Fraser, Jean Vietnam, China Banas and Pablo and Japan. CombinRivera ing indigenous The Cultural traditions and borCenter rowed designs, www.ccpvb.org these decorative and This exhibition show- practical objects cases the visual clarity document the crossand tranquility of cultural exchange Diane Fraser’s paintof material goods ings; vibrant, abstract and artistic motifs works by Jean Banas; that began centuries and sculptural creations by Pablo Rivera. Thru 10.18

SARASOTA Thru 10.30

Crosscurrents of Design:

1. Joan Miró (1893-1983), Spanish, Untitled, Miro Lithographs I, Volume IV, Blair-Murrah 2. Red Uchikake (bridal) kimono for a young bride, Blair-Murrah 3. Jean Banas, Carousel, acrylic on paper, 37 x 48” 4. Japanese, early Meiji (1868-1912) period, painting 1868-1870, Montgolfier Balloon with Enameled Decorations, porcelain

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ago—and still continue today. 10.11-10.16

Ringling International Arts Festival The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

seum—it’s the perfect venue to enjoy a stimulating international exhibition of arts and culture by established and emerging artists. (See On View Destination on pg. 110.) Thru 01.29.12

The Amazing American Circus Poster: The Strobridge Lithographing Company The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

The Ringling International Arts Festival is a six-day cultural celebration of modern music, dance, theater, and visuals arts held in, and around, the picturesque estate of The Ringling Mu-

The Amazing American Circus Poster showcases 80 brilliantly colored, boldly bombastic posters advertising the feature attractions and peerless performers of the Big Top, and provides a

reflecting ancient traditions with an occasional glimpse of a more modern spirit. 10.11-01.08.12

detailed portrait of the American circus in its Golden Age. (See story on pg. 124.)

Zimoun The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art www.ringling.org

Thru 10.30

The Art of Jade The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Utilizing simple and functional components such as motors, wires, cardboard boxes, cotton balls and ventilators, Swiss artist, Zimoun, builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound through mechanized kinetic sculptures. (See story on pg. 120.)

www.ringling.org

Featured in this exhibit are objects created chiefly during the late Qing dynasty,

1. Image courtesy of the Ringling Museum of Art 2. The Barnum & Bailey Greatest Show on Earth, Stobridge Lithographing Company, courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 3. Image courtesy of The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art 4. 49 prepared vibration motors/Untitled Sound Objects, Pe Lang + Zimoun 2008

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European, while those of the photographer PETERSBURG Walker Evans and Thru 11.13 artist William Gropper Four Portfolios are American. Doisof the Twentieth- neau’s photographs reCentury: veal his love for Paris Archipenko, and Gropper’s color Gropper, Evans, lithographs examine and Doisneau the Watergate crisis, Museum of which drove Richard Fine Arts, Nixon from power. ST.

St. Petersburg Thru 12.04

www.fine-arts.org

This exhibition of 53 works brings together two lithographic and two photographic portfolios by four important artists. The portfolios by Alexander Archipenko and Robert Doisneau are

Story and Symbol: Dutch and Flemish Paintings from the Collection of Dr. Gordon and Adele Gilbert Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

The more than 30 paintings in this exhibition are striking, but they are also rich in

the history of 16th and 17th century northern Europe. The works encompass biblical stories, mythological subjects, stunning portraits, scenes from everyday life, seascapes and landscapes, and still lifes. Thru 11.27

The New York School: Selections from The Gollay Collection Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg www.fine-arts.org

Approximately 35 paintings, sculptures

and works on paper from the collection of Benjamin Gollay are on display. Works by Robert Motherwell, Willem de Kooning, Norman Bluhm, Robert de Niro Sr. (the Oscar-winning actor’s father), Michael Goldberg and Milton Resnick are

among the artists represented. TAMPA 11.17-01.08.12

Bud Lee’s America Florida Museum of Photographic Arts

1. William Gropper, To the Gallery, from the Watergate Series, 1973, color lithograph on paper, gift of Walter B. and Terri B. Finley in memory of Murray and Marilyn Blaivas 2. Michiel Jansz. van Mierevelt, Double Portrait of a Husband and Wife with Tulip, Bulb, and Shells, 1609,
oil on panel,
collection of Dr. Gordon and Adele Gilbert 3. Michael Goldberg, The New Dump, 1964,
mixed media with collage on canvas,
on loan by Jean Gollay from the Benjamin Gollay Collection

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Duane Michals Florida Museum of Photographic Arts www.fmopa.org

Self-taught photographer, Duane Michals, merges writing and photography into highly distinct and www.fmopa.org innovative photoIncluded in this survey sequences which of works is a selection of images by photojournalist, Bud Lee, spanning a career that began in 1965. Lee’s raw images of celebrities, war, landscapes explore thought and and Americana have emotion. appeared in Life, Esquire, Harper’s Ba10.08-01.08.12 zaar, Town & CounNo Limits: try, Rolling Stone, Janet Biggs the New York Times, Tampa Vogue and numerous Museum of Art other publications. www.tampamuseum.org For more than a deThru 11.06 cade, New York-based Life and Death by video artist, Janet

www.tampamuseum.org

Realism provides a compelling view of the realist tendencies in the visual arts of the last 30 years. The exhibition juxtaposes stellar examples of the PhotoRealist movement in painting with a selection of sculptural in-

Biggs, has explored the relationships between athleticism and human ambition, individualism and community, and free will and control. Her work has focused on sports and natural environments ranging from a claustrophobic pool with synchronized swimmers to the vast expanse of the High Arctic. (See story on pg. 102.)

stallations by leading contemporary artists.

Thru 12.31

Realism: Selections from the Martin Z. Margulies Collection Tampa Museum of Art

Thru 10.16

The Hillsborough River: From the Green Swamp to the Bay

1. Bud Lee, Clint Eastwood 2. Duane Michals, A Story About a Story, 1995, ©Duane Michals, courtesy of Pace/MaGill Gallery, NY 3. Janet Biggs, Fade to White, 2010, still images from the single channel video, courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art, Washington, DC 4. Tony Oursler, Coo, 2003, fiberglass sculpture, Sony VPL CS5 projector, DVD, DVD player, courtesy of Martin Z. Margulies

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Ta m p a c o n t i n u e d . . .

Tampa Museum of Art

Contemporary Art Museum

www.tampamuseum.org

www.ira.usf.edu

Presented by the City of Tampa and hosted by the Tampa Museum of Art, this portfolio of exquisite cultural and natural landscapes was created for The Big Picture Project during Karen Glaser’s tenure as the City of Tampa’s

Thru 11.20

Worlds Apart: Myth & History, Gods & Mortals, Heroes & Hybrids Tampa Museum of Art

The Talent Show explores the competing desires of notoriety and privacy, and the evolving relation-

8th Photographer Laureate. Karen chose the Hillsborough River as her subject, and the story of this specific river speaks volumes about Tampa, one of Florida’s most vibrant cities. (See story in the August/September 2011 issue on pg. 84.)

Thru 12.10

The Talent Show University of South Florida

TARPON SPRINGS 10.02-12.04

Remembering Frank Rampolla Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art www.spcollege.edu/museum

www.tampamuseum.org

Drawn primarily from the museum’s renowned antiquities collection, Worlds Apart examines the many intersecting spheres of the world of classical antiquity, in particular, those of myth and history, gods and mortals, heroes and hybrids.

Lorca diCorcia, Andy Warhol and others.

ship between artists and audiences in our culture of reality television and Webbased social media. The exhibition features international artists Chris Burden, Sophie Calle, Peter Campus, Graciela Carnevale, Philip-

At the time of his untimely death in 1971 at the age of 40, Rampolla was recognized as one of the most important artists working in Florida. His figurative expressionist style was a

1. Karen Glaser, Near the Source 2. Image courtesy of Tampa Museum of Art 3. David Lamelas, Limit of a Projection I, 1967, theater spotlight in darkened room, dimensions variable, Collection Walker Art Center, T.B. Walker Acquisition Fund, 2009 4. Frank Rampolla, Self-Portrait, 1966, oil on Masonite, 48 x 36”, on loan from the collection of Ron Rampolla

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Ta r p o n S p r i n gs c o n t i n u e d . . .

response to the social and political events of the turbulent 1960s, while his large, emotionally charged paintings were inspired by the Renaissance masters he studied and admired. VERO BEACH

press beauty, fragility, memory and our connection to the earth. (See story on pg. 106.)

Clyde Butcher, Jennifer Steinkamp and Charles Burchfield, among others.

Scott Young, Ray Ellis, Dean Mitchell, William Matthews and Alan Shuptrine.

Thru 01.08.12

10.01-01.15.12

Thru 12.31.11

Inspired by Nature: Celebrating the Beauty and Complexity of Trees Vero Beach Museum of Art In the Tradition www.verobeachmuseum.org of Wyeth: Regardless of changes Contemporary in medium and style Watercolor during the 20th and Masters 21st centuries, artVero Beach ists have continued Museum of Art

Sculpture from the Permanent Collection Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

Explore an engaging and focused look at a variety of sculptural styles, including welded sculpture by David Hayes, John 10.15-12.31 Henry and Lyman Against the to find inspiration in www.verobeachmuseum.org Kipp; kinetic sculpture Grain: Wood trees. Enjoy the beauty Focusing on waterSculpture by and complexity of color paintings that Robert F. Lyon arboreal forms in the unify realism with Vero Beach work of James Balog, emotional expression, Museum of Art this exhibition features www.verobeachmuseum.org five Andrew Wyeth Robert Lyon creates paintings alongside innovative sculpture in the influenced work of turned wood, utilizing contemporary master form and color to exwatercolorists Stephen 1. Robert F. Lyon, Double Taille, 2009, poplar, pencils and graphite, 11-3/4 x 24 x 7”, collection of the artist 2. Clyde Butcher, Loxahatchee River #1, 1991, gelatin silver print, 34 x 54”, gift of the artist 3. Andrew Wyeth,The Wales Farm, 1967, watercolor on paper, 22 x 29-1/2”, Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Athena Society 4. Lyman Kipp, E, 1979, painted aluminum, 84 x 30 x 48”, gift of Janet and Clark Daugherty

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Ve r o B e a c h c o n t i n u e d . . .

by Jerome Kirk; and bronze work by Hanneke Beaumont and Thomas Ostenberg. WEST PALM BEACH

including cars, trucks, planes and found objects, help to create his style of work—smart, amusing and at times, erotic. (See story on pg. 108.)

fluenced by the past, present and future, Bottero’s paintings reflect a symphony of sensations and dreamlike encounters.

of the 20th and 21st centuries, ranging from such seminal figures as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston to a younger generation of photo-based artists.

Thru 10.16 10.01-10.27

11.30-03.04.12

“The Love of the Poet” paintings by Daniel Bottero Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

Jenny Saville Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

www.ansg.org

The Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens is hosting an exhibition of poetic abstract paintings by New York-based artist, Daniel Bottero. In-

11.09-11.27

“Movement” by Rene von Richthofen Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens www.ansg.org

From A to Z: 26 Great Photographs from the Norton Collection Norton Museum of Art

This selective exhibition of canvases and drawings, dating from 1999-2011, brings Saville’s mature work together for the first time. Included are such

www.norton.org

Von Richthofen’s love of all things automobile combined with all things miniature,

From A to Z acknowledges the work of some of the most notable photographers

1. Rene von Richthofen, Global Warming, 2007 2. Daniel Bottero, Following You, 56 x 66”, mixed media on canvas, 2006 3. Graciela Iturbide, Nuestra Senora de las Iguanas, Juchitan, 1979, gelatin silver photograph, 24 x 20”, Museum Purchase acquired through the generosity of the Photography Committee of the Norton Museum of Art, courtesy of the artist and Rose Gallery 4. Jenny Saville, Atonement Studies: Central Panel, 2005-2006,
oil on watercolor paper,
99 x 72-3/4”,
Private Collection

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recognizable works as Fulcrum (1999) and Reverse (2002-3) as well as key works from her recent series Reproduction. 10.22-02.19.12

Objects in various media, including painting, jade, ceramic, glass and metalwork, are featured in this exhibition— all created for the greatest art collector in 18th century China, the Qianlong Emperor.

paintings by Grandma Moses and Jennie Augusta Brownscombe; prints by Georgia O’Keeffe, Carrie Mae Weems and Nancy Graves; and sculpture by

www.rollins.edu/cfam

Janet Macoska has captured some of rock and roll’s most legendary performers through the lens of her camera. Her images have appeared in Creem, Rolling Stone, People, Entertainment Weekly, the New York Times and the London Times.(See story in the June/July 2011 issue on pg. 84.)

WINTER PARK 10.22-01.15.12

The Emperor’s Orders: Designs from the Qianlong Imperial Workshop (1736-1796)
 Norton Museum of Art www.norton.org

A Room of One’s Own: Women Artists from the Permanent Collection Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

It’s Always Rock and Roll: The Work of Photojournalist Janet Macoska Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

Anna H. Huntington and Audrey Flack. Thru 10.09

www.rollins.edu/cfam

This show provides an overview of the important art historical contributions women have made, featuring

Thru 10.09

Douglas Witmer: I Found a Reason Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

1. Portrait of the Imperial Guard Uksiltu/Keshiki Batu Luwuke Shier, the 29th of 100 portraits of Meritorious Officers participating in the East-Turkestan campaign (1755-1759),
ink on silk, Qianglong seal, dated 1760 with honorific calligraphy in Manchu and Chinese by Liu Tong xun (1700-1773), 60 x 38”,
Private Collection 2. Lavinia Fontana, The Dead Christ with Symbols of the Passion, 1581,
oil on panel,
gift of General and Mrs. John J. Carty in memory of Thomas Russell 3. Janet Macoska, Tina Turner, 1985,
courtesy of the photographer

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W i n t e r Pa r k c o n t i n u e d . . .

www.rollins.edu/cfam

This display of works marks the Florida debut of two series of intimate abstract works by Philadelphia artist, Douglas Witmer. Beginning with found materials, both bodies of work go in unique directions that differ suprisingly from the artist’s usual

E. Brady Robinson uses the camera to examine her environment and record fleeting moments of existence. (See story in the August/ September 2011 issue on pg. 120.)

a body of images that represents 21st century non-traditional families at life-size, employing the techniques of embossing and watercolor. Thru 10.09

10.22-01.08.12

The Very Queer Portraits of Heyd Fontenot Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

10.22-01.15.12

reductive geometric paintings.

Kim Russo: Family Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

www.rollins.edu/cfam

E. Brady Robinson: Transfer Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

The Velvet Years: 19651967, Warhol’s Factory
Photographs by Stephen Shore Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College

www.rollins.edu/cfam

www.rollins.edu/cfam

www.rollins.edu/cfam

This exhibit includes

Thru 10.09

The Velvet Years presents an intriguing collection of photographs which capture a time when Andy Warhol was emerging as a prominent visual artist and avant-garde filmmaker.

Showcased in this presentation are two of Fontenot’s main avenues of investigation— the genre of portraiture and the nude figure. In

1. Douglas Witmer, installation view, AxD Gallery, Philadelphia, PA 2. E. Brady Robinson, Above Virginia, 2011, inkjet print 3. Kim Russo, Family (Kitchen), 2011, watercolor and graphite, 23” x 28-1/2” 4. Andy Warhol and Lou Reed, lead singer, guitarist and songwriter of the Velvet Underground;
photograph by Stephen Shore,
courtesy of the photographer 5. Heyd Fontenot, Ten Portraits/Ten Books, 2008-2010,
 mixed media installation, dimensions vary

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his quirky likenesses, Fontenot emphasizes the expressive features of his subjects—absurdly large heads, visual puns with erotic innuendoes and the occasional goat, accentuate Fontenot’s highly intentional sense of playfulness in his work. Thru 01.08.12

Darker Shades of Red: Soviet Propaganda from the Cold War The Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens www.polasek.org

Darker Shades of Red provides a rare opportunity to revisit the Cold War period through the exploration of the Soviet Union’s official im-

agery. The collection reveals the economic, social and political ideology of the Soviet Union, from the mid-1940s to 1990, through striking poster graphics and Soviet ephemera. Thru 01.15.12

A Church Record: Photographs from the Tiffany Studios Ecclesiastical Department The Charles Hosmer Morse

Museum of American Art

Museum of American Art

www.morsemuseum.org

www.morsemuseum.org

This exhibition features more than 30 archival photographs which provide a glimpse into the creative range of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s ecclesiastical com-

Roseville Pottery Company (1890– 1954) of Ohio was one of the country’s most prolific and longlived art potteries. In this exhibit, the Morse presents about three dozen new acquisitions of Roseville ceramic objects, which represent the rich colors and beloved patterns that made the pottery so popular in its era and contribute to its collectability today. On View

missions at the height of religious construction in America. 10.18.11-10.07.12

Roseville Pottery from the Morse Collection The Charles Hosmer Morse

1. A. Dobrov, The Borders of the Soviet Union are Sacred and Inviolate, 1969 2. Louis Comfort Tiffany, Chapel Electrolier, ca. 1900, duplicate image from a mounted photograph 3. Vase, 1938, Bleeding Heart, Roseville Pottery Company, 1890–1954, Ohio, gift of Noel and Toby Siegel

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NAPLES

Gallery: Gardner Colby Gallery www.gardnercolby gallery.com

gallery G a l l e r y

A r t i s t s

Artist: LINDA RUTH DICKINSON “MY WORK

acknowledges greater mysteries and wonders to be experienced, and suggests an inner tranquility that observes and embraces the declaration and dialogue between Heaven and Earth.”

BOCA RATON

Gallery: Rosenbaum Contemporary www.rosenbaumcontemporary.com

Artist: Tom McKinley

TOM’S METICULOUS PHOTOREALIST PAINTINGS PRESENT

alluring and richly mysterious depictions of classic mid-century and contemporary domestic architecture. From left: Linda Ruth Dickinson, Certainty, oil, 24 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Gardner Colby Gallery; Tom McKinley, Papyrus Court, 2010, oil on panel, 30 x 49”, courtesy of the artist and Rosenbaum Contemporary

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BOCA RATON

Gallery: Elaine Baker Gallery www.elainebakergallery.com

Artist: Dan Christensen

WITH A UNIQUE MASTERY OF

the language of abstract painting, Dan Christensen (1942-2007) used his ability to produce a diverse and distinctive S A R A S O T A body of work. His paintings are a part Gallery: of major national and international museum collections such as the Hodgell Gallery Chicago Art Institute and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. www.hodgellgallery.com Artist: DANNY PERKINS

TAMPA

Gallery: Baisden Gallery

DANNY’S ELEGANT

towering glass vessels involve a unique technique that employs blowing glass into a wooden mold, cutting the glass, reassembling the pieces and then sandblasting the final vessel to a matte finish before airbrushing color onto the surface. The result is both luminous and electric.

www.baisdengallery.com

Artists: Philip Baldwin & Monica Guggisberg

WORKING TOGETHER AS A

team for over 28 years, Philip and Monica have been using glass as an expression of art, combining their feelings about color, form, texture, pattern and material.

Clockwise from top left: Dan Christensen, Untitled, 1984, courtesy of the artist and Elaine Baker Gallery; Danny Perkins, Spirited, courtesy of the artist and Hodgell Gallery; Philip Baldwin & Monica Guggisberg, Curly Que, 2006, 120 x 80 cm, courtesy of the artists and Baisden Gallery

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CORAL GABLES

Gallery: Virginia Miller Galleries www.virginiamiller.com

Artist: PAUL JENKINS PAUL HAS MAINTAINED

a deep commitment to watercolor from his earliest beginnings. His process of controlled paint-pouring and canvas manipulation, and the gem-like veils of transparent and translucent color have characterized his work since the late 1950s.

JACKSONVILLE

Gallery: Jen Jones Art Consulting http://jenjonesart.com

Artist: Jack Allen

JACK’S VIBRANT COLORS AND BOLD COMPOSITIONS BURST

from the canvas. Intriguing, dynamic and complex, his paintings combine deliberate, gestural applications of striking colors and sculptural depth that either stimulate or appease the viewer’s eye. “My abstract paintings visually embody how I see the world today and how I want to see the world forever—vast in size, vibrant in color and ambiguous in interpretation.” For Jack, painting abstract art is an equilibrium point of contemplation and energy. He says that abstractions provide him an opportunity to interpret the world through his eyes and then to marry those visions with canvas and color. From left: Paul Jenkins, Phenomena Joanne Penseer, 1977, August 29, St. Croix, watercolor on paper, 41-1/2 x 30”, courtesy of the artist and Virginia Miller Galleries; Jack Allen, In Motion I, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 24”, courtesy of the artist and Jen Jones Art Consulting

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NAPLES

FT. LAUDERDALE

Gallery: Alan Brown Gallery

Gallery: Artists’ Haven Fine Art Gallery

www.alanbrowngallery.com

www.artistshaven gallery.com

Artist: James Rosenquist

LEGENDARY POP ARTIST,

James Rosenquist, has adapted the visual language of advertising and pop culture to the context of fine art since the ’60s. His work, which includes a vast array of prints, drawings and collages, continues to develop in exciting ways and is an ongoing influence on younger generations of artists. PALM BEACH

Gallery: Gallery Biba www.gallerybiba.com

Artist: MICHELLE BOYD TRINIDADIAN ARTIST,

Michelle Boyd, has been entranced by nature’s beauty from as early as she can recall. The bountiful flora, breathtaking landscapes and exotic rhythms of the Caribbean inspire her drawings and paintings.

Artist: Peter Anton

CANDY HAS BEEN THE

sweet obsession of artist, Peter Anton—and the subject of this series of irresistible works. His sculptures are crafted with painstaking detail from a variety of materials, including wood, wire, plaster and clay, then painted in multiple layers to achieve the perfect visual and tactile effect.

Clockwise from top: James Rosenquist, Circles of Confusion and Lite Bulb; offset color lithograph, 1966, signed, 19”h x 19”w x 22”d, courtesy of the artist and Alan Brown Gallery; Michelle Boyd, Peeping Through, acrylic on canvas, 25 x 36”, courtesy of the artist and Artists’ Haven Fine Art Gallery; Peter Anton, Heaven Assortment, 2010, mixed media, 48 x 48 x 5”, courtesy of the artist and Gallery Biba

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STEVE TOBIN’S N On view

10.01-12.30

Steelroot series, Untitled, 2008, Steel

at the P a t t y a n d J a y B a k

Natural HISTORY

ker NAPLES MUSEUM OF ART

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Steven Tobin’s

Natural History

FOR MORE THAN THREE DECADES,

Pennsylvania-based sculptor, Steve Tobin, has been transforming natural wonders into monu-

mental sculptures in bronze, steel, glass and ceramics. His mesmerizing works challenge us

to reconsider what we know about art and nature.

The retrospective Steve Tobin’s Natural History, hosted by the Naples

Museum of Art, celebrates the career of this nature-centric artist through a

diverse range of works reflecting Tobin’s prolific vision and unique ability to translate forces of nature into form. Highlights from the exhibition include a selection of works ranging from Tobin’s cast glass Doors and detonated Exploded Earth vessels, to cast glass and bronze Torsos and signature bronze Roots, to the massive and soaring formations of his Steelroot series— each piece is a timeless, visual documentation of the interplay between art and nature. Born in 1957, in Philadelphia, PA, Steve Tobin received a B.S. in theoretical mathematics from Tulane University. Tobin first began his artistic career in ceramics, making

pots, and later began working in glass. He was the first foreign artist invited to build a studio in Murano, Italy, the birthplace of glassblowing. His series Torsos, which innovatively combined cast glass and bronze, led him to create monumental bronze sculptures. Tobin gained international acclaim in 2004 with the installation of his transcendent Trinity Root near Ground Zero in lower Manhattan, the first and only art memorial near the 9/11 site. The sculpture is a massive bronze casting of the stump and roots of the historic syca-

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Steven Tobin’s

Natural History

Right: Exploded Earth series, Untitled, 2007, ceramic and glass Opposite: Trinity Root, 2005, cast bronze

“I try to make icons from nature so that people see themselves and the earth differently.” —S teve T obin

Above: Door series, Untitled, 1993, cast glass

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more tree that saved St. Paul’s Chapel during the attack on the World Trade Center and is permanently situated on the corner of Wall Street and Broadway, where millions of visitors see it each year. “The function for me of roots is to show the power of the unseen,” Tobin told the New York Times. “And on 9/11, we found out about the power of all our unseen connections, the things that nurture us that are hidden below the surface.”

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To create his bronze sculptures of tree roots, Tobin excavates dead roots as large as 30 feet in diameter and then casts them in bronze. It can take up to 200 castings to make a single piece. The natural structures, from the trunks down to the tiniest roots, are cast individually and then welded together. Trinity Root required one year and over 20,000 man hours to complete. One of the great, protean

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Steven Tobin’s

Natural History

Left: Earth Bronze (detail), 2001, cast bronze Opposite: Syntax, 2008, cast bronze letters

sculptors of his generation, Tobin has worked in mediums ranging from blown and cast glass and clay to bronze and steel. He has also transformed found materials such as medical glass tubing, animal bones, fireworks tubes and military tank windows—creating “new life” from manufactured scraps and detritus of the environment. His work has ranged in scale from tiny, exquisite porcelain pieces to soaring monumental outdoor projects—and he has continued to experiment with new techniques to expand the limits of each material utilized. The works are remarkable not just for their beauty, but how they transform the way people look at nature. Visitors are invited to touch the sculptures, lie down beneath the

massive art forms and appreciate their unique framing of the sky and clouds above as well as the surrounding landscape and the changing effects of light and shadow. Tobin’s work is represented in many private and public collections, including the Museum of Arts and Design in NY, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Switzerland. His work has also been shown at the American Museum of Natural History in NY, the Page Museum/La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Carpe Diem Gallery in Paris and Retretti Art Center in Finland. Steve Tobin lives and works in Coopersburg, PA. On View

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Above: Shoe Wall, 1995, cast bronze

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FLORIDA AND I Through the Lens o

On view through DECEMBER 11th at the MUS

w w w. m o Bashful Black Beauty, 2008; Species: Black Swan; Location: St. Augustine, FL

ITS

WILDLIFE:

f Harry Moulis, MD EUM OF ARTS

&

SCIENCES, Daytona Beach

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Florida and Its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD

T

THE MUSEUM OF ARTS &

Sciences in Daytona Beach is hosting an exhibition of Florida wildlife photography by national award-winning photographer and noted local gastroenterologist, Dr. Harry Moulis. Florida and Its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD, features striking scenes of animals, sea creatures and birds in their natural

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Above: Mid-Blink, 2007; Species: Sea Eagle; Location: Merritt Island, FL Opposite: Meadow Guard, 2011; Species: Burrowing Owl; Location: Cape Coral, FL

Florida and Its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD

habitats. Forty images from the doctor’s vast array of vibrant photos are on display. “Dr. Moulis’ photography is a must-see for Floridians and anyone who enjoys wildlife and the idea of capturing that ‘perfect’ moment,” said Deborah B. Allen, MOAS’ Interim Executive Director. Cynthia Duval, MOAS’ chief curator, said she began entertaining the idea of a museum show after visiting the doctor’s Port Orange office and seeing his artwork there. She was immediately struck by the uniqueness of what he had captured. “We are all bewitched by birds, but he has a sensitivity that makes you feel he captures the bird’s personality,” said Duval.

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Above: It’s Not a Toupee, 2010; Species: Crested Cara Cara; Location: Cocoa, FL Opposite: Regal Pose, 2008; Species: Seriema; Location: Jacksonville Zoo, FL

Above: Columbine and Friend, 2008, Species: Rufous Hummingbird; Location: Steamboat Springs, CO Opposite: Fed Up, 2008; Species: Rufous Hummingbird; Location: Steamboat Springs, CO

Florida and Its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD

Dr. Moulis’ interest in photography began during his high school years abroad in Iran, where he learned key basic principles such as lighting, lines, angles, shadows, juxtaposition and composition. As a gastroenterologist, he photographs internal anatomy and pathology regularly, but his passion is outdoor photography, capturing natural habitats and wildlife. Most of his photos are actually taken from a kayak or canoe—or possibly while hiking or boating. Dr. Moulis’ work has been displayed at the Ormond Beach Art Museum and Gardens and at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. New Smyrna

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“A sensible man travels light on the road of life. Curiosity is his map, wonder his fuel, and a good story—with an accompanying photograph— his favorite souvenir.” —H a r r y M o u l i s , MD

Right: Morning ‘Do, 2011; Species: Yellow-Crowned Night Heron; Location: Ormond Beach, FL Opposite: Make-up, Check, ‘Do, Done, 2008; Species: African Crane; Location: St. Augustine Alligator Farm, FL

Florida and Its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD

Beach and St. Augustine galleries also show his images. Most exciting is his inclusion in Audubon’s Florida Naturalist magazine—his breathtaking Yellow Crowned Night Heron (pictured left), was selected from among 8,000 entries to be included in the 2012 Audubon Magazine Photography Awards Calendar, the first national recognition for the doctor, who took up nature photography as “a little hobby” and a release from the stresses of his medical practice. Dr. Moulis was floating down the Tomoka River in a kayak in June 2010 when he snapped “the winning shot”— the climax of a long period of getting to know this particular family of yellow-crowned

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Florida and Its Wildlife: Through the Lens of Harry Moulis, MD

night herons nesting near his home. According to the doctor, his willingness to wait hours just drifting in front of a nest of his favorite birds is what earned the shot. “They were used to me,” he said. “I know the parents very well.” Although Dr. Moulis has spent enough time observing birds that he can anticipate their moves, he says he’s no “bird nerd.” Photographing any wildlife is a thrill for him. “I love all wildlife,” said Moulis. “If I could find alligators, otters and panthers, I’d photograph them.” To view more of Dr. Moulis’ work, please visit his website at www.photosbythedoc.com. O n V iew

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Above: Supervising Construction, 2006; Species: Yellow-Crowned Night Herons; Location: Ormond Beach, FL Opposite: Family Portrait, 2009; Species: Great Egret; Location: Ormond Beach, FL

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E U G E N E SAVA G E: The SEMINOLE Paintings

10.07.11-01.08.12 at the CUMMER MUSEUM of ART & GARDENS, Jacksonville • www.cummer.org Above: Portrait of Eugene F. Savage at age 32 (detail), ca. 1915, photograph, courtesy of Eugene and Virginia Crawford; Left: Everglades, Largo, 1954, oil on canvas on Masonite board with stretcher, 30-1/4 x 21-1/2”. *All paintings were purchased with funds from the Mae W. Schultz Charitable Lead Trust and all photography is courtesy of Daniel Portnoy Photography.

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ES

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Eugene Savage:

The Seminole Paintings

IN 2007, THE CUMMER MUSEUM

of Art & Gardens purchased 113 paintings, drawings and watercolors inspired by Eugene Savage’s trips to the Everglades. As part of the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebration, The Cummer is presenting a selection of these works, on display to the public for the first time since the 1960s.

This article consists of excerpts from “Eugene Savage: The Seminole Paintings”, by Elizabeth B. Heuer, published by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens, in association with D Giles Limited, London. Right: Orchid Trail, 1935, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 13 x 13”

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In January of 1935, American painter, Eugene Francis Savage (1883–1978), embarked on a journey into the deep recesses of the Everglades in search of the Florida Seminoles. Accompanied by two Indian guides, Savage was led through the mosquito-infested swamps and dense tropical hammocks to an interior Seminole camp. Here, amidst the quiet solitude of the cypress swamps strewn with thick swags of Spanish moss, he caught glimpses of Seminole life. Recounting his three-week expedition, Savage noted, “The entire experience was very strange to me…the life there, and the Indians themselves.” Following this initial journey, he

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Eugene Savage:

The Seminole Paintings

Right: Lakes Without Water, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum and wood, 30 x 30” Below: Burnt Pavilion, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum and wood, 30 x 30” Following pages: Cypress Trail, 1945, oil on canvas on Masonite board, 13 x 21”

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returned regularly to south Florida for nearly two decades. Inspired by his encounters and observations, Savage produced a series of more than three dozen paintings and countless studies. Impressed by the austerity of the Seminoles’ social behavior and the beautiful simplicity of their everyday life, he combined bold colors with shifting perspectives and rhythmic lines and patterns to create stylized scenes of Seminoles gliding through lush tropical swamps in dugout canoes. Eugene Savage was born in Indiana in 1883. He attended the Corcoran School of Art, the Chicago Art Institute and later, the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. In October of 1908, Savage married a young physician named Mathilda Freitag from Arrowsmith, Illinois. Mathilda’s medical practice supported the young couple and permitted Eugene to attend art class full-time. In 1912, Savage entered and won the competition for the Prix de Rome, a three-year fellowship in painting at the American Academy in Rome. While in Italy, he studied works by the masters of the early Renaissance, such as Giotto, Piero della Francesca and Masaccio. Savage was particularly drawn to the linear strength of these early Renaissance artists who would continued on pg. 70

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Eugene Savage:

The Seminole Paintings

Above: Orchid Pavilion, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum and wood, 30 x 30” Opposite: Biscayne Holiday, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum and wood, 36 x 36”

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have a deep effect upon his early manner of painting. Following his graduation from the American Academy in 1915, Savage returned to the US. He taught painting at Cooper Union in NY and later, at the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh and the College of the City of New York. In 1924, Savage was elected to the National Academy of Design. That same year, he joined the art faculty at Yale University and would be named Dean of Fine Arts in 1931. He was subsequently appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to serve on the Commission of Fine Arts, a position he held until 1941. In 1935, Savage and his wife traveled to Florida for a winter vacation. Their arrival in Florida coincided with growing concern over the plight of the Seminoles as well as the introduction of new legislation to designate the Everglades as a National Park. South Florida’s rapid development threatened to destroy the complex ecosystem of the Everglades and in turn, disrupt the Seminole way of life. Struggling for survival, the Seminoles were forced to find new forms of financial support. As a result, they turned to the growing tourist market for economic opportunity and the money-making possibilities of commercial Indian villages.

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Eugene Savage:

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Opposite: South Moon Under, 1935, oil on canvas adhered to aluminum and wood, 20 x 20� Below: Scherzo, 1953, oil on canvas on Masonite board with stretcher, 21 x 29-1/2�

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Dismayed by the spectacle of these commercial villages, Savage hired two Indian guides to lead him into the Everglades so that he could observe Seminoles in a natural setting. Not permitted to live in the Seminole camp, the artist generally observed Seminole life from a distance and occasionally hired Indians to model for him. Savage did not paint directly from nature, but rather from sketches and watercolor studies as well as photographs and tourist postcards. Returning to his studio in New York, he spent a year developing a series of works that feature a carefully constructed perspective of the Seminoles. Capturing the natural rhythms of the Everglades, these works not only present a vision of Seminole life, they seek to awaken the imagination and inspire the spirit. O n V iew

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October/November 2011

50

DOUGLAS KIRKLAND YEARS of

PHOTOGRAPHY

10.21.11-02.19.12 at the SOUTHEAST MUSEUM of PHOTOGRAPHY, Daytona Beach w w w. s m p o n l i n e . o r g OnV

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D DOUGLAS KIRKLAND IS RENOWNED

for his work in photojournalism, celebrity portraiture and film photography. His retrospective exhibition at the Southeast Museum

of Photography in Daytona Beach is a compelling look into a career in photography

spanning over five decades. With just under

200 images, this exhibition features portraits

Douglas Kirkland:

50 Years of Photography

Previous spread: Marilyn Monroe, Hollywood, 1961 Opposite: Elizabeth Taylor, Las Vegas, 1961 Below: Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, Paris, 1964 All images ©Douglas Kirkland, courtesy of the artist

of celebrities such as Elizabeth Taylor, Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland, ‘Coco’ Chanel,

Michael Jackson and other icons, alongside iconic stills taken on the sets of acclaimed

films such as The Sound of Music (1965), Out of Africa (1985), Titanic (1997), Moulin Rouge (2001) and Australia (2008). OnV

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The Mind’s Eye

Douglas Kirkland:

50 Years of Photography

Joel Grey, Los Angeles, 1987

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Kirkland was born in 1934 in Toronto, Canada, and became intensely interested in photography at the age of 14, when he lived in a small town called Fort Erie, near Buffalo, NY. “I got a Speed Graphic, and went around town photographing everything from hockey games to babies and passport pictures, with flash bulbs,” he said. Kirk-

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land spent much of his early professional life working in NY. In 1960, at the age of 25, he was hired by Look magazine. He recalls the experience as his dream job…“That’s where I grew up as a more mature photographer, working for the magazine. There was almost unlimited film when you went out on assignment, and you had to give

2011

your interpretation of what you found.” Kirkland’s first assignment for Look was to photograph men’s fashion at Cornell University. “They hired me to shoot color. I was the youngest photographer there at the time and the older photographers couldn’t shoot color reliably,” he said. “I represented the new generation coming in.” Kirk-

land was on a fashion assignment shooting bathing suits at Pismo Beach, California, when he received the call that would change his life. Kirkland’s boss asked him to go to Las Vegas with their movie editor, Jack Hamilton, because Elizabeth Taylor had agreed to an interview with the magazine. “I was told to go there and persuade her

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Douglas Kirkland:

50 Years of Photography to let me photograph her,” said Kirkland. Taylor hadn’t been photographed in a formal manner for about a year and a half because she had been very sick. “I went with the journalist, sat quietly through the interview, and at the end, I went to shake

“The bottom line for me is that I love photography. Not just photographing stars, but all types of photography.” her hand and say goodbye,” he explained. “As I was doing that, I held her hand and looked her straight in the eye. I said, ‘goodbye, it was very nice meeting you.’ I was very respectful of her. I said to her again in a most earnest way, ‘I’m new with this magazine. Could you imagine what it would mean to me if you’d give me an opportunity to photograph you?’” Taylor responded by telling the young photographer to come by the following evening at 8:30 p.m. That was Kirkland’s launch into photographing celebrities. Soon after, in 1961, he found himself OnV

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Douglas Kirkland:

50 Years of Photography world famous for the sensuous photographs of Marilyn Monroe he had taken for Look’s 25th anniversary issue. Since then, he’s had the opportunity to take pictures of Hollywood’s biggest stars on movie sets, as publicity stills and on numerous other occasions. And nearing 80 years young, Kirkland continues to shoot almost daily. With the same passion, enthusiasm and keen eye, he immortalizes celebrities. Taking part mostly in blockbusters, he travels around the world shooting the icons of today. Kirkland also does charitable work for organizations like the Red Cross and Starlight Foundation. “It’s not only about making money, but about doing the right thing,” he said. “I’m very happy to give back.” For Kirkland, the bottom line is that he loves photography—not just photographing stars, but all types of photography. His lifelong love affair with the camera, whether still or motion pictures, has been applauded with the most prestigious awards the industry can bestow, including several for lifetime achievement. In a highly competitive

Above: Nicole Kidman, Australia, 2007 Right: Audrey Hepburn, Paris, 1965

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Untitled, 1982, gelatin silver print

Douglas Kirkland:

50 Years of Photography

Kirkland credits his success to his ability to connect with his subjects. field, he credits his success to his ability to connect with his subjects. Through the years, he has worked on the sets of over one hundred motion pictures. Among them, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 2001 A Space Odyssey, Out of Africa, Titanic, Moulin Rouge and Australia. His books include Light Years; Icons; Legends; Body Stories; An Evening With Marilyn; the best selling James Cameron’s Titanic; Coco Chanel,

Above: Douglas Kirkland with equipment (detail), Hollywood, 2010 Opposite: Jack Nicholson, Beverly Hills, 1975 This exhibition is sponsored by Legion/MOAB Paper

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Three Weeks; Michael Jackson—the Making of Thriller; and Freeze Frame, a decade by decade look behind the scenes from 50 years photographing the entertainment industry. Kirkland’s fine art photography has been exhibited all over the world. His exhibition Freeze Frame is now in the permanent collection of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills. His work is also in the collections of the Smithsonian; the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra, Australia; the National Portrait Gallery in London; the Eastman House in Rochester; the Houston Center for Photography and the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Kirkland’s assignments have taken him to all continents in the world (with the exception of Antarctica) where he’s worked on subjects as varied as Astronomy in Chile, to The Trans Siberian Railroad and fashion in Bali. When not traveling the globe on assignment, his home and studio is in the Hollywood Hills where he lives with his wife and business partner, Françoise. On View

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Katharine

HEPBURN Dressed FOR Stage AND Screen

at the APPLETON MUSEUM of ART, Ocala

11.19.11-01.22.12 w w w. a p p l e t o n m u s e u m . o r g

OPPOSITE: PUBLICITY IMAGE all images courtesy of Kent State University Museum

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

ON THE SILVER SCREEN AND BROADWAY STAGES,

Katharine Hepburn’s beauty and talent made her one of the top actresses of all time. Off screen, the independent, outspoken individualist blazed a trail for women by incorporating slacks into her personal style, giving women permission to be comfortable. The exhibit Katharine Hepburn: Dressed for Stage and Screen, at the Appleton Museum of Art in Ocala, comes directly from Kent State University Museum and is the star’s personal collection of costumes from her six-decade career. Among the garments on display are the actress’ beloved trousers, worn by a handful of half mannequins lying in repose, sitting with legs crossed and even upside down with legs spread wide—a play off one of the actress’ publicity shots depicting the athletic young star in a headstand. “She found a style she liked and she had it made again and again and again,” explained Jean Druesedow, Director of the Kent State University Museum. KATHARINE HEPBURN BLAZED TRAILS BY POPULARIZING SLACKS FOR WOMEN AND HELPING INTERNATIONALIZE WHAT IS NOW CALLED “THE AMERICAN STYLE.” OPPOSITE: PUBLICITY IMAGE

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

Slacks and jodhpurs are just a fraction of Hepburn’s personal collection featured in this exhibit. Kent State University Museum acquired the actress’ performance clothes in 2008 from her estate. Upon her death in 2003 at age 96, the “First Lady of Cinema” had stipulated that the collection be given to an educational institution rather than sold at auction.

This rare personal glimpse into the star’s private collection includes trays of her greasepaint as well as wiglets, false eyelashes and more than 40 costumes spanning her career from early stage work in the 1930s to her late film and TV movie work in the 1980s and ’90s. Performance clothes are divided into film, television and theater sections. Accompanying groupings of costumes

ABOVE: the little minister (1934) contributed to hepburn being labeled “box office poison,” but it also cemented her REBELLIOUS IMAGE, BECOMING A VALUABLE PART OF THE HEPBURN LEGEND. OPPOSITE: COSTUME DESIGN BY WALTER PLUNKETT, PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOANNE ARNETT

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

are movie stills and publicity shots featuring many of the outfits on display and Hepburn ephemera such as playbills, photos, posters and colorized movie lobby cards. The young Hepburn was so tiny, museum curators had to carve mannequins to fit her clothing. In the 1934 movie The Little Minister, represented in the exhibit by a floral gypsy dress, Hepburn had a 20 1/2-inch waist.

A Bryn Mawr College graduate, who came from a privileged background, Hepburn achieved early success on Broadway. She became “box office poison” with a string of flops from 1935-38 but fought her way back by purchasing the movie rights and starring in both the stage and movie versions of The Philadelphia Story. Hepburn was nominated a record 12 times for best leading actress and won

ABOVE: stage door (1937) OPPOSITE: COSTUME DESIGN BY MURIEL KING, PHOTOGRAPH BY JOANNE ARNETT

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

four Oscars. Her triumphant career included roles that have become iconic in film and theatre. On screen and stage, Katharine Hepburn was dressed by some of the greatest designers of the 20th century, including Valentina, Adrian, Walter Plunkett, Edith Head, Cecil Beaton and Coco Chanel, among many others. “From the beginning, the last thing

the independent-minded star wanted was to be glamorized or ‘Hollywoodized,’” Druesedow explained. The studio tried to get her into dresses for publicity appearances, but Hepburn would have none of it. When the costume department finally resorted to stealing her dungarees from her dressing room in the early 1930s, Hepburn walked around the studio in her underwear until

HEPBURN RESUSCITATED HER CAREER BY BUYING THE FILM RIGHTS TO PHILIP BARRY’S THE PHILADELPHIA STORY. ABOVE : HEPBURN IN THE THEATER PRODUCTION OF THE philadelphia story (1939). OPPOSITE: COSTUME DESIGN BY VALENTINA, PHOTOGRAPH BY JOANNE ARNETT

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

her dungarees were returned. “On screen and off, she epitomized the modern American woman—smart, independent, active, honest, feisty and outspoken. In terms of fashion, Katharine Hepburn blazed trails by popularizing slacks for women, wearing or adapting men’s suits as women’s apparel and helping internationalize what is now called ‘the American

style,’” Druesedow added. There seemed to be no rhyme or reason for which costumes Hepburn kept. She had great respect for Walter Plunkett, who designed for her for The Sea of Grass, The Little Minister and nine other films. She kept her costume collection in closets in her Manhattan apartment until her later years, when she moved to Connecticut and the gar-

ABOVE : without love (1945) OPPOSITE: COSTUME DESIGN BY IRENE, PHOTOGRAPH BY DANIEL MAXWELL

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

ments went into a warehouse. Figuring out which garment came from which movie or stage production took many months of work, since most of the pieces were not labeled. Former Kent State University Museum intern, Jaclyn Lerner, identified the majority of the pieces through movie and Internet research as well as at the New York Library for the Performing Arts at

Lincoln Center. Druesedow also pored through every still of Hepburn from every movie she was in, at the library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles. Glamorous pieces range from a beautifully draped black gown with fishtail train from the 1949 movie Adam’s Rib to an elaborate silk and velvet dressing gown by Cecil Beaton from the

ABOVE: HEPBURN, FLANKED BY DAVID WAYNE AND PAULA RAY, GETS FASTENED BY SPENCER TRACY IN ADAM’S RIB (1949). OPPOSITE: COSTUME DESIGN BY WALTER PLUNKETT, PHOTOGRAPH BY JOANNE ARNETT

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KATHARINE HEPBURN: Dressed for Stage and Screen

musical Coco on Broadway. On the wilder side is a leopard print caftan with matching jumpsuit from the 1973 movie version of Edward Albee’s A Delicate Balance. On January 19, 1986, the Council of Fashion Designers of America recognized Hepburn’s lasting influence on fashion design with its 1985 Lifetime Achievement Award. Over her career, Hepburn typically shunned awards

presentations, but she came to that ceremony to collect the statue, presented by Calvin Klein, to honor her unique contribution to style for women. Accompanying the exhibition are a series of lectures on Hepburn’s life and fashions as well as a special “Date With Kate” tour package. For details, please call 352.291.4455. Take note, classic movie fans and fashionistas— you won’t want to miss this. O n V iew

ABOVE : hepburn with Paul Scofield in a delicate balance (1973) OPPOSITE: COSTUME DESIGN BY MARGARET FURSE, PHOTOGRAPH BY JOANNE ARNETT

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FOCUS { J A N E T

NEW YORK-BASED VIDEO

B I G G S }

Exhibition

No Limits: Janet Biggs On view October 8th through January 8th, 2012 at the Tampa Museum of Art www.tampamuseum.org

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artist, Janet Biggs, has earned an international reputation for her daring work. She travels the globe to record on film, humans testing their limits—and in the process, often tests her own. For more than a decade Biggs has explored the tense relationships between athleticism and ambition, individualism and community, and free will and control. Her work has focused on sports and natural environments and has ranged from a claustrophobic pool, where synchronized swimmers test their lung capacity, to the vast expanse of the High Arctic. Not only has she won accolades from art critics, but audiences consistently find her work enthralling. No Limits: Janet Biggs is the first full survey of the artist’s career. Featured in the exhibition is a more recent work, Vanishing Point, which looks at the ways in which an individual disappears. Informed by her experiences with the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, Biggs asks, “When are we no longer ourselves?” Combining images of 2011

F O C U S

motorcycle speed record hold- ject not often documented in er, Leslie Porterfield, on the salt the art world—NASCAR racflats of Utah, with Harlem’s Ad- ing. In this work, auto racing’s dicts Rehabilitation Center Gos- wild popularity and position pel Choir, Vanishing Point ex- within consumer culture create amines the struggle to maintain both drama and heroism. Rathone’s identity, the role of those er than focusing exclusively on who witness that identity vanish- the drivers, Biggs presents the ing and the search for freedom. speed, precision and agility of While the concept of iden- the pit crews—and reveals their tity is often evident extreme grace unin Biggs’s work, so der pressure. is the idea of enBiggs earned durance. When she her undergraduate went to the High degree from Moore Arctic in 2009 College of Art and to shoot Fade to pursued graduate White, the artist had studies at Rhode to train like an athIsland School of lete. “I learned how Design. She has Video artist, to paddle a kayak exhibited extenJANET BIGGS, in extreme situsively in the US knows ations,” she said. and abroad and “NO LIMITS.” “I joined the kayher work is in pubak polo team, [and discovered lic collections, including the it’s] a full contact sport. I also High Museum, Atlanta, GA; learned how to enter and exit a the Herbert F. Johnson Musekayak in frigid, rough waters. um of Art, Cornell UniversiAnd in 2010, I took high pow- ty, Ithaca, NY; Mint Museum ered rifle lessons to protect my- of Art, Charlotte, NC; Gibbes self from polar bears while trav- Museum of Art, Charleston, SC; eling and filming by myself.” and the New Britain Museum of In Duet, Biggs took on a sub- Art, New Britain, CT. O n V iew

opposite page: Vanishing Point, 2009, Still images from the single channel video above: Fade to White, 2010, still images from the single channel video left: JANET BIGGS below: Duet, 2010, Still images from the single channel video All images courtesy of the artist and Conner Contemporary Art, Washington, DC

PROFILE { M A R K

M A R K H A N D F O RT H WA S

H A N D F O R T H }

Knight Exhibition Series

Mark Handforth: Rolling Stop On view November 30th through February 19th, 2012 at MOCA, North Miami www.mocanomi.org

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the first Miami artist to receive a solo show at MOCA, North Miami in 1996. He has since achieved major international recognition and has become an important role model for Miami artists. Handforth’s work merges together an interest in the contemporary urban landscape, a Minimalist’s emphasis on simple forms that interact with ambient space, a penchant for surreal effects and a playful, PopArt sensibility. His large-scale sculptures take their inspiration from everyday objects such as an illuminated lamppost, a neon moon, a monumental coat hanger and a giant “STOP” sign—poetic, lyrical and comical objects that wryly comment on daily life and human interaction. By blowing up their scale and distorting their form, Handforth imbues each object with a new sense of being. Although each sculpture is a self-contained work, Handforth prefers that groups of works be shown together and conceived 2011

P R O F I L E

the installation at MOCA as a fore settling in Miami in 1992. landscape through which viewHandforth has exhibited in ers can wander. The exhibition solo shows at the Museum of brings together over 30 works, Contemporary Art (MCA), including a major new light in- Los Angeles; Gavin Brown’s stallation occupying over 80 enterprise, New York; Galerfeet of the museum’s wall that ie Almine Rech, Paris; Galerwill highlight the unique space ie Eva Presenhuber/Tessinerof MOCA’s current galleries and platz, Zürich; The Modern Inwill lead to the groundbreaking stitute, Glasgow; Kunsthaus, for its new expanZürich; and the sion. The exhibiHammer Museum, tion will also spread Los Angeles. He out to locations has also exhibited throughout South in numerous group Florida, including shows, including an installation of the 2004 Whitney Electric Tree, loBiennial. cated in Griffing Mark Handforth’s His work is held Park, North Miami, in public and priSCULPTURES which consists of a vate collections, bring NEW giant banyan tree ilincluding the DalMEANING to luminated by more las Museum of Art; everyday objects. than 60 fluorescent Le Consortium, light fixtures. Dijon, France; FRAC Centre, Born in Hong Kong in 1969, Orleans, France; MOCA, North Handforth grew up in Lon- Miami; Museum of Contempodon and attended the Städel- rary Art, Los Angeles; Whitney schule, Staatliche Hochschule Museum of American Art, New für Bildende Künste in Frank- York; the François Pinault Colfurt am Main, Germany and lection; Rachofsky Collection; Slade School of Fine Art at Uni- and Rubell Family Collection. versity College in London be- O n V iew

opposite page: Ziggy Stardust, 2004, fluorescent lights, fixtures, 275 x 150 cm Above (top to bottom): 1. Rolling Stop, 2008,
aluminum, vinyl and acrylic,
96 x 96” 2. Eclipse, 2003,
white fluorescent lights, 15-1/2’ x 25’ 3. Lucky Luke, 2008,
painted aluminum I-beams left: MARK HANDFORTH All images courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise

CRAFT { R O B E R T

F.

R O B E RT F. LY O N C R E AT E S

L Y O N }

Exhibition

Against the Grain: Wood Sculpture by Robert F. Lyon On view October 15th through December 31st at the Vero Beach Museum of Art www.verobeachmuseum.org

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surprising and innovative sculpture in turned wood, going beyond the usual techniques of those who turn functional bowls and forms. Rather than simply relying on the beauty of the wood, Lyon explores form and color and their ability to express beauty, fragility, memory and our connection to the earth. As Lyon explains, “…Bringing together natural and architectural concepts with wood, I try to meld the activities of man with those of nature. Because the work, in part, celebrates the wood itself, I allow the wood to move and crack as if it has a mind of its own. I am fascinated with the idea of control—the struggle to control the uncontrollable. I try to let the process take over so that the viewer can revel in the image, form and meaning.” In his current work, Lyon attempts to blur the distinction between art and craft by expanding his conceptual ideas through the use of larger turnings in an installation format. “Installation art tends to be unconventional and 2011

C R A F T

challenging, often using familiar partment of Art at Auburn Uniobjects placed in a different con- versity, AL. In 1997, Lyon was text, as an artist may respond to named Professor and Chair of a particular issue through a col- the Department of Art at the lection/arrangement of objects,” University of South Carolina. says Lyon. “In this work, which I In 2002, he relinquished his think of as ‘markers,’ the objects, position as Chair and now and their use of form and color, teaches sculpture. become signs or symbols that He has received numerhelp ‘mark’ our place in nature ous awards, including a Projand the culture in ect Grant from the which we live. This Southeastern Colintense, though inlegeArt Conference termittent, identifiand a Southeastern cation with natural Artist Fellowship materials and forcfrom the Southes causes time to diseastern Center for solve—and work Contemporary Art. to become indisLyon’s work has “...when I’m tinguishable from working properly, been shown in nuplay. I know when merous venues, inEVERYTHING I’m working propcluding the Wood else DISAPerly, everything else Turning Center in PEARS.” —R. F. Lyon disappears.” Philadelphia, AlBorn in 1952 in Queens, NY, ternative Museum in New York Lyon received his M.F.A. in City, New Orleans Museum of 1977 from the Tyler School Art, Tampa Museum of Art and of Art in Philadelphia, PA. Vero Beach Museum of Art. He taught ceramics, glass and He is represented by Blue sculpture at Louisiana State Spiral 1 in Asheville, NC, and University from 1978-95 and lives in South Carolina with then accepted the position of his wife, artist, Ann Hubbard. Professor and Head of the De- O n V iew

opposite page (left to right): 1. Aerial,
93 x 18 x 18”,
 Maple, cherry, walnut, dyes 2. Receptor,
95 x 23.5 x 23.5”,
 Maple, poplar, dyes 3. Receiver,
90 x 20 x 20”,
 Maple, ash, cherry, walnut, dyes above (top to bottom): 1. Getting To The Point (detail), 
 Ash, pencils 2. Memory Cells, from the Hive Series, 2010, ash, pencils and graphite *ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; ALL DIMENSIONS: H x W x D left: Robert f. LYON at the lathe

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“Movement” by Rene von Richthofen On view November 9th through the 27th at Ann Norton Sculpture Garden, West Palm Beach www.ansg.org

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ASSEMBLAGES AND WALL

reliefs have a very hip and modern feel when presented by the always-flamboyant artist, Rene von Richthofen, who takes inspiration from all things associated with the automobile. Richthofen’s love of cars—American horsepower, Italian design, Japanese technology and German precision—combined with all things miniature, including cars, trucks, planes and toys, help to create his style of work—smart, amusing and at times, erotic. “Along with its practical purposes, I celebrate the finer points of the automobile that have brought the world together and have inspired our inner child,” says von Richthofen. “Many of my new works explore the paradoxes and contrasts that are currently associated with the automobile. This is represented by contrasts in color and texture as well as composition. They are not complicated works and are not meant to be. You’ll discover the beauty in my work 2011

S P O T L I G H T

through its simplicities.” his playful installations—each Von Richthofen has been piece is a unique yet easily fascinated by automobiles identifiable reflection of the since his early childhood in artist. Austria, when he began colThough not formally trained lecting toy cars. At the age as an artist—he graduated of 16, he competed in Austri- from the University of Innsan Hill-climb racing with his bruck in 1971 with a degree first car, a Mini Cooper S. Al- in business law and economthough he still enics—von Richjoys car racing as thofen possesses a hobby, von Richthe innate ability, thofen combines endurance, drive, that passion with and eccentricity designing automoto make captivatbile art. Now in his ing works for aumid-60s, the artdiences of all ages ist has been conto enjoy. structing works His work has Rene von from model cars, been purchased RICHTHOFEN automobile parts, by private colshares his children’s toys lectors, including LOVE of all and found objects Charles Lazarus, things for more than 20 founder of Toys AUTOMOBILE. years. ‘R’ Us, and has While his inspiration de- been shown at venues across rives from his love of cars, his Florida, including Steve Johnwork is also a vehicle for ex- son Gallery Space in West pressing his views concern- Palm Beach and Boca Raton’s ing social and cultural issues Karen Lynne Gallery. such as global warming, war Von Richthofen lives in West and racism. These themes are Palm Beach with his wife, artoften underlying currents in ist, Jane Manus. O n V iew

opposite page: Hercules Above (top to bottom): 1. untitled 2. fireworks 3. global warming left: RENE VON RICHTHOFEN images courtesy of the artist

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on iew D E S T I N A T I O N

The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and New York’s Baryshnikov Arts Center present a celebration of artistic expression in the world today through performances in dance, music and theater, art exhibitions and special events throughout the theaters, galleries and gardens of the Ringling Center for the Arts during the 2011...

Ringling International Arts Festival 10.11-10.16. 2011 at THE JOHN AND MABLE

Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota www.ringling.org

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Ringling International Arts Festival October 11-16, 2011

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THE RIN GLING INTERNA-

tional Arts Festival is full of surprises on stage as well as in the galleries and grounds of the Ringling Museum of Art. Held around the Museum’s picturesque 66-acre estate in Sarasota, the nearly week-long festival features an international exhibition of music, dance, theater and visual arts, in addition to a variety of special events and programs. Established and emerging artists from the US and abroad will be performing. Argentinian actress and singer Soledad Villamil, along with Hermanos Macana, brings the power and passion of the Argentinean OnV

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Tango to life in Canta Tangos. Presented in cooperation with Rodgers & Hammerstein: An Imagem Company, Doug Elkins and his company have reimagined a familiar show, Fräulein Maria, making what was once familiar new and exciting, set to “The Sound of Music.” Bridging American and French cultures, Company Stefanie Batten Bland mixes European subtlety with American ardor as part of her dance repertoire in Terra Firma. And Colin Dunne, the Irish dance icon who shot to international stardom in Riverdance, showcases the intimate and playful presentation of his latest solo project, Out of Time.
 It all starts Opening Night, October 11th, in the Museum of Art Courtyard, with entertainment by Asphalt Orchestra, an iconoclastic 12-piece marching band. The festival also includes RIAF 360º programs, an exhibition by Swiss artist, Zimoun, and The Amazing American Circus Poster: Strobridge Lithographing Company exhibit. From October 12th-16th, museum admission is just $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 5-16. For tickets and info, visit www.ringlingartsfestival.org. Clockwise from top left: Soledad Villamil, Canta Tangos; Valerie Gillespie Ensemble, RIAF 360° Jazz Sunsets; Doug Elkins & Friends’ Fräulein Maria; Company Stefanie Batten Bland, Terra Firma

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Ca’ d’Zan & Museum of Art

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Ca’ d’Zan, the Ringlings’ dazzling palatial mansion, is a tribute to the American Dream and reflects the splendor and romance of Italy. Described as “the last of the Gilded Age mansions” to be built in America, Ca’ d’Zan has 56 incredible rooms filled with art and original furnishings. With its Venetian Gothic architecture, the mansion is a combination of the grandeur of Venice’s Doge’s Palace, combined with the gothic grace of Cà d’Oro, with Sarasota Bay serving as its Grand Canal. Construction began on Ca’ d’Zan in 1924. The house was completed just before Christmas 1925, at a cost of $1.5 million. OnV

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Ca’ d’Zan Image courtesy of the Ringling Museum of Art.

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The Museum of Art, built by John Ringling to house his personal collection of masterpieces, today features paintings and sculptures by Rubens, van Dyck, Velázquez, Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese, El Greco, Gainsborough and more. The European, American and Asian masterworks available here make the Museum of Art an awe-inspiring retreat. It is a palace for treasures emulating the footprint of Florence’s

O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : R I N G L I N G M U S E U M o f A RT, S A R A S O TA

Ca’ d’Zan & Museum of Art

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Left: Museum of Art Below: Museum of Art Courtyard Images courtesy of the Ringling Museum of Art.

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Ca’ d’Zan & Museum of Art Uffizi Gallery, echoing its grace and grandeur. In 1925, Ringling engaged architect John H. Phillips to design the museum. Construction began in 1927, but was slowed by the collapse of Florida’s land boom and later, Wall Street’s stock market crash. The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art was officially opened to the public in October 1931. The Courtyard of the Museum of Art features casts of original antiquities and renaissance sculptures, including the towering David by Michelangelo, as well as two fountains—the Fountain of Tortoises and the Oceanus Fountain. Special exhibitions are featured in the Ulla R. and Arthur F. Searing Wing, which opened in February 2007. The galleries mirror the original Museum of Art’s exterior, but make available expansive exhibit space for major traveling shows. OnV

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Museum of Art, Rubens Gallery Image courtesy of The Ringling Museum of Art.

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49 prepared vibration motors, Untitled Sound Objects, Pe Lang + Zimoun 2008;

EXHIBITION:

Zimoun

361 prepared dc-motors, filler wire 1.0mm, Zimoun 2010;

On view 10.11-01.08.12

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361 prepared dc-motors (detail), filler wire 1.0mm, Zimoun 2010; 49 prepared vibration motors, Untitled Sound Objects (detail), Pe Lang + Zimoun 2008

UTILIZING SIMPLE AND

functional components such as motors, wires, cardboard boxes, cotton balls and ventilators, Swiss artist, Zimoun, builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. His mechanized kinetic sculptures explore the complex and intricate tensions between the “artificial” and the “organic,” in playfully poetic installations which reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships between sound and movement. Zimoun’s collaboration with Berlin-based media artist and programmer, Pe Lang, has re-

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sulted in their current project, Untitled Sound Objects, a live performance platform and series of site-specific installations in which small, electrically-controlled machines are used to excite existing physical spaces, literally knocking, rubbing and otherwise activating the room. Often controlled by a computer, large arrays of these micro-machines produce simple patterns through which larger macro-structures emerge as the individual elements interact with one another and their respective environments. At the root of Zimoun’s work is a fascination with natural algorithms such as those found in insect swarms and hydrodynamic reactions, in which complexity arises from a multitude of simple interactions. His interest lies not so much in randomness but in the forms and textures that grow organically from complexity and multiplicity. “We are not preoccupying ourselves with chance factors and generative systems simply to discover unexpected results,” said the artist, “but rather so that the compositions can attain a higher level of vitality.” OnV

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The Circus Museum & Tibbals Learning Center

HOME TO THE LARGEST

miniature circus in the world, the Ringling Circus Museum’s Tibbals Learning Center has grown more colossal, thanks to the generosity of Howard Tibbals, philanthropist and

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Established in 1948, the Ringling Circus Museum was the first in the country to record the rich history of the circus. Colossal parade and baggage wagons, sequined costumes and a sideshow banner line are among the memorabilia and artifacts on display. Also on exhibit is the Wisconsin, the private rail car of John and Mable Ringling.

circus model builder—and the architect of the miniature circus. The Center celebrates the legendary performers of the center ring, including acrobats, aerialists and daredevils, many of whom made Sarasota and her neighboring cities home. Featuring 11,000 square feet of interactive exhibition space, children of all ages will experience the atmosphere, drama and magic of a day at the circus. Visitors can feel what it is like to walk a high wire and fit into the model of a 2-foot by 3-foot car made famous by clown, Lou Jacobs. They can even superimpose their faces onto replicas of circus posters.

Top left to right: Circus Museum, Circus Parade Bandwagon; Bruno Zacchini’s super-repeating cannon; Bottom left to right: Tibbals Learning Center, detail from The Howard Bros. Circus Model; Master model builder, Howard Tibbals

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O N V I E W D E S T I N AT I O N : R I N G L I N G M U S E U M o f A RT, S A R A S O TA EXHIBITION:

The Amazing American Circus Poster: The Strobridge Lithographing Company, 1878-1939 On view through 01.29.12

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BEFORE TELEVISION, RADIO

and film, the circus was a colossal entertainment industry. Circus owners enticed massive crowds with brilliantly colored, boldly bombastic posters that advertised never before seen attractions, performers and animals from all corners of the globe, including Jumbo the Elephant and Gargantua The Great. The ability to print the thousands of sheets of paper quickly and OnV

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Clockwise from top left: and Barnum & Bailey Combined Shows:

efficiently was made possible through the lithographic process, a flexible medium quickly embraced by printers, including the famous Strobridge Lithographing Company. “As early examples of mass marketing, these circus posters document a vibrant record of social change and new technology,” said Deborah Walk, Tibbals Curator of the Circus Museum at The Ringling. All 80 circus posters on display were made in America, produced in Cincinnati and distributed throughout the country. The works span from the time of P.T. Barnum’s Greatest Show On Earth to the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. The exhibition is co-organized by the Ringling Museum and Cincinnati Art Museum. On View The Barnum & Bailey Greatest Show On Earth; PT Barnum’s Greatest Show On Earth, & The Great London Circus: Jumbo The Elephant; Ringling Bros The Greatest Show On Earth; Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Combined Shows: Gargantua The Great; Strobridge Lithographing Company


On View 10-11.2011