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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS VO L . 78, N O. 2

FA L L 2010

W W W.O L I V E T.E DU

This is

House

Service of celebration   and thanksgiving for the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins    Centennial Chapel page s 10 –11

BOWLING’S UNANIMOUS FIVE-YEAR RENEWAL

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

page 6

A BRUSH WITH HOPE page s 8 – 9

SHINE.FM GOES GLOBAL page 14

snapshots

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THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

CHAP’S FOLLY

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Contributing Writers Nick Birkey ’07 Amanda Jensen ’04/’06 M.O.L. Casey Manes Kate Morgan Laura Wasson Warfel

University Chaplain Mark Holcomb ’81 revealed that he wasn’t a completely unbiased observer of Ollies Follies activities.

Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography or as credited

BAREFOOT JAMBOREE

Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

In spite of brisk 60-degree weather, barefooted students could be spotted all over campus ­October 13, raising awareness for the “TOM’S Shoes Jamboree.” For every pair of shoes they sell, TOM’s Shoes sends one pair to children in a developing nation. Olivet students purchased 300 pairs during the drive.

MARIO BROS.

Brothers Mario and Luigi (a.k.a. Mike Zaring ’11 and Brad Palmer ’14) made an appearance at this year’s Candy Costume fest.

Enjoying the unseasonably warm fall weather, this group of friends chose to make a grassy field their dining hall for the day.

President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90 Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D. Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Education Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

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The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2010 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAE CHTER ’10

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAE CHTER ’10

Olivet Nazarene University

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

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perspectives

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

The Creative Arts: An Avenue of Praise By John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./’06 D.Div., University President

Not long ago we were privileged to host our annual Homecoming Celebration on campus. What a great weekend! As I think back to those few days, and on the myriad of activities that take place each weekend at Olivet, I am reminded how important the roll of the fine arts are to the life and legacy of the University and to the Church in general. It seems that each event of the weekend featured some aspect of the arts. Music, painting and other visual arts, drama, choreography, crafts, along with architecture and landscape design — all enriched the weekend and continue to enrich the life of work of those who live, work and study on this campus. Not only does the University provide a fine education in the arts, we are surrounded by this gift of God on a daily basis. The role of the arts reminds us that God is the Divine Creator and the source of all creativity. God created men and women in His image and therefore, our creativity is a direct reflection of His. Because God is the creator of all things, human artistic expression is simply a response to what He has already created. The arts serve as a means of expressing our God-given creativity. As a University and as the people of God, we are particularly responsible to nurture others in their journey to self-expression. There is a wonderfully instructive passage of Scripture that relates to the arts. In the 35th chapter of Exodus, God tells Moses how the building of the tabernacle is to be accomplished. “Then the LORD said to Moses, ‘See, I have chosen Bezalel son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah, and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with skill, ability and knowledge in all kinds of crafts — to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of craftsmanship. Moreover, I have appointed Oholiab son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan, to help him. Also I have given skill to all the craftsmen to make everything I have commanded you.’” This passage reveals where creativity comes from. The God of creation gives creative gifts to His people for the enjoyment of life and the praise of our Maker. In his famous Stone Lectures at Princeton, the theologian, journalist and statesman Abraham Kuyper observed: “As image-bearer of God, man possesses the possibility both to create something beautiful and to delight in it … The world of sounds, the world of forms, the world of tints, and the world of poetic ideas, can have no other source than God; and it is our privilege as bearers of His image, to have a perception of this beautiful world, artistically to reproduce, and humanly to enjoy it.” (The Stone Lectures of 1898 - Abraham Kuyper, pp. 142, 156–157, available from The Kuyper Foundation)    Art enhances our ability to communicate ideas and feelings in ways that words cannot. Art inspires as well as instructs. There is something very powerful in a fine painting, photograph, musical score or performance, thus the creative arts are an avenue of praise as well as expression.

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engineering department of

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By the

SUBMITTED PHOTO

HEAT of the SUN

Apartment Building at Mount Carmel Missionary Complex (MCMC)

to me how many of our engineers and high school prospects sense a call from God for engineering and ministry!” Problems to solve  |  The compound in ­Kenya that is part of the solar water heating project houses both short- and long-term missionaries in seven apartment flats and four motel suites.    The large water heating bill can be ­attributed to water being heated for bathing and hand washing, moments taken for granted in America that wouldn’t come close to costing as much for a whole year.    Leaders at the missionary compound expressed interest in ways to cut costs and be more sustainable. This year’s team leader, engineering student John Rachan ’11, is heading up the project along with Kevin Walsh ’11 and with support from ONU engineering professor and adviser Dr. Joseph Schroeder.    “This past summer, I had the opportunity to travel to Kenya with an MIA mission team from Olivet,” shares John. “We stayed at the missionary complex in Nairobi for most of the trip. This was an awesome experience for me, but also allowed me to talk to the directors and maintenance people at the facility.”    While on site, John was able to do some valuable reconnaissance work face-to-face with directors and maintenance workers. He brought back the information he gleaned so that he and his team could begin using their engineering expertise to solve the problem.

By Casey Manes

Engineering students providing financial relief for Kenyan missionary compound

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 heir water bill flashes an annual $22,000 price tag. So the Mount Carmel Mission Complex in ­Nairobi, Kenya is very keen on finding some realistic, long-term solutions to curtail these costly operating expenses.    Olivet engineering alumnus Jeff Lamping ’10 heard about their plight and wanted to use his expertise — and he enlisted the help of current ONU ­students.    And so began the story of a realworld problem being solved by aspiring ONU engineers.

Getting off the grid  |  Last year’s engineering team got so far as creating an actual prototype, but it was soon realized that it wouldn’t warm the water to a sufficient degree.    “This year, I am ‘taking the baton’ and continuing the project that began last year as a part of my senior design project,” said John. “After much research, I hope to develop and redesign a solar water system that works effectively, saving both energy and electricity for the people in Kenya.”    John’s team is in the early research stages of how to most effectively build the solar heater in a way that works with Kenyan systems and heats water sufficiently.    “Ultimately, we are trying to design a system that solely uses the sun to heat up water and eliminate the need for electricity to provide the heating. This is known as ‘getting off the grid.’”    The team of students plans to travel to Kenya following graduation in May 2011 to install their solar water heating system.

SUBMITTED ILLUSTRATION

“The engineering program seeks practical ways to carry out our mission of serving God and humanity, especially in global mission applications,” explains Mike Morgan, ONU professor of engineering.    “Students learn that their calling and skills as an engineer can be used for shortterm, long-term and lifetime opportunities among developing nations. It’s amazing Diagram showing the concept of heating water with solar energy

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friends of olivet

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

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‘Olivet has provided me with more

than just

an excellent

education.’ — SARAH MANCHESTER ’10

I feel very privileged to be receiving my education from Olivet, and for that, I thank you. Without your financial gifts, it would have been difficult for me to continue.

“I was born into a Nazarene family, and it was through my hometown church that I learned about Olivet’s ­nursing program. I cannot imagine being anywhere else. “Olivet has provided me with more than just an excellent education. I have built many wonderful Christian relationships, not just with other students but also with professors and staff members. I am surrounded by a community of Christians who daily remind me of the overabundant love God has for me and my future.

“I want to specifically thank you for your continued prayers. Nursing school is the hardest thing I have done in my life so far, and every day is a struggle. It is easy to lose sight of the path God has for me, but it doesn’t take long for me to find my way back to Him. “Following graduation, I desire to work on an oncology unit or pediatric unit in a hospital back home. I hope to see clearer what God has planned for me so that I may care for, and show His love to, the patients I come in contact with.” Sarah Manchester is a senior nursing major from Cambridge, Vt.

Give Today. Change Tomorrow. 815-939-5171  |  www.olivet.edu  |  development@olivet.edu

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onu news ONU

Insider UNANIMOUS SUPPORT | With a vote of

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

54 to 0, Olivet Nazarene University’s Board of Trustees voted to renew Dr. John C. Bowling’s appointment as president of the ­university for five more years. According to the university bylaws, the board may elect to renew the presidential appointment for a maximum of five years, and the board unanimously voted to do so during their semiannual meeting October 28.    “We are blessed and fortunate to have a man of his ability and experience to be the president of our great university,” said Dr. Ted Lee, chairman of the Board. ­Immediately following the vote, the entire assembly rose to offer Dr. Bowling their congratulations through a prolonged standing ovation.    In a separate vote, the Board of Trustees then unanimously elected to name Olivet’s admissions building near the campus entrance the “Jill and John Bowling Admissions Center” in honor of the Bowlings’ years of service to the university. A formal celebration of Dr. Bowling’s twenty years of service as president and the official naming will take place during the spring meeting of the Board.

HOW DO I SING THAT | As part of an

­Illinois National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) sponsored project, music professor Neal Woodruff ’91, along with faculty from Bradley University and Augustana College, will be presenting a voice pedagogy seminar at the January 2011 ­Illinois Music Educator’s Conference entitled: “How Do I Sing That? Choral Director as Voice Teaching Professional: Helping Students Navigate the Waters of Style.” Woodruff is completing his second term as Illinois governor for NATS. This responsibility includes organizing the annual auditions, and coordinating a young artist competition every other year.

RECORD-BREAKING undergraduate enrollment,

ACT record for freshman class

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ACTUARIAL SCIENCE

By Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

| Olivet’s Depart­m ent of Mathematics recently ­received word that three courses for the actuarial ­sciences program (applied statistical methods, corporate finance, and economics) have been approved for VEE (Validation by Educational Experience), and that the program is now listed on the Society of Actuaries website. Olivet is one of a handful of schools within the 110-member Council for Christian Colleges and Universities that offer a degree in actuarial science, and of those that do, many only have two areas VEE approved.

After the official 10-Day count, Olivet Nazarene University reports the largest-ever traditional undergraduate enrollment with 2,680 students. The incoming freshman class also set a new all-time high for average ACT composite score, and 10 percent of the Class of 2014 scored 30 or above, scores only 4 percent of test takers achieve nationally.    Overall enrollment for the University also remains strong with 4,612 total students enrolled both in traditional undergraduate programs and in the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies — the third largest overall enrollment in the University’s 103-year history.    “These kinds of numbers are extraordinary under any circumstances, but especially in light of the current economic environment,” said Dr. John C. Bowling, university president. “The fact that we continue to hit our enrollment goals year after year shows not only that students value a solid Christian education, but also that our admissions and financial aid staff are working hard to make the Olivet experience attainable for families of all economic backgrounds.”    Not only did 888 new students contribute to undergraduate enrollment, but also a recordbreaking number of returning students. Olivet’s retention rate for last year’s largest-ever freshman class was 75 percent, compared to the statewide average of 66.2 for private, four-year institutions.    The 10-day count is the standard measurement used by colleges and universities nationwide to measure student enrollment. Based largely on the traditional undergraduate calendar, it does not take into account the natural ebb and flow of enrollment in the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies.    “We are pleased to have contributed to another year of strong enrollment at Olivet Nazarene University,” said Ryan Spittal, vice president of graduate and continuing education. “Due to our learning format and year-round enrollment process, we anticipate continued strong enrollment growth as we welcome new learners each month throughout the year.”    Currently, the School has 134 cohorts meeting in schools, hospitals, churches, businesses and other locations throughout Chicagoland.    “Our enrollment numbers are strong,” said Bowling, “but more important than the numbers are the lives and stories represented by these numbers. This is an exceptional group of men and women from across the United States and around the globe who plan to change the world. I have no doubt they will succeed in doing so.”

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

| Olivet’s School of Education is now the largest producer of teachers among private universities in the State of ­Illinois, and the fourth largest among all Illinois colleges and universities. Of Olivet’s 1,507 May 2010 graduates, 753 were from the School of Education, or roughly 50 ­percent.

BUSINESS BOOSTER | David Horton

’84 is coming on board for 2011–2012 as an adjunct professor teaching auditing. His experience includes his most recent position as director of field specialists for the Internal Revenue Service’s Large Business and International Division. Well-known within the IRS and professionally, Horton is looking forward to enriching students’ education from his wealth of “real world” auditing work with corporations.

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grad school

ENTREPRENEUR IN THE CLASSROOM Grad school alumnus named Chicago Teacher of the Year

By Andy Corbus ’91 ollowing his passion for entrepreneurship and his calling to education, Olivet School of Graduate and Continuing Studies alumnus Ricardo ­Johnson ’07 M.A.T. is making an ­impact at Thornton High School in ­Harvey, Ill. Armed with the experience of a business owner, and multiple master’s degrees in education, Ricardo delivers a dynamic classroom experience to the urban youth of south suburban Chicago.    “My current mission and assignment is to faithfully serve the young people of Harvey as their dedicated business teacher,” Ricardo states.    Ricardo teaches computer literacy and entre­ preneurship utilizing a curriculum from the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE), a global effort to provide programs that inspire young people from low-income communities to stay in school, recognize business opportunities and plan for successful futures.

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

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 Ricardo Johnson ’07 M.A.T., business teacher, Thornton High School, Harvey, Ill.

   Ricardo is a 2007 graduate of the Master of Arts in teaching program and credits the program with helping him create a positive learning environment. “At Olivet, I learned how to incorporate various teaching methodologies in the classroom. Currently, I include a lot of nontraditional teaching techniques into my business classroom. These include group activities that promote team and community building, as well as various ­experiential activities that help students to apply concepts learned in class.”    When asked what he has in mind for the ­future, 40-year-old Ricardo replied, “I am blessed to be in the urban classroom — imparting entrepreneurship, financial literacy and life skills into my students. In my association with NFTE, I plan to continue promoting entrepreneurship education locally, regionally and nationally through conferences and workshops on this new educational trend, which actively engages students.”    In following with his commitment to education, Ricardo intends to become a more involved advocate for increased funding for public education, and would like to earn a doctorate before he reaches age 45.

   For his outstanding work in and out of the classroom, Ricardo was recently named 2010 Entrepreneurship Teacher of the Year by the NFTE. When asked about his award, Ricardo said, “I was truly excited about being recognized as the 2010 Chicago Teacher of the Year. It was such a great experience to share the stage at the ­Marriott ­Hotel in New York City with other outstanding NFTE teachers from other major U.S. cities and around the world, including New Zealand, Israel, China and Germany.” Of the 1,500 NFTE faculty, about 20 were honored at the national “Dare to Dream” convention held earlier this year.    What makes Ricardo’s classroom special is the variety and energy he brings to his students. His entrepreneurial business experience as a ­Subway franchisee along with his M.B.A. allows him the ability to offer practical experience. His passion for the classroom empowers him to deliver his experience in dynamic ways. “I am considered a great teacher by my colleagues and administrators because of the differentiated instructional strategies, technology and interpersonal communication skills incorporated in my urban classroom environment,” shares R ­ icardo.

Unleash your passion with educational skills.

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Think back to a passionate teacher who helped shape your life. If you are looking to become that teacher, or are already on your way and need to sharpen your skills, Olivet Nazarene University has several master’s degree programs designed to help adults become better teachers. We believe in the influence of teacher, and the value of education.

Masters of Arts in Education Library Information Specialist Reading Education: Reading Specialist Curriculum and Instruction School Improvement Leadership Teacher Leadership Masters of Arts in Teaching Elementary Secondary K-12 Certification Programs Middle School Endorsement Drivers Education Endorsement Reading Teacher Endorsement English as a Second-Language Endorsement

◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽ ◽

For more information, contact the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies at 877-9-OLIVET. w

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feature story

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Brush with Hope FINDING NEW LIFE AND PURPOSE BY ACCIDENT BY C A SE Y M A N ES

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The last memory Steve Love ’79 has from before his accident was seeing three deer in front of his vehicle on the highway. Then, he remembers waking up from a comatose state in the hospital.

causing damage to the left side of his brain. Nerves, neurons and brain matter are materials that cannot be regenerated once they have been injured. So ­despite Steve’s very real progress and rehabilitation, he will forever be impacted by the accident.    “Once you’ve had a brain injury, a new person emerges,”    It was only from eye witshares Steve, who has become nesses at the scene of the bruvery educated on his condition. tal car crash that Steve and his “It changes your personality and family had any answers to what you will never be the same perreally happened. He never did son you were before.” collide with a deer. But his car    Often because of this, 90 did careen across the opposing percent of a person’s close lane for reasons unknown and community will not continue to land in a violent twist of metal be part of an injured person’s in a nearby gulley. life. For many, it is just too    “Without someone seeing ­difficult. it happen, I would have lain in    “I have been blessed; my that gulley for months,” shares marriage is intact, and I have a Steve. The doctors told his wife community who has stayed with and adult children to prepare me. But it is amazing how many themselves; they could almost medical professionals or others guarantee Steve wouldn’t pull STEVE LOVE ’79 will still talk to me like I’m a prethrough. schooler,” relays Steve about    They even went so far as his adjustment from his life-altering injuries. to call in a chaplain who, ironically, happened to be one of Steve’s old chums from Olivet, Chaplain Painting a new reality Ralph Hill ’61.    Steve didn’t stop living once his recovery was    “When Ralph heard my name, he realized he accomplished. Though he is unable to hold down a had just been called to comfort the family of a man full-time job — a hard reality which he says “is the he’d known for 20 years,” shares Steve. pits!” — Steve has allowed this difficult trial to be used in a number of ways. Never the same    “Luckily for me and my artwork, the right side    Steve’s survival and recovery from the crash of my brain was left undamaged,” explains Steve astounded even medical professionals. on his interest in painting, which began when he    But despite still being very much alive six was a youth. years later, he will never be the same man he was    Because of this preservation of the artistic lobe ­before. of his brain, Steve has delved back into painting.    Steve sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, w

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   Sometimes his memory fails him, words come a little slowly to his lips, or his legs just don’t walk like he wants them to. These are the daily realities with which Steve must now live. But he can still

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

ALUMNI IN THE ARTS Brock Boyts ’06 Occupation: Freelance motion graphic designer Additional schooling: Corcoran College of Art and Design

paint and reach out to others struggling with similar situations.    Somehow, by putting his energies into helping others and through the release of his art and faith, hope hasn’t been elusive to Steve and his family in this ordeal.

Coolest gig so far: For the past six years, I have been working full-time as a designer and animator for the FOX Network Show, “America’s Most Wanted” in Washington, D.C.

Where it all began: I enjoy art mostly because I have always enjoyed using my

imagination. I played with toys a lot growing up. When I found out I can use my imagination and toys to make a living, I realized I couldn’t ask for a better career path. I enjoy every day of my job, and I have a lot of fun.

Leading the way

   Steve has gone on to found a traumatic brain injury group in his hometown and is currently the vice president of the Fulton County Art Council.    He is active in the Brain Injury Association of Illinois, and yearly attends the adult camp hosted by this organization where he shares his paintings and stories with friends.    “My time at the adult camp is important ­because it helps all of us there look beyond our injury to really see one another. Everyone else will always see our injury, but there, we are just friends.”    Last summer was unique for Steve because ­fellow Olivetian and current student Leeanna ­Neeley ’11 was serving there as a counselor.    Leeanna, a senior nursing major, spent her summer at the Easter Seals wilderness camp where Steve annually attends. Steve appreciated the ONU connection.    “Steve was a camper at Wilderness Endeavor, and he was in my cabin. As I got to know him throughout the week, I saw how he used his ­outstanding gift to overcome his TBI,” shares ­Leeanna.    “He would take photos of his friends and other campers through the week which might later ­become a painting.”    As Leeanna navigates her own professional ­future, she’s grateful she was able to build a relationship with Steve, and put a face on an injury.    “It is amazing to me that people like Steve can live through such life-changing accidents, recover, learn new skills and adapt in order to live fulfilling lives.”

Ilene (Frazier) McHone ’74 Occupation: Sugar artist, owner of Classic Cakes in Carmel, Ind. Why cake art? I have always been interested in art, but thought

I had no talent because I could not draw. But when I took a pottery class at ONU, I discovered I could do art if it was 3-D. I was hooked, and I took every class they had and even did a semester of directed study. In cake ­decorating, we are always building structures, hand forming sugar and molding things. We work with color every day and need to know how to mix color and know what looks pleasing to the eye.

Favorite part of her role: I love designing custom cakes for customers. It is

most gratifying when they bring you a theme and let you just take off with it. Then when they see the ­completed project, there is an instant reward. Our regular customers know they can trust us with the ­design and many just let us ‘do our own thing.’ Sometimes they bring us an invitation to the party, a picture of their wedding gown, a color scheme or a collection of photos.

Ways the job keeps her growing and changing: I have trained all my employees and am now very active with a number of colleges and culinary schools. We partner with them, take interns and train them in our techniques. Presently, we have a student from the Cordon Bleu Restaurant and Hospitality School in Chicago, Ill.

Mark Rice ’01 Occupation: Artist, mural painter in Indianapolis First knew art was for him: When I was four or five,

I turned up missing. When my parents found me at the neighbors’, I had used the woman’s lipstick and makeup to draw all over the walls. I have early memories of drawing on the notepads in church as well.

More than a hobby

   In 2010, Steve and his paintings were highlighted in a local art festival where he was honored as the featured artist. Thirty of his works were on display, and his story of healing through art ­therapy was covered in local television and magazine ­media.    Art, for Steve, is much more than something to dabble in to fill the time. It has been a key component in helping him find purpose, utilize the uninjured portion of his body and serve God.    He not only paints regularly and tries to take his art to the next level, but he is also an avid writer. He recently authored both a children’s book and a devotional.    Perhaps what Steve is most proud of is one of his many works in the making. “Thanks to my religion degree from Olivet, I feel equipped to write a devotional book for other people struggling with brain injuries,” shares Steve.    This book is important to Steve in helping others remember that life can still be rewarding and full, regardless of the trials of this complicated injury.    “I am currently in the editing stages of this ­publication. I hope it will encourage others in my situation not to give up.”

Latest art project: A little over a year ago, I was commissioned to do five mural instal-

lations on the exterior facades of a Moroccan restaurant in downtown Indianapolis called Saffron Cafe. Each wall has its own theme. Two of the pieces are large architectural doors representing actual buildings in the owner/chef’s hometown of Meknes in Morocco. One wall contains images of the Tajines, the traditional Moroccan ceramic dishes that the stewed meats are prepared and served in. One wall contains some faux architectural windows and shutters, and the final wall is of a desert oasis scene with palm trees and a camel caravan.

Favorite part of being an artist: I love doing what I love to do and getting paid for it. As a public mural artist, I love interacting with people from around the globe and learning new things about different cultures as a part of my work. Most of all, I just love sharing my perspective of this ­beautiful world we live in and being able to celebrate life every day through my creativity!

Did YOU KNOW?

Through Olivet’s Office of Counseling and Health Services, ONU students are offered the opportunity to participate in “Art Therapy for Stress Management.” In this popular eightweek course, students are taught how to utilize various art media to cope with stress in their lives.

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cover story C

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PHOTO by AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

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This is Your

Service of celebration and thanksgiving for the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel By Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

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rom the choir’s opening “Anthem of Praise” to the final benediction B, there was electricity in the air during the October 29 dedication of the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel.    With massive crowds C hoping to take part in this significant moment in the life of the University, all 3,046 seats in the Crawford Auditorium were filled. Several hundred more gathered in overflow seating in the Chapel lobby and Wisner Auditorium or streamed the service live from their homes and offices.    Those in attendance were wowed by the music of Steinway artists Ovid Young ’62 and Stephen Nielson D, acclaimed soprano Shirley Close ’70 E, alumni trio Promise F, the Olivetians G, the Olivet orchestra H, and a combined choir of more than 200 student singers. Yet as impressive as their performances were, the overriding theme throughout the morning was that all glory belongs to the Maker of Heaven and Earth. The movement of the Spirit was palpable through songs like “This Is Your house,” “Holy, Holy, Holy” and “Breathe On Me.”    “We gather in a spirit of celebration and thanksgiving,” said Dr. John C. ­Bowling I, university president. “We’ve come to dedicate a building, but we come for more than that. We’ve come to praise the God who has brought us to this glad hour.”    Dr. Paul G. Cunningham ’60 J, ­general superintendent emeritus for the Church of the Nazarene, delivered the dedicatory message declaring, “Chapel is the heart of campus” because it is “where so many important things happen.” Preaching from Philippians 4:12–13, he reminded the crowd that, “Our God is the God of the impossible. Whatever we run up against in life, God can do the impossible.”    Following the final prayer from University Chaplain Mark Holcomb 1), and as the crowd stood to disperse, the University orchestra began their final song. The trumpets declared what was already ringing in the hearts of those who attended: “Praise God from whom all blessings flow!”

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A video recording of the Dedication Service

for the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel is available at www.olivet.edu. Click on the “Olivet Live” graphic on the homepage, and then navigate to the “On Demand” tab.

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Fall 2010

The Olivetian

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House Thank You! With great appreciation, we recognize the 1,348* individuals, churches and organizations whose gifts and prayers have helped make the construction of Centennial Chapel possible! Your gifts will be used to transform the lives of generations of Olivet students, and their children and families, and their churches and workplaces, and their communities — and the long reach of all the places they touch. To learn more about sponsoring a seat in Centennial Chapel, contact the Office of Development at 815-939-5171 or e-mail development@olivet.edu.

* Gifts as of October 30, 2010. We praise God that we continue to receive pledges and gifts for Centennial Chapel daily!

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PHOTO by AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

Anyone who makes a gift of any amount will be recognized on the Wall of Thanksgiving.

12

in review

Homecoming

Always one of our f­avorite traditions, Homecoming 2010 was especially memorable this year.

From the classics like coronation, athletic competitions and class reunions, to the awe-inspiring d­ edication service for the Betty and ­Kenneth Hawkins ­Centennial Chapel, this Homecoming Weekend is sure to be one we will never forget!

Coronation Annie Weaver ’11, a secondary education major from Peoria, Ill., was crowned the 2010 Homecoming Queen.

Chapel

Marching Tigers

Holding a piece of the historical Berlin Wall, Dr. Paul C. Cunningham ’60, general superintendent emeritus, reminded us that the “God of the Impossible” is still breaking down walls in our world and in our lives. (See page 10 for more on Centennial Chapel’s dedication.)

The 160-member Marching Tigers, the largest marching band in the 110-member Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, entertained the crowd during halftime of Saturday’s football game.

RAs/RDs Reunion

As a special surprise, Mary Margaret Reed ’71/’75 (center, front) was honored for her 36 years of service to the University during the reunion of RAs and RDs.

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Want to see more photos? These are just a small sampling of the photos taken at

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

13

Homecoming 2010. Check out more of our favorites at www.flickr.com/olivet/collections.

2010

Tiger basketball In their first game of the 2010–2011 season, the Tigers pulled out an 87–76 victory over Point Loma Nazarene University.

Shirley Close ’70, an acclaimed soprano who has more than 30 years of experience in the major opera houses in America, Europe and Asia, was recipient of the 2010 Lay “O” Award.

‘O’ Awards PHOTO by AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

Gordon Wickersham ’47 was recognized with the Ministerial “O” Award for dedicating his life to the ministry and for his years of service through higher education.

Concert In the first concert to be held in Centennial Chapel, crowds were entertained by the comedy and ventriloquism of Taylor Mason and the inspirational music of award-winning artists Larnelle Harris and Selah.

Prayer Breakfast Just before hitting the road, over 500 alumni and friends were inspired by a special message from Dr. Bowling during the annual President’s Prayer Breakfast.

Mark your calendars!

Homecoming

O.N.You! for Kids

Class Reunions

The youngest Olivetians enjoyed games and activities during O.N.You! Homecoming for Kids.

Hundreds of alumni enjoyed reminiscing and catching up with their former classmates during class reunions. w

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2011

November 10–13, 201n1s:

unio Celebrating re 6, ’01, Classes of ’0 ’81, ’76, ’96, ’91, ’86, ’61 and ’71, ’66 and old Grads. Purple and G

shine.fm

14

The new wave of radio Shine.FM’s influence expands through online streaming, mobile apps and new signal Global expansion

By Seth Hurd ’06/’08 MOL

On a Monday morning, a teenager in Chicago, a soccer mom in northwest Indiana, a missionary in Brazil and a soldier deployed to ­Afghanistan all have one thing (and perhaps only one thing) in common. They’re all listening to the same song, thanks to Shine.FM.    What started as a daytime, college station in the 1960s has now grown into a multimedia music platform reaching 100,000-plus people over the airwaves in Chicagoland and northwest Indiana, as well as listeners around the world through online streaming. The Gospel through music

   In September 2003, WONU flipped from “Chicago’s Christian Variety” to its current format. The previous format had been centered on a large catalog of “recurrents” (songs from long established adult contemporary artists) to a more progressive hit format. ­Although it took some time and experiments to find the right programming formula, Shine.FM has experienced an explosion of growth in the last three years. An ever-increasing audience continues to be drawn to a hit music format featuring songs with spiritual depth and meaning.    “The purpose for the station is to take the Gospel out through music,” explains ­Johnathon Eltrevoog ’05, Shine.FM’s awardwinning music director. “Many Christian stations broadcast a lot of teaching and talk. Since our focus is music, it’s important that each song communicates something about faith and the cross.”

mission is not changing, the methods we use to deliver content will continue to evolve,” says Fletcher.

   New innovations in technology have­ vastly expanded what’s possible for ­radio and all other media outlets. Through ­online streaming, listeners in more than 70 countries around the world regularly tune in to Shine.FM.    “When I saw a world map highlighting the countries Shine.FM was streaming to, I was shocked,” says station manager Justin Knight ’97/’07 MOL. “When we became the first station to stream online in stereo sound, the goal was to take the radio station into the office buildings of listeners and provide the station for Shine.FM fans who had moved. No one had any idea the station would reach as far as it has.”    The online streaming of Shine.FM is now complimented by two additional online radio stations, ShineRock and ShineWorship. Both stations share a few key songs with the main station, but dive further into niche playlists to reach a more specific audience. The two stations also provide ONU students with true-tolife training tools, as students serve both as on-air personalities and behind-the-scenes producers.    “Our two streaming stations run the same software as ESPN, Clear Channel, and other top media companies” says Carl Fletcher ’92/’99 MBA, ONU communications ­professor. “And these aren’t just ‘practice stations.’ At this point, there are more people streaming ShineWorship each month than are listening online to our main station, Shine.FM.”    The two online stations continue to grow as more Christian music fans discover Shine.FM via iTunes radio. They also have the option to access the music nearly anywhere via free iPhone and DROID apps.    “By Christmas of next year, one in two Americans will own a smartphone. While our

What God’s up to

   Despite the technology advances, radio is still predominately delivered from a very tall antenna to cars, home and mobile ­devices in a specific area. In 2011, Shine.FM will ­expand onto 89.3, WNOU in Morris, Ill. The new station, which reaches further into the Chicago metro area and out towards an expanding suburban population, will sound ­almost the same as its parent station, with the exception of a few local underwriting spots specific to that area.    “Our original intent was to expand into Northwest Indiana, where a new station had bled over our signal and cut us off from thousands of listeners,” explains Knight. “But by the third time we were offered this station, our staff got a strong feeling that God was trying to tell us something.”    With the momentum behind the expanding brand, Knight looks to continue to expand within the Olivet region. But at the end of the day, it’s not about building some sort of CCM empire.    “We recently got a call from a 20something woman named Nikki, who wanted to share how Shine had introduced her to ­Jesus,” recalls Knight. “A year ago, Nikki was a self-proclaimed atheist, who happened to flip on the station after seeing a Shine. FM billboard. She liked what she heard. After ­listening to the music for a few months, Nikki walked through the doors of a church.”    “And that,” he pauses for a moment, “is why we’re expanding. This music points ­people to Jesus. So we want as many people as possible to hear the Message.”

Ladies Day 2011 presents

Patsy   Clairmont   WITH

April

16 2011

4 2011

Author of God Uses Cracked Pots, Normal is Just a Setting on Your Dryer, Sportin’ a ’Tude, The Shoe Box and several other best-selling books. April 16, 2011 Olivet Nazarene University Bourbonnais, Ill.

Date Night

February

with the

Parrotts

7 p.m.  |  Centennial Chapel

Enjoy the humor and practical wisdom of ONU alumni, authors and renowned relationships experts, Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott! Les and Leslie have been featured by:

Call 815-939-5385 or purchase tickets online at www.olivet.edu (select “Online Store” from the drop down menu).

For tickets and more information, call 815-939-5258.

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Tickets are $10 per person.

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onu alumni

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

15

Class Notes

Nominations

for new Alumni Board members

19 50s

Off Region – At Large

Martha (Reed) Garvin ’59 is celebrating twenty years of taking the Gospel around the world through music. She began her musical career on Olivet’s station WONU. Today she has a television show called Martha (Reed) Garvin “Musical Memories,” “Old Songs of the Faith.” Martha is married to George Garvin ’58.

  Geri (Caven) Bottles ’87, Eagle, Idaho | Geri resides in Eagle, Idaho with her husband, Mark. After earning her elementary education degree from ONU, Geri went on to earn a master’s from Boise State in 1990 and then taught in Olivet’s education department for one year. After teaching elementary school for five years, Geri has decided to stay at home and raise their three children, Jacob, John and Rachel.   Russ Bredholt, Jr. ’71, Winter Springs, Fla. | Russ is president of Bredholt & Co., and is in his 31st year advising business and nonprofits on strategy. Russ, who received an honorary doctor of letters from ONU in 1997, and his wife, Chris (Reed) ’71, have four grandchildren.   Gerald Oliver ’76, Plano, Texas | Gerald, who received his degree in accounting from Olivet, is currently a senior vice president with Behringer Harvard, a real estate investment trust based in Dallas. He is secretary/treasurer and co-owner of Hangar Workshop, a video and TV production company. He is married to Kathy (Granger) ’75 with whom he has two grown children and five grandchildren.   Robert Sloan ’68, Washington D.C. | Upon receiving his bachelor’s in English from Olivet, Robert entered the U.S. Army and graduated from Engineer Officer Candidate School. He was commissioned a 2nd Lt. in Military Intelligence and had a distinguished military career before entering the field of hospital administration. Robert has been president and CEO of Sibley Memorial Hospital for 25 years. He has been married to the former Janet Ruth Kwong for 38 years and has three children and four grandchildren.

19 60s Robert Sloan ’68 was recently elected to serve as president of The Society of Ceola Sloan and his four sons, the Friendly John, Bob, Gary and Tony Sons of St. Patrick of Washington, D.C. for 2010. The purpose of the society is “to foster and promote a knowledge of Irish culture and traditions; to keep alive the Celtic love for art, letters and history; to stimulate fellowship and good feeling among people of Irish extraction and lineage; and in every way to stimulate and strengthen better relationships ­between all people.”

On Region – Northwest Indiana District

19 70s

  Andrew Hardie ’04, Kokomo, Ind. | Following graduation from Olivet, Andrew joined the staff of Olivet’s Office of Admissions. He has since moved back home to Kokomo, Ind. and joined his family’s business, The Hardie Group Real Estate Company, which deals with homes, commercial buildings and building lots in the Kokomo/ Howard County area.

Judith Coomer ’71 was recently named 2010 School-Related Employee of the Year by the Sarasota County School District. Judy serves physically and Judith Coomer developmentally challenged students as the food and nutrition services manager at Oak Park School in Sarasota. At the luncheon, she received the keys to a new Toyota Corolla to drive for the next year, courtesy of a local Sarasota car dealership. Judy retired in 2006 after 37 years in food service at Olivet. She began working in food service while she was still a student, working her way up to general manager by 1976. At her retirement, the Judy Coomer Dining Room was officially named in her honor.

On Region – Southwest Indiana District   Doug Hanner ’92, Seymour, Ind. | Doug is the director of the Southeast Center for Congregations in Seymour, Ind. He recently became a minister in the Church of the Nazarene, currently serving as the associate pastor of worship at the Community of Hope Church of the Nazarene in Corydon, Ind. Doug and his wife, Trina, have two children, Abby and Emmitt. To vote for the 2011 Alumni Board, visit www.olivet.edu. Voting begins December 1 and will go through January 31.

Mark Soper ’76 recently published, “Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Windows 7 in 10 Minutes.” This book provides a fast way for experienced Windows users to get up to speed on the new features in Windows 7. Mark has worked with computers and related technologies for over 25 years, and specializes in technology education through training, writing and public speaking. He is the president of Select Systems & Associates, Inc.

Upcoming Events February 24–27, 2011

19 90s

WINTER GOLF OUTING

8 TH ANNUAL

Cindy (Huber) Alsip ’91 earned her Ph.D. in educational leadership from the University of South Carolina in August 2010. She is an assistant principal at a public high school and serves as an elected board member for Nazarene Educators Worldwide. Her husband, Jon ’91, is a police officer; son Jonathan is a freshman at Furman University; daughter Elizabeth is a sophomore in high school. The Alsips reside in Greenville, S.C.

Orlando, Florida

Marriott’s Grande Pines and Hawk’s Landing Falcon’s Fire • Metrowest

Kim Read-Smith ’93 has been teaching at San Pasqual Union Middle School for 13 years. She is in her fourth year of teaching music part-time to the district, grades K-8. In May 2010, she led a choir to a first place win in the treble clef choir category and earned a superior rating at the Music in the Parks Music Festival at Disneyland in Anaheim, Cal. While at Olivet, Kim sang in Orpheus choir all four years. Andrew Peckens ’93 and Jessica Buxton were married September 12, 2009, in Bedford, Ohio. ­Andrew works as a programmer/analyst for Swagelok in Cleveland. Jessica is a nurse practitioner with The Cleveland Clinic. They reside in Garfield Heights.

Andrew and Jessica Peckens

Pam (Dahlman) ’95 and Jimm Shepard: A girl, Reese Lynn, July 19, 2010. She joins big brother Ethan, 3. Pam is a licensed social worker and is employed at Metropolitan Family Services as an adoption preservation therapist. Jimm is self-employed at ­Assurepath. They reJimm, Pam, Ethan and Reese Shepard side in Park Forest, Ill. J e n n i f e r ( C ro w d e r ) ’96 and Jeff Noricks: A girl, Elizabeth “Libby” Katherine, April 2, 2010. She joins brother Zach, 3. Jennifer is employed as a piano teacher and church musician. Jeff works in web marketing for Village Green Apartments. They reside in Livonia, Mich.

Elizabeth “Libby” Noricks

Molly (Cropper) ’99 and E. Alvin Smalley: A girl, Nora Alyss, April 28, 2010. Alvin works for Harrison Steel as a scheduling manager. Molly teaches preschool for Lafayette Head Start. They reside in Attica, Ind. Nora Smalley

20 00s Lee Yowell ’00 has been appointed vice president for student development at Toccoa Falls College in northeast Georgia. He most recently served as associate dean of student development at Mount Vernon Nazarene University. Lee is married to Bridget (Nixon) ’00 and together they have Lee Yowell four children: Houston (8), Ashton (6), Grace (4), and Peyton (2). Heather (Rosene) ’01 and Mark Dzioba: A boy, Micah Joel, February 27, 2010. Micah joins brother, Caleb, 4. Mark is a middle school teacher and Heather is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Kenosha, Wis. CO NT INU ED, NEXT PA G E

The Gift that Keeps On Giving This Christmas season, why not consider a gift that will benefit both your family AND Olivet students?

  Charitable Gift Annuities are a popular giving option for many friends of Olivet, because they allow you to provide critical dollars for ONU students, while providing a lifetime of income for you and your family.   An Olivet gift annuity can provide significant tax benefits, and unlike certificate of deposit and money market rates, your gift annuity payments do not fluctuate during turbulent economic conditions!

For more information about these and other events:

We’d love to discuss options with you!

Contact the Office of Planned Giving at 815-939-5171 or e-mail development@olivet.edu.

visit www.olivet.edu or     call 815-939-5258

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onu alumni

 Class Notes, David ’02 and Kati ( O n d e r s m a ) F o rd ’03: A boy, Gideon Daniel, May 14, 2010. David works for the family business, and Kati is a family therapist. The Fords reside in Kankakee, Ill. Jamie ’02 and Barbie (Pool) ’99 Rucker: A boy, Barrett James, September 29, 2009. He joins big sister Hallie, 3. Jamie works as an IT analyst at Sallie May. Barbie works as a part-time school psychologist for IPS. The family resides in Fishers, Ind.

continued

Gideon Ford

Donny ’05 and Krystal Tollefson: A girl, Harper Marie, August 4, 2010. The family resides in Bourbonnais, Ill.

Barrett Rucker

Amanda (Goodbred) ’03 and Aaron ­Wilderman: A girl, Lydia Eileen, July 22, 2010. She joins twin brothers Silas and Levi, 2. Amanda is a stayat-home mom, and Aaron is a manufacturing engineer at Boston Scientific. They reside in SpenLydia Wilderman cer, Ind. Karla (Crawford) ’03 and Jason Aukerman: A girl, Bryar Rowan, born May 28, 2010. She joins big sister Brynne, 2. Karla is a second grade teacher, and Jason works in the Office of Development at ONU. The family resides in Bourbonnais, Ill. Kelly (Gates) ’03 and ­Nicholas Nesler: A girl, ­London Grace, January 12, 2010. Kelly is a first grade teacher in Manteno, Ill. She and her family reside in Bourbonnais, Ill.

In Memoriam

Lindsay (Myers) ’04 and Wyatt Partlow ’05: A boy, Kyler Dillon, January 26, 2010. Wyatt is a self-employed oil producer, and Lindsay is a housing administrator at Eastern Illinois University. They reside in Charleston, Ill. Kyler Partlow

Krista Pusey ’06 and Josh Patten were married August 15, 2009, in Meridian, Idaho. Krista also gained a beautiful  stepdaughter, Annabelle, 5 years old. Krista  is working as a pediatric nurse in Boise, Idaho. Josh is working for the National Guard and attending school fulltime for a degree in math education. All three reside in Meridian, Idaho. John ’06 and Natalie Huish: A girl, Madison Leigh, February 1, 2010. The family resides in Bradley, Ill.

Robert Clyde Ridall died at his home June 23, 2010. Dr. Ridall was born on a farm in Luzerne City, Pa. on March 9, 1921. On September 23, 1969, he married the former Lynda Joyce Carter, and she survives.    He served many years as an evangelist and Methodist pasDr. Robert Ridall tor. Dr. Ridall was a professor at Olivet Nazarene College from 1962 through 1969, where he taught numerous courses including New Testament Greek and biblical archeology. He was the author of two chapters in the Beacon Bible Commentary and wrote numerous other scholarly papers. He had visited Jerusalem four times and had taught at the Mount of Olives. Dr. Ridall held a Doctor of Theology degree from Concordia University. He earned five other degrees in his lifetime. Dr. John H. Cotner, Nazarene educator and pastor, passed away on August 9, 2010, in Marshal, Texas. He was born ­August 19, 1919, in Flasher, N.D. He married Marilyn Rogers June 3, 1973, in Chicago, Ill.    Dr. Cotner began his professional career at Olivet Nazarene College in 1952 as a professor in the Department of Religion. He later went on to serve as chairman of the Department of Religion and Philosophy as well as vice president of student Dr. John Cotner affairs. While at ONC, he co-authored a book and was often a contributor to the Herald of Holiness.    He served as senior pastor at several churches in Illinois and Louisiana. He remained active in the ministry, even after retirement, as a special speaker in area churches and supply pastor.    He was an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene since 1944. He was a faithful church member and upon retirement was bestowed the honor as pastor emeritus of the Huntington Park Church of the Nazarene (now Grace Pointe) in Shreveport, La.

Harper Tollefson

Krista, Josh and Annabelle Patten

David ’06 and Amy (Byrne) Giove: A boy, Vincent Lorenzo Vito, September 20, 2010. David Vincent Giove is a designer and developer for the Department of Information Technology at Olivet. They reside in Bourbonnais with children Noah (5), Frencesca (3), and Giovanna (1).

Bryar Aukerman

Mathew Gerhard ’08 has joined the staff of Kokomo Zion United Methodist Church in Kokomo, Ind. as minister of music. He previously served as minister of worship and Mathew Gerhard senior organist at First Baptist Church in Glendale, Calif.

London Nesler

makes “Education with a Christian Purpose” possible! Students featured in this issue are recipients of the following Foundation scholarships: Sara Byrne ’11 Dixie Turner Scholarship Nora Durkin ’13 Frank E. and Rose M. Springer   Scholarship Erica Engelbrecht ’11 Fred E. Douglas Scholarship Dee Ann Garvin ’12 Hugh G. and Gladys E. Kelly   Scholarship Billy Jackson ’11 Verne W. and Anita R. Tolbert   Gambill Scholarship Kenny MacDonough ’12 Detroit, MI First Church of the   Nazarene Scholarship Larry D. Watson Ambassador   Scholarship

Sarah Manchester ’11 William Brandenburg   Scholarship Marjorie L. McCoy and Harold   E. Phillips Scholarship

19 40s

19 90s

Donald Starr ’44 passed away March 15, 2010. He was born October 4, 1922. Donald married Vada (McNutt) ’44, and the couple had five children.    In addition to his deDonald Starr gree from Olivet, Donald had a master’s degree and Ph.D. in chemistry. He went on to receive a post-doctoral degree in Gerontology. Donald also taught for the U.S. State Department in India and was instrumental in gaining accreditation for Malone University as a liberal arts college.    Donald was a member of the Detroit First Church of the Nazarene and a dedicated ­churchman. He enjoyed travel, speaking at seminars on topics such as “good aging” and grief, and radio announcing. He once interviewed ­former president Herbert Hoover.

Samuel A. Miles ’98 passed away in his sleep from an undiagnosed heart condition on February 12, 2010. Sam was born August 20, 1971, in Danville, Ind., to Glen and Vonda Samuel Miles Miles. He graduated from Olivet Nazarene University with a degree in accounting. Sam was an active member of United Community Church of the Nazarene in Plainfield, Ind. He was a CPA and had worked for H&R Block and Citizens Bank. Sam enjoyed hiking and was a member of the Hendricks County Symphony.

19 50s Alyn Fletcher ’52 passed away June 7, 2010. He was born and raised in Lowell, Mich., where he met and ­m arried Gladys ­S tevens. In the sumAlyn Fletcher mer of 1951, he took a posi­tion at Olivet Nazarene College. He started in the business office and was later promoted to the position of comptroller. In 1954, he received the President’s Merit Award for his outstanding work. He left Olivet in 1964 when he returned to Michigan.    Alyn battled both rheumatic fever and chronic arthritis as a child. During those years, he developed a love for aviation while building model airplanes. After many years in a rehabilitation center, he went on to become a member of the Civil Air Patrol in World War II.

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

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John Rachan ’11 Ethel Mueller Scholarship Lauren Versweyveld ’11 Marion Fry Scholarship

To establish a student scholarship,

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Nathan Beard ’11 passed away at his home November 1, 2010. He was a current graduate student at Olivet, pursuing an MBA degree. Nathan was an industrial engineer.    He was born March 3, Nathan Beard 1980, in Kankakee, the son of Joseph and Sally Campbell Beard. He was a graduate of Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School and Northern Illinois University. He loved the outdoors, hunting and fishing. Kelle Ill ’12, of St. John, Ind., passed away November 3, 2010 in a tragic car accident. She was a current student at Olivet pursuing a nursing degree. Kelle was born February 15, 1978.

We’d love to hear FROM YOU!

or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

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20 10s

Kelle Ill

Send us your news and photographs. Please submit alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www. olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through e-mail or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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onu sports

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

17

TIGERTRACKS

JOE CARTER, JR. ’14

RACHEL RAYNOR ’14

Playing it

forward

CHRIS MAST ’11

CORY HAINLEN

H

omecoming 2010 was especially significant for Cory Hainlen ’11 of Bloomington, Ill. Not only is he an Olivet senior, but he also scored 27 points during the October 29 game against the Sea Lions of Point Loma Nazarene University — a career high for the 6'6" guard and forward.    Cory has been among the team’s leaders in both playing time and scoring. He currently ranks 16th on the all-time three-pointer list.    But Cory’s leadership extends far beyond the white striped boundaries of the basketball court as he strives to embody the athletic department’s motto: “Winning championships. Developing champions.”    Cory accepted Christ when he was in junior high and was baptized when he was a high school freshman. His family didn’t talk much about their beliefs, and so now, he has a passion for encouraging people to be more open about their faith.    “When I go home to visit, I play basketball with my friends,” he says. “After we By beat up on each other for a couple of hours on the court, then we can talk about Laura our faith.” Wasson ­Warfel    Cory also enjoys working with children.    “My summer job is at the State Farm Summer Day Camp in Bloomington,” he says. “This gives me an opportunity to be a role model for the kids as an athlete and a good citizen.”    Asked why he dons the Tigers jersey, Cory replies, “I chose Olivet because of the winning sports program. I also appreciate the quality coaching staff we have and all the tradition here.”    During his time at Olivet, the Tigers have advanced to the NAIA National tournament twice.    But in the process of winning, Cory discovered much more. “I’ve never experienced the level of camaraderie I have at Olivet,” he continues. “I’ve met a lot of new people here. I have a great new group of best friends.”    Would he recommend Olivet to other players? Cory answers with a resounding, “Yes!”    “I love basketball, and this is the most challenging program I’ve ever been part of. I would recommend Olivet to any player who really loves the sport. You’ll have a great time, and it will be rewarding for you.”

Senior Cory Hainlen a leader on and off the court

New!

MICHELLE DAVIS ’11

KENNY MACDONOUGH ’12

LAUREN VERSWEYVELD ’11

Tiger Sports app for Facebook 

Keep up with the latest headlines, view upcoming events, and find out which of your friends will be attending the next big game! Go to http://apps.facebook.com/olivet-athletics/# today.

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The new setter had some big shoes to fill. A freshman from DeKalb, Ill., Raynor replaced two-time NAIA All-American Erin Sikora and became Olivet’s first freshman starter at the position in 12 years. Through the end of the regular season, she’s averaged more than eight assists per match and is just one of two Tigers to play in all 130 of the team’s games this season. “She is going to continue getting better and better,” coach Brenda ­Williams said. “She has the talent and work ethic to do it.” After starting 71 straight games in three seasons at Mount Vernon Nazarene (Ohio), the senior midfielder transferred to Olivet and has made his mark. The Smithville, Ohio, native is the only field player to start all 18 of the Tigers’ games, and his 15 points (six goals, three assists) rank second on the team. He also leads the team with three game-winning goals, including a 20-yard blast just 35 seconds into the Tigers’ game on Oct. 23 against St. Xavier (Ill.), which was ranked No. 18 in the country. Olivet has a new queen. With a first-half goal against Holy Cross (Ind.) on Oct. 5, Davis became Olivet’s all-time leading scorer. The 59th goal of her career broke the old school record set by ­Emily Ouimette from 2001–04. Through the end of the regular season, the speedy senior forward from Bourbonnais, Ill., has ­t allied 61 career goals. She has made the All-Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic ­Conference First-Team every season of her career. The reigning  Chicagoland Collegiate ­A thletic Conference champion, ­MacDonough is looking to qualify for the NAIA Cross Country National Champ­ ionships for the fourth year in a row. The ­senior from Novi, Mich. hopes to improve on last year’s 18th-place finish, but the road there hasn’t been without challenges. Still working back up to speed after an extended illness this fall, MacDonough took 24th at the 28-team NAIA Great Lakes Challenge on Oct. 23 in Grand ­Rapids, Mich. A late start hasn’t slowed Lauren ­Versweyveld, the defending Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference champion. The senior from Delavan, Wis., sat out her freshman and sophomore seasons but is now making noise on the national level. In the spring, she took third in the 10,000-meter run at the NAIA Outdoor Track and Field National Championships. This fall, she led the Tigers in four of five events and is poised to improve on last year’s 46th-place finish at the NAIA Cross Country National Championships.

Editor’s Note: Statistics are as of November 3, 2010. For the latest sports updates, visit www.olivet.edu.

(Note: You must be logged into Facebook to view and use the app correctly.)

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This soft-spoken defensive standout lets his play do the talking. Through nine games, the junior linebacker ranks second in the NAIA in tackles per game (12.1) and second in the Mid-States Football Association in tackles for loss (11.5). A transfer from Grand Rapids Community College (Mich.), the Detroit native has been a welcome addition. His 18 tackles against No. 3-ranked St. Xavier (Ill.) on Sept. 18 is tied for the conference’s highest total this season. Said assistant coach Bobby Ladner: “He brings a sense of excitement to the field.”

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PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

PHOTO BY AMY DUERRWAECHTER ’10

purple FOR pink

The ONU volleyball, men’s soccer and football teams all traded in their purple for pink during the week of October 19 for Breast Cancer Awareness Month and to help raise support for breast cancer research through the Side-Out Foundation.

SPORTSSHORTS Football

   Wins have escaped the Tigers’ football team, which has lost its first nine games. Still, the season has featured plenty of individual highlights. After not playing since high school, junior Nate Lagacy ’11 (Manteno, Ill.) ranks third on the team in tackles. The linebacker scored Olivet’s only touchdown — a 94-yard fumble recovery — in the Homecoming game against undefeated St. Francis (Ind.). Junior Josh Long ’12 (Lakewood, Calif.) and freshman Demetrius Brown ’15 (Miami, Fla.) are also making an impact in their first full seasons. After an injury forced him to take a medical redshirt last season, Long leads the Tigers in both receiving yards (502) and touchdowns (5). Brown, meanwhile, has collected a team-high four interceptions.

Volleyball

   The season hasn’t been without adversity. The program’s streak of consecutive conference wins was snapped at 30, junior libero DeeAnn Garvin ’12 (Bloomington, Ind.) missed time with a concussion, and 10 losses to opponents receiving national votes pushed the Tigers down from their highest NAIA Top 25 ranking ever. Still, the Tigers (2214, 10-1) won their third straight Chicagoland ­Collegiate

Athletic Conference regular-season championship and are vying for a fifth straight NAIA National Tournament berth. Senior Sara Byrne ’11 (Downers Grove, Ill.) is fourth in the conference in hitting percentage (.322) and was named to the Liz Lykowski Memorial All-Tournament team for her performance at Indiana Tech in October. Most recently, junior Molly Goldbach ’12 (Redondo Beach, ­Calif.) was named to the all-tournament team at the Boneyard Brawl in Georgetown (Ky.), which included the nation’s No. 1 team, Lee (Tenn.).

the Chicago­land Collegiate Athletic Conference standings, the Tigers (13-4-1, 8-1-1) are shooting for their first NAIA National Tournament berth. Senior Brittany Hengesh ’12 (Canton, Mich.), junior Janel Schmitt ’12 (Geneva, Ill.) and sophomore Devin Johnston ’13 (Bloomingdale, Ill.) have started all 18 games and helped the Tigers outshoot every opponent since the first week of September. Schmitt has a team-high seven assists, and Johnson leads the team in shooting percentage (.185). Hengesh, meanwhile, is the leader of the defense. “Her leadership on and off the field is a major reason we have been able to do as well as we have this season,” head coach Bill Bahr said.

Men’s soccer

Men’s cross country

   A year after the program’s first NAIA National Tournament appearance, the Tigers are looking for trip No. 2. ­Senior forward Billy Jackson ’11 (White Stone, Va.) notched a team-high eight goals and five assists during the regular season, helping the Tigers (12-5-1, 9-2) to a second-place finish in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference standings. It’s not all about offense, though. Senior goalkeeper Kenny Huber ’11 (Grand Blanc, Mich.) and the defense have recorded seven shutouts, and Huber’s save percentage (.848) is tops in the CCAC.

   Ranked in the NAIA Top 25 since the start of the ­season, the Tigers are looking for their fifth consecutive team appearance at the NAIA Cross Country National Championships, held this year on Nov. 20 in Vancouver, Wash. Led by senior  Kenny MacDonough ’12 (Novi, Mich.), sophomore Kasey Ferrigan ’12 (Dixon, Ill.) and freshman ­Mitchell Dale ’14 (Rochester Hills, Mich.), the Tigers won the season-opening Midwest Classic, a 12team event hosted by Olivet at Aspen Ridge Golf Course in Bourbonnais. Since then, MacDonough and Ferrigan have each been honored as a Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Runner of the Week.

Women’s soccer

   How’s this for a finish? Ranked in the NAIA Top 25 for most of the season, ­Tigers earned wins in 12 of their final 14 games. Now, after a second-place finish in

Women’s cross country

   A fifth-place finish by sophomore Kortney Ellinboe ’13 (Hamilton, Ill.) helped the Tigers win the 25-team NAIA Great Lakes Challenge on Oct. 23 in Grand Rapids, Mich. The victory was the latest highlight for the Tigers, who are looking for their first Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference championship and first NAIA Cross Country National Championships appearance since 2007. Ellinboe set a career-best time in 5K (18:14) and joined senior Lauren Versweyveld ’11 (Delavan, Wis.) as CCAC Runner of the Week honorees this fall. The Tigers have been ranked in the NAIA Top 25 since the first regular-season poll.

Men’s tennis

   Sophomore Julian Kurz ’14 (Stuttgart, Germany) and freshman Landon Williams ’14 (Erie, Pa.) led Olivet to an unbeaten fall season. The team won all four of its dual team matches, and the Tigers’ tandem took second in doubles play in the NAIA division of the Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s National Championships on Oct. 14–17 in Mobile, Ala. The Tigers’ spring season starts with a home match on Feb. 29 against Wheaton (Ill.).

Women’s tennis

   Senior Erica Engelbrecht ’11 (Moline, Ill.) took fourth place in the top singles bracket at the Hinds-Kellogg ­Classic, hosted by Western Illinois in Macomb on Oct. 9. ­Engelbrecht, an NAIA All-American honorable mention last year, fell in the third-place match to Bryna Nasenbeny from NCAA Division I South Dakota State. The team’s spring season begins with a home match on Feb. 18 against St. Mary’s (Ind.).

Men’s golf

Can’t get enough TIGERS? Check out the new live streaming options at www.olivet.edu. (Click on the “Athletics” section.)

Live play-by-play Video feed of all home games and select away games Up-to-the-minute stats

   Sophomore Andrew Woodhull ’13 (Elmhurst, Ill.) fired Olivet’s lowest score in all four of the Tigers’ fall matches, including a 2-over-par 146 at Blackthorn Golf Club in South Bend, Ind. on Sept. 17–18. Woodhull’s performance, which included a 2-under-par 70 on the second day, landed him in a tie for 11th place at the 14-team event, hosted by Bethel (Ind.).

Women’s golf

   During Olivet’s inaugural season, sophomore  Nora ­Durkin ’13 (Peotone, Ill.) was named to the All‑­Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference team after tying for fifth place at the CCAC Fall Classic at Inwood Golf Course in Joliet, Ill. on Oct. 1–2. Editor’s Note: Statistics are as of November 3, 2010. For the latest sports updates, visit www.olivet.edu.

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ten questions WITH

TRAVIS

Graphic Design major from

C hicago , Ill .

Fall 2010

The Olivetian

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4. You are known by your peers as a very ­social, fun guy. What do you find humor in, and what keeps you laughing?    The things that make me laugh are very simple ­comedy or impromptu comedy, unfortunate situations in life and God’s compelling humor.

SMITH ’11

5. When diving into college life, what has been the hardest part to adjust to?    The hardest thing that I’ve adjusted to in college was ­creating and following my own schedule to balance my social, spiritual and academic life. 6. In what ways has your life changed now compared to before you came to Olivet?    In several ways. I am much more balanced mentally, physically, socially and spiritually. Before, I didn’t know how to prioritize and follow a schedule to be successful in my day. I am much smarter. I have learned how to glorify God through my artwork, and I am altogether better at creating art. I am much better at sustaining healthy relationships with friends and family. And most importantly, I am much closer to Christ in my relationship with Him. It was here at Olivet that God made clear some of His plans for my life and gave me a desire to fulfill them. 7. What gives you motivation and ­encouragement in your daily life?    God has helped me to develop a habit of conversing with Him throughout the day, and this is what gives me motivation and encouragement in my daily life. God always reaffirms that He has a plan for me and my future, and knowing this helps me get through the day. Also, reading His Word encourages me every day. And I always operate more effectively when I get a decent amount of alone time during my day. This motivates me for whatever daily struggles I must face.

Kinetic potential 1. What is your dream job for your future?    A dream career would be as a successful novelist, illustrator and founder/owner of a Christian clothing company.

8. What are some significant factors in your life currently that have impacted you?     The most significant factors in my life are my relationships, both with God and ­people.    My mom has played a huge role in my growth, and she ­continues to support me in my growth in Christ and my academic success. She continues to be an inspiration in my life.    My friends, both those whom I have met at Olivet and those I have back home, are also very important parts of my life.    Many professors have also been very impactful in my life. Some include: Dr. Olney of the sociology department and­ Prof. Greiner of the art department. Also, Woody Webb of the student development department has been a great inspiration to me. He has held me accountable and supported me ever since I came to Olivet. I can tell he cares about me and my success in life — like many other Olivet employees,.    The RA ministry is also a huge factor in my life right now and the relationships that I have begun to develop because of it.    And not to sound cliché, but God really is the biggest and most important factor in my life. I honestly can’t go a day ­without at least thinking about Him. My relationship with Him really is what keeps all of my other ones afloat.

   Although these were rough and rocky times, God ­continued to encourage me because I was truly convinced I belonged here. God also provided me with people at Olivet who encouraged me and helped me to continue to trust in the Lord. Because of His provisions, I never stopped believing it was God’s plan to have me here. Here I am on the verge of graduating from Olivet this May! Besides an irreplaceable education, God has blessed me with what I believe to be lifelong relationships with other students, professors and Olivet employees.

2. What are some of the significant challenges you overcame to attend ONU?    I am from the Cabrini Green neighborhood of Chicago. For many years, this area has been considered underprivileged, and the children there have unfortunately been introduced to a life without a good education — a life that involves violence, drugs, crime and other gang related activities.    Growing up in Cabrini, I was one of these children, and I ended up joining a gang myself. I had no motivation to achieve an education because I believed, like so many of my peers, that we had no real opportunity to become anything more than a stereotypical Cabrini Green resident.     When I was fourteen years old, the Lord introduced me to a Christian organization called By the Hand, and I completely surrendered my life to Christ when I was sixteen. God changed my entire lifestyle. I began to care about my education and achieved academic success in high school.    The moment I began to research Olivet, I knew it was the ­college God wanted me to attend. After I began at Olivet, I lacked the finances to register and struggled to remain a student here. For the next five semesters, I couldn’t register on time because of financial reasons.

9. What class do you enjoy the most right now?     My favorite class is career preparation because it consists of all of the other art students that I have gotten to know over the years. We have fun with one another as we all prepare for our art shows and careers. The professor, Scott Dombrowski, has always inspired me and challenged me to operate at my full potential. And I am excited that I get to work on the illustrations for the novel I plan to publish after graduation and display them for my art show in March.

3. You are one of many Olivet students with a God-sized story on how you ended up here. How do you ensure your past doesn’t define you?    I use my past for God’s glory by first realizing that everything is all about Him and that He is sovereign. Being a former gang member, my past haunts me and tempts me to believe it does define me. However, God helps me remember He has made me new in Him. God continues to use my testimony to bless others for His glory. I have found I can relate to various people with different rough backgrounds because of what God has brought me through. Also, I grew up without a father in my life and since I gave my life to Christ, God has helped me to view Him as my Father. He helps me not to be defined by my past life as a fatherless child.

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10. When you have free time, what do you like to do?    Some of things I enjoy doing with my friends in my free time are playing board, card and video games; watching movies; telling jokes; conversing (discussing a wide variety of things); and playing sports. Some of the things I enjoy doing on my own are reading, playing video games and watching movies, going for walks, observing nature, working on my novel series, ­designing artwork, creating, conversing with God, thinking while I listen to soft music, imagining and working out.

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admissions Education is about more than earning a degree. At Olivet Nazarene University, home of the 160-member Tigers Marching Band, students focus on being, becoming, believing — in the classroom, on the field and around the world.

PHOTO BY JONES PHOTO

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Schedule a visit today! Call 800-648-1463.

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Fall 2010 Olivetian