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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS Vol . 79, N o. 1

I s s u e T h r ee, 2 0 1 1

www.o livet .ed u

Ambition

untamed

Alumni on the fast track to their dreams page s 10 –13

In this issue:

BEARS CAMP TRIUMPHS OVER LOCK-OUT page 2

SHINE.FM LOOKS TO INDY FOR EXPANSION page 4

FALL SPORTS PREVIEW: OUTSTANDING FRESHMAN RECRUITS page 6

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onu alumni

 Class Notes,

continued

Pete ’01 and Katie (Sullivan) Bretzlaff ’01: A boy, Henry Sullivan Gustav, Feb. 12, 2011. Henry joined Emma Kate, 8 and James, 5. Pete teaches social studies at Kankakee Junior High School and is the varsity soccer coach for Kankakee High School. James, Emma and Henry Bretzlaff Katie recently completed her M.A. in art education from Ohio State University and teaches art, foundations and photography at Bradley-Bourbonnais Community High School. CORRECTION FROM ISSUE 1: Scott ’04 and Anne ( Wa d s w o r t h ) ’ 0 3 Whalen: A girl, Averie Hope, June 22, 2010. She joins big sister, Ellie, 2. Scott is the executive pastor at the Sterling First Church of The Whalen Family the Nazarene. Anne is taking a year off from teaching to be a stay-athome mom. They reside in Sterling, Ill. Ben ’04 and Stephanie (Quimby) ’04 Kumor: A boy, Luke Michael, born Feb. 12, 2011. He joins big brothers, Caleb, 5 and Nathaniel, 2. Ben is finishing up his medical residency Luke Kumor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, where Stephanie is the president of the House Officers Association Alliance. In July, they will be moving to Anchorage, Alaska, where they will be stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base. Erin (Ouwenga) ’05 and Nicholas Rogers: A boy, Samuel Alan, Feb. 7, 2011. He joins big sister, Kate. Erin is a stay-athome mom. Nicholas is in his third year of a gastroenterology fellowship at UT Southwestern. The family lives in Richardson, Texas.

Samuel and Kate Rogers

Marissa Lynn ’05 and Michael Coblentz ’99 were married March 19, 2011 in Kansas City, Mo. Michael and Marissa both work for Nazarene Theological S e m i n a r y, w h e r e Marissa is also a student. They reside in Marissa and Michael Kansas City, Mo. Coblentz Jennifer (Opperman) ’05 and Andrew Maynard ’05: A boy, Alexander Clark, Feb. 20, 2011. Andrew works on a team implementing electronic health records at SSM Health Care. Jennifer works in security at Vantage Credit Union. They reside in St. Louis, Mo.

Alexander Maynard

Denise Sullivan ’06 and Michael Caparula were married Dec. 18, 2010, in Chicago. Denise is a family and consumer science teacher at Hoopeston Area High School. They reside in Hoopeston, Ill. Michael and Denise Caparula

Landon ’06 and Kara (Klinger) ’05 DeCrastos: A boy, Josiah Andrew, Oct. 7, 2010. Landon is the pastor of Fishers Point Community Church, a new church in Fishers, Ind. Kara works for Truth@ Work, also in Fishers, Ind.

What’s Not to Love? Josiah DeCrastos

Meagan Hainlen ’07 will graduate from Indiana University School of Medicine in May 2011 with a Doctorate of Medicine. In June, she will start her residency in Neuro­d evelopmental Meagan Hainlen Disabilities at Texas Children’s Hospital/Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Rich Benjamin ’07 MOL, in just his fourth year as baseball coach at Judson University (Ill.), has become the winningest coach in school history. After spending three seasons as an assistant at Olivet, the Tennessee native moved north and has already built the Elgin school into a winner. The program made its first NAIA playoff appearance in 2008, then set the school record for wins in back-to-back seasons. This season, the team is on pace to win 40 games for the first time ever.

A Charitable Gift Annuity offers so much! You can … … supplement your retirement income

In Memoriam

… receive an income tax deduction

• 1950s

… invest in the life-changing mission of Olivet

Sylvia Adeline (Richardson) Jones ’50 passed away April 11, 2011, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer’s. Sylvia was born Oct. 26, 1928, in Irvine, Ken. She attended Olivet for one year where she became engaged to Richard M. Jones ’50. They were married June 27, 1950, in Ypsilanti, Mich.    Sylvia was a committed and involved Christian, a loving and devoted wife, a gentle and kind mother and grandmother, and a loyal and caring friend. She resided in Ypsilanti, Mich., and was a member of Detroit First Church of the Nazarene. Shirley Ann (Strickler) Crabtree ’55 passed away March 20, 2011. She was the daughter of Dr. Dwight J. ’29 and Mrs. L. Esther (Newman) ’31 Strickler. Strickler Planetarium, on the campus of Olivet, was named after her father. She was married to Rev. Robert E. Crabtree ’56 for 55 years.    Shirley taught public school at the elementary level for 27 years in the Kansas City, Grandview and Olathe school districts. She enjoyed golfing, skiing, hiking, horseback riding and traveling. Habib (Herb) George Abou Samra ’56 passed away Feb. 23, 2011, after a long illness.    Herb was the son of the late Georges Habib Abou Samra and Laurice Mujais Hobeika, the father of Debbie Samra Sellers.   Herb attended the American University of Beirut and graduated from Olivet Nazarene College with distinction and honors. He was an accomplished violinist at the age of 14. His love of classical music continued throughout his life.    He taught elementary school after graduating and in later years, was finance and training director for employees in several General Motor dealerships in Illinois. Thomas C. Murray ’57 passed away Dec. 12, 2010, in Tempe, Ariz. He was born Dec. 22, 1935, to Rev. Charles and Mary Murray. Thomas Murray   Tom excelled in football and track at Olivet, where he met and

Send us your news and photographs. Please submit alumni news,

less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all information, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via email to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through email or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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married Wilda L. Bennett ’57 on May 19, 1956. The couple moved to Xenia, Ohio. Tom worked as a machine operator for 42 years. He was a member of the Xenia Church of the Nazarene. Dr. Mary L. Shaffer, Nazarene educator and artist, passed away Nov. 22, 2010, one day before her 83rd birthday, in Meridian, Idaho.    Dr. Shaffer served 49 years in higher education, having earned two master’s degrees and a docMary Shaffer torate in education from Indiana University. Fortytwo of those teaching years were in Nazarene colleges and universities. She taught art at Olivet from 1964–1971. While a professor at ONU, she worked tirelessly to improve the aesthetic appeal of the campus, which is still enjoyed today. Dr. Shaffer was awarded the President’s Merit Award at ONU in 1971.   Dr. Shaffer taught at Northwest Nazarene University for 28 years, where she was named Faculty Emeritus in 1998. While at NNU, she assisted in the design of the Brandt Fine Arts and Convocation Center. There is a sculpture park named in her honor on the campus of NNU.   Dr. Shaffer’s award-winning paintings were inspired by her world travels and the beauty of Idaho. Her painting “Watercolor of Sun Valley Idaho” was chosen to go to the moon in the Endeavor Space shuttle in 1992. Many of Dr. Shaffer’s paintings are displayed in the Frieson Art Galleries on the campus of NNU.

• 1960s

Lawrence “Larry” Spaulding ’66 passed away March 2, 2011. He was born Sept. 22, 1940, in Hartford City, Ind. He was married to Linda (Steckhan) ’69 for 43 years.    He and Linda were very active at Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene.

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Request a FREE, personalized calculation of how a Charitable Gift Annuity could benefit you and Olivet. Contact us today to begin the conversation. Also, request our free guide, ONU Gift Annuities.

Ronald P. Schwada ’68 passed away on April 16 of complications from Multiple Myeloma. He wa s born D e ce m be r 13, 1946, in Columbia, Mo., to Paul and Alta (Slabaugh) Schwada. He married Lynda Dunn on Ronald Schwada November 21, 1970, in Gary, Ind.    Ron worked as the manager of office and staff services at Lane Electric Co-op until his retirement in 2009.

• 1970s

Paul L. Clack ’78 passed away Feb. 17, 2011. Born May 31, 1954, he was the son of former Wisconsin District Superintendent Robert J. Clack, Sr. After receiving his degree in psychology, he moved to San Diego, Calif. where he completed both his masPaul Clack ter’s degree and PhD. in psychology.    Paul will be remembered by many as a courageous friend with a sharp wit and contagious smile who did not let a diving accident and life bound to a wheelchair slow him down.

• 1980s

Kathleen Marie (Doerner) Lunn ’84 passed away April 3, 2011, in her home. She had fought small cell lung cancer for four years.    She was born May 7, 1961, to Ken and Marie Doerner. The family lived in Southern Indiana. She was married to Kevin Lunn ’85 in 1989. The couple had one daughter Margaret “Meg” Lunn.

in this issue

Issue 3 | 2011

The Olivetian 1

14 perspectives ›› Dr. John Bowling: How Olivet prepares students for the challenges that await them after graduation | page 3

Fire. Cancer. National crisis. David Goodwin ’11 and Carrie Stinson ’91/’98 MAPC reveal the power of relationships in persevering through it all.

onu news

›› Dr. Dennis Crocker ’75

and Allison Durham Speer take on key roles for Olivet | page 4

›› Shine.FM Network expands to Indy | page 4

cover

onu sports

Some people take a lifetime to achieve their wildest dreams. These alumni did it in 10 years or less.

C OV E R P H O T O BY S H E D D A Q UA R I U M / BRENNA HERNANDEZ

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Sports analyst Caleb Benoit ’06 shares what’s in store for the Tigers | page 7

They’re fast. They’re strong. They’re the latest addition to Tiger sports.

PHOTO BY AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

PHOTO BY MIRIAM ERNST

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›› Fall sports preview:

alumni zone

›› 105 candles for this month’s birthday boy! | page 19

The lazy days of summer? Not so much.

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

PHOTO BY AMY (DUERRWAECHTER) SMITH ’10

Departments of Nursing and Engineering team up for the journey of a lifetime

5 18

PHOTO BY DEREK BOWSHIER

View from the top: Robert Sloan ’68, president and CEO of Sibley Memorial Hospital

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snapshots

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Happy Olliedays!

A M Y ( D U E R R WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

The 2011–2012 year was kicked off with our favorite Olivet tradition — Ollies Follies!

heavylifting Students within Olivet’s Roaring Tiger Battalion were on hand to help new students move in.

Construction Zone

KY L I E M C G U I R E ’ 1 3

Construction for the new Student Life and Recreation Center is well underway, with a launch party planned for midnight on 12-12-12. Once completed, the 160,000 square-foot facility will boast an eightlane, 200-meter running track; two pools, including a 10-lane competition pool for men’s and women’s varsity swimming; a four-story rock climbing wall; four basketball courts; workout facilities; a large game area; a spacious central lounge; and several classrooms.

Bear down PHOTO BY NAM Y. HUH / THE ASSOCIATIED PRESS

After months of lock-out speculation, the NFL’s Chicago Bears, approximately 100,000 fans, and several Chicago and national media personalities returned to the Olivet campus for Training Camp, July 31–August 19. Here, QB Jay Cutler faces an impromptu press conference in front of Parrott Hall.

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Contributing Writers Caleb Benoit ’06 Nick Birkey ’07 Andy Corbus ’91 Amanda Jensen ’04/’06 M.O.L. Luke Olney ’10 Laura Wasson Warfel

Designer Donnie Johnson

A special thank you to long-time Olivet supporters, Martin Whalen Office Solutions, Inc., for loaning us the furniture needed for the photo that appears on pg. 8.

Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div.

Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03

Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography or as credited

Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D.

Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

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The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement.

Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div.

Photography Coordinator Amy (Duerrwaechter) Smith ’10

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Vice President for Graduate and Continuing Education Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 M.B.A.

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Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited.

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Copyright © 2011 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

perspectives

Issue 3 | 2011

The Olivetian 3

By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div., University President

Life

beyond the campus Following graduation each spring, stories start to filter back to the campus concerning the lives of our recent graduates. Their college days have ended, and the reality of finding jobs or making the transition to graduate school, which for so long was out there on the horizon, has become the present focus of their lives. The current economic realities, including high unemployment, complicate the transition all the more. I have three observations to make concerning the challenges that face our graduates.

First, it is in the midst of tough times, the value of a solid Christian education becomes most apparent. In days of economic prosperity, jobs are plentiful, and it becomes easier for college and university graduates to make the transition from the world of study to the world of work. But when times get tough, employers are looking for more than “warm bodies.” They look for employees who bring added value. It is in that environment that Olivet graduates seem to thrive. They have a solid education from a highly accredited university, and they also have a record of service. They have learned to live in community with others from different backgrounds, and they are men and women of character.

Second, it is important to remember that the value of a Christian liberal arts education goes well beyond vocational training. An Olivet education equips our graduates for life, as well as for making a living. Therefore, even in those situations when our graduates do have to wait a little longer than usual to find the right job, they are well equipped to succeed in the long run. Life is not a sprint; it is a marathon. Our graduates have what it takes to go the distance.

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Third, and most important, is the active presence of God in the lives of our graduates. Graduation is called “Commencement,” for it marks a new beginning. I have full confidence that the God who has been with our students here on campus will also go with them out there — wherever “there” might be.

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A year or two ago, I ended a baccalaureate sermon with these words for our seniors: As you graduate and leave Olivet, please be assured that God will go with you. In fact, He is already there in that distant city where you will move. He is there in the office, school or hospital where you will be working. God will sit beside you in graduate school. He already lives in the neighborhood or apartment complex where you will be living. God has promised to be with you wherever you go. Look for Him. Listen for His voice. He will guide you into the future. It is rewarding to hear the many success stories of our young graduates. Several are profiled in this edition of The Olivetian. Their stories remind me that the value of an “Education with a Christian Purpose” extends well beyond the years a student spends on campus.

onu news

ONU

Insider SUBMITTED PHOTO

Musical ambassador

▲ allison durham speer

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International authors

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livet professors Dr. Donald Daake and Dr. Edward S. Piatt ’11 Ed.D have written a chapter in the book, “Los No. 1 en responsabilidad social sustentable,” published by one of the largest publishers in Argentina. In English, the title means “The No. 1 in sustainable social responsibility” and is addressed to business and academic leaders who want to learn about cutting edge efforts on sustainability. The chapter by Daake and Piatt — the only English chapter in the book — summarizes the development of sustainability and moral education within the evangelical movement. It details the steps taken by Olivet Nazarene University to present a balanced view on environmentalism and sustainability.

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ospel music legend Allison Durham Speer is now partnering with Olivet Nazarene University as an ambassador and guest lecturer. A member of the Speer family — the famed “First Family of Gospel Music” — Speer has traveled around the country singing and spreading the Gospel for the past 25 years. She has been an integral part of the Gaither Homecoming Series and has performed at numerous Praise Gatherings and at the Nazarene General Assembly. The singer will be on Olivet’s campus several times each year to work with the Department of Music, giving special instruction to the music ministry teams Before Tomorrow, All Things New and The Olivetians. In this role, Speer will serve as a performance and communication coach.

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livet has appointed Dr. Dennis J. Crocker ’75 the new dean of the School of Professional Studies. Crocker comes to Olivet from his position as vice president for academic services and chief academic officer at Bethel College in Mishawaka, Ind. Prior to Bethel, Crocker served at MidAmerica Nazarene University as chair of the division of fine arts for 22 years and as associate academic dean for three years. He and his wife, Jeannie (Cone) ’77, both received bachelor’s degrees from Olivet — he in music and she in nursing, and he is the 2002 recipient of Olivet’s “O” Award. As dean, Crocker will lead ten departments, as well as work closely with the dean of the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies.

Shine Indianapolis

he Shine.FM network, broadcast from the campus of Olivet Nazarene University, has made a recent move toward a major expansion in Indianapolis, Ind. In the coming months, Shine.FM plans to work alongside an existing ministry in Indianapolis and will launch its “Positive. Hit. Music.” format across the region this fall. This will be in addition to its four current stations in the Chicagoland and northwest Indiana regions, which reach approximately 100,000 listeners. “This is a great opportunity to expand the ministry and reach of Shine.FM,” says station manager Justin Knight ’97/MOL ’07.

Dean appointment

A M Y ( D U E R R WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

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▲ dr. dennis j. crocker

HOMECOMING 2011

save the date!

Featuring a special concert with the Gaither Vocal Band

SOL OUTD

November 9–13 Celebrating reunions: Classes of ’06, ’01, ’96, ’91, ’86, ’81, ’76, ’71, ’66, ’61 and Golden Grads

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Register by calling the ONU Ticket Line at 815-928-5791 or online at www.olivet.edu.

Issue 3 | 2011

The Olivetian 5

freshman orientations

A M Y ( D U E R R WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

In June, Olivet hosted two freshman orientations, each bringing over 1,000 people to campus. During their weekend visit, incoming freshmen chose their residence halls, met some of their professors, became acclimated to Olivet’s campus and perhaps even met their roommates.

During times when Olivet is not using summer conferences its facilities, there is a good chance

I KNOW WHAT ONU DID    It happens every year. After the excitement of graduation, families are enlisted in helping their recent graduate pack four (or five) years of possessions into one vehicle.   The campus is abuzz with activity all day long. With arms full of boxes, moms and dads, older brothers and little sisters all take trips out to the car, carrying memories as they go. Toward late afternoon, the buildings and parking lots start to look empty as the former students move out of Olivet and into the next chapter of their lives.    Once the last car has pulled away, the University is still. The noises that characterize a campus full of 2,000 college students have been replaced by the peaceful sounds of chirping birds and a summer breeze drifting through the blossoming trees. An eventful year — packed with academics, social activities and celebration — is over.    … for 24 hours!

nyc NYC 2011

2011 Summer Highlights Summer school

This year, 486 traditional undergraduate students stayed throughout the summer to take classes. In addition, regular graduate and continuing studies classes continued throughout the summer months, including several academic intensives in both the master’s and doctoral programs.

mission This summer, over 100 Olivet students and professors traveled abroad with Missions in Action trips

(M.I.A.). Destinations included Argentina, Haiti, Ghana, Thailand, India, Zambia, Vancouver, Rwanda and South Korea. Several members of Olivet’s faculty and staff visited countries including Albania, Ecuador, China, Tokyo, Swaziland and South Africa. In May, 55 students from Orpheus Choir, led by Dr. Jeff Bell, spent a week at Africa Nazarene University in Nairobi, Kenya.

renovations and As with every year, sevbuilding projects eral improvements were

made to the Olivet campus throughout the summer. Most significantly, construction on the Student Life and Recreation Center began in the middle of May. The projected completion date for the building is December 12, 2012.

athletic camps

Hit the ground running   Classes resume the very next day with the onset of the first block of summer school courses. Mission teams rise in the wee hours of the morning to catch the bus that will shuttle them to their flight at O’Hare Airport. The sound of a bulldozer and jackhammer can be heard in the parking lot which will soon house the Student Life and Recreation Center. Buildings and grounds crews ready the campus for a community event the following day.   The Monday following graduation commences Olivet’s summer season — a time that is arguably just as busy as the school year.    “Students who stay on campus during the summer for the first time are often surprised at how much goes on,” says Director of Conference Services Jana Hacker. “We start right away with events after graduation!”

From July 5–10, over 20 Olivet representatives traveled to Louisville, Ky., for the Nazarene Youth Conference 2011. With over 6,300 Nazarene students in attendance, Olivet’s admissions staff used the opportunity to recruit a new generation of Olivetians. “A World Unbroken” was the focus of the week, which included music, special speakers and even an ONU flash mob! On the way back home, the Olivet staff hosted a day of fun at King’s Island Theme Park for the youth of Olivet’s four-state educational region.

Olivet’s athletic department hosted multiple day-time camps and overnight camps for children and youth of all ages. This summer’s camps included basketball, volleyball, soccer, softball and baseball, and more than 800 children and youth participated. Coaches and players from Olivet’s sports teams facilitated the camps, where participants not only improved their athletic skills, but also learned about life through daily devotionals.

president’s picnic

Have you ever seen Dr. Bowling compete in a watermelon seed spitting contest or Jill Bowling wearing cat eye glasses? Ever seen Olivet’s professors in jeans or even shorts? Each summer, University President John Bowling and his wife Jill host a fun and casual picnic for the families of all ONU faculty and staff at Olivet’s Warming House. The picnic has a different theme every year — country, luau, rodeo (complete with pony rides), camping, and many more! This year’s theme was patriotic, since the picnic was held on Flag Day.

chicago bears training camp

For the last 10 years, the Chicago Bears have made Olivet’s campus their summer home. In addition to the team, Olivet hosts dozens of NFL staff members, journalists, sports reporters, vendors and thousands of fans each day! This year’s NFL lockout caused a delay to the football season, jeopardizing the training camp altogether. But soon after the settlement, the Bears arrived on campus in full force, occupying Olivet’s dorms, dining hall and the practice fields during one of the hottest summers in recent memory.

M A R J O R I E ( FA L L ) V I N S O N ’ 6 9

By Luke Olney ’10

SUMMER

A M Y ( D U E R R WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

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LAST

that another organization is! One of the largest conferences held at Olivet each year is Celebrate Life, sponsored by the Nazarene churches on Olivet’s region. This year was its 25th year of holding the event at Olivet. Approximately 2,000 teenagers occupied the campus, competing in athletic and artistic events and staying in the dormitories.    When allowing other groups to use its facilities, Olivet has three main goals: 1) to support and partner with the Church of the Nazarene; 2) to support and partner with the local community; and 3) to bring in extra revenue to put toward University expenses. “Olivet has been blessed with some beautiful facilities,” says Jana Hacker, “and we are pleased that during the summer we are able to share those with our community, the Church of the Nazarene and others.”

prep week for Each year at the end of May, ministry teams Olivet’s ministry teams (The

Olivetians, Before Tomorrow, All Things New) spend two weeks learning music and preparing for a summer of traveling and ministering throughout Olivet’s educational region. This year, gospel music favorite Allison Durham Speer visited campus to provide each group with additional training, marking the beginning of a partnership between Olivet and the Nashville native; she will serve as an Olivet ambassador and frequent guest lecturer in years to come.

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“My favorite theme,” remembers Marjorie Vinson, administrative assistant to the president, “was the 1950s theme we did in 2008. The Olivetians sang songs from the 1950s and the girls wore poodle skirts. That was fun!”

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onu sports AS OF AUGUST 17, 2011

FRESHMEN TO Stand-out recruits

WATCH

for the 2011–2012 athletic seasons

By Caleb Benoit ’06

football

  Among Payne’s high school nicknames was “D-Payne,” perhaps for the feeling he inflicted on other football players.   The running back averaged more than 11 yards per carry and scored 28 touchdowns during his senior season at Central High School (Clifton, Ill.). Now,

he’s tackling the challenge of learning a college playbook.   Payne says he never runs out of energy, which is helpful when learning a new offense. He decided on Olivet after first-year head coach Brian Fish spelled out how Olivet football would be different under the new regime. Assistant coach

david payne

Chebanse, Ill.

volleyball

  It’s a tall task, but if there’s a freshman who’s tall enough, it’s Lenzi.    The right-side hitter stands 6 feet tall, and she’s being asked to help replace Tara Schmidt, the Tigers’ three-time NAIA AllAmerican who graduated this spring. That’s no small role to fill for the Tigers in their quest to get back to the NAIA National Championship.    Lenzi’s club volleyball career took her to tournaments all over the country. Now, after she considered continuing her career

kaia lenzi men’s soccer

  Simoes planned to join Olivet’s soccer team last season, but a one-year layover hasn’t lowered head coach Justin Crew’s expectations for the Tigers’ latest Canadian import.    “He has me starting and playing 90 minutes, so that’s a big deal to me,” said Simoes, a native of suburban Toronto. “He has a lot of trust and confidence in me, so I have to go out there and do what I’m expected to do.”

at bigger schools, she’s in the lineup at Olivet, a place she couldn’t resist.    “I visited, and I just fell in love with the campus,” she said.    An all-county player in high school, Lenzi also has experience playing the middle blocker position. That versatility will help the Tigers, who expect big things from her.    “She’s just scratched the surface of her potential,” head coach Brenda Williams said.

waukegan, ill.

   Crew originally scouted Simoes two years ago, and that led to a scholarship offer. But paperwork complications prevented him from coming to Olivet right away, so he spent last year playing in Portugal. The two kept in touch, and Simoes turned down an offer to stay in Europe to return to North America and play at Olivet.    Simoes, a center midfielder, is penciled in the starting lineup — an opportunity reserved for only the most talented

brandon simoes women’s soccer

  Olivet’s recruiting of Silver started when head coach Bill Bahr saw her play at a Celebrate Life event as an eighth grader.    Three years later, Bahr remembered her when she attended an Olivet soccer match. She had already crossed Olivet off her list of potential colleges because she thought she played poorly at a summer camp. Bahr had other ideas.    “He said he loved the way I played,” Silver said.    Five years after her first encounter with Olivet soccer, Silver is vying for a starting role as a center midfielder or forward on the Tigers’ team, which is coming off its most successful season in school history.

  Going into her senior year of high school, Odle had decided she was going to walk on at a Big Ten university to continue her running career. That was before, out of the blue, she received a postcard from Olivet.    So she filled it out and sent it in, which led to a phone call from head coach Mike McDowell. And that led to a campus visit.

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homer glen, ill.

   “I just absolutely loved it,” Odle said. “I love the people, the school, the team. It’s one of those things that’s definitely a God thing.”    Visiting Olivet’s campus helped convince her to join the Tigers’ cross country team, which jumped back on the national radar by qualifying for the NAIA National Championships last season.    Odle owns the 5K record at Southport

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indianapolis, ind.

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freshmen. He said he came to Olivet because he knew the coaching staff would make him an even better player and give him the best shot at playing professionally. Two former Olivet players have signed professional contracts this year.    “I’m obviously not the best player,” he said, “but they’re trying to make me better and better and better. They’re trying to push me to the max, even when I think I can’t go any further.”

  Silver has accomplished much in the meantime. She’s overcome a reading disorder and was named an Illinois State Scholar and a member of her high school’s National Honor Society. She’s also decided on a career path — nursing. When her cousin was diagnosed earlier this year with Lemierre’s syndrome, a rare disorder that causes blood clots, Silver stayed with her in the hospital and developed a passion for the work nurses do.    Silver has some work to do on the soccer field, too.   “My goal is to be a starter by the end of the season,” she said.

karlee jo silver cross country

Nate Brown sold him on the team aspect of the program. Being close enough to drive home to do laundry doesn’t hurt, either.   One of Payne’s goals is to be the starting running back by the end of the season.    The other is pretty simple: “We want to win as many games as we can.”

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High School, on the south side of Indianapolis, but she knows past accomplishments aren’t enough to get by at the next level. To prepare for her first college season, she upped her training this summer from 25–30 miles to 50–60 miles a week.    Running won’t be the only thing occupying Odle this fall. A double major in political science and foreign policy, she also has her sights set on law school.

Issue 3 | 2011

P H O T O BY A M Y ( D U E R R WA E C H T E R ) S M I T H ’ 1 0

FO R TH E L ATE S T S C O R E S AND S P O RTS NE W S , VI S I T W W W.O L I V E T. E DU .

fall sports

football

PREVIEW

Last season: Despite some close games, the Tigers finished the season without a win. Two returnees were named to the all-conference team: senior wide receiver/punter Josh Howells (Sycamore, Ill.) and junior wide receiver Josh Long (Lakewood, Calif.).

This season: New head coach Brian Fish ’97/’00 MAT and the Tigers have their work cut out for them. Five of the Tigers’ first six games come against teams ranked in the NAIA Top 25 poll, including No. 6 Marian (Ind.) and No. 2 St. Xavier (Ill.). Another challenge will be inexperience: freshmen make up about half of the team’s roster. Who to watch for: Af ter sitting out last season, 6-foot-2 junior Sam Smidt (Mor ton, Ill.) is competing for the starting quarterback job. As a s m idt freshman in 2009, he broke the school record for touchdown passes in a game with five against Southern Nazarene (Okla.).

Did you know? Fish played tight end for Olivet’s team that reached the NAIA National Championship game in 1998. He was named an NAIA All-American honorable mention that season. Quotable: “Our success will be measured by how we deal with the things we can control — how we compete and what kind of teammates we are,” Fish said. “We want to be a team the University and the community can be proud of.”

volleyball Last season: The Tigers’ streak of consecutive national tournament appearances was broken at four, but not before they claimed the CCAC regular-season title for the third straight year. This season: Returning players are hungry for the postseason, and seniors DeeAnn Garvin (Bloomington, Ind.) and Terese Byrne (Downers Grove, Ill.) will fill the leadership roles vacated by NAIA All-Americans Tara Schmidt and Terese’s sister, Sara. The bench will also have a different look: Jill Rokosik, formerly the head coach at Trinity International (Ill.), replaced assistant Sue (Webber) Jacobson ’10 MAT, who is now coaching at Saint Louis University (Mo.).

Who to watch for: Senior mid-

goldbac h

dle blocker Molly Goldbach (Redondo Beach, Calif.), last year’s team MVP, helped the Tigers end their

spring season with a win over NCAA Division I Western Illinois University.

Did you know? Coach Brenda Williams

felt last year’s team lacked chemistry, so this year’s squad went on a mission trip and worked at the Sun Valley Indian School in Arizona. Flying would have been faster, but players boarded a train for a 31-hour journey together.

Liz Abfall (Mount Prospect, Ill.) and sophomore Rachel Kilbry (Spring Lake, Mich.) are expected to pick up the slack on defense. That list doesn’t include junior Devin Johnston (Bloomingdale, Ill.), who started all 22 games last season.

Who to watch for: Midfielder

men’s soccer

Janel Schmitt (Geneva, Ill.), a fifth-year senior, earned NAIA AllAmerica honors last season. “She controls the game for us,” Bahr said. “She sets the tempo.”

Last season: The Tigers improved their

Did you know? Of the 26 players on

conference record for the second straight year, but their postseason run ended in the CCAC Tournament semifinals against St. Xavier (Ill.), a team they had beaten earlier in the season.

the roster, 23 are from Illinois, Indiana or Michigan.

Quotable: “Our program has gotten used to going to nationals,” Williams said. “A lot of teams would be happy with our (2010) record, but our goals are much higher. We’re not satisfied with that.”

This season: Coach Justin Crew ’01/’08 MOL believes his players’ talent will overcome their inexperience. He calls this year’s recruiting class the best he’s had, and those newcomers join a pair of sophomore leaders: defender John Nardozzi (Oakville, Ontario, Canada) and midfielder Eugene Burndam (London, England). A 1-0 exhibition loss to NCAA Division I Northern Illinois University was encouraging. This year’s schedule includes a home match against Hastings (Neb.), the defending national champions. Who to watch for: Junior forward

Quotable: “We’re always going to take that approach,” Crew said of his team’s defenseorientated style of play. “That won’t change as long as I’m here.”

women’s soccer Last season: Everything went right for the Tigers, earning the first NAIA National Championship appearance in school history.

This season: Eight returning starters leaves just a few holes in the lineup, and 10 freshmen offer coach Bill Bahr ’96/’02 MBA plenty of options. The 17th-ranked Tigers will miss all-American Brittany Hengesh, but junior Katrina Holm (Antioch, Ill.), senior

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sure on themselves,” Bahr said of his returning players, after qualifying for last year’s national tournament. “I don’t know if we have any outside pressure, per se, but they put some pressure on themselves to be successful like that again.”

cross country Last season: The men’s team struggled with injuries, illness and inconsistency and missed the NAIA National Championships for the first time in five years. The women’s team flew back onto the national radar by winning the CCAC title and qualifying for nationals. punch of senior Justin Jones (Oakwood, Ill.), junior Kasey Ferrigan (Dixon, Ill.) and sophomore Mitchell Dale (Rochester Hills, Mich.) is expected to lead the men’s side. Leading the women are senior Lauren Versweyveld (Delavan, Wis.), who extended her undergraduate studies to run one more season, and junior Kortney Ellingboe (Hamilton, Ill.).

Did you know? Freshman Brandon Simoes and sophomore Michael Da Silva grew up playing soccer together in their hometown of Brampton, a suburb of Toronto.

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Quotable: “I think they have some pres-

This season: The 1-2-3 all-conference

Logan Engelkes (Winnebago, Ill.) is one of two players left on the roster who played on the 2009 team that qualified for the e n g e lk e s national tournament. He tied for a team high with five assists last season.

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NEWS AND NOTES Sue (Webber) Jacobson ’10 MAT, is now an assistant volleyball coach at Saint Louis University (Mo.), which has qualified for the NCAA Tournament twice in the last three seasons. Jacobson, 30, spent the last three years as an assistant at Olivet.    “It says a lot for our program and a lot for Sue,” Olivet coach Brenda Williams said. “We’re going to miss her like crazy.”    Jacobson, a native of Herscher, Ill., was an all-conference player at the University of Illinois. During her tenure, the Tigers won 30 of 31 conference games, advanced twice to the NAIA national tournament and reached a No. 12 national ranking.

Ben Heller ’13 pitched this summer in the Alaska Baseball League, a two-month wood-bat showcase for college players. Playing for the Athletes in Action Fire, a sports ministry team, Heller finished as his team’s best relief pitcher. But the work he did off the field was perhaps the most important.    “We’re there to share our two loves — baseball and our faith in Jesus,” said Heller, who finished with a teambest 2.20 ERA in 14 appearances. “I got to play at a really high level, and I also got to grow in my faith and share it with other teams.”

After coaching the Waldorf College (Iowa) baseball team to its first ever .500 season last season, Chad Gassman ’02 MAT has taken over as head coach at University of Pikeville, an NAIA school in Pikeville, Ky.   Gassman was an assistant at Olivet when the Tigers qualified for back-to-back NAIA World Series in 2002 and 2003. This summer, he won coach of the year honors for leading the Hyannis Harbor Hawks to a division title in the prestigious Cape Cod Baseball League, a showcase for top college players.

Who to watch for: Sophomore Chantalle Falconer (Byron, Ill.) led the women in three of seven events last year and finished third among Olivet competitors at the national meet.

Falconer

Did you know? Sophomore Megan Perigo (Fort Wayne, Ind.) has returned to the team after missing all of last season with a stress fracture in her leg. “She has a lot of talent,” coach Mike McDowell ’09 MOL said. Quotable: Will missing last year’s national meet serve as motivation for the men’s team? “No question about that,” McDowell said. “The guys are already discussing how bad last season was and how they’re going to improve.”

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Becky DeRuiter ’16 is the volleyball team’s first Class of 2012 signee. A middle blocker, DeRuiter led Chicago Christian High School in Palos Heights to Illinois’ Class 2A state championship last year.

Alex Rodriguez ’09 has started his first season as the head volleyball coach at Herscher High School in Herscher, Ill. Rodriguez, 25, served as a student assistant coach during his senior year at Olivet. A native of Worth, Ill., Rodriguez is also a driver’s education teacher at the school.

Tim pulled an all-nighter for today’s Calculus III exam. He interned with Department of Social Services, then ran 400 meters in 48 seconds flat. And he still had time to close the deal.

Together.

The Olivet experience is possible because of friends like Tim. Your gifts to Friends of Olivet will equip the next generation of Olivetians to make an impact in their homes, in their churches, in their communities. Together, our reach spans the globe.

Olivet Nazarene University.

Tim ’90 and Mary Schweigert have been faithful supporters of Friends of Olivet since 2000.

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feature story 2011 nursing and engineering mission trip By Laura Wasson Warfel

hearing the roar

of the mighty igauzu falls. gazing at constellations in the southern hemisphere

Issue 3 | 2011

The Olivetian 9

BLESSING

ARGENTINA

sky from laguna blanca.

Swatting giant mosquitoes. Eating pizza with no red sauce — just cheese, ham, egg, olives and peppers.    But for the Olivet students and professors who spent two weeks [May 20 through June 4] on a mission trip in Argentina, their entire trip was memorable.

Professor Tiffany Greer, Professor Mike Morgan, Ashley Morgan, and Freddy Shoffstall share some of the highlights from their work in Argentina. They will always remember …

   “The easiest way we found was solar disinfectant. Putting unclean water in a bottle in the sun for six hours kills most of the bacteria that could make the people sick. I gave training, then left materials on laminated sheets for Persida to use in explaining this to the families.”

… How God made it possible for them to go

A s h l e y: “I work at Pizza Hut. One weekend, I told God that I would put all the money I earned toward my trip. I made the most I’ve ever made.”

… What they learned

T i f fa n y: “I joined the group a little late as a substitute for another professor. The details came together so quickly and easily. I knew that this was what the Lord wanted me to do. This was the longest time I’d ever been away from my 8-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son.” … People they met

Trip at a glance • 27,000 miles — 24,000 miles by air and 3,000 miles by land • 25 bags in all — one bag filled with toothpaste and toothbrushes only; other bags packed with blood pressure cuffs, stethoscopes, thermometers, a baby scale, a standing scale, blood sugar testing machines and test strips, wound care supplies • 22-hour bus ride from Buenos Aires to Laguna Blanca • Mission: Assist the Argentine Church by conducting medical clinics; providing dental hygiene training; distributing clothing; evangelizing to children; and helping the Toba people have clean drinking water

F r e d d y : “Persida, the Toba nurse who worked with us, works harder than I will probably ever work in my life. She’s the most giving person I’ve ever met. Every day, she works with people who are sick and have complaints. She has to be so strong in her Christian faith to continue to do that.”

A s h l e y : “Carlos [a global Nazarene missionary] showed us the character of Christ. He drove the bus 20 hours by himself, and never complained or got angry. A very patient man and really funny, too!” T i f fa n y: “Carlos found us the best food. He made sure we had mosquito repellant, sunscreen

and water. His stories about Argentina and the people helped us connect. The time he spent with us was his vacation time.”

… Cultural differences they noticed

M i k e : “Ita, a hairdresser, came with us from Buenos Aires. Every day, she washed and cut the Toba people’s hair. She also did lice treatments when needed.”

we were there [in Buenos Aires], we had dinner with the youth pastor [of Moreno Church of the Nazarene]. We spent two hours eating, and then two hours drinking maté [tea] and talking. I realized this wasn’t just for us. That is what they do all the time.”

… Care they provided

F r e d d y: “The clinics were like a doctor’s office on caffeine. Everyone worked very quickly, but took breaks when they could. I translated conversations between Mike, Rosalie [Tuttle], Tiffany and Persida, the nurse. I also translated for the nurses a few times to help them communicate instructions to patients.” As h ley: “When we took out the toothbrushes and toothpaste to give to the kids, they began grabbing because they wanted the stuff so badly. We learned that for something free in a poverty situation, we had to give out things one at a time.”

• 900-plus patients served during five days of six-hour clinics

T i f fa n y: “On the first Sunday

A s h l e y : “I wore the same clothes over and over during the five days we were traveling from village to village. I realized that I don’t need to spend all my money on clothes. We couldn’t use our cellphones. I had more free time to read my Bible and talk with God. My fire for the Lord was reignited. I feel God calling me to missions. I want to do more medical mission trips for longer periods of time.” F r e d d y: “It’s not about what we did while we were there. It’s about the relationships we made. Even though Spanish and communication were the reasons I was there, I built relationships with the Toba kids. God used us as a blessing to them. Please pray for the Toba people.

A s h l e y : “The Argentine people are very friendly and

welcoming. Sharing is part

of their community. Soccer is a huge part of their life. We saw people playing soccer everywhere. … Outreach they did

M i k e : “This was my ninth mission trip to work with the Toba people. I wanted to find some way to help each household purify their own water. We researched this in the engineering department before the trip.

   “Toward the end of our trip, Carlos took us to Iguazu Falls. As we looked at the Falls, he said to me: ‘When God made these, he knew you would see them one day.’ That brought everything into focus. God’s love is so big. He has everyone’s heart in mind.” SUBMITTED PHOTOS

OLIVET TEAM MEMBERS

Ashley Borggren ’13 (nursing), Kankakee, Ill.

Treavor Dodsworth ’14 (biology, religious studies), Vernon, Colo.

Clarissa Cox ’13 (nursing), Beardstown, Ill.

Brianna Lomas ’13 (Spanish, accounting), Loves Park, Ill.

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Ashley Morgan ’11 (nursing), Coldwater, Mich.

Melissa Tanner ’12 (nursing), Kankakee, Ill.

Holly Pflederer ’12 (nursing), Morton, Ill.

Kori Yergler ’12 (nursing), Gibson City, Ill.

Freddy Shoffstall ’12 (Spanish education), Holt, Mich.

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Prof. Mike Morgan (engineering) Dr. Rosalie Tuttle (nursing) Prof. Tiffany (Hardy) Greer ’97 (nursing)

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Ambition

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Who says it takes a lifetime

to make your dreams come true?

PHOTO BY MIRIAM ERNST

PHOTO BY SHEDD AQUARIUM / BRENNA HERNANDEZ

   Just barely out of college, these alumni are already on the fast track to achieving success in its various forms. Whether they aspire to climb the corporate ladder, travel the world, or give their lives away in full-time ministry, Olivetians are making an impact in their homes, in their churches and in their communities around the globe.    These alumni, graduated ten years ago or less, provide a quick glimpse into what can transpire when an Olivet education, hard work and a never-say-never attitude collide.

A PPLIED S C IEN C ES Alumni in math, science and engineering

▲ Lana Vanagasem ’01 Assistant supervisor of penguins and otters, John G. Shedd Aquarium, Chicago Chicago Heights, Ill. Biggest career challenge: “Working with marine mammals is a competitive field. Many times you have to do unpaid internships or volunteer work to get the animal experience needed to get a job. I had to spend a couple of years working my way into a full-time permanent position. It definitely takes perseverance and sacrifice. I feel very blessed to have a job that I love.” Mark Lockwood ’11 Actuarial analyst, State Farm Insurance Bloomington, Ill. Biggest surprise so far: “Getting a job with a large company within months of graduating. With the job market the way it is, I was expecting to start in a small, local company and work my way up. Nothing I deal with on the job every day is out of my comfort zone, and I have Olivet to thank for that.”

Waves of mercy chelsi clauson ’08

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By Laura Wasson Warfel

 Volunteering on Africa Mercy, the world’s largest charity hospital ship, Chelsi Clauson ’08 received training in the skills she needed to work in pediatric orthopedics. In those two months docked off the coast of Sierra Leone in West Africa, she also learned one life lesson after another from the families she served.    “The children touched my heart in so many ways,” she says. “Through so much pain, fractures that had never healed, bowed legs, club feet, they were still enjoying life. One boy, John, had severely deformed legs and was in a cast for the entire time I was there. He eagerly read the Bible, prayed and worshiped God. He was so hungry for God and loves Him so much!”

Amy (Rattin) Lutz ’04 Senior software ­engineer, BAE Systems Nashua, N.H. Advice for current Olivet students: “Enjoy the time you have in school. Learn as much as you can and, even more, learn how to learn. There are always new things to learn. With today’s technology, everything changes so incredibly fast, it can be hard to keep up and retain all the information you need.”

Na m e s a n d faces

  Africa Mercy has six surgical suites, and Chelsi often assisted the doctors as they performed 10 to 15 surgeries a day. “Mercy Ships instills so much hope in the patients’ lives because they can’t get the surgeries they need anywhere else in their country. Before every surgery, our team would lay hands on the patient and pray. That’s how it should be, because Christ is the ultimate healer.    “These were life-changing surgeries in so many ways. Many of our patients had been isolated by their people because of their deformities. We gave them a name and a face in their society.”    The ship’s 75 patient beds are occupied most of the time. “Each day, we took all the patients outside to the upper deck. I loved the spontaneous times of worship we shared. We would just break out in worship songs, singing praises to the Lord.”

Jeff Lamping ’10 Graduate researcher, Bioengineering Orthopedic Research Center, University of Kansas Medical Center Olathe, Kan. Biggest surprise so far: “Carrying a bag of embalmed cadaveric human hands down the hall to test in the lab. I currently work in a research lab. The most fulfilling part of what I do is being able to create and design new technologies to be used by doctors and patients.”

At t he cen t er of it all

  Chelsi is grateful to her employer, SwedishAmerican Hospital (Rockford, Ill.), for allowing her to take an eight-week leave of absence and holding her job for her.    “It was difficult for me to change my environment and learn something new. I left my fiancé of one week for two months! I went by myself, and I didn’t know anyone on the ship.”    But she gained new friends from countries all over the world. They worked long hours side-by-side, then studied God’s Word and explored the beautiful country of Sierra Leone together.    God’s love is the obvious link that connects the entire ministry. “Every aspect of the ministry and every person on the ship focused on serving Christ, doing His work. Christ was at the center of all the medical care we provided.”

Rebecca (Ibrahim) Dickey ’07 Mechanical engineer for U.S. Navy Washington, D.C. Job description: “I am currently in a rotation program with the U.S. Navy. I have held positions as a mechanical engineer at the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY), and Naval Research Laboratory (NRL).”

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PHOTO BY COLLING PHOTOGRAPHY

Todd Maberry ’03

MODERN M EDI C INE Alumni in healthcare

▲ Drs. Landon ’02 and

Amber (Hoskins) ’04 Colling Harman Eye Center Lynchburg, VA Landon: Ophthalmologist, diagnosing and treating diseases of the eye. Amber: Optometrist, providing primary eye care to patients. Landon’s greatest reward in his job: “Surgically restoring vision.” Amber’s advice for current Olivet students: “Be open to exploring different career paths. I began my time at Olivet believing that I needed to determine the Lord’s ‘will for my life,’ what one specific vocation He had in mind for me to do. I came to realize that the Lord’s will is for us to be in a relationship with Him and to seek His guidance in all decisions.” Jon Williams ’11 Doctoral student, physical therapy, Ohio University

Director of academic ­formation and programs, Duke Divinity School; Pastor of The Refuge Durham, N.C. How Olivet prepared him: “A lot of what I’m doing now in academic administration is based on my relationship with Woody Webb while I was at Olivet. Woody approaches his administrative position pastorally. That has helped me in working with students. Dr. Jay [Martinson] taught me about commitment to family. I remember that and desire that for my life, too. I know it’s possible because I saw him do it.” Emilie Padgett ’10 Physical and health ­education teacher, Phnom Phen, Cambodia Advice for current Olivet students: “Throughout college, I worked two jobs and took 16 to 18 credit hours. I was always overwhelmed and felt like I had no time to spend with God or anyone else. I have learned not to allow worries to overcome me, but to seek out God in everything I do. No matter what profession you go into, God has a huge plan to use you!” Rusty Funk ’07 Sports coordinator for Breakthrough Urban Ministries, Chicago, Ill. Most fulfilling part of job: “Working in an organization and a community that understands God’s desire is for His followers to extend His grace and care to the poor. In my job, I get to apply God’s longing for social justice and racial reconciliation to our neighborhood situation through creative avenues such as youth sports!”

Athens, Ohio

Katie (Eleiott) Ficker ’06

Canilla, El Quiche, Guatemala Job description: “We work primarily with an underserved indigenous population (the Quiche Indians) who will walk up to five or six hours each week to have their blood pressure checked, be given some Tylenol for their pain, or receive an ultrasound or milk for their malnourished child — grateful for each small gesture that we can offer.”

Best workplace in Chicago

PHOTO BY MARY BURKLIN

Advice for current Olivet students: “Strive to thrive and grow where you are now. Become who you are in Christ. Listen to the Lord’s call for your life, dream big and go for it. He will make a way for you. Find your sweet spot, that which you feel God has placed you on this earth to do. Don’t let anything stop you from doing it. Trust that the Lord will provide a way. He sure did for me!”

Registered nurse, Adonai International Ministries

L a Toyia strickland ’06

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A R T S A ND CR A F T S

by Luke Olney ’10

Alumni in the arts

  “My career path has honestly been amazing,” says LaToyia M. Strickland ’06 of Chicago. “I never would have guessed that I would be blessed with any of the experiences that I have had.”

▲ Dave Mohr ’09 Lead guitarist for Remedy Drive, Nashville, Tenn. Most surprising thing so far: “Since I left Olivet and moved to Nashville, every day has been a constant surprise. I was playing full-time as a hired gun within eight months of moving. I played for a variety of different artists in a variety of different genres and styles. Now, traveling full-time in Remedy Drive, it’s a surprise every time I get off the bus in a new city with new people to meet and a new room to perform to, minister to, and fellowship with.”

   From 2005 to 2008, LaToyia worked in advertising research for Johnson Publishing Company (Ebony/Jet Magazines), the oldest national publishing company in the country. After that, she was hired at Condé Nast Publications (Vogue, W, GQ, Portfolio, Glamour, Allure, Lucky and many others). She was also one of the youngest account executives for Clear Channel Communications, working for WGCI, V103, Inspiration 1390 and KISS-FM.

Aaron Alyea ’01 Graphic designer and print engineer, Triguard Memorials Danville, Ill.

M ISSION M INDED Alumni in ministry and social services

Biggest career challenge: “Learning to be creative even when I don’t feel like being that way. For me, there is an ebb and flow to how creative I can be. On the days when I’m just not feeling it, I’ve learned to grind it out instead of waiting for the light bulb to turn on. Employers aren’t too fond of someone who is waiting for inspiration.”

▲ Stephanie Smith ’10

Steve Cargile ’09

Student at University of Notre Dame, Theological Studies

Actor at Sight & Sound Theatres

Recently returned from Rotherberg International School at Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

Lancaster, Pa.

Bourbonnais, Ill. Favorite verse: “Deuteronomy 1:29–31. I first learned it in Spanish while I was studying abroad in Quito (NILI program) my last semester at Olivet. It reminds us to remember how God has freed us in our past; carries us now on our journeys, holding us in His arms like a Father cradling his child; and will fight for us in the future.”

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PHOTO BY DUKE PHOTOGRAPHY

Issue 3 | 2011

“ I w a n t to be here ”    Now, LaToyia is a client research manager at Centro, LLC, which

was ranked by Crain’s Chicago Business as No. 1 on its “Best Places to Work 2011” list.    As a client research manager at Centro, LaToyia provides support in the form of research and analytics to advertising and marketing departments, aiding in their efforts to brand their company and secure funds for advertising. “Basically,” she sums up, “it’s a nerd’s job in a cool kids atmosphere!”    Centro works hard to maintain a fun, yet productive atmosphere so that its employees enjoy coming to work and can take pride both professionally and personally. After five years at Centro, employees are given a three-week paid sabbatical. They can travel, stay at home or do anything they would like to do during that time. The company also offers yoga classes in the middle of the work day and has fresh fruit delivered

Most fulfilling part of job: “I’m grateful to be doing what I love every day in such a positive and wholesome environment. Prior to working at Sight & Sound, I’d been struggling to find work in the entertainment industry that didn’t force me to compromise my beliefs and convictions. I am blessed that God has surrounded me with people who share my faith and has also has given me the opportunity to share my faith with others.”

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two to three times a week to encourage a healthy lifestyle among employees.   “The way people are treated at Centro is unbelievable,” says LaToyia. “I want to be here.”

Pro clamation G ospel Choir    So much has happened

since she graduated five years ago, but LaToyia cherishes the time she spent as a student at Olivet Nazarene University.    “I had great teachers and leaders surrounding me. They pushed and encouraged me both during school and in the following years,” she recalls. “Olivet prepared me to stand firm in what I believe and stand out in an industry reaching people who may have never known Christ.”   While a student at Olivet, LaToyia was the first president of Proclamation Gospel Choir. Under her leadership, the group grew from just a handful of singers to nearly 100 students.   “I honed my leadership, team building and decisionmaking skills during that time,” says LaToyia. “I learned patience, discipline and true accountability while working with some of my closest friends.”    At one of her jobs, LaToyia was able to put this experience to good use when Johnson Publishing Company asked her to start a Christmas Gospel Choir.

Isaac and Jorden climbing the Inca Trail in Cuzco, Perui, standing in front of the city of Machu Picchu, July 2011.

Traveling scientists

Isaac ’07 and Jorden (Cupp) ’07 Hayes

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by Luke Olney ’10

   The two first met in their hometown of Richland Center, Wis., where Isaac’s father is the pastor of Richland Center Church of the Nazarene.    “We were friends throughout high school and started dating the summer before we came to Olivet,” says Jorden. “During high school, Isaac’s unwavering Christian faith played a major role in developing my own faith.”    The two continued their relationship at Olivet and were married shortly after graduating from Olivet in 2007.    In the two years that followed, Isaac and Jorden moved to Tuscaloosa, Ala., then to Midland, Texas, and now they are living in the beautiful mountains of Laramie, Wyo. Jorden is currently working on her doctorate in geophysics at University of Wyoming, studying the Earth’s subsurface using active source seismology.    “I am interested in how the crust of the Earth is formed and shaped by tectonic and weathering processes,” Jorden explains.

Out of a suitcase

   Though Jorden’s travels are longer, Isaac’s are more frequent. He travels during the week and lives out of his suitcase — even when he is home for the weekends.   “I almost live on a Southwest Boeing 737,” Isaac laughs. “I actually have employees at Denver International Airport who know me by name.”    Isaac currently travels across the eastern and central United States, working as a process automation engineer for E2i.   His education from Olivet’s Department of Engineering is paying off. “The Olivet engineering department is an incredible program that provided me with a solid foundation for my career,” Isaac says. “It prepared me to succeed in the real world and to work alongside those who went to much larger universities.”

Rachel: Director of media and communications, Park Community Church Chicago, Ill. Luke’s greatest reward in his job: “I get to work in an emerging market (social business), with some of the greatest brands and smartest colleagues. This formula allows me to take what I’m passionate about and develop some great solutions, all while being constantly challenged to grow in my capabilities.”

The firs t five ye ar s

   Whatever LaToyia does, she does with her whole heart. Her skills, personality, positive attitude, and professional drive have already taken her far.   “I have had the opportunity to travel, meet celebrities, speak to students and experience things that many will never get the chance to experience during their career. And this is just the first five years!”

   As a student of geophysics, Jorden spends much of her time traveling and doing research at sea. She has traveled to Fiji, Kingdom of Tonga and the Bering Sea, to name a few.    “Travel is one very fulfilling part of being a geophysicist, but when I’m in the field, I may be gone for over a month at a time with very little contact. Being separated from my husband so often has certainly been challenging.”

  In the four years they have been out of college, Jorden (Cupp) ’07 and Isaac ’07 Hayes have traveled more than most people have in a lifetime.

Rachel’s advice for current Olivet students: “Go be, live and work somewhere that makes you uncomfortable. Do something that challenges your faith, makes you think and stretches your horizons.”

T HE BO T T O M LINE

Michael Tuttle ’11

Alumni in business

Tax staff accountant, Ernst & Young

▲ Lukas ’04 and Rachel

(Studebaker) ’05 Quanstrom

Brownsburg, Ind.

Luke: Social marketing strategist, [wire] stone

Favorite Bible verse: “Isaiah 40:28–31 has been a

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great source of comfort throughout my life. In times of failure or exhaustion, struggles or disappointments, these words refocus my attention on the power and strength of Almighty God. Trying to work through my own strength inevitably fails me. God continuously calls out to me, reminding me that His understanding far outweighs my own.” Angela Giordano ’10 Marketing coordinator, The Morey Corporation Frankfort, Ill. Most fulfilling part of current job: “This is a business-to-business, family owned and operated company. For more than 77 years, these Christian businessmen have regularly donated significant portions of revenue to spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ all over the world. In July 2011, our executive vice president/co-owner preached the Gospel to more than 250,000 people in Uganda. Thousands gave their lives to Christ

Issue 3 | 2011

Ben Zobrist ’03

grow. Supporting and working with their parents is one way I can help. I enjoy hearing from our teachers, their joys and successes in the classroom.”

Second baseman/ outfielder, Tampa Bay Rays Nashville, Tenn. A member of the American League All-Star team in 2009, Zobrist currently leads the American League in doubles and hasn’t committed an error in more than 1,600 innings as an outfielder.

Alexandra Smith ’09

Biggest challenge so far: “It has been difficult to persevere through failure and stay positive on a daily basis. Keeping focus and perspective on Christ and His kingdom, and not on self, has been difficult through both success and failure.”

Baltimore, Md.

IN OTHER NE WS Alumni in broadcasting and mass media

▲ Britni McDonald ’09 Milwaukee, Wis. Most surprising thing since Olivet: “Almost everything’s been a surprise! After getting a job as an anchor in Casper, Wyo. just two months after graduating, I made a big jump to a 35 market in Milwaukee, Wis., two years later. I could have never predicted it. It’s been quite a journey so far. I’m always learning, growing and changing. Never a dull moment! I have interviewed celebrities like Rainn Wilson, Carson Daly and Joel McHale.” Jessica Shumaker ’09 Reporter, The Villages Daily Sun newspaper Lady Lake, Fla. Most fulfilling part of job: “Being able to talk with people and hear their stories. And also see that there are real-life consequences from my reporting, like writing about an insurance salesman who is now on trial for exploiting the elderly.” Paul Goldsmith ’04 Program director, Air1 Radio Network Lincoln, Calif. How did Olivet prepare you for your life? “Dr. David Van Heemst helped shape my worldview as a Christian. In his class, I learned that as Christians, we ought to be creators of great art, thought leaders, successful business people, entrepreneurs and leaders in all aspects of life. Once we earn the respect of others, we can then begin to share our faith. Nearly a decade later, I’m re-reading (and highly recommend) some of the books we read in class such as Roaring Lambs, The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind, Good News About Injustice, and anything by John Stott.”

and experienced life-changing healings. I am sincerely grateful to work for a company that gives back to our world in such an impactful way.” Jeff Rucker ’03 Director of ticket sales, Arizona State University, Sun Devil Athletics, NCAA PAC-12 Conference; formerly manager of inside sales, Phoenix Coyotes Hockey Club Phoenix, Ariz. Most fulfilling part of job: “Being involved in the tradition, history and passion for an NCAA Division I university and helping others kick-start their careers. I teach them what they need to know to be successful in the sports industry. It is a great feeling to help others get to where they want to go in their careers — and hopefully instill some wisdom in their lives along the way.”

P L AY M A KERS Alumni in sports

5th grade teacher, Baltimore City Public Schools, Teach for America Additional education: Master of arts in teaching, The Johns Hopkins University Most fulfilling part job: “I have been blessed to work with and serve some of the most resilient little people I have ever encountered — students who face more obstacles than one ever should at such a young age. They frequently come to school hungry, don’t have adequate school supplies, lack basic skills they need to succeed and often come from broken homes. I find my greatest joy seeing these little ones step up to the plate to work extra hard so they can get to the level they need to be, when their eyes light up when they feel successful, or when they touch my heart most by letting me know how much my love means to them.” Dayna Keelor ’06

▲ Mitch Street ’08

6th grade teacher, Chicago Public Schools

Head football coach, Hamilton Heights High School, Arcadia, Ind.

Chicago, Ill.

Elwood, Ind.

Additional education: Master of curriculum and instruction, Concordia University

Named head coach at age 25 this summer, making him one of the youngest high school varsity football coaches in the state of Indiana. Advice for current Olivet students: “Cherish the opportunity you have to go to a university like Olivet and realize that Olivet is going to support you — not only in your Christian walk, but also your Christian career endeavors.” Mark Hollis ’07 Pole vaulter, USA Track and Field

C H AMP IONS IN T H E C LASSR OOM

Mishawaka, Ind. Currently training for the IAAF World Championships in South Korea and the 2012 Olympics in London. He finished first and fourth, respectively, at this year’s USA Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field Championships.

Biggest challenge so far: “Trying to excel at a job when the resources are not plentiful and the support is not always there. There are times when I feel like I’m fighting a losing battle because the need is so great — but those are the times when I have to stop and realize it is not my battle to fight. God has called and equipped me for the position that I am in, and I am fully reliant on Him.”

Alumni in education

▲ John Snipes ’03 Assistant principal, Manteno (Ill.) Middle School

Advice for current Olivet students: “Soak it all in, and enjoy it. And whatever it is you want in life, I think I’m proof that if you work hard enough at something, you can really achieve anything.”

Bourbonnais, Ill. Most fulfilling part of job: “I love working with kids, seeing them gain confidence and

SU B MIT T ED PHO T O S O R A S CR EDIT ED

Dan Heefner ’01 Head baseball coach, Dallas Baptist University Cedar Hill, Texas Led the Patriots this spring to the school’s first-ever berth in the NCAA Division I Super Regionals, the final round before the College World Series. Three of his players were selected in this year’s Major League Baseball draft.

Young Alumni Award At Homecoming 2011, Olivet Nazarene University’s Alumni Association will be presenting a new award — the first annual Young Alumni Award.

Most fulfilling part of job: “Being in a place where we can compete at the highest level of baseball and in a program where we’ve had success on the national level. But while that’s happening, that’s not the biggest thing we’re doing. We’re being intentional about helping guys walk with the Lord. Doing those two things together has been the most fulfilling.” Cory Miller ’11 Defender, Carolina RailHawks Cary, N.C. In his first year with the team, Miller has helped the RailHawks to first place in the Nor th American Soccer League. He is the first Olivet athlete to sign a professional soccer contract. How Olivet prepared him: “Olivet made me more solid in my faith. It prepared me to go into a mission field, as I like to think about it. Professional sports are sometimes rough around the edges, and athletes are not always the cleanest cut guys. Olivet prepared me to be in that environment.”

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PHOTO BY RON KINNAN PHOTOGRAPHY

News Reporter at WDJT CBS 58

The Olivetian 13

  

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This award will be given to one male and one female recipient, chosen by vote of the Alumni Board. Recipients must have graduated from Olivet within the last 10 years. The winners will present a financial scholarship to two current Olivet seniors, who will be selected as a result of an essay competition. This year’s award is sponsored by Judith (Tucker) ’73 and Mel ’73 Sayes and will be named the Sayes Young Alumni Award. “Not only does this award recognize outstanding young alumni, it also includes interaction between three generations of Olivetians,” says Dennis Williamson, president of Olivet’s Alumni Association. “The Alumni Association looks forward to making this annual award one of the highlight events of Homecoming at Olivet Nazarene University each year.”

feature story

14

In Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies, there is great value placed on relationships. Not only does this emphasis enhance the learning that takes place in the individual programs, it also fosters an environment of flexibility and support outside the classroom.

relationships

By Luke Olney ’10

Just keep going: A student’s perspective

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David Goodwin ’11, winner of the 2011 Ralph E. Perry Student Award of Excellence

a m tter

   David Goodwin started working at Jewel-Osco in Bourbonnais when he was 16 years old. Over the years, he has held a variety of positions, working his way up to his current role as assistant store director, which he began in 2006.    “I oversee everything that happens in the store,” David explains. “I work with department managers and vendors. I am in charge of hiring new employees. And I deal with merchandising and administrative responsibilities.”    David describes himself as the “ultimate extrovert,” and enjoys interacting with people at the store on a daily basis. Still, he admits that he would like to eventually be in a position to spend more time with his family on weekends, holidays and in the evenings.

The cohort

   In order to do this, David thought he should go back to school. His wife, Lindsey (Turnbull) ’07, encouraged him to sign up for Olivet’s associate’s program. In 2009, David received his associate’s degree from Olivet and immediately went on to the bachelor’s program, which he completed in May 2011.    “What I found in Olivet’s graduate and continuing studies program, and didn’t find in other schools, is the cohort — working together. Our cohort is really good, and I’ve had some great people in my group,” David says. “We have become very close.”    For David, it has been helpful to have so many others in the program with similar situations — full-time jobs, children and other responsibilities. “When you get in a rut, someone picks up the phone, asking if you’re doing alright,” he explains.

Family crisis

  This support system was never more appreciated than in January 2009, when a smoldering fire swept through the Goodwin’s Bourbonnais home. Although no one was hurt, the damages were estimated between $50,000 and $60,000. They salvaged what they could, but many things, including photos and family heirlooms, were lost forever.    The fire displaced the family from their home and into the local Holiday Inn. With a two-year-old son, and with David just beginning his bachelor’s program, this was a difficult period for the Goodwins.    When it seemed things could only get better, the family received the worst news of all: Lindsey had been diagnosed with cancer. She would have to go through chemotherapy and would not be able to work. At this devastating news, David wondered, Should I step out of school? But Lindsey told him to keep going, so he did.    “My mother-in-law, who lives with us, was a huge help during that time,” David recalls. “She went to the doctor’s appointments with my wife, while I took care of my son.”    After a grueling year of treatment, Lindsey’s cancer was finally gone.    However, by the summer of 2010, she was diagnosed again with the same type of cancer and referred

the goodwin family David Goodwin with wife, Lindsey, and son, Jackson, 4.

You will make it: A professor’s perspective

to Rush University in downtown Chicago. This time, the doctors decided to try something more aggressive, and Lindsey needed to be in the hospital for four weeks. Again, David wondered if he should drop out of school, but Lindsey told him, “You are so close to being done! Just finish.”    It has been one year since the procedure, and Lindsey remains cancer-free. Doctors are optimistic that the cancer is now gone for good.

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Still going

  “Thankfully, I had a good support system around me from my group and my professors in the program,” David says. “When I received my award at graduation, it wasn’t just about me. I felt like everybody in my cohort won; they were the ones who were there with me through it all.”    Now, David is enrolled in the EMBA program, which overlapped with the last five weeks of the bachelor’s program.    “I was in the rhythm of going to school, so I thought I’d keep going,” he says.    David has enjoyed his Olivet education so much that he is already recruiting others to do the same. “The other day, I was encouraging a guy at work to enroll in the same program. I wouldn’t do that unless I really believed in it.”

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Carrie (Grizzle) Stimson ’91/’98 MAPC,

winner of the 2011 Willis E. Snowbarger Award for Teaching Excellence

   “I love teaching at the graduate level. The students have more life experience that they bring with them,” says Carrie. “Their knowledge adds a different dimension to the classroom.”    As an adjunct professor in Olivet’s Master of Arts in professional counseling (MAPC) and Master of Arts in school counseling (MSC) programs, Carrie Stimson draws from her own experience as a student in the MAPC program. She was a part of its first graduating class in 1998.

Important connections

   While a student in the program, Carrie built relationships with faculty and students from her cohort, while gaining the knowledge she needed in the broad field of counseling.

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Issue 3 | 2011

   Her group included current Director of the Master of Arts in Professional and School Counseling programs Dr. Rebecca Taylor ’88/’98 MAPC and Olivet political science professor Dr. David Van Heemst ’98 MAPC.    “We got together at Becky’s house on Saturday mornings,” Carrie recalls. “We had a blast!”    Prior to enrolling in Olivet’s graduate program, Carrie had enrolled in a similar program at another university, but did not finish. “That relationship aspect wasn’t there,” she says.    At Olivet, she noticed a difference. “It’s a place you can come and have a personal relationship with your peers and your teachers, to enable you to become the best that you can be.”

Ground Zero

   Three years after completing the program, Carrie’s training in counseling was put to the test in a way she never imagined.    Following the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, Carrie flew to New York City with the county crisis response team. Arriving on September 20, the team spent one week helping the disaster relief effort. Many volunteer efforts concentrated on the rubble at Ground Zero, cleaning up the physical damage. But Carrie and her team focused on helping people cope with the aftermath of the attacks.    “We did large group crisis intervention, training, and interacted with families of victims and people who had witnessed the horrific sights on September 11,” she explains. “We heard so many stories. I was on emotional overload — but I would have gone back in a heartbeat.”

Everybody loves Carrie

   Since Carrie began her job as an adjunct professor in Olivet’s MAPC program in 2006, her compassion and gentle spirit put her students at ease right away.    “I have students in their very first class of the program, when they’re scared,” she laughs, “and then

again for the first class of their second year — when they’re scared of practicum.”   As a mother herself, Carrie has a calming effect on her students, telling them, “You will make it! Just breathe. It will be okay.”   In addition to teaching, Carrie also supervises several students, meeting weekly with them throughout an entire year. During these meetings, she reviews tapes of their counseling sessions, offering both constructive criticism and positive reinforcement.   One of her students, Megan Reed ’09/’11 MAPC, says, “In class and one-on-one, Carrie created an environment that both challenged and encouraged us to explore our questions, improve our weaknesses and develop our strengths.”    To many of her students, Carrie is more than a professor. She is a confidant, mentor, friend and number one cheerleader.    “Carrie is approachable in all ways — there is nothing you can’t talk to her about. And she’s a lot of fun,” Megan adds. “Everybody loves Carrie!”

The Olivetian 15

finish

o str ng

Keeping priorities straight

  As an adjunct professor, Carrie is able to volunteer at church — Hoopeston Community Church of the Nazarene — and in her daughters’ classrooms with the reading program.   “I know their friends and their teachers, and they know who I am. One year, my daughter’s schoolteacher was a student in my class at Olivet,” Carrie laughs.    Carrie’s flexible schedule allows her to spend time at home in her most important roles – as wife and mother.    “With the way the program is set up, I am only teaching about 20 nights a year, so I still have family time in the evenings,” she says. “Teaching in the MAPC program keeps me up-to-date in my profession, but I’m still the one raising my kids.”

While we love to celebrate when people complete their degrees, we’re also good at celebrating when someone starts a new program. Education can transform lives, but sometimes the hardest part is getting started. We are here to answer questions, explore program options and get you all the information you need to start you on your journey. After all, a strong finish requires a strong start.

the stimson family

get started today. visit:

Carrie Stimson with husband, Buck, and

www.olivet.edu/graduate or call 877-9-Olivet to speak with an enrollment counselor.

daughters, Caitlyn (9) and Melissa (7)

Olivet Nazarene University School of Graduate and Continuing Studies Education for busy adults

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onu alumni

Class Notes

• 1970s

Debra (Chessman) Wilson ’76 has completed her Ph.D. in education from Capella University. She graduated summa cum laude. Debra lives in McMinnville, Tenn. David L. Miller ’77 has been named vice chancellor and chief information officer for the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). In this role, he will oversee information systems for all UAMS programs throughout the state.

• 1990s

C. Chris Jones ’91 has started his own web design and graphic arts business called CChrisJones Designs. The primary purpose of his business is to help churches with affordable, custom websites.

David Miller

Chris Jones

Mark Hanson ’93 graduated with his Doctor of Ministry in formational counseling from Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio. He is currently conducting retreats. He and his wife, Sandy (LaVigne) ’93, live in Gardner, Kan. Amanda Clark-Mikolajczyk ’95 and William Mikolajczyk ’96: A boy, Logan, June 5, 2011. He joins big brother Liam, now 2½. Bill is the afternoon radio personality at KNIX in Phoenix, Ariz. Mandy is an RN, but is a stay-at-home mom, for now.

Wayne II ’96 and Amy Walts: A boy, Dylan Duane, April 1, 2011. Dylan joins proud sisters Haley, 3, and Macy, 2. Wayne is a real estate agent for RE/MAX River Haven, and Amy is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Gladwin, Mich.

Scott ’00 and Rebecca (Lindman) ’99 Weinberg: A boy, Joshua Michael, July 26, 2010. He joins big sister Abigail, 4. Scott is a program manager for the Department of Justice and Rebecca is a branch, Joshua and Abigail manager for BB&T Bank. They Weinberg reside in Fairfax, Va.

Dylan Walts

Dana (Benson) ’98 and Stephen Porter: A girl, Brynlee Faith, July 1, 2010. She joins her brother Watson, 5. Dana works parttime as the executive assistant for the International Board of Education at the Global Ministry Center, and Stephen is the director of educational Brynlee and technology and assessment at Watson Porter Nazarene Theological Seminary. They reside in Lenexa, Kan. Laura (McBurnie) ’98 and Anthony ’98 Hudgins: A girl, Lindsey Noelle, January 18, 2011. She joins big sister, Hannah, 8, and big brother, Luke, 3. Anthony is a music teacher in Bradley, Ill. Laura is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill.

Jaime (Bartling) ’01 and Andy Matthews: A boy, Mason Everett, November 27, 2010. He joins big sister Noelle and brother Evan.  Jaime is a stay-at-home mom, and Andy is a user experience manager. They reside in Nashville, Tenn.

Revs. Benjamin ’01 and Amanda (Lattig) ’01 Pettit: A boy, Timothy Wesley, July 15, 2011. He joins big sister Madison, 2. The Pettits are ordained elders and commissioned evangelists in the Church of the Nazarene. Benjamin has recently published two theology books, The Great Privilege of All Believers: The Doctrine of No Sin, (2009) and The Holy Amanda, Madison, Remnant: Warnings from Benjamin and the Past (2011). The famTimothy Pettit ily resides in Vicksburg, Mich.

Lindsey Hudgins

• 2000s Logan Mikolajczyk

Lindy (Arrowood) ’96 and Mike Bethke: A girl, Claire Eden, February 25, 2011. She joins big sisters Paige, 4, and Meg, 2. Lindy is currently a stayat-home mom, and Mike is a Claire Bethke packaging engineer for Schreiber Foods. The family resides in Green Bay, Wis.

Evan, Mason and Noelle Matthews

Jamie (Foote) ’00 and Richard Griffith: A girl, Helen Grace, May 24, 2011. She joins Freddie, Katherine, Olivia Katherine, 9, Olivia, and Helen Griffith 7 , a n d Fr e d d i e , 4. Richard is an administrator at Roudebush VA Medical Center. Jamie is a stay-at-home mom, homeschooling the older girls and teaching first through third grade science for their homeschool cooperative. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind.

Staci (Allen) ’04 and Brent ’03 Henderson: A girl, Camille Liana, April 20, 2010. Staci is the online new home consultant for Westport Homes and Brent is an enterCamille Henderson prise service account manager for Monster. They reside in Fishers, Ind. Benjamin ’04 and Katie (Flippo) ’04 Kunz: A boy, Silas Benjamin, August 11, 2010. Silas joined big sister Mary Alice. Ben is completing his doctorate in clinical psychology and is the worship leader at their local church. Katie teaches s c i e n c e a t B r a d l e yMary Alice and Bourbonnais Community Silas Kunz High School.

Good bye, Risk!

Erica (Fowler) ’04 and Josh Bedyk: A boy, Christian Tyler, June 26, 2010. Josh is a mechanical engineer, and Erica is a stay-at-home mom. The family resides in Sandwich, Ill.

You’ve worked hard to accumulate your Securities.

Avoid the uncertainty of selling them. Invest in Olivet’s students by donating … • Appreciated Stocks/Bonds • Real Estate or Personal Property • Mutual Funds • Life Insurance

Michael D. Podguski ’04 graduated with honors from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Washington, D.C. He received a Master of Arts in [national] security studies. His thesis was on historical trends in disarmament regimes and their relevance for future nuclear disarmament proposals. He works as a national security analyst in the Washington, D.C. area, supporting U.S. Government Lindsey and implementation of the New START arms control treaty with Michael Podguski the Russian Federation. He also contributes foreign and military policy analysis for the Young Professional (YP) Nation website. He and his wife, Lindsey, recently celebrated two years of marriage. They live in Arlington, Va. Brian ’05 and Jenny Schafer: A girl, Eliana Helene (Ellie), February 8, 2011. Brian graduated from Nazarene Theological Seminary in 2009, and is now the pastor to youth and Eliana Schafer families at the Gaithersburg Church of the Nazarene in Gaithersburg, Md. Jennifer (Bast) ’05 and Brian Durbin: A girl, Hannah Margaret, February 22, 2011. Hannah joins a proud big brother William, 2, and Jake, 13, Elisabeth, 9, and Kayla, 7. Jenni teaches high school English in Pleasant Plains, Ill. Brian manages T-Mobile and serves as youth director at Chatham Presbyterian Church. Hannah Durbin They reside in Chatham, Ill.

• 2010s

In March 2011, Abbie (Sandhagen) Mantor ’06 launched Madhouse Creative Marketing, and is a marketing and communications specialist for small businesses. Utilizing the skills she learned in Olivet’s journalism program and her experience at Shine.FM, Abbie helps small business owners maximize their marketing efforts, particularly through word-of-mouth advertising. Scott Alan Smith ’06 and Amy Duerrwaechter ’10 were married August 13, 2011, in the Civic Auditorium, Kankakee, Ill. Scott and Amy both work at Olivet. Scott is a network integration specialist in the IT department and Amy is the graduate assistant in the Office of Marketing Communications. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill.

Scott and Amy Smith

Christian Bedyk

makes “Education with a Christian Purpose” possible! Students featured in this issue are recipients of the following Olivet ­Foundation scholarships:

Hello, Confidence! Receive a charitable deduction when you support Olivet. Request a FREE guide, A Secure Plan for Your Securities.

liz abfall Bessie Fern Mumbower Scholarship KatrINA HOLM R.D. and Lydia Bredholt Scholarship freddy shoffstall Joysong Memorial Scholarship

ALSO: Find out if

your employer will match your gift!

Melissa tanner Marjorie L. McCoy and Harold E. Phillips Scholarship Lauren Versweyveld ’11 Marion Fry Scholarship

815-939-5171 email: development@olivet.edu phone:

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KYLIE MCGU IRE ’13

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To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing Foundation scholarship, email the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

Issue 3 | 2011

Rebekah Mingus ’06 and Nicholas Metzger were married October 2, 2010, at Sturgis Church of the Nazarene, Sturgis, Mich. Rebekah works part-time for the Sturgis Public Schools and is pursuing her Rebekah and Master of Arts in counseling. Nicholas works as the case Nicholas Metzger manager for the Sturgis Salvation Army office. They currently reside in Sturgis, Mich. Matt ’06 and Kerrin (Jerome) ’06 Smith: A boy, Bryson Marcus, January 6, 2011. Kerrin just completed her MAT in elementary classroom teaching and teaches in the Anchor Bay School District. Bryson Smith Matt graduated from Wayne State University Medical School in May 2011. He has begun his residency in otolaryngology at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Mich. Nick Birkey ’07 and Ashley Getz were married July 9, 2011, in Decatur, Ill. Nick is the assistant men’s basketball coach and men’s sports information director at Olivet. Ashley is a first grade teacher in the Reed-Custer School District. They reside in Bourbonnais, Ill. Jessica Bayless ’08 and Jason Hart were married June 18, 2011, in Troy, Ohio. Jessica and Jason are both fourth grade teachers and currently reside in Englewood, Ohio.

Nick and Ashley Birkey

Jessica and Jason Hart

Scott Karalis ’08 and Brittany Dahl ’08 were married in Cancun, Mexico, August 3, 2011. Scott graduated from the University of Iowa law school in 2011. Brittany is a high school Spanish teacher in Wauconda, Ill. and is pursuing her Master’s in Spanish from the University Scott and of Northern Iowa. They currently Brittany Karalis reside in Palatine, Ill.

Sarah Henning ’09 and Tristan Riddell ’08 were married June 11, 2011, in Niles, Ill. Tristan is a video editor for ProFootball Weekly, and Sarah is an English and drama teacher at Warren Township High School. They reside in Vernon Hills, Ill. Courtney Spagnoli ’10 and Michael Zoril were married September 25, 2010, in Elgin, Ill. Michael is a commercial analyst for Kerry Ingredients. Courtney is a preschool teacher in the Rockford 205 School District. They reside in Beloit, Wis.

Norah Fry

Sarah and Tristan Riddell

Courtney and Michael Zoril

In Memoriam

• 1940s

SAVE THE DATES

Jean (Strahl) Goble ’46 passed away April 12, 2011. Jean and her twin brother, John, were born July 1, 1924. She was married to Donald Goble for 62 years. In 1982, they retired and moved to Arizona. Jean taught public school for many years and was deeply involved in the Church of the Nazarene’s mission work on the local and district levels. She was a gifted Bible teacher.

9th ANNUAL

Winter Golf Outing

FEB

Helen (Rush) Speckien ’46 passed away August 14, 2010, in Reno, Nev. She was born January 13, 1919, in Morgan County, Ind. She attended “Old” Olivet for one semester in 1935, then returned to the present campus in 1942 to pursue a Helen Speckien business degree. Helen was one of the first three graduates of Olivet’s Business Department. She met Elbert Speckien ’46 at Olivet, and they were married May 27, 1945, in Stinesville, Ind. After graduation, they began ministry on the Central Ohio District. Helen served as a pastor’s wife and worked in the District Office as Elbert’s secretary after he became the district office manager in 1975. They retired in 1989 and moved to Sparks, Nev., to be near their daughter Ruth Johnson ’71.

23–26 2012

Part of the Larry Watson Memorial Golf Series For more information and to reserve a foursome or individual golfer, email Jeff Domagalski at jdomagal@olivet.edu or call 815-928-5455.

Rev. William R. Bennett, Sr. ’47 went home to be with his Lord April 29, 2011. He was born September 9, 1925, in Portsmouth, Ohio.    William was the registrar for Olivet Nazarene College for 11 years and then served at Mount Vernon Nazarene College for 23 years. Prior to his work in the colleges, he pastored several churches in Ohio. He was a member of First Church of the Nazarene in Mount Vernon, and was a member of the American Association of Registrars and Admissions Officers and the National Society for Study of Education.

APR 14

2012

featuring

Lysa TerKeurst,

Paul Peffer ’48 passed away January 2, 2011. Paul was born September 13, 1918. He was married to his childhood sweetheart, Ruth, for 50 years, and after her death, he married Alice, who survives. Paul served as an army major during WW II. He managed Mound Grove Gardens of Memory in Kankakee until he retired to Arizona. Paul was active in church, his community, Rotary Club and veterans’ groups. He traveled to many parts of the world during his lifetime.

  president of Proverbs 31 Ministry and a New York Times bestselling author

and

• 1950s

Matthew ’08 and Jacklynn (Spencer) ’08 Fry: A girl, Norah Mae Capri, June 8, 2011. Matthew is the youth ministry coordinator, and Jacklynn is the children’s ministry coordinator at Highland Park Church of the Nazarene, Lakeland, Fla.

Ruth R. (Noffsinger) Dickinson ’40 passed away March 4, 2011, in Marion, Mich. Ruth was born November 22, 1917, in Gaylord, Mich. She was united in marriage to Russell F. Dickinson on June 7, 1941, in Flint, and he preceded her in death in 2006.   Ruth was a pastor, evangelist and did many speaking Ruth Dickinson engagements. She also was a published author. Ruth really enjoyed preaching, leading people to Christ; she also enjoyed camping, fishing and family gatherings.

Paul Aldrich,

John Y. Jones, Jr. ’50 passed away June 22, 2011. He was born March 7, 1926. John was a teacher in the Lamping, Ill., schools for many years. After retiring, he sold real estate. John served in WW II, and then attended Olivet where he met and married June Brown ’50.

Christian comedian

For more information, call 815-939-5258.

Dr. Allen H. Dace ’56/’87 MCM died July 16, 2011. Dr. Dace retired from the Illinois District Church of the Nazarene in 2003. During his 50 years of ministry, he pastored in Illinois, Kansas, Colorado and Michigan. He was a pastor for Dr. Allen Dace 35 years before becoming district superintendent for the New Mexico District, where he served for five years. He then served 10 years for the Illinois District. He was most recently involved with grief support groups in the area. He was also on staff at the College Church of the Nazarene, where he was a member.    He was born June 12, 1933, in Salem, Ill. He married Virginia L. Pace ’56 on August 29, 1953. He enjoyed golfing, reading, snowmobiling, fishing, riding WaveRunners and parasailing.

Announcing Olivet’s new online Planned Giving Center! Are you interested in becoming involved with the future of Olivet’s mission? Scholarships? Life Income? Bequests?

Cynthia Janet “Jan” (Storer) Foiles ’57 died November 14, 2010, from complications of a stroke.    Jan was born on June 3, 1935, in Coquille, Ore., and was raised near South Charleston, Ohio. She was Homecoming Queen at Olivet in 1956. She married Eugene Foiles ’57.    Jan taught school in Xenia, Ohio, for 16 years. She was a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church. Upon retirement from teaching, she became a real estate broker and had her own business. Jan worked closely with Boy Scout Troop 165. Her sons and one grandson were members of this troop and received their Eagle Scout awards with her help.   Jan volunteered freely with her time and received many community honors. She will be remembered for her love of birds and traveling.

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The Olivetian 17

Learn more

by visiting

www.olivetpgc.org.

Send us your news and photographs. Please submit alumni news,

less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all information, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. News should be sent via email to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914. Pictures must be sent through email or uploaded online. For detailed Class Notes guidelines, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links menu.

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onu alumni

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Alumni Spotlight

By Luke Olney ’10

S

Factories, farmland and family   “It was a good place to grow up,” he says of his hometown, New Castle, Ind. “You could ride your bicycle all over town and play outside until dark. I had great friends and a good school system.”    Growing up in the 50s and 60s, Robert quickly learned he had to work hard and work early. In a rural area surrounded by “factories and farmland,” everyone worked. From a young age, each of the four Sloan children — all boys — were assigned chores to do around the house.    “If it wasn’t right,” Robert recalls, “Mom made us do it again. We learned quickly to do it right the first time.”   Robert can still remember his mother’s favorite phrase: “If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right!”    His father encouraged his children to show initiative, be productive and contribute to wherever they worked. He used to say, “If you run out of work to do, pick up a broom and start sweeping!”    This strong work ethic was instilled in Robert as a boy, and has stayed with him all his life. Dirty jobs    “I did all kinds of jobs,” Robert says of his early years.    “My first paid job was shoveling snow off driveways for 50 cents when I was eight or nine years old,” he smiles. “It was cold, but it was good money.”   As he got a little older, Robert acquired other jobs — delivering newspapers, cleaning office spaces at night, stocking and cleaning the local A & P supermarket, and working at a foundry for three summers.   “We weren’t afraid to work,” Robert explains. “We did what we had to do and worked wherever we could find work.”   When Robert arrived at Olivet Nazarene College in 1964, he continued finding work in a variety of areas — cleaning toilets in the men’s

Robert L. Sloan ’68

Locati on: Washington, D.C. Occupati on: President and CEO, Sibley Memorial Hospital

from

dirty jobs to

▲ As president and CEO of Sibley Memorial Hospital, Robert Sloan oversees the work of 1,700 hospital employees in the nation’s capital.

   Robert’s experience in managing people in the Army was ideal in preparing him for his career.   After serving in the military, Robert received a master’s degree in public administration from George Washington University. He decided to take initiative to personally call all the hospitals in the area, asking if there were any job openings.   “I could only take about three rejections a day,” Robert laughs. “Once I had three rejections, I would have to go do something else for a while.    “But I got through to about 15 hospitals, and out of those I got three interviews.”   He soon became the assistant administrator at Prince George’s General Hospital and Medical Center, where he would serve for five years. For the next seven years, Robert became the executive vice president of the Columbia Hospital for Women Medical Center. In 1985, Robert accepted his current position of president and CEO of Sibley Memorial Hospital, one of the most prestigious hospitals in the country.    He currently oversees more than 1700 employees at Sibley. Under

A midnight guest    During one of his night shifts, at 3 a.m., the nurses told Robert, “Get busy and do something! The administrator is coming through to make rounds!”   Robert, who had already completed his tasks for the evening, innocently asked, “Who is the administrator, and what does he do?”   The nurses explained that the administrator runs the business of the hospital, and Robert thought, That would be a great job!   “I liked the people in the hospital, I liked the mission of the hospital, and I liked the work we did. But I didn’t want to be a doctor,” he explains. Because of that, hospital administration turned out to be the perfect career path.   But he did not become a CEO overnight. Persistence   Upon graduating from Olivet Nazarene University in 1968, Robert was immediately drafted into the United States Army, serving four

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CEO

years. At age 23, Robert was responsible for the food, shelter and safety of 80 soldiers and eventually became captain and company commander of 250 enlisted men.

residence halls, working at the local tire shop and eventually working the midnight shift at Riverside Hospital in Kankakee, where he first realized his interest in hospital administration.

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The journey of an ethical leader

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his leadership, the hospital officially joined the esteemed Johns Hopkins Health System in 2010. Keeping ethics on top   Though the job market has changed since his first job, Robert explains that companies still value the same characteristics in their new workers.    “Employers are looking for young people with initiative,” he says, “people who are dependable, consistent, enthusiastic, willing to work hard and have a good attitude. If you do a good job, you will get an opportunity to advance.”    No matter what you do, he advises the next generation: “Be mindful of your ethics.”   For Robert, ethics were taught from an early age by his parents, and were reinforced when he attended Olivet.    “When I was a student at Olivet, I watched the professors and learned great lessons from how they lived their lives. It wasn’t always what they taught in the classroom, but it was the example they set with their lives.”   He continues, “Olivet Nazarene University has had a great deal to do with my success. It helped establish the foundation of my life.”

PHOTO BY DEREK BOWSHIER

eated comfortably at his desk surrounded by family photos and snapshots of his highly successful career is a man at the top of his field: Robert L. Sloan ’68. Though the average tenure of a hospital CEO is less than six years, Robert is in his 26th year as president and CEO of the renowned Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C.    Working in the nation’s capital, he serves some of the country’s top executives, politicians and professional athletes. But even with his extraordinary career full of accomplishments, Robert has never strayed from his roots.

Nam e:

alumni zone

Issue 3 | 2011

The Olivetian 19

OLIVET

TIGER

How do you show your colors? Send us pictures of you or your family wearing ONU colors or apparel

Olivetians show us their true colors!

to TheOlivetian@olivet. edu for possible inclusion in a future issue of The Olivetian! When emailing, please use “Tiger Pride” as the subject and include a full description of the persons in the photo, including class years for Olivet alumni or students. Due to space constraints, not all submitted photos will be printed.

. The Sherwood

family showed their love for Olivet in their most recent church directory photo. John ’89 is IT manager for Pekin Insurance and Cheryl (Crawford) ’91 is children’s pastor for Pekin First Church of the Nazarene. Both Brittany and Tyler plan to attend Olivet in the fall of 2013.

k David Quimby

’11 sports his ONU gear while heading to Chicago on his bike.

. Meredith Young ’11 represents Olivet at Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom in Orlando, Fla.

“Get involved! Whether it’s at ONU, church or the community, it’s a great way to meet new people with your same interests. They will become lifelong friends!” S tephanie Little

S herrie willis

We asked our Facebook fans and Twitter followers what advice they have for the incoming Class of 2015. Here’s what some of them had to say.

, Olivet’s oldest

“As a dad whose son is in the high school class of 2015, my advice for your freshmen is the same as my advice to mine: The future God has planned for you is better than any you’ve imagined for yourself. Keep doors open so you can follow Him.” bradley buhro ’9 5

living alumnus,

George Reader ’29, of Chrisman,

“Become the leader at ONU you never were in high school. There are lots of opportunities, embrace them. Also, watch your GPA; it all adds up and “You’re going to be homesick the first week is hard to dig out if you you get there. You may even cry every day slack off a semester.” for the first month. But don’t take that mindy (spencer) as a sign that you’re not supposed to be jones ’ 0 3 there and decide to go home. Give it time, and before you realize it, Olivet will start feeling like home.” kris strehlow ’9 5

Ill., turns 105 this month!

In the year George was

born (1906), the American flag had 45 stars, the maximum city speed limit was 10 mph, and only 14 percent of homes had a bath tub. Olivet wasn’t founded until one year later!

“From experience of doing it the wrong way…. Above all be 100% OBEDIENT to the voice of God as He speaks to you through His Holy Spirit.” earl brant ’6 9

Join the conversation today at twitter.com/olivetnazareneu and www.facebook.com/olivetnazareneuniversity.

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SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Making a smart start

Did you know?

“Don’t forget to call your parents! They want to know that you are doing okay, or even better than okay!”

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

Education is about morethan earning a degree. Just 50 miles from Chicago is Olivet Nazarene University, where students focus on being, becoming, believing — in the classroom and around the world.

800-648-1463 www.olivet.edu

UPCOMING EVENTS

2011

Purple and Gold Days For high school seniors and their parents

Oct. 21–22 Nov. 4–5 Nov. 18–19


Ambition untamed