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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS

Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

VOL. 75, NO. 1

FALL 2007

WWW.OLIVET.EDU

The Olivetian

Fall 2007

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

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orate September ceremony, Olivet’s ROTC was formally introduced as the new Roaring ­Tigers battalion. Previously, ONU cadets were in the Rolling Thunder battalion along with students from Wheaton College.

RYAN TIMM ’09

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02 Contributing Writers Dr. Michael Benson Gary Griffin ’81/’07 M.A. Seth Hurd ’06 Casey Manes Kate Morgan Marc Shaner ’00/’02 M.A.T. Designer Donnie Johnson Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03 Editorial Advisers Susan (Hendley) Wolff ’94/’06 M.B.A. Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited Sports Editor Gary Griffin ’81/’07 M.A.

Olivet Nazarene University President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Jim Knight Vice President for Student Development Rev. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R.

t p Seniors enjoyed a fun and   inspirational day together during Prime Time at ONU.

Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

u Students, staff and faculty had a friendly day of competition during the ONU golf scramble.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement. Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited.

RYAN TIMM ’09

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t  Approximately 60 students

and other volunteers from the University and community helped raise funds and awareness during the annual CROP Walk, which aims to end world hunger.

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Copyright © 2007 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div., University President

Fall 2007

The Olivetian

Chapel … a Mark of Identity

Dr. Bowling, along with Kenneth ’53 and Betty Hawkins, assists the “next generation” of Olivetians during the groundbreaking ceremony for Centennial Chapel.

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wish you could have been there! Chapel services are always terrific, but the first week of chapel this fall was exceptional. For one thing, the services were held in the Leslie Parrott Convocation Center so that all of our students, faculty and staff could attend together. Simply being together in one place for chapel made it special, but there was more … God came in a wonderful way.    In the first service, I spoke about the dangers of identity theft. I told a story of how one evening during my freshman year in college my father called me saying, “I got a notice today that your bank account is overdrawn. What’s going on?”    “I don’t know, I haven’t written any checks,” I said.    “Well something’s wrong,” he replied.    A few days later, a letter from my father arrived with several canceled checks enclosed, each with my signature. Except it wasn’t my signature. I went to my desk drawer and pulled out my checkbook. Everything seemed to be fine at first; but as I looked a little closer, I noticed that several checks had been torn from the back of the packet of checks in my checkbook.

best interest at heart.    “Sometimes I think God has been the victim of identity theft. Lots of people have distorted images of God and therefore find it hard to trust Him or build a relationship or perhaps even believe in God.    “My prayer for you this year at Olivet is that you will come to know God, the God who loves you, and then, by His grace may you find your true identity.”    There was a wonderful response.    During the past few weeks, I’ve continued to think about that service in terms of the University as a whole. It is appropriate, along the way, to ask Olivet Nazarene University the identity question, “Are you you?”    The realization that a university can lose its identity took me back to the first chapel service. Reliving that service reminded me chapel is one of the key markers of our institutional identity.    During Homecoming, we broke ground for the construction of Centennial Chapel where we can all be together every time we meet for worship. Keeping chapel at the heart of who we are is particularly important as we step into our second century.    In chapel at Olivet …      … the Gospel is proclaimed with       simplicity and love        … the Bible is taught with clarity         and passion          … we pray and learn how to pray.      In the context of chapel we confront       the issues of the day and        we celebrate God as we worship         and sing and testify.    Chapel — it is a vital part of who we are!

   Somebody was stealing checks, signing my name, and taking the money, and most of the checks were being cashed at the campus business center. I talked with my resident director, and he got word to the cashier that someone posing as me was cashing checks. Within a week or so, I determined that one of the fellows on the floor above me was probably the person responsible, and over time that proved to be the case. He was disciplined and paid back the money.    I didn’t think much more about it until later in the semester when I stopped at the cashier’s window on campus to cash a check. The young woman looked at the check, looked carefully at me, looked back at the check and back at me, then she asked, “Are you you? Or are you the other guy?”    “I’m me,” I said.    “Okay,” she replied, and with no further verification, handed me the money.    That was years ago. Yet, I still think about her question from time to time: “Are you you, or are you the other guy?” That was the question I posed to the students on the first day of chapel, saying:    “Are you you, or are you someone else? Are you the person God intended you to be or has your identity been stolen — stolen by a culture that would fashion young women into the image of Lindsey Lohan, Brittany Spears, Paris Hilton — stolen by a culture that would fashion men into the image of athletes like Michael Vick? Or stolen by some painful event in your life, which colors everything else?    “Being in college is the perfect time in life to find your identity and become ‘you,’ as God intended you to be. Remember, God has your

Specia!l Issue Watch for a special edition of the Olivetian — arriving in mailboxes in January — which includes stories about the impact of chapel and information about the Betty and Kenneth Hawkins Centennial Chapel.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

Fresh ­experiences

Upperclassmen pranks. Roommate drama. The freshman 15. It’s not easy being the new kid on the

college block. Visit www.olivet.edu and click on “The Olivetian” to read how new University initia-

tives are preparing ­freshmen for success through college and beyond.

P H O T O S BY R YA N T I M M ’ 0 9

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Not monkeyin’ around

Fall 2007

The Olivetian

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PODCASTS Free, downloadable broadcasts of weekly chapel services and other ONU events are now available online. Go to www.olivet.edu and select “Podcasts — Listen Now!” from the drop-down menu.

Zoology program unique among Illinois Christian universities

SUBMITTED PHOTO

  Featured poDCASTS:

“Have Thine Own Way” y September 5–6, 2007 and “Whose Will is Being Done?” Chuck Milhuff, evangelist     In the second week of the 2007–2008 school year, Millhuff urges the student body to live lives that are fully consecrated to the Lord.

by casey manes

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Fall Revival Services y September 16–19 Gary Henecke, pastor, First Church of the Nazarene,

     Nashville, Tenn.     In this special eight-part series, Henecke preaches on a variety of topics for Olivet and College Church of the Nazarene’s joint fall revival services.

Becky Tirabassi’s Testimony Becky Tirabassi, founder and CEO, Change You Life, Inc.

    Tirabassi shares her personal testimony and encourages students to overcome their struggles with sin through the power of confession. Additional podcasts include addresses by: n John C. Bowling, University president n Michael Benson, University chaplain n David Graves, pastor, College Church   of the Nazarene, Olathe, Kan. n Marsha Coats, recipient of the   2007 Maggie Sloan Crawford award n David Caudle, pastor, Westside Church   of the Nazarene, Indianapolis, Ind. n Wayne Huizenga, owner, Miami Dolphins n Ron Blake, pastor, First Church of the Nazarene, Detroit, Mich. n Mark Fuller, pastor, Grove City Church   of the Nazarene, Grove City, Ohio n Paul Borthwick, Development Associates International n James Diehl, general superintendent,   Church of the Nazarene SUBMITTED PHOTO

hile most kids grew up with sunny yellow rubber duckies bobbing in their bathtub, Jamie Dumelle ’09 splashed around with baby alligators — real ones.     The junior zoology major is drawn to animals, and her not-so-ordinary mix of pets growing up has a lot to do with it. Her experiences with emus, thoroughbred racing horses, a python and baby gators helped net her an internship at Central Florida Zoological Park in Sanford, Fla.     Jamie spent her summer as a zoo assistant in the primate and porcupine sections of the Florida facility.     Her days consisted of providing enrichment activities for the many monkeys and porcupines she oversaw, cleaning cages, portioning food and assisting with vet visits.     Jamie appreciates the preparation she’s received so far at Olivet in zoology, and felt very ready for all she encountered during her internship.     “I’m glad for what I’ve learned through the program that I can put into practice,” she states.     “Olivet was the only Christian college in Illinois that had the zoology, pre-vet program. Being at Olivet helped me get my internship. This was my first choice of zoos to work at; there were 150 applicants for three internship positions, and I got one of them,” shares Jamie of the education and experiences that helped land her a competitive slot.     Olivet’s zoology program is a part of the larger Department of Biology. With around ten current students, it isn’t its size that makes it impressive, but the depth of opportunity, personal assistance offered to those enrolled in the program and the rigorous curriculum that prepares participants so well.     “Our zoology program has been strengthened. We offer content-specific classes, like the new one we are offering for the first time this semester, animal behaviors, taught by new professor, Dr. Leo Finkenbinder,” explains Dr. Randal Johnson, chairman of the ­department.     “We also want to help students get real life experience in their career interest since it’s a competitive field.”     To offer students this coveted experience, the zoology major now has a required field experience or field class component — the reason Jamie sought out her zoo internship.     Past students have participated in a wide range of field experiences or classes that fit their needs. The options are vast. Students have the freedom to hunt down an opportunity that fits their interest and meets the Olivet academic requirements.     Students have spent time studying killer whales off the coast of Washington state, studying sea turtles in Cape Canaveral and interning at Shedd Aquarium. Many zoology graduates go on to veterinary school, medical school or other graduate work, while still others, like Jamie, hope to delve right into their field.     In her future, Jamie hopes to seek out a full-time zoo position and has aspirations to work with raising animal babies brought up for zoo life. Working with animals is her ministry. The more time she spends with God’s creation, the more she sees God.     “God wants us to know and see these creatures — that’s why we have zoos. Olivet has brought me closer to God, when I got my first choice of internships, it grew my faith. It showed me this is what I want to do with my life, and I thank God for blessing me.”

CHAPLAIN’S NOTEBOOK Seeking fresh spiritual inspiration and biblical ­insight? University Chaplain Michael Benson, ­noted author and evangelist, has a regular blog on Olivet’s Web site.   Featured posting:

Happy Birthday, Olivet! y November 12, 2007     Benson reflects on Olivet’s Centennial Homecoming and the faithfulness God has shown the University over our first 100 years. To read the full article, go to www.olivet.edu and select “Chaplain’s Notebook” from the drop-down menu.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

Casting the vision A conversation with Ryan Spittal ’99/’04 MBA, dean of the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies

By Kate Morgan

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very step of Ryan Spittal’s professional career has been an intentional move to follow God’s call for his life — even when he wasn’t sure where God was leading.    Fresh from Olivet, Ryan worked as a CPA, growing as a professional and elevating his understanding of the business world.    During this time, he accepted a position as an adjunct faculty member for Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies. But when offered a full-time faculty position, Ryan needed extra assurance.    “While considering this move seemed opposite of where I believed my professional life was headed, God had other plans,” Ryan says.    “This time with the School prior to my new appointment allowed me to observe and understand the vital role SGCS plays, and how this part of the institution will be impactful for ONU for the decades ahead.”    As he steps into his new role of dean, we interviewed Ryan about his vision for the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies. What is the mission of the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies?    Our mission is to support the mission of Olivet as a whole. We ser ve Olivet by taking the ONU mission to new locations and extended audiences who would normally not have an opportunity to be a part of the Olivet experience. There is such a tremendous opportunity to impact so many individuals by advancing the Kingdom of God through Olivet’s mission, and we take that responsibility very ­seriously. What is your vision for the SGCS?    My hope for the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies is to make an impactful difference for Olivet as we enter our next 100 years as an institution. Our vision is to enrich, impact and transform the lives of our learners through Christ. How do you go about making your vision a reality?    The most important thing we can do is to consistently keep the mission of ONU at the forefront of ever ything we do. We are proud of the programs we offer and the suppor t we provide for our students. We are consistently looking for new ways that meet the changing needs of our students and are mindful of keeping the identity of Olivet secure as we expand our boundaries to meet these needs. How will the SGCS continue to meet the new challenges of today’s students?    We believe this is not just about obtaining a diploma, but really a chance to impact the lives of our students in many facets. For the last 100 years, Olivet has transformed lives professionally, spiritually and personally. … Our commitment at SGCS is to continue this approach by equipping our learners to not only be successful in the classroom and the workplace, but to have a transformed life through Christ.

School of graduate and continuing studies

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Fall 2007

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Record-breaking enrollment for eleventh consecutive year By Kate Morgan

NI C O LE BAT Y ’ 06

   After ten days of classes, Olivet Nazarene University announced a record-breaking enrollment of 4,652 students. Marking 11 consecutive years of growth, this fall’s enrollment surpasses last year’s by more than three percent.    Contributing to the record-breaking student body are 332 transfer students, the largest transfer group in Olivet’s histor y, and 712 first-time freshmen.    The figures also include 2,048 students enrolled in the University’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies. The 584 students enrolled in the School’s continuing studies program is another University record, up nearly 15 percent from this time last year.    The University continues to recruit high caliber students, as well. The average ACT score for this year’s incoming freshmen is 22.88, well above the national average of 20.9. This year’s freshman class also includes 44 students who achieved ACT composite scores of 30 or higher.    “In a highly competitive market for students, the consistently strong enrollment numbers at Olivet speak highly of the University’s stature among America’s colleges and universities,” says Brian Allen, vice president for institutional advancement. “Quality benchmarks, including our standing as one of ‘America’s Best Colleges’ by U.S. News and World Report, are indicative of the strong commitment to excellence across the curriculum and every facet of the University.”    Continuing, Allen comments on the students choosing to attend Olivet. “While the enrollment numbers are impressive, what grabs my attention the most is the quality of our student body. These are young men and women who have a heart and soul for God and are eager to impact the world through their academic preparation at Olivet!”

Shine.FM to add two new radio stations through HD radio By Seth Hurd ’06/’07 M.A.

RYA N TIM M ’09

    In just three days, Shine.FM took significant steps toward putting two new Christian radio stations in the Chicago market. During the station’s fall pledge drive, October 16–18, listeners pledged $85,000 to fully fund the operational budget of the station, and then gave an additional $35,000 toward upgrading Shine.FM to high definition radio.     “For more than 20 years, Chicagoland listeners have fully supported WONU,” says Justin Knight ’97, station manager. “Now they’re taking it to the next level, helping to provide more outlets for Christian programming.”     Shine.FM expects to move forward with HD programming as early as January 1, 2008. In addition to allowing the current signal to simulcast in HD quality, the upgrade will allow Shine to offer Justin Knight, additional radio formats station manager to the market on new “HD2” and “HD3” channels. Unlike satellite radio, HD stations are free to everyone who has an HD receiver. Most new cars now come with the technology, and major retailers, such as Wal-Mart, are also carrying the equipment.     Although the formats of the new stations have not been specified yet, Knight looks forward to the additional opportunities the expansion will give students. “Olivet’s radio broadcasting program already enjoys a rich heritage, with graduates working in top positions in both radio and the music industry. Adding two new radio stations will give students more opportunities to gain experience while receiving a top-notch education.”     Currently, Chicago has 60 HD stations, none of which carry Christian content.

RYAN TI M M ’0 9

Purple and Gold Days

February 22–23

Join with other high school seniors for an in-depth look at what it’s like to be a student at Olivet!

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l Campus tours l One-on-one conversations with admissions counselors l Financial aid consultations l Academic open house l Campus meals l Tiger athletic events l Department of Music performances l Overnight stay in a resident hall with a current student l Student trip to Chicago for pizza and time together in the city

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February 29– March 1 (music auditions available)

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March 28–29

Call 1-800-648-1463 or visit www.olivet.edu to R.S.V.P. today!

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

Creating a culture of success By Kate Morgan

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or 100 years, Olivet has had a knack for producing successful graduates.    From Church leaders like Drs. Paul Cunningham ’60 and James Diehl ’59 to business entrepreneurs like Dr. Cecil Crawford ’42 and Rich ’67 and Debbie (Davis) ’70 Reedy, Olivet graduates have always made a positive impact on their world.    As Olivet begins its second century, the University’s new Center for Student Success sets out to continue that tradition and to become even more focused on preparing students for success after graduation.    “Olivet has always been turning out successful college graduates,” says Beth Olney, director of the Center. “But we want to become more intentional in our doing so. The Center for Student Success allows for collaboration, for working together to accomplish goals for our students.”    Housed within the Center’s main building are Counseling Services, Career Services and Health Services. But the Center is also a hub for all efforts across campus. The Center has already worked with student development and academic affairs to launch programs. And future programs will include spiritual development, relationship preparation and intercultural programming.

Owning their success

tions Freshman Seminar offer a one-two punch to familiarize students with the Olivet culture, introduce them to university learning and facilitate academic advising.

   With the myriad of programs offered, Beth still stresses the importance of student responsibility.    “Student success is a two-way street. We create the conditions [for success], but the student has to take advantage of the things we’ve created,” she says.    And when students soak up what the University strives to offer, big things happen. Students leave with more than a degree; they step from Olivet’s campus ready to be and do what God calls them to.    “We want our graduates to walk away from Olivet with more than just a diploma. We want

Building on a successful start    In the future, the Center will create programs catering to each specific class, with career preparation being a major component each year.    “Students need to become more equipped for going out into the work world,” Beth explains. “We have initiatives that will target career explorations. Each year … a student spends in college, there are different things that they can

   This fall, the Center has focused extensively on the freshman year experience. With new friends, schedules, stresses and living environments — not to mention a newfound level of freedom — the first weeks on campus are vital to future success.    “We want to set a tone from the minute they step on campus that they’re coming into an academic setting,” Beth says.    She describes the freshman year experience as a two-pronged package. Together, the Jump Start New Student Conference and the Connec-

The Center for Student Success resides in what was formerly the president’s home.

RYAN TIMM ’09

A fresh start

them to have the skills, the character and the qualities within them to go out and be leaders in our world,” Beth concludes. “That is what Olivet can offer. That is the added value a student gets when they attend Olivet Nazarene University.”

do that will equip them for getting a job.”    Other future programs will focus on character development. “This is so critical in our society today,” Beth says. “We want our students to … leave here with the kind of character that will impact the world in a positive way.”

“Education with a Christian Purpose” is made possible for our students ­because of your generosity.

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@ olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

Kasey Carr

Kaeley Matuz

Dr. Richard T. Lind Scholarship

Amber McKean

Russell Lundry Scholarship

Andrew Johnson

Iris Eileen Zimmerman

Josh McDaniel

Rev. Norman L. and Mary Moore Scholarship

Donald N. and Irene L. Gustavsen Scholarship

Michelle Kapteyn

Dr. C. Neil Strait Scholarship

Tara Schmidt

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Crawford International Scholarship

Katie Sweet

Lowell and Barbara Malliett Scholarship

Terry L Kochersperger Scholarship

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Leonardo Viltard

Donald and Faith Bell Family Scholarship

Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship

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Matt Soulia

Audrey L. Schlamb Scholarship

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John and Leah Marangu Scholarship

RYAN TIM M ’09

Students featured in this issue of The Olivetian are recipients of the following scholarships:

Fall 2007

The Olivetian

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Visit www.olivet.edu and click “News & Events” for the latest news about Olivet Nazarene University.

A tale of t wo c ampuses Alta Everett ’42 was drawn to the small, denominational college she had heard about when an Olivet quartet visited her church. So, nervous and already more than a little homesick, Alta began her four-year journey that would span two campuses and spur relationships that would last a lifetime.

Recent stories: ■ Olivet helps launch international language institute

Visit www.olivet.edu and   click on “The Olivetian”   to read Alta’s memories   of a golden era in   Olivet’s history.

t Undercover agents: Students share Gospel in closed countries

u Spinning dreams: World champion baton twirler accents marching band t Journeywoman: Former high school dropout impacts others as nurse, volunteer and professor

u Ugly kitchen contest: Design majors help make life beautiful for a local homeowner

p Nursing department adds cutting edge technology to learning labs

Want to receive ONU news ­updates right in your inbox? E-mail alumni@olivet.edu to subscribe to the free, monthly Alumni & Friends E-News.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

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Fall 2007

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Centennial Homecoming Queen Katie Bradshaw ’08 (escorted by Matt Bowman ’08) of New Lathrop, Mich., received her crown during the 2007 Coronation Ceremony which celebrated “Unfading Beauty.”

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Students helped break ground for the Kenneth and Betty Hawkins Centennial Chapel.

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The Tiger men’s basketball team defeated Rochester College 61–49 in a Homecoming matchup.

    Olivetians came from far and wide    to play a part in Olivet’s massive   100-year birthday celebration during Homecoming 2007.

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Tiger women defended their home turf in a faceoff against MidAmerica University with a final victory of 103–94.

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Olivet alumni were recognized with All Stars Awards for their athletic involvement at Olivet prior to the induction of varsity competition.

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Following the big game, onlookers enjoyed the Fireworks Extravaganza, offering a visual celebration of Olivet’s Centennial.

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On behalf of the Class of 1962, Dr. David Strawn ’62 presented a check for $62,750 to the University for student scholarships.

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The ONU volleyball team defeated Taylor University during a Friday afternoon matchup.

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Audiences enjoyed a refreshing take on life at the drama production, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten,” performed by Olivet students in Kresge Auditorium.

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Dr. David P. Wilson and Richard L. Reedy are this year’s recipients of the “O” awards.

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O GDE N C URTIS

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

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1957 class members enjoyed the fellowship of their peers during their 50th year class reunion.

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A sold out Ward Field cheered on the ONU Tiger’s football team 26–21 against McKendree College.

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Cyndi (Green) Frame ’84 sang of God’s faithfulness during the Centennial Homecoming Concert featuring a wide array of Olivet’s campus singers and instrumentalists from the 1950s to the present day.

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Younger attendees had a load of fun at the Hula, Hula, Hula Kids Luau during Super Saturday night of Homecoming 2007.

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Following the concert, alumni and friends enjoyed cake and fellowship at the official 100th birthday party for Olivet Nazarene University.

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More than 300 current and former Orpheus choir members gathered for a special reunion and an unforgettable performance during the Sunday morning Centennial Worship Service held in McHie Arena.

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GO RDO N C. WIC KE RSH AM ’ 47

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Fall 2007

QUESTIONS

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You have a reputation among students for bringing a great deal of enthusiasm and humor into the classroom. What is your favorite topic to teach? I’m really excited about learning, and I love challenging students to learn. Mark Twain described good teaching as inspiring the “aha” moments in students — the moment when a light comes on. In the information age, good teaching goes beyond information stuffing and should be geared towards inspiring a love of learning so that young adults will leave here excited about being lifelong learners.

With

David

Van Heemst ’88/’96 M.P.C./’98 M.A. Associate Professor, Department of History and Political Science

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Over the years you’ve inspired many students to go out and make a profound difference in the world. What do you say to those who feel unequipped to do so or don’t know where to begin? One of the things that occurred to me while having devotions years ago was the concept of “radical ordinariness.” God brings about His Kingdom piece by piece, little by little, through the radically ordinary acts of obedience of His children. From a teacher staying 15 minutes after school to counsel a troubled student to the social worker helping a socioeconomically disadvantaged individual fill out paperwork — God unfolds his kingdom. He provides glimpses of the already but not yet fully completed Kingdom reversing the tidal wave of injustice in this world, through His ­children.

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Any plans for more books in the ­future? I’m one of those people who’s always thinking. Last week I was at the park with the twins and they were hopping on and off the swings. I explained to them the impact of dark matter in contrast to the power of gravity that keeps them on the ground after getting off the swing — yeah, they weren’t overly interested. Seriously, there’s always another book idea going on somewhere in my mind. Presently I’m thinking about one related to a Christian worldview and college undergraduates and another on good teaching pedagogy in Christian colleges. But with our hands a bit full at home right now, the next book will be at least a few years away! Can you tell us a little bit about the new Master of Arts in political theory you co-developed with the other professors in your department? Our department has tried to do something cutting edge. We’ve put together a substantive master’s degree in political theory and in the philosophy of history that focuses on the ideas that spearhead social change throughout the history of Western civilization. Many M.A. programs are pretty narrow in focus; we have intentionally built one with a broad focus so that when one has completed the degree one will have a solid understanding of the ideas that have driven social change. It’s a program that’s ideal for social studies teachers and for recent graduates looking to delve deeper into the big picture.

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Besides teaching, you’ve authored or co-authored three books in the past few years. Have you always wanted to be a writer or is this a recent passion? Growing up in New Jersey and playing a lot of baseball, I always wanted to be a baseball player for the New York Yankees — not a writer. My books grew out of my 15 years of teaching undergraduates at Olivet. We spend time studying social justice, for example, how we can live out a fundamental paradox of the Gospel. Namely, that we are called out of the world to be thrown back in as salt and light. My heart has always been pulled toward the issues and people impacted by social justice and my passion for this grew as I worked with students, inspiring them and getting them involved with service opportunities.    The thought occurred to me one day while sitting in my office in the basement of Burke that one positive change in governmental policy could literally impact thousands of lives. I realized that while some are called to give a cup of cold water in Christ’s name, others are called to focus on systems and structures. I decided I wanted to try to impact the larger national discussion, and so I wrote my first book around issues of social justice as they related to the poor children in K–12 schools in the U.S. today.

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You’ve lost a significant amount of weight in recent years. What was your inspiration for the initial loss and what have you done to keep it off since then? Two years ago I experienced two mini-crises: I realized I was about to turn 40, and I discovered my first gray hair — something had to be done. So, I started walking, then biking, then jogging, and then running. I got up to running about 10 miles per day but then I’d be pretty spent after my run, and being spent is not a good condition to be in with three little babies around the house. So now I run six–eight miles per day and have a really good energy level to focus on the fam.

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Your most recent book, Hope in Troubled Times: A New Vision for Confronting Global Crisis, was co-authored with two other people. Did you enjoy the more collaborative process to writing? Collaborative writing is certainly very different from writing alone in my office! You have to have pretty thick skin because what I think is really good, well, let’s just say others might think it’s not quite as good! But seriously, it was an amazing process to work digitally with Mark, who lives in Canada, and Bob, who lives in ­Europe. We sent each other well over 1,000 e-mail messages in the five years that we worked together on the book.    Over that time we came to see our work as not just a book but as our common calling. Some of that is reflected in how we dedicated the book: “To Ellie and Maggie Van Heemst, two of God’s precious children.” In the acknowledgements, we explain dedicating the book to my 6-year-old twins: “During the making of the book, David Van Heemst’s young daughter Ellie was stricken with se-

The Olivetian

THE VAN HEEMST FAMILY  Pictured, from left: April ’94, Ellie, Maggie, Annika, Jessica and Elizabeth

vere viral encephalitis; to our community of three, her journey of illness and recovery, and the exquisite care and attention given by her twin sister Maggie, became a living metaphor of the vulnerability and resilience of life in God’s world that occupies us throughout the book.”

tion where he met with the assistant to the The Most Reverend Njongonkulu W. H. Ndungane, the current Anglican archbishop of South Africa. Mark gave him a draft of the book to give to the archbishop. The archbishop loved the book and gave us an endorsement, then he passed the book on to Archbishop Desmond Tutu who was so impressed by it that he agreed to write the foreword for us. Can I just say how excited we were when the archbishop’s assistant contacted us saying that Desmond Tutu had agreed to write the foreword!

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The foreword for Hope in Troubled Times was written by Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa. How did he come to be involved with the project? That’s an interesting story. Mark, one of the co-authors, was at an international conven-

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Which was the more difficult adjustment? Having twins as a first-time parent or having triplets as a more “seasoned” parent? Having the twins six years ago was mostly the “fear of the unknown.” April and I just didn’t have the experience. This time around we knew what we were getting into! I’d have to say that this time is actually the bigger challenge because now we have five children vying for and needing our attention instead of two. Although we’re still adjusting to life being a bit out of control and going on less than ideal sleep, we hold the deep conviction that children are a blessing from God. We are so thankful to God for all five of our little girls and are wholly dedicated to raising young women who are sold out for Christ and His Kingdom. You are now the only male in a household with six women and all female pets. Any insight for those male readers still trying to understand the gentler gender? I’m reminded of the Tom Hanks movie, “A League of Their Own,” because so many have said I now have my own basketball team. As much as I’d like to say that, “There’s no crying in baseball,” I’m learning that there is crying (and drama!) with girls — that’s just a part of life. Seriously, the most precious place in the entire universe is the heart of a female, and I am committed to instilling significance and security into my girls so that they can grow up with the internal peace and joy of Jesus and then pass that on to their families, friends and colleagues.

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Son Comes Home, was originally published in 1999 and the second, a non-fiction book, Silent God: Finding Him When You Can’t Hear His Voice. Joseph resides in La Verne, Calif.

Donald Boyd ’95 published a book, Prose for the Soul: Poems, Philosophical Abstracts and Essays, through Author House Publishing. To purchase the book, visit www.author­ house.com.

Al Hilgendorf ’84 recently released his first CD of original praise and worship songs on his label EverydayPraise Records. Al lives in Kalamazoo, Mich., with his wife, Carolyn. He volunteers as a worship leader at Agape Christian Church.

Jennifer (Crowder) ’96 and Jeff Noricks: A boy, Zachar y Isaac, January 17, 2007. Jennifer works from home as a piano teacher and social work consultant, and Jeff Zachary Noricks is an account manager for Village Green Communications. They reside in Livonia, Mich.

Greig Hutchens ’87 recently released “Hymns & Meditations for Prayer.” The CD is available online at iTunes, Rhapsody, eMusic and Napster. Greig also completed his master’s certificate in songwriting from Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass.

Jerriann (Pace) ’90 and John A. Travis, Jr.: A girl, Danielle Jenai, December 21, 2006. She joins siblings Kendrianna Marie, 9, and Zoe Elizabeth, 2. Jerri is a homeschooling, stay-at-home mother, and John is active duty militar y with the Third Infantr y Division stationed at Fort Stewart, Ga.

Members of the class of 1968 gathered for an informal reunion on the Majesty of the Seas cruise ship. Pictured, top: Carol (Dearmond) Dreisback, Karen (Blue) Firestone, Sandra (Smith) Sommerfroind, Carol (Tanner) Morse, Ann (Pasko) Schwob, Mary Ada (Bennett) Dillinger, Brab (Crabill) Crabtree; bottom: Kenda (Barrett) Smith, Patti (Zunker) Manuel, Wanda (Hanes) Schneider, Georgia (Hatfield) Chappel, Carolyn (Gibson) Vance, Jane (Crisman) Long, Doris (Gunter) Burke, Linda (Kimmons) Wulff.

Class Notes Rev. Phil Pinckard ’73, the director of Chaplaincy Ser vices and Education at the Medical Center of South Arkansas has successfully completed his fourth unit of Clinical Pastoral Education [CPE] at the University of Arkansas. CPE is a professional training experience for persons engaged in clinical chaplaincy.   In September 2006, Chaplain Pinckard joined the Little Rock Chapter of the College of Pastoral Supervision and Psychotherapy [CPSP]. The Chapter recommended him as a Board Certified Clinical Chaplain and Certified Pastoral Counselor. These actions were ratified by the CPSP Governing Council and at their 2007 Plenary in Raleigh, NC, Chaplain Pinckard was recognized as a Board Certified Clinical Chaplain and Certified Pastoral Counselor.   In January 2007, Chaplain Pinckard submitted his certification packet to the Association of Professional Chaplains. Following a successful regional interview this summer, Chaplain Phil will be recognized as a Board Certified Chaplain at the 2008 Conference of the Association of Professional Chaplains in Pittsburgh, PA.

Liz (Duff) ’90 and Mark Blachly: A girl, Bethany Lauren, October 18, 2006. She joins big brother Ben, 5, and big sister Abby, 3. Liz is a family medicine doctor in her 10th year of practice. She recently helped to start a free indigent clinic at Shepherd Community Bethany Blachly in Indianapolis. Mark is a high school physics and calculus teacher at Arsenal Tech High School. They recently moved to New Palestine, Ind.

velopment and business improvement consulting firm. They reside in Aurora, Ill., with son Matt, a junior at Olivet, and daughter Jessica, a sophomore at Taylor University. Steve Moore ’79 has been named managing director of investment management and trust for Fifth Third Bank. In this role, Moore is responsible for overseeing the bank’s trust and investment capabilities. He specializes in asSteve Moore sisting high-net-wor th clients with a variety of estate planning and tax saving strategies, including charitable planning, business succession and retirement plan distributions.

James Tew ’91 ser ved on a panel discussing the topic of “Moving the Newsroom Online” at the Associated Press Managing Editors conference in Indianapolis. He also accepted an award for second place in the Best Web Site category while at the conference. James is online editor for the Kendallville Publishing Company, which publishes a group of daily and weekly newspapers in northeastern Indiana. Sheri (Baker) ’94 and Lee Smith: A girl, Mackenzie Joy, December 13, 2006. She joins brother Kaden. Sheri currently is a stay- at-home mom, and Lee is a biomedical engineer at Community Hospital. They reside in St. John, Ind.

Joseph Bentz ’83, professor of English at Azusa Pacific University, released two books simultaneously. The first, a novel, A

Bryan ’98 and Jill Smith: A boy, Casey Br yan, February 27, 2007. He joins sister Lindsay, 1. Br yan works for Lindsay and Casey Smith Car tridge World, and Jill is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Moline, Ill. Jennifer (Robinson) ’98 and Andy Monk ’95: A boy, Cooper Joseph, October 6, 2006. He joins big sisCarson, Cooper and Madison Monk ter Madison, 7, and brother Carson, 5. Jennifer is a middle school math teacher in Manteno, and Andy is a marketing manager for ITW in Beecher. They reside in Manteno, Ill. Sherri Sloan-Bohinc ’98 and Scott ­B ohinc: A boy, Landon Cole, May 25, 2007. Deliver y was at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., which is run by Robert Sloan ’68. Landon joins big sisLandon and Ava Bohinc ter, Ava Grace. Sherri recently resigned from her position as account executive at Google, Inc., after five years, and Scott is a finance manager at European Aeronautical Defense Systems in Rosslyn, Va. Barbie (Pool) ’99 and Jamie ’02 Rucker: A girl, Hallie Rose, June 8, 2007. Barbie works par t time as a school psychologist for Indianapolis Public Schools, and Jamie works for the engineering company E2i at Eli Lilly.

Randall Hartman ’76 received his Doctor of Ministr y degree from Grace Theological Seminary in Winona Lake, Ind. He currently serves as the lead pastor of the Church of the Nazarene in Monroe, Mich. Brenda (McCorkle) Nixon ’76 is a speaker and writer with an expertise in parenting/family issues. She has contributed to her 22nd and 23rd books with “Feeling Better?” in the recently released Chicken Soup for the Soul in Menopause and two stories in Chicken Soup: Christmas Collection. Brenda is also a frequent contributor to Focus on the Family parenting newsletters and wrote “The Season of Gratitude” in the September/October/November ’07 issue of Connect! with the Church of the Nazarene. Brenda and her husband, Paul, live in Mount Vernon, Ohio. Megan (Eix) and J.R. Samples ’78: A boy, Jack Lawrence, February 25, 2007. Megan is the marketing manager for Project Leadership Jack Samples in Chicago. J.R. is CEO of Accountability Partners, a leadership de-

Doug ’97 and Tamera (Bolich) Jones ’96: A girl, Jazlyn SharonKay, June 3, 2007. She joins brothers Austin David, 10, and Brandt Douglas, 5. Doug is an undercover police officer with the city of Pekin, Ill., and Tamera is a stay-at-home mom. They currently reside in Pekin.

Leah Marangu ’65, Rodney Reed ’84/’86 M.A., Sarah VanMeter Reed ’84, Daryll Stanton ’75/’81 M.A., Verna (Baker) Stanton ’75, Russell Lovett ’68/M.A. ’70, and Donna (Seeley) Lovett ’68/’92/’97 MBA were unable to travel from Africa Nazarene University to Bourbonnais, and so held their own Centennial Homecoming Celebration, cake and all, in Nairobi on November 2.

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Hallie Rucker

Brenda ’76/ M.A. ’99 (Rhoads) and Richard M.A. ’99 Herivel have served with The Salvation Army as officers (clergy) for 23 years. In May they received three-year appointments to Eastern Europe. Brenda will serve as the divisional secretary for the countr y of Russia. In this role she will be second in command of The Salvation Army’s work in Russia. She will also have direct responsibility for the work/ministry in central Russia. Rich will serve the Eastern Europe Territory as the business administrator, with direct responsibility for finances, property, IT and development. Both will give spiritual leadership, as well, through strategic planning and as they travel the region. They will live in Moscow. Kathy (Wyse) ’99 and Matt ’96 Burlend: A boy, Joshua David, September 26, 2006. He joins big brother Elijah, 3. The Burlends still reside in sunny Phoenix, Ariz.

Jamie (Foote) ’00 and Richard Griffith: A boy, Richard Rober t Frederick, May 31, Richard Griffith 2007. He joins sisters Katherine, 4, and Olivia, 2. Richard is employed with Roudebush VA Medical Center, and Jamie is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Indianapolis, Ind. Kirk ’00 and Kathryn (Malone) ’00 Johnson: A girl, Khloe Alysse, May 14, 2007. She was welcomed home by her sister, Kaelyn, 3. Kirk is a pastor at Wyoming Church of the Nazarene, and Katie is the director of the Pregnancy Resource Center in Wyoming, Ill. Joel ’00 and Stephanie Newsham: Adopted a boy, Levi Joel, born May 26, 2007. Joel is an elementar y music teacher and Stephanie Levi Newsham is a CPA with Ernst & Young, LLP. They reside in Greenwood, Ind. Stephanie (Wilkinson) ’00 and Barak Parker: A boy, W yatt Nathan, March 7, 2007. He joins big brother Seth, 2. Barak and Stephanie reside in Bourbonnais, Ill. Wyatt and Seth Parker Tom ’05 and Judy (Moore) ’01 Ewen: A girl, Ava Grace, July 7, 2007. Tom is a youth pastor at Mor enci Church of the Nazarene, and Judy is now a stayat-home mom. They reside in Morenci, Mich. Marcy Miller ’01 and Ryan Secor were Ava Ewen married December 30, 2006, at Northside Church of the Nazarene in Elkhar t, Ind. Marcy graduated with her Master of Arts in teaching and leadership from Saint Xavier University in January 2007. Marcy is in her seventh year teaching four th grade in Tinley Park, Ill., and Ryan is a pilot for Pinnacle Airlines. They reMarcy and Ryan Secor side in Mokena, Ill. David, Jr. ’01 and Peggy Lampton: A girl, Angel Victoria, born December 26, 2000, and adopted December 12, 2006. David is a substitute teacher in Indiana and Peggy is a stay-at-home mother caring for foster children. They reside in Griffith, Ind. Phillip ’02 and Amanda (Wangler) ’02 Cox: A boy, Landon William, November 7, 2006. Phil is a social studies teacher at Catlin High School. Amanda is a first grade teacher at Judith Giacoma Grade School in Westville, Ill. They reside in Catlin, Ill. Landon Cox Melissa (Crider) ’02 and Shawn Graham: A boy, Alexandar Thomas, December 4, 2006. Melissa currently works as a T.E.A.C.H. scholarship counselor, and Shawn works as a communications technician. They reside in St. Louis, Mich. Jesseca (Pitts) ’02 and Parrish Watson: A girl, Hannah Elliese, July 8, 2006. Jesseca is a stay-at-home mom, and Parrish works as a sales consultant. They reside in Glendale Heights, Ill. Hannah Watson

Melissa Wagoner ’03 and Max Rector w e r e mar ried June 9, 2007, in Indianapolis, Ind. Max is pursuing Melissa and Max Rector his doctorate in biomolecular sciences at the University of Central Florida, and Melissa is a teacher at Rock Lake Middle School. They reside in Lake Mary, Fla.

    Gary Griffin, director of alumni and university relations, is pleased to announce the addition of two new members on the alumni team: Stan Martin and Deb Stafford. Martin assumes the first-ever role of associate director, while Stafford has stepped into the role of manager of operations.     Martin, a music minister for 33 years, has served at Valparaiso First Church of the Nazarene, Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene, Flint Central Church of the Nazarene and Indianapolis Westside Church of the Nazarene.     His chief roles as associate director will include planning and directing alumni and friends events off-campus, assisting with Homecoming and class gathering reunions, and working with Prime Time events.     “I love relationships and working with peoSTAN MARTIN ple,” he shares. “My strengths will be utilized in this capacity because I will be working with others. I see my job as building rapport with alumni — that may be by praying with people or encouraging them.”     As manager of operations, Stafford will oversee the administrative duties connected to the offices of Alumni and University ­Relations.     She feels it is a privilege to be back working at her alma mater and is amazed at God’s timing in connecting her with a position she finds very fulfilling.     “I love the Christian environment, and I love working with people. I’m proud of this University and the integrity that still holds since I was here. I’m proud [Olivet] still has the Christian values and teaching, and it is great DEB STAFFORD being part of the big picture,” shares Stafford.     With the additional team members, Griffin feels they are now even better equipped to build relationships with the network of Olivet alumni who span the globe.     “I’m extremely excited about the addition of Deb and Stan to the alumni team,” states Griffin. “Our goal is to find out what alumni are doing and how they are impacting our world. The team we are assembling is uniquely gifted to help us do that.”

Rebekah (Thompson) ’04 and Joshua ’03 Whiteley: A boy, Jonah Alan, June 7, 2007. Rebekah is a mechanical engineer with Duke Energy. Joshua is an electrician with Florida Tan Center. They reside in Jonah Whiteley Terre Haute, Ind. Maternal grandparents Houston and Martha Thompson, Bradley, Ill., are both employed by Olivet. Paternal grandparents Jeff and Karen Whiteley reside in Indianapolis, Ill. Chad Kammholz ’04 and Joanna Pollard were married on March 31, 2007. Chad is a personal financial representative for Washington Mutual in Orland Joanna and Chad Kammholz Park, Ill., and Joanna is the director of the research facility at Midwestern University in Downers Grove, Ill. The couple resides in Oak Lawn, Ill.

tion of Ramadii. Two sergeants were killed in the attack and Scott took shrapnel to the neck. Lt. Smith is in stable condition and has been released from medical lock-down. The shrapnel has not yet been removed.

Katie (Lyons) ’04 and Tim Redmond: A girl, Emma Katherine, August 11, 2007. Katie works in Customer Support at Federal Signal Corp. Tim works for AT&T. They reside in Lockport, Ill. Rachel (Hawkins) ’04 and Christopher Kearby ’04: A girl, Selah Elise, May 31, 2007. Christopher is an eighth grade English teacher at Brownsburg West Middle School in Brownsburg and Rachel is in her final year of medical school at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, pursuing a career in pediatrics. They reside Selah Kearby in Brownsburg, Ind.

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Elizabeth ’05 and Brian Moore: A boy, Luke Wayne, May 31, 2007. He joins sister Hannah, 2. Elizabeth is a stay-at-home mom. Brian is an instructor

Luke and Elizabeth Moore

with Nielsen Media Research. The family has recently moved to Tampa, Fla. Christine (Becker) ’05 and Stephen Case ’05: Twin boys, Jack Loren and Baylor Reid, March 22, 2007. Christine has been working as a high school English teacher and is now a stay-athome mom. Stephen completed his master’s degree in physics at the University of Mississippi in May of 2007 and is Jack and Baylor Case now pursuing his Ph.D. They reside in Oxford, Miss. CONTINUED, NEXT PAGE u

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alumni news, less than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. Pictures will be accepted only via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet. edu. News should be sent via e-mail, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345.

Lt. Scott W. Smith ’05 was injured in action in Iraq. Scott’s platoon was engaged in an explosive firefight situation while on a special mission outside his normal duty loca-

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Michael Meier ’04 recently received his MBA from Texas Wesleyan University. He also earned third place honors during the annual Texas Intercollegiate Press Association convention for a column Michael Meier (left) he composed on football star Terrell Owens. He recently founded Focused Pursuit, LLC, a career coaching and small business consulting company serving the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Michael also recently became a national board member for the National Collegiate Table Tennis Association (NCTTA), the official governing body of college table tennis. He resides in Hurst, Texas.

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The Olivetian

Introducing new members of Alumni Relations team

Timothy Livengood ’03 and Andreea Molcut were married April 14, 2007, in Cleveland, Ohio. Timothy Andreea and Timothy graduated mediLivengood cal school at Ohio State University on June 10, 2007, and has begun an emergency medicine residency. Andreea also graduated medical school at Ohio University on June 2 and has begun her family medicine residency. They reside in San Antonio, Texas.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

Class Notes, continued Jackie (Schwemin) ’05 and Tom Sergeant: A girl, Chloe Elaine, April 6, 2007. She joins big sister Natalie, 1. Tom is a HVAC tech for Temperature Engineering and Jackie is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Richton Chloe Sergeant Park, Ill. Sara Hart ’05 recently accepted a position at Northstar Behavioral Health System as a clinical therapist in Anchorage, Alaska, where she also resides. Levi Williams ’06 and Danielle McClendon ’08 were married on May 12, 2007, in Loveland, Colo. Levi is employed by Golden Bell Nazarene Camp and Conference Center in Divide, Colo. Danielle will finish her engineering degree at Olivet in May 2008 and they will Levi and Danielle Williams reside in Divide, Colo. Beth Johnson ’06 and Andy Long were married July 7, 2007 in Indianapolis. Andy is a sales manager for the Royal Automotive Group. The couple resides in Bloomington, Ind. Daniel (Dee) McDonald V ’06 and Amanda Ludlow ’06 were married June 2, 2007, in their home town of La Porte, Ind. Dee and Amanda are currently employed by Olivet. Nakia Hall, ’07, M.A.P.C. is celebrating the new release of her first book, Sitting … at His Feet: When Standing Isn’t Enough.

In Memoriam Eleanor Louise (Pat) (Moore) Westmoreland ’39 died June 26, 2007. She was the daughter of Ruth Jones Moore and Paul Fisher Moore, who both preceded her in death. A brother, Jack, also preceded her in death. Pat married Milburn Westmoreland on June 1, 1957. After graduation from Olivet, she received a Master of Science degree in library science from George Peabody College for Teachers. In 1963, Pat worked with architects on the design of the Bethany Public Library and became the head librarian upon its opening. She served as head extension librarian of Oklahoma Count Branch Libraries, head librarian of the Oklahoma City main library, librarian for Southern Nazarene University, served on the Board of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Library Commission, and worked with Nazarene Volunteer Ser vices starting libraries from Nazarene colleges in the countries of Switzerland, the Philippines, Africa, Trinidad and Tobago.

Rev. Sherman D. Hunter ’40, passed away Februar y 13, 2007. He was born in Por tsmouth, Ohio, June 12, 1914. He attended old Olivet and graduated from the Bible College in 1940. He married Gertrude Hunter in 1942. They had two daughters and sons-in-law: Mar y and Larr y Holder of Bourbonnais, Ill., and Carol and Woody Self of Mukilteo, Wash. Rev. Hunter pastored churches in Illinois and Iowa for 41 years and retired to Bourbonnais in 1983. He continued as a supply pastor for many years and held services in numerous nursing homes. He continued to “preach” from his wheelchair, even though he suffered from Alzheimer’s disease and was confined to a nursing home. He had a wonder ful sense of humor and delighted in telling stories to amuse his friends.

Dr. Leslie Parrott: A legend at Olivet firm connection with the Church of the Nazarene, living out the motto “Education with a Christian Purpose.”     On a personal level, Parrott was a gregarious, outgoing man with a love of life. He once said fried chicken was his favorite meal and that the best advice his mother ever gave him was to “accept the jealousy people always have toward people who accomplish something.” He was a highly educated man with a docDR. LESLIE PARROTT torate and post-doctoral studies, but also a man whose first job involved earning a nickel from Goodyear Tire for each worn tire he could find as a potential sale in a parking lot.     He traveled the world, extensively studied the life of Salvation Army founder William Booth, and wrote more than a dozen books, many of them about living a Christian life during challenging times.     Credit him, too, with helping to open the campus to a broader view of the world and building new links between Olivet and the community.     He did not found the Maggie Sloan Crawford Award, but it started during his tenure and brought Elizabeth Dole to the Bourbonnais campus to accept the first honor. In 1993, he kicked off the campaign to successfully raise $1.7 million for St. Mary’s Surgical Intensive Care Unit. In 1983, he gave the keynote speech for the United Way drive. In 1979, he crossed over to the other local campus to give the commencement address at Kankakee Community College. Dr.

   This editorial originally appeared in the Daily Journal (Kankakee, Ill.) and is reprinted with the permission of that publication.

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ew of us get to time our departure from the world.     But for Leslie Parrott, 85, it was indeed fitting that he died as Olivet Nazarene University celebrates its Centennial year.     Parrott, president of the university from 1975 to 1991, who died [September 23], cast a giant shadow over Olivet and its role in the community. By the time of his retirement, he had signed 6,000 diplomas, half of all those awarded in the history of the institution up to that time.     Indeed, if it were not for his father, A.L. Parrott, Olivet might not be here at all. If it were not for Leslie Parrott, the university as we know it today would most likely be different.     The most visible parts of campus today, those frequented by the community, the scenic entrance off Main Street in Bourbonnais, the Larsen Fine Arts Center, the McHie Arena inside the Leslie Parrott Convocation Athletic Center, were all the work of Dr. Parrott’s administration. Every time someone listens to a note in the auditorium, or sinks a free throw in the arena, he or she lives a part of Dr. Parrott’s vision.     His staff presented him with a chrome-plated bulldozer in 1989, symbolizing the 70 buildings he had removed over the years to create the modern, beautiful campus we see today.     It was on his watch, too, in 1986, that Olivet changed its designation from a college to a university. The move was designed to help project the image of an institution of higher education that sends most of its graduates out into the world of secular work. Yet, the university maintains its

   While attending Olivet, Ernie was a class president and a staff member of the Aurora and GlimmerGlass.    In Minneapolis he established Blanchard & Associates Advertising Agency. Among his clients were the Nazarene Publishing House, Lillenas Publishing Co., and Olivet College for whom he created a new logo Ernest C. Blanchard in 1972.    Ernie was a long-time active member of Minneapolis First Church of the Nazarene.

Lottie Gertrude Norton ’44 passed away on Sunday, July 1, 2007, at her home, surrounded by her family. She was born in Metcalf, Ill., on Sept. 6, 1916, the daughter of Emory and Naomi (Downey) Tresner.    Mrs. Norton had been a resident of this area since the 1980s coming from China, Texas, where she had taught school for more than 20 years. She was a member of the Corey Church of the Nazarene.    Mrs. Norton loved to fish, write, play SkipBo and travel the United States. Virginia Ruth Arnold Bigelow ’46 died May 28, 2007. She was born to the Rev. U.B. Arnold, Sr., and Alice Smith Arnold on Feb. 19, 1923. She graduated from Olivet in 1946 and began working as a music teacher in Watseka, Ill., and then Lansing, Ill., where she met and married George E. Bigelow. She later taught preschool in Ann Arbor, Mich. After receiving her master’s degree in elementary education from Eastern Michigan University, she taught many years at Clinton Elementary School in Ann Arbor. Throughout this period she was involved in a variety of church activities including directing both adult and youth choirs, as well as the youth club at Calvary United Methodist Church. Ginny had a great sense of humor, wry wit and a gift of poetry. She was an avid reader. She enjoyed camping, music, theater, painting and golf. Ginny is survived by her husband, daughter Becky Bush (Garry), daughter Robin Winters (Tom) and son Larry (Wendy). Also surviving are nine grandchildren, five greatgrandchildren, brother Wendell (Bonnie) and their children, and sister-in-law Jane and her daughter. She was much loved by her extended family, and she loved all of them.

Velma E. (Johnson) Keesling ’49 passed away July 20, 2007. She was ordained an elder in the Church of the Nazarene in 1952. She pastored several Nazarene churches in Indiana as well as serving several churches in other denominations. She became the executive director of the Montgomery County Chapter of the American Red Cross in 1979, a position she held until retiring in 2001. Rev. Craig Rhorer Dillman ’49, of Charlestown, Ill., passed away Februar y 23, 2007. Rev. Dillman was born May 19, 1917, in Newbern, Ind., the son of Rev. Clifford K. and Bertha (Eickelberg) Dillman. He was married to Martha Imogene Creed on December 29, 1945. Rev. Dillman received his Bachelor of Theology Degree from Olivet Nazarene University. Rev. Dillman served as a minister in the United Methodist Church for 52 years, pastoring churches in both Illinois and Missouri. He was a veteran of World War II in the United States Army. He enjoyed working in the yard, flower gardening and was an avid reader. But it was his devotion and love for his family and his extended church family which was demonstrated on a daily basis. Rev. Dillman was a man of unwavering faith and possessed a tremendous love for the Lord. The Scriptures were the foundation for his life and for the messages he preached.

Ernest C. Blanchard ’47 passed away February 6, 2007. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia ’47; daughter, Colleen Everitt ’76 (Rick); son, Brian (Kathy); and three grandchildren, Brittany Everitt, and Dan and Mallory Blanchard.

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Mary L. (Reitz) Johnson ’50 passed away January 1, 2007. Barbara A. Bowden ’51 passed away February 9, 2007. She was born August 14, 1929. Barbara was a graduate of Thornton Township High School and Olivet. She was an auxiliary member of The Gideons International since the late 1940s. Barbara was a dedicated employee of Marsh & McLennan in Chicago for more than 47 years. As an active member of the Monee Free Methodist Church since 1944, she taught Sunday school, vacation Bible school, served as director of Christian education and served on the official board of administration. Barbara was a devout Christian and took pleasure in helping others. Her wonder ful personality, sense of humor and interest in others made her a joy to her friends and family. She enjoyed traveling and visited more than 30 countries in her lifetime. She is survived by her aunt Maxine (George) Longendorf of Escondido, Calif., and several cousins. She is preceded in death by her parents, Milton and Maysell G. Bowden. Betty Chivington Meyering ’51 went to be with her Lord and Savior on June 14, 2007, after a long bout with Alzheimer’s disease. Betty was born in Dayton, Ohio, on September 10, 1927, to Rev. and Mrs. Olin Chivington. Upon receiving her degree in home economics from Olivet and her master’s degree from the University of Illinois in 1955, she and her husband, Chet, moved to Colorado Springs to teach. She taught home economics at South Junior High School beginning in 1956 and finished her teaching career at Mitchell High School in 1983. For almost a quarter century, she served as social chairman at First Church of the Nazarene in Colorado Springs, where she was a member. For another quarter century, she served in various capacities at Trinity Nazarene Church, also in Colorado Springs. For many

O F F I C E O F

ALUMNI

REL AT IONS

Fall 2007

The Olivetian

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ministry in the Nazarene church in 1994. He continued part time as a senior adult pastor at Lansing South Church of the Nazarene and was honored as pastor emeritus in 2002. He is survived by Madonna, his loving wife of 56 years. Also surviving are his three children, Charles (Teresa) Allen, Deanna (Steve) Butler, Brian (Lynda) Allen; one brother, Alton Allen, Jr.; twelve grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. He is preceded in death by his parents, brother, Ivan Allen, and a son, Steven Allen.

Parrott invited the Kankakee Valley Symphony Orchestra to campus, fostering a relationship that has endured.     As a newsmaker, Dr. Parrott had a special relationship with Daily Journal Publisher and Editor Jean Alice Small during the many years the two were contemporaries. He toured The Journal as “publisher for a day” in 1990. He knew the press. He loved the printed word.     He also had a great sense of history. He was president during the time the university celebrated its 75th anniversary. To commemorate it, he commissioned Harvey Collins to paint the history of the school. The massive mural, 7 feet high and 70 feet wide, hangs in the university’s student center, subtly, or not so subtly, reminding today’s undergraduates of the university’s roots.     In retirement, he wrote “The Olivet Story,” covering the college through 1990. Part of that history involved his father, A.L. Parrott.     On Nov. 15, 1939, a disastrous fire leveled Olivet College, then located in downstate Olivet.     A.L. Parrott, then president, was charged with finding a new campus. He was familiar with St. Viator’s, a Catholic college closed by the Depression, in Bourbonnais. The two schools had competing debate teams.     When the Olivet campus was damaged, the Massachusetts Life Insurance Company sent a brochure about St. Viator’s to the Parrotts. They drove up Illinois Route 1, with Leslie steering the family Buick for his dad.     A locked chain-link fence surrounded the campus. Leslie scaled it and found the caretaker to let them in. His father subsequently convinced the school’s trustees to accept the Bourbonnais campus as part of the settlement of the school’s fire insurance claim.     If he hadn’t been able to scoot over the fence, Leslie Parrott once said, history would have been different.     Indeed, he climbed over that fence, and never stopped building once he got here.

The Rev. Eugene Owen “Jack” Jones ’54 passed away June 25, 2007. The Rev. Jones was born Nov. 7, 1931, in Chariton, Iowa, the son of the Revs. Arthur Kring Jones and Ruth Wilkinson Jones. He was a loving husband to Camillia Ann Marsh ’54, whom he married Aug. 5, 1956. The Rev. Jones was named the pastor of Perkins Road Church of the Nazarene in 1961. The church’s name was changed to Faith Church of the Nazarene soon after he arrived, and he remained there as pastor until 1972. In 1972, the Rev. Jones founded Faith Community Church, which continues today as Faith Crusaders Church. The Rev. Jones was also the director of Christ Theological Seminary and was the bishop of Crusaders Churches, USA. For a brief time in the 1960s, the Rev. Jones served as the chairman of the Champaign County War on Poverty. Surviving are his wife; two sons and daughters-in-law, Pastor Richard M. Jones (Vicki) and Dr. Marsh W. Jones (Kim); his brother, Richard M. Jones ’50; and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents and two sisters, Marcella Julia Gerdes and W. Janette Williams. John Neff ’56, of Hillard, Ohio, passed away December 31, 2006. He was married for 52½ years to Hilda (Hurdle) ’56. John earned a B.A. in philosophy from Olivet Nazarene University then went on to earn both a B.S. and an M.A. from Ohio State University. He enjoyed his teaching career at Upper Arlington High School, where he taught sophomore English, psychology, and humanities, and was the alcohol/drug educator for the district for seven years. While at UAHS, he developed a course, “The Bible as Lit,” and taught it for many years. Following his teaching career, he did light catering and was a gourmet cook. He was a man

Read more about the life and presidency of Dr. Leslie Parrott at www.olivet.edu.

of these years, she also volunteered her service for the Salvation Army’s Women’s Auxiliary. She is survived by her husband of almost 56 years, Dr. Chet Meyering ’53, a daughter and son-in-law, Michelle and Greg Isham of Colorado Springs, son, MG Meyering of Jonesboro, Arkansas; five grandchildren, Jenifer (Amos) Velasquez, Bryan and

Ryan Isham, Linzi and Beau Meyering, and a great-grandson, Jace Chet Velasquez. She is also survived by two sisters and one brother of Ohio. Rev. Carl Allen ’52 passed away June 22, 2007. Carl was born August 8, 1929, in Wheeler, Mich., the son of Alton and Beatrice (Green) Allen. Carl retired from full-time

77, of Bourbonnais, died Aug. 25, 2007, at the Miller Center in Kankakee, Ill.

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Edwina L. Bonds ’87, died Saturday, October 6, 2007, at her daughter’s home in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Ms. Bonds had worked at the Kankakee County Training Center for the Disabled as a residential coordinator. She had formerly worked for Kankakee School District 111 and Shapiro Developmental Center. She was born Dec. 4, 1945, in Chicago, the daughter of Edward and Maude Davis Rodgers. She was a member of the Red Hat Society. She was a lifelong member of Caldwell Chapel AME Zion Church, where she served on the Board of Trustees, the Board of Christian Education, the Altar Guild, the Lay Council, Homecoming Committee, and the Mortgage Committee. She was also a Church school/Vacation Bible school instructor and a member of the Gospel Choir. She enjoyed traveling, crafts and reading.

    Gunnell M. Jorden ’59, former Olivet Nazarene University professor, passed away July 16, 2007, in Portland, Ore., at age 90. She was born March 16, 1917, in Lofberga, Sweden, the eldest of five children.     In 1919, the family immigrated to Drumheller, Alberta, Canada, where Gunnell eventually met her future husband at a district church event. She married Eric Jorden in September 1941, and Rev. and Mrs. Gunnell M. Jorden Jorden served Nazarene pastorates in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Graham, Cypress, and North Hollywood, Calif.; and London, England. The Jordens returned to the United States, and Mrs. Jorden earned her undergraduate degree from Olivet while Rev. Jorden taught at ONU. They then moved to Nampa, Idaho.     After Eric’s untimely death in 1963, Gunnell returned to graduate school at age 47, earning an M.A. in English literature from the University of Oregon in 1966. Moving back to Illinois that fall, she became a professor of English at ONU. She was passionate about literature, especially Shakespeare, the romantic poets, modern poetry and the short story. Gunnell Jorden was a brilliant and much-loved professor, inspirational speaker at retreats and conferences, and a devoted churchwoman.     After her retirement in 1982, she moved to San Diego, continuing her teaching at Point Loma Nazarene University. Later she moved to Salem, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash., to be close to her elder daughter.     Gunnell’s Bible and devotional books — filled with notes of joy, prayers of supplication, and answered prayers — show that she called to God each day for wisdom and understanding. She loved the church: attending, supporting, worshipping and being a part of the body of Christ. Even as her memory declined, her spirit continued to shine. Her heart and voice sang to her Lord, reciting Scripture and singing hymns, for His Word was written in her heart.     Memorial contributions may be made in Gunnell’s name to: Office of Planned Giving, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Ave., Bourbonnais, IL 60914.

    She was born Feb. 2, 1930, in Danville, to Carl S. and Eunice Spruce McClain. Her parents were teachers at Olivet College in Olivet, Ill. They moved to Bourbonnais with the college in 1940. She graduated from Bradley-Bourbonnais High School in 1947, and from Olivet Nazarene University in 1959 and 1954, with degrees in English and music. After earning her M.A. in music at the University of Illinois, she spent 37 years teaching music in Trevecca Nazarene University, Nashville, Tenn. During her tenure there, she served as assistant to the academic dean for three years, and as department chairwoman for seven years. During this time, she helped lead the college to NASM accreditation, the first Nazarene college music department to be so accredited. She founded and directed the women’s choir for 10 years, traveled with other choirs, and other music groups as well.     Barbara retired from teaching in 1993. She married Norman W. Bloom, April 29, 1995, in Nashville, Tenn., and then moved back to Bourbonnais. An accomplished pianist and organist, she has supplied many churches in the Kankakee area. She also has presented music programs for various groups and has spoken at various women’s retreats. A volunteer for Hospice and for Riverside Hospital, she was also a member of a study club, Minerva. Barbara was a member of College Church of the Nazarene, where she led a women’s Bible study. She enjoyed traveling, having been to 49 states and 30 foreign countries. Her hobbies included reading, writing and working word puzzles.

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Leanne (Peterson) Converse ’67 went home to be with Jesus on May 6, 2007. ­Leanne was the faithful and loving wife of Ed Converse ’65 for 40 years. The couple had two children, Jonathan (Marie Louise) and Mandee Converse. They had two grandchildren, Olivia and Alma. Following Leanne’s years at Olivet, she fulfilled her educational calling as a teacher and administrator at various Illinois schools. She served God faithfully, using her spiritual gifts and talents in both secular and church ministry. Memorial gifts may be given to the Larry D. Watson Ambassador Scholarship at ONU.

Gunnell M. Jorden ’59

Barbara L. McClain Bloom ’59/’54,

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of many talents and was very widely read. John was also active in his church, teaching an adult Sunday school class, singing in the choir and serving on various boards and committees. John was the first leader of the Alpha Group at Camp Akita, now called L.I.F.E. Guard (Life is First Eternal), which is a service group of campers to Camp Akita. His final job was manager of Utzinger Memorial Garden at the Farm Science Review, a job he loved very much.

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The Olivetian

Fall 2007

TIGER TRACKS men’s

football

soccer

Four men’s soccer players named first-team all-conference    Four Tiger men’s soccer team members were selected to the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic First Team All-Conference. Defender Rodrigue Fontem ’09, goalie Andy Stembridge ’10, midfielder/ forward Josh Ayers ’10 and midfielder Vincent Mkhwanazi ’10 were all first-time first-team selections. Fontem anchored a defense that allowed a conference-low six goals during conference play. Stembridge had posted a 1.12 goal against average through the team’s first 20 games, recording 65 saves and posting six shutouts, including five during conference play. Ayers and Mkhwanazi were two of the team’s leading scoring threats. Ayers had scored eight goals and dished out seven assists in the team’s first 20 games, both team highs. Five of Ayers’ eight goals were gamewinning efforts. Mkhwanazi had scored three goals and dished out five assists, and was a leader in the midfield for the Tigers. Defender Chad Houseman ’08 was an All-CCAC Second Team selection.

Rory Fry Vincent Mkhwanazi

women’s

soccer

Davis named All-CCAC First Team    For ward Michelle Davis ’11 scored a team-leading 14 goals through the team’s first 19 games and was awarded with being named a Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic First Team All-Conference selection. In addition to Davis’ team-leading 14 goals, she also scored six game-winning goals. Rachel Page ’09 was an All-CCAC Second Team selection. Through the team’s first 19 games, she ranked second on the team with 10 goals and six assists.

Fry earns team’s first NAIA weekly award since 1998    Rory Fry ’09 scored two touchdowns off blocked punts against William Penn University (Iowa) on Oct. 27, including one that he had blocked, helping the Tiger football team to a 37-24 victory. Fry was not only named the Mid-States Football Association Midwest League Special Teams Player of the Week, but he was also named the NAIA National Special Teams Player of the Week. It marked the first time since 1998 that a Tiger football player received an NAIA National Player of the Week award.

golf

Doran and Dulin named Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Golf All-Conference    Seth Doran ’10 and Brad Dulin ’10 were named Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Golf AllConference, following their play at the NIIGC Championship Meet. Doran tied for the medalist at the meet, falling in a one-hole playoff. Dulin tied for third at the meet. Christopher Dean ’10, Jordan Dillard ’10 and Andrew Johnson ’09 were named NIIGC Honorable Mention.

Find the latest news, stats and scores at www.olivet.edu

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WOMEN’S

Fall 2007

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SOCCER

Not your ordinary training camp By Kate Morgan

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They broke bread together; through broken English and Spanish, they shared stories.    The Tigers also donated much-needed equipment — soccer balls, cones, jerseys — to two of the teams. SUBMITTED PHOTO

ith a heart for missions and a passion for soccer, Bill Bahr ’96 took on the role of Olivet women’s soccer coach with a plan: Find ways to integrate ministry with sport.    As part of his vision, Bill committed to taking the team on an international mission trip every three years. Since his arrival, the team has served in Zimbabwe and Australia.    This year the team embarked on a mission to Central America, serving the community and several churches in the Central District of Guatemala.

Helping hands    Prepared for their first day of work, team members traveled to the Joshua 1:9 Church of the Nazarene in Zone 7 of Guatemala City. The task seemed simple enough: Clear piles of dirt from a soccer field so a neighboring church could use it as an evangelism tool.    The women soon realized, though, that with antiquated tools and no onsite dumpster, the job was anything but easy.    Meandering through narrow streets, the girls carted dirt in broken-down wheel barrels four blocks to the cliff where garbage is dumped.    But soon, they were not alone in their mission.    By mid-afternoon the number of Guatemalans on the worksite equaled the number of Americans. Even the children tried to maneuver the wheel barrels — the wheel barrels that, when packed with dirt, weighed more than they did.    “I was especially moved by the helpfulness of a young girl,” Katie Sweet ’08 remembers. “I asked her to find me a few rocks. For the next hour she diligently waded through piles of dirt in her nice velvet dress — probably the nicest she had — searching for the rocks I had asked for.”

   Once they had completed the soccer field renovation, the team moved on to Campo Nissi, a school for underprivileged children. There, they painted a multi-purpose sports area and poured concrete for a new parking lot.    But the women did more than just manual labor. They also had the opportunity to reach out to the Guatemalan children through Bible schools, sports evangelism and workshops.    Through their work, 33 children, youth and adults came to know Jesus as their personal Savior.

Faithful feet    As soccer players in a country charged by the sport, the Tigers had another tool to utilize: their feet. While abroad, they had the opportunity to play against four local women’s teams.    The games served as more than a chance to sharpen their skills; they served to as a way to minister to the crowds of fans who watched. “These games and the activities that followed provided an ample place for a large number of people to hear testimonies of the team,” Bill says.    After the games, the teams connected with each other.

Modified minds

   Back in the States, the team has had a chance to reflect on their journey, a journey that changed the lives of the served as well as the servers.    “The entire time was an unforgettable experience,” Bill reflects. “Because of [the team’s] testimony, several families came to know the Church of the Nazarene that they had never before known was in their community.”    As they served the community, they also strengthened their relationships with each other and with God.    “It is a learning experience [for our team],” Bill adds. “But more importantly, I have seen tremendous spiritual growth as a result of these trips.”    The trip was the first glance at the global Church for many — and the first opportunity to see how they fit into that larger picture.    As Katie adjusts back to life in the States, she reveals what she learned. “Seeing how God was moving in a different country was the best part of the trip. He showed me that it is possible to use the things that I am passionate about, like soccer, to serve Him.    “God allowed our soccer team to have a glimpse into His greater purpose. He showed us that through Him we can be a part of something that is so much bigger than ourselves, winning souls for the Kingdom.”

Find the latest news, stats and scores at www.olivet.edu

Sports Shorts

Men’s Basketball

  After a successful 2006– 07 season, the Tigers opened the season ranked No. 18 in the NAIA Top 25 Preseason Poll. It marked the second straight year the Tigers had opened at No. 18.   The Tigers are coming off their second straight trip to the NAIA Division I National Tournament and 13th in School history. Thirteen trips are the most by any school in the state of Illinois.   The Tigers started the season with a 61-49 victory over Rochester University (Mich.). Ryan Paxson ’10 led the way for the Tigers, scoring 18 points, while Phil French ’07 added 11 points and a teamtying high of seven rebounds in the season-opening victory.   NAIA Second Team All-American French, a 2007–08 Sporting News Preseason First Team AllAmerican, is one of three returning starters for the Tigers. Last season he averaged 18.1 points and 7.7 rebounds. Starters Tyler Wallenfang ’10 and Josh Bronke ’09 also return. Wallenfang averaged 12.2 points and 5.9 rebounds, while Bronke averaged 9.6 points, 3.7 rebounds and dished out 113 assists. Paxson averaged 8.8 points and hit a teamleading 54 three-point shots.

Women’s Basketball   After just missing out on an automatic and atlarge bid to the NAIA Division I National Tournament, the women’s basketball team is looking to make its first trip to the national tournament since 2000.   The Tigers opened the season ranked No. 27, receiving 50 votes.   In their season-opening game, the Tigers rallied from an eight-point second-half deficit to post a 103-94 victory over MidAmerica Nazarene University (Kan.). Hilary Disch ’08 scored a game-high 27 points, while Courtney Hehn ’09 scored 17 points. Maggie Sillar ’08 posted a double-double, scoring 12 points and 12 rebounds.   Disch, an NAIA Honorable Mention All-American a season ago, is the top-returning scorer, averaging 15.0 points per game and 14.0 assists. Hehn

averaged 13.4 points and a teamleading 139 three-pointer made, while Sillar averaged 10.4 points and a team-leading 6.6 rebounds. Last season, the Tigers reached the century mark 18 times, tying an NAIA Division I National Record.

Men’s Cross Country

  For the second straight season, the men’s cross country team won not only the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Championship, but also captured the NAIA Region VII Championship.   Kacey Carr ’08 won both the CCAC Meet and the NAIA Region VII Meet. Carr won the CCAC Meet in 25 minutes, 42 seconds, while winning the NAIA Region VII Meet in 24:45. Drew Collette ’10 led the Tiger contingent at the region meet after Carr, taking third overall by running a 25:28.   The trip to the NAIA National Meet was the Tigers’ fourth overall and fourth in six years.

Women’s Cross Country   For the second straight year, the women’s cross country team was ranked high with the NAIA, as high as No. 7.   The Tigers won four of their meets, including the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Meet. The Tigers tied for the NAIA Region VII Meet, but were beat out by Saint Xavier University (Ill.) on their sixth-runner finish.   Bethany Carr ’08 won both the CCAC and NAIA Region VII Meets. Carr won the CCAC Meet in 18 minutes and two seconds, while running 17:34 to win the region meet. Cheri Hoffmann ’08 and Kaeley Matuz ’10 finished in the top 10 in both meets. Hoffmann took fourth in the CCAC Meet with 19:15.30 and second in the region meet with an 18:43. Matuz took third in the conference meet with a 19:11.30, while running a 19:17 to finish fourth at the NAIA Region VII Meet.   Despite tying for the NAIA Region VII Championship, the Tigers will still advance to the NAIA National Meet for the sixth straight year.

Football   Facing three teams that participated in postseason play a season ago did not bode well for the Tigers, as they started 0-3.   However, once they got into Mid-States Football Association Midwest League play, the Tigers won five of their first six games. The Tigers had one game remaining at press time.

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  Through nine games, the Tigers were 5-4 overall and 5-1 in the MSFA Midwest League, a game back of first place St. Ambrose University (Iowa).   After missing the first game of the season, Derek Diehl ’08 passed for 1,012 yards on 99 completions in 190 attempts. He also threw nine touchdowns. Austin Kizzee ’09 led the receivers with 36 receptions for 487 yards and four touchdowns, while Aaron Swart ’10 had 27 catches for 197 yards and Matt Ostrom ’08 had 21 receptions for 329 yards and four touchdowns. Marshall Fraley ’11 led a resurgent rushing attack, gaining 853 yards on 189 attempts with six touchdowns.   Defensively, linebacker Jeremy Robinson ’08 not only led the team but also led the MSFA in total tackles with 102. He was among the NAIA’s top 10 in tackles for loss, registering 15 in eight games. Robinson did not play in the team’s first game of the season. Josh McDaniel ’08 and Brandon McClure ’11 had been credited with 60 tackles each, through nine games.   Matt Soulia ’08 booted 10 of 14 field goal attempts, while connecting on 27 of 29 extra points. Through nine games, Soulia had scored a teamleading 57 points. Zach Alexander ’11 handled the punting duties, punting 48 times through nine games for 1,917 yards, including a career-long 64 yard punt.

for the third time in School history.   The Tigers finished the regular season 9-7-1 overall and 6-3 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference, finishing fourth. Five of the Tigers’ six conference victories were by shutout, as they finished with six shutouts through 20 games.   Josh Ayers ’10 led the Tigers in scoring, recording eight goals and seven assists through 20 games. Seth Arriaga ’11 had scored five assists and dished out two assists, while Vincent Mkhwanazi ’10 had three goals and five assists.   After taking over in goal before the team’s third game, Andy Stembridge ’10 posted 1.12 goals against average, making 65 saves in 1,612 minutes. He posted six shutouts, including five during conference action.

Women’s Soccer

  The Tiger golf team had one of its finest seasons in School history. Not only did they win the Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Golf Conference Championship Meet, but they also finished runner-up at the NCCAA National Meet and NAIA Region Meet. Both runner-up finishes were the highest ever by a Tiger team at the respective events.   Seth Doran ’10 led the way for the Tigers, as he was named an NIIGC First Team selection. He was also named an NAIA All-Region VII selection. Brad Dulin ’10 was also selected to the All-NIIGC First Team.

  In a season that started with so much promise, the women’s soccer team went 7-7 after a 4-0-1 start to stand 11-7-1, heading in the NCCAA North Central Region Tournament. The Tigers outscored its first three opponents 12-0, recording three of the team’s eight shutouts.   The Tigers finished the regular season 11-6-1 overall and 6-3 in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference, tying for fourth. The Tiger defense posted five shutouts in their six conference victories.   Michelle Davis ’11 posted a team-leading 14 goals through 19 games. She also dished out one assist and scored a team-high six game-winning goals. Rachel Page ’09 scored 10 goals and dished out six assists and was a main distributor in the Tigers’ midfield. Megan Taylor ’09 scored five goals and dished out four assists, while Caitie Horner ’08 scored one goal and dished out a team-leading eight assists.   Danielle Johnston ’10 started every game between the pipes for the Tigers, posting a 1.27 goals against average through 18 games. She recorded 86 saves in 1,486 minutes and posted five shutouts.

Men’s Soccer

Men’s Tennis

  The men’s soccer team struggled at the beginning of the season, dropping their first two games of the season. They then lost only once in their next eight games, and went 5-5 over their next 10 games, heading into their NAIA Region VII Semifinal game against St. Ambrose University (Iowa) on Nov. 5. The Tigers defeated Grand View College (Iowa) 2-1 in double overtime in the NAIA Region VII Quarterfinal, advancing to the region semifinal

  After several close calls, the men’s tennis wrapped up its fall season with a 7-0 record. The Tigers swept all nine games in two matches, while narrowly defeating Taylor University (Ind.) 5-4 to end the fall season.   Hector Sanchez ’08 led the Tigers in singles action, going 7-0 during the fall season. Michael Chamberlain ’11 went 6-0 in his six matches, while Chris Tudor ’09 went 5-0.

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  In doubles action, Mark Bell ’10 and Leandro Viltard ’09 combined to win all seven matches in second doubles action. Uyapo Nleya ’09 and Chamberlain won four of their first doubles matches.

Women’s Tennis   The only blemish on the women’s tennis fall schedule was a 5-4 setback to the University of Chicago (Ill.). Besides that, the Tigers cruised to a 15-1 record, including winning 13 matches by a shutout score. The Tigers defeated McKendree University (Ill.) 6-3 and Taylor University (Ind.) 8-1 as the only two non 9-0 victories.   In the Tri-State Conference Tournament, the Tigers swept Clarke College (Iowa) 6-0 and St. Ambrose University (Iowa) 5-0. With the victories, the Tigers clinched its second straight trip to the NAIA National Tournament and fifth in the program’s history.   Jennifer Ramsay ’09 led the Tigers with 14 wins during singles action, while Alicia Cullen ’11 posted 13 singles victories. Erica Engelbrecht ’11 went unbeaten, going 12-0 in singles play.   In doubles action, Cullen and Engelbrecht went 14-0, while Haas and Jade Stanlick ’09 went 12-0.

Volleyball   The volleyball squad returned all but three players from last season’s NAIA National Tournament and Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Championship team. However, a stiff schedule and injuries put a damper on the Tigers’ season.   The Tigers started the year 1-6, but rallied to win 13 of their next 18 matches. However, the Tigers went 3-8 in their final 11 regular-season matches to finish 17-19 before the start of the postseason. The Tigers finished third in the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference with a 7-2 mark.   Injuries cost leader Michelle Kapteyn ’10 the team’s final 26 matches and all of the postseason. Kapteyn was the team’s defensive stopper and emotional leader. At the time of her injury, Kapteyn had recorded 249 digs and had a 93.8 passing percentage.   Amber McKean ’08 led the offense through 36 matches, recording 321 kills, while Michelle ­McFadden ’09 and Tara Schmidt ’11 posted 317 kills. Erin Sikora ’10 engineered the offense, dishing out 1,037 assists, while Cyndi Rucker ’08, who took over for Kapteyn as the team’s libero, posted 478 digs to anchor the defense. Sara Byrne ’11 led the way defensively for the Tigers at the net, recording 161 blocks, while Schmidt added 113 blocks.

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