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2011-12 Annual Report

College of Health Sciences 1

message from the dean This has been a year of progress and success for our College of Health Sciences! Our progress includes additional space, more research publications, a new Physical Therapy clinic and the creation of the Center for Global Health. Our growth includes revitalization of our nurse anesthesia program, transfer of the athletic training program to the School of Physical Therapy, and increased enrollment in our tracks of the EVMS-ODU joint master’s program in public health (MPH). Our successes are many, including full accreditation of every program and first time pass rates exceeding the national averages. Several programs achieve 100 percent pass rates the first time our graduates sit for their exams! Our Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences received initial accreditation by the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) and the MPH program achieved reaccreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). The chairs and program directors are already gearing up for the continuous process of reaccreditation and program review using outcomes data to demonstrate quality. This year, the college implemented a monthly newsletter to communicate our many activities, announcements and achievements not only within our college, but also with our constituents. Please see our website for back issues of the newsletter and join the many who have signed up on our mailing list. It is exciting to be working with the college’s Advisory Board to cultivate and steward major gifts to support programming, endowed professorships, simulation and new initiatives, such as the Center for Global Health. The department chairs, major gift officer and I are optimistic about pursuing philanthropic support and increasing engagement from our alumni. As we continue to grow research, the numbers of partnerships of our faculty leading to successful grant funding and publications is on the rise. Our interdisciplinary research continues to reflect the collaborative approach valued within the College of Health Sciences. Researchers from various disciplines are working together to create innovative solutions to health and public health problems. Problem solving extends to our metropolitan community and service to our citizens continues to be a priority. Although we have outgrown our College of Health Sciences Building, it is a joy to see our building bustling with students, faculty, staff and guests. On any given day, you will see faculty and students engaged in discussions, laboratories, presentations, and technology (especially laptops and cellphones), along with advisement and good doses of laughter. We continue to explore options to acquire much needed space, including a proposed addition to our building. We acquired new space at the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center and on 47th Street. The nurse anesthesia program will relocate to Virginia Beach and the additional space down the street will provide more faculty offices, as well as the opportunity to launch Monarch Physical Therapy, offering treatment, practice and research opportunities. As reflected in this annual report, our students, faculty, alumni, advisory boards and partners are working together to achieve ambitious goals as we educate world-class health care and public health leaders of the future.

Shelley Mishoe Dean

Table of Contents Administration Message.......................................................................................................................................... 4 Mission/Vision/Values............................................................................................................................................. 5 Chairs’ Message..................................................................................................................................................... 6-8 Programs Offered...................................................................................................................................................... 8 Enrollment Information..................................................................................................................................... 9-11 Graduation Highlights............................................................................................................................................12 Accreditations..........................................................................................................................................................13 Degree Completion Programs...............................................................................................................................14 Graduation Information.........................................................................................................................................15 Service and Engagement........................................................................................................................................16 Research and Grant Funding.................................................................................................................................17 Grants Awarded.......................................................................................................................................................18 Grant Funding..........................................................................................................................................................19 Scholarships and Learning.....................................................................................................................................20 School Highlights..............................................................................................................................................21-23 Annual Giving..........................................................................................................................................................24 Financial Status........................................................................................................................................................25 Global Health.....................................................................................................................................................26-28 Alumni Highlights...................................................................................................................................................29 Publications........................................................................................................................................................30-32 Books and Book Chapters.....................................................................................................................................33 Our Dean’s Office....................................................................................................................................................34 Cover Photo: David Hollingsworth

Administration Message Richardean Benjamin, MPH, PhD, PMH-BC, ANEF, FAAN, Associate Dean The 2011-12 academic year has been marked with expansion and revision of graduate programs in the College of Health Sciences (COHS). In addition, the MPH program jointly offered with Eastern Virginia Medical School hosted a Commission on Education of Public Health (CEPH) accreditation site visit last fall and it received full reaccreditation. The addition of a new physical therapy clinic facility represents the first effort by the School of Physical Therapy to provide treatment, practice and research space for faculty and students. The transfer of the athletic training program to the School of Physical Therapy will complement the services and research programs offered in that school. Enrollments have remained stable with over 586 students enrolled in the 10 master’s and doctoral programs in the college. The highest enrollments were reported in the physical therapy program with 127 students and increasing enrollments were seen in the environmental health and health promotions tracks of the MPH program. The COHS offers certificate programs in modeling and simulation, occupational health and molecular diagnostics. The PhD in health services is undergoing a major revision; expect to see impressive changes coming soon. The Adult Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist/Nurse Educator track (CNS) is the most recent program revision which replaces the nurse educator track. Graduates of the newly revised CNS track will be eligible to sit for the examination to become certified as a clinical nurse specialist in adult gerontology nursing. Another notable accomplishment: three of the seven ODU students selected to participate in the Seventh Annual Graduate Research Forum hosted by the Virginia Council of Graduate Students in February were students enrolled in the College of Health Sciences.

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Deborah Blythe Bauman, BSDH, MS Assistant Dean I am very proud of the extraordinary accomplishments of the faculty, staff and students of the College of Health Sciences in 2011-12. It is evident that these caring and high achieving people value excellence, integrity, inclusiveness and partnership. The College of Academic Success Center increased full-time staff this year, which contributed to improvements in student success in gaining admission to our programs and persistence of students from freshman to sophomore year. Student enrollment is steady in the undergraduate health sciences programs and reports indicate increases for next year as the number of program applications and applicant GPAs are increasing. While enrollment is stable, an upward trend in the number of degrees conferred demonstrates increasing numbers of healthcare providers entering the workforce. Health Sciences program quality is affirmed through the internal review and external accreditation processes, as well as measured by student achievement on certification and licensure exams. Our numerous professional continuing education programs and frequent alumni events are exciting and enjoyable opportunities to stay connected with alumni and friends of the college. I feel tremendously fortunate to be able to serve the College of Health Sciences as assistant dean.

Mission/Vision/values

OUR Mission “The College of Health Sciences will provide leadership in health care by offering excellent educational experiences in a quality learning environment to facilitate the development of competent, caring health professionals; by generating knowledge through inquiry and discovery; and by engaging in lifelong learning, professional, and community service.”

OUR VIsion “To advance healthcare education and research through interdisciplinary and global collaborations.”

OUR VALUES Integrity Inclusiveness Excellence Partnership

College of Health Sciences 5

chairs’ message Gene W. Hirschfeld School

of

Dental Hygiene

The School of Dental Hygiene has its eye toward the future based on interprofessional collaboration; a talented network of community partners, alumni, faculty and staff; transformational educational experiences; and a commitment to create opportunities for life. Our community partners and alumni play distinguished roles as adjunct faculty, speakers and mentors to our students. The generosity of our network supports scholarships, special events and the acquisition of new resources such as the electronic health record for the Dental Hygiene Care Facility. Although our faculty are few, their efforts have resulted in the publication of three books, three book chapters, eight refereed publications (some with Physical Therapy, Engineering, Medicine and Biology faculty), seven professional magazine publications; and 17 national/international presentations. Assuring the advancement of evidencebased practice, faculty and students continue to conduct research on blue-spectrum light technology in identifying oral cancer, hand-arm muscle activity during dental instrumentation, use of simulation in cross-cultural competence training, and the effects of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma on oral pathogens and tooth whitening; and our research and master’s degree programs prepare the next generation of practitioners, leaders and academicians. Faculty service spans membership on editorial, industry and foundation advisory boards, and our continuing education program meets the needs of over 500 professionals annually. Our outreach programs delivered oral health services to 7,889 people and $85,464 in donated care; and the on-campus clinic experienced close to 6,000 patient encounters. Faculty and graduate students, Physicians for Peace, and the University of Nicaragua faculty are global partners for the first dental hygiene program initiative in Central America; the dental school dean from the University of Nicaragua-Leon spent a week with faculty studying the ODU approach to dental hygiene education. The school also participated in the White House Interfaith and Community Service Campus Challenge. A source of pride, our faculty, alumni and students continue to garner recognitions, e.g., the 2012 Health Care Heroes Award from Inside Business, the Hampton Roads business journal; the Virginia Dental Association Community Service Award; the American Dental Hygienists’ Association-Crest/ Oral B Pro in the Profession Award; and the W.S. Jackman Award of Distinction from the University of California of Pennsylvania. Students have represented the school at the Virginia Council of Graduate Schools’ Student Research Forum at the University of Virginia, the American Dental Hygienists’ Association’s (ADHA)/Dentsply International Graduate Student Research Forum and the Virginia Dental Hygienists’ Association (VDHA) professional development workshops. Some have won Student Merit Awards for outstanding achievement in community health dentistry from the American Association of Public Health Dentistry, and the nationally competitive American Dental Education Association/Sigma Phi Alpha Linda DeVore Scholarship and the American Dental Association Dental Hygiene Scholarship. Leadership skills developed as our seniors were student delegates to the VDHA and the ADHA House of Delegates. Our achievements reveal the school’s ability to create its future and advance its mission. While we face challenges, the same commitment to excellence and “can do” attitude will continue to be our legacy.

Michele Darby, University Professor, Eminent Scholar, and Chair Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene

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School

of

Community

and

Environmental Health

The academic year 2011-12 was a very busy year for faculty and staff in the School of Community and Environmental Health. The following are some of the highlights of their accomplishments. Lillian Thompson was nominated for 2012 HACE Staff Member of the Year Award. Professor James English led in the development of the Environmental Health (ENVH) track of the joint EVMS-ODU MPH Program and assisted with the self-study and site visit for reaccreditation from CEPH. This past year, Charlene Brassington assisted with the leadership of the program and the coordination of the ENVH track. Faculty were very active in scholarly activities. Drs. Carol Mansyur and James Neff published one paper each in peer-refereed journals; Drs. James Blando, Anna Jeng, Harry Zhang and Emmanuel Rudatsikira published three, four, six and 12 papers, respectively. Faculty made 28 presentations at national and international conferences. Dr. Jeng received a $100,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and continued to run her two active grants from NIH. Dr. Blando was co-investigator on a $390,000 grant from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOHS). Dr. Jim Neff’s $900,000 challenge award was extended through 2013. Dr. Zhang continued to run his three active research grants. Faculty were recognized for outstanding service to the University and to the community at large. Dr. Jacqueline Sharpe was selected as the Most Inspirational Faculty member by the COHS honor graduate, Devon Taylor, whose research was selected for display in Washington, D.C., and who is the first ODU student to be admitted into Harvard Medical School. Dr. Ann Marie Kopitzke received the Shining Star Award for her commitment to excellence in teaching and mentoring. Dr. Mansyur was invited to serve as a member of the Abstract Review Committee for the American Public Health Association (APHA). Dr. Neff was appointed to the board of directors and chair of the membership committee for American Academy of Health Behavior. Dr. Mariana Szklo-Coxe was elected to the board of directors for the Virginia Academy of Sleep Medicine. Dr. Rudatsikira was invited to serve as public health specialty editor for WebMed Central Plus; chair-elect of the Public Health Forum in the Association of University Programs in Health Administration; and accreditation site visitor for the Council on Education for Public Health.

Emmanuel Rudatsikira, MD, PhD Chair Community and Environmental Health

chairs’ message Medical Laboratory

and

Radiation Sciences

As chair, I would like to say “Hello” from the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences and tell you a little bit about our department. MLRS is a very diverse department comprising five separate programs: Cytotechnology, Medical Technology, Molecular Diagnostics, Nuclear Medicine Technology and Ophthalmic Technology. MLRS consists of 13 faculty members, with five of our faculty members being part of the Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics. Therefore, we have a very close collaborative relationship with the Bioelectrics Research Center. Even though we have varied backgrounds, we all work together on numerous projects and endeavors. The Clinical and Molecular Diagnostics Research Facility located in the Innovation Research Park has seen active research in several areas including prostate and lung cancer. Results on isoprenoid perillyl alcohol inhibiting telomerase activity in prostate cancer cells were presented at a national conference in San Diego. Previously, results had been shared nationally on complex modeling of histone-mediated apoptosis and the effects of chromatin accumulation in lung cancer. A fully functional histopathology laboratory is nearing completion and should be operative in the near future. This past academic year has proven to be a productive one for the MLRS faculty. There were 14 peer-reviewed publications on diverse subjects ranging from heart rate variability to electrogene transfer to probing nanoparticle interactions. Functioning as experts in their fields, faculty members contributed three book chapters to texts in molecular medicine and bioelectrics. Six book reviews were also published. MLRS faculty displayed their expertise at local, regional, national and international conferences by delivering 18 presentations, abstracts and posters. International invited presentations were given as far away as Cork, Ireland, Toulouse, France, and Ljubljana, Slovenia. Other presentations and posters were shared throughout the United States. Numerous guest lectures were presented to classes within the College of Health Sciences and the university. The total of grant funding for the department was $7.4 million. The funded grants were from the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Act and Intrexon. Projects were based on such diverse subjects as elector gene transfer for coronary artery disease, flu vaccine technology, and plasmid delivery to tumors using electroporation. We are very proud of the funding record of the department. MLRS faculty members are very active in service to the university, community and professional organizations. The faculty members serve on numerous committees throughout the college and university such as the Faculty Senate, Alumni Association and the Quality Enhancement Plan. Community service is demonstrated through service on local boards and committees. MLRS is well represented in professional organizations and associations with members functioning as officers, committee chairs and members. Six faculty members share their expertise on review committees for professional journals and grant submissions. Thank you very much for your interest in the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences. We will continue to provide excellence in teaching, scholarship and service in the future. Please visit the websites of our programs for more information. .

Sophie K. Thompson, MHS, CT (ASCP) (IAC)

School

of

Nursing

The School of Nursing remains the largest professional school in the College of Health Sciences. Our staff includes 30 full-time faculty members, a student clinical services coordinator, a program recruiter, four full-time classified staff members, two hourly staff members, and a cadre of over 100 adjunct faculty. Over the years, we have worked to increase the number of faculty with doctoral degrees; as of May 2012, 56 percent of our full-time faculty members have doctorates. This figure includes three faculty members who recently completed doctoral studies at the University of Virginia: Dr. Rebecca Poston, Dr. Shannon Harrington and Dr. Debra Murray. Given the shortage of nursing faculty with doctoral degrees, this school has committed to providing limited release time to faculty returning to school and engaged in doctoral study. We believe that our support embraces the concept of lifelong learning and assures that we will be able to retain highly qualified faculty to teach in all of our programs, as well as engage in research. In an effort to increase scholarship by nursing faculty members, the school has partnered with scholarship consultant Dr. Kathleen Heinrich of KTH Consulting. Now in the middle of a threeyear partnership, Heinrich has worked with the faculty to show them how to mentor each other’s scholarly development, as well as identify everyday practices that can be transformed into scholarly publications. Heinrich visits the ODU campus twice each year to conduct faculty-wide workshops, small group seminars, and one-to-one consultation sessions. These interactions have proven extremely beneficial in helping faculty learn to balance scholarship goals with heavy teaching assignments. To date, Dr. Heinrich’s support and guidance have resulted in a 50 percent annual increase in scholarly publications and presentations, including many faculty-student collaborations. This year, chief nursing academic advisor, Janice Hawkins, has been especially prolific with one sole author publication and four other accepted manuscripts in collaboration with undergraduate students. In addition, 11 other faculty members contributed to the development of seven grant proposals; Dr. Carolyn Rutledge was the lead author and principal investigator on four of these proposals. Dr. Kimberly Adams Tufts was appointed as associate chair of the School of Nursing in August 2011 in addition to her roles as director of community and global initiatives for the school. As the associate chair, she serves as chair of the undergraduate and graduate admissions, continuance and advanced placement committees; she is also a member of both the undergraduate and graduate curriculum committees. She is currently working to establish nursing faculty exchange relationships with Norfolk’s sister city in Kochi, India, as well as with the African country Ghana. ODU School of Nursing faculty, staff and students are energetic, talented and deeply committed to our mission to “transform health care by preparing exceptional nurses, extending nursing science and partnering with our global community.” The continued success of our programs and the accomplishments of our graduates reflect a culture committed to inspiring minds, transforming lives and creating the future!

Karen A. Karlowicz, EdD, RN Associate Professor and Chair School of Nursing

Associate Professor and Chair School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences

College of Health Sciences 7

chairs’ message

PROGRAMS OFFERED Entry Level BS degree

School

of

Physical Therapy

The School of Physical Therapy flourished last year. Forty-one students completed the DPT program. With increased curricular emphasis on clinical problem solving, these graduates are more ready than ever to start treating patients the first day of their new careers. A heartfelt thankyou goes to the hospitals, clinics and rehabilitation centers that provided PT internship experiences, and to therapists, many of whom are ODU graduates, who serve as clinical instructors. Community support is vital to our mission. We have enjoyed support from Lake Taylor Hospital Foundation for research; from Medical Facilities of America for the annual White Coat Ceremony and alumni weekend; from Sentara for educational support and the annual graduation reception; from Tidewater Physical Therapy for educational support and flash drives for DPT 2 students; from David Lawrence’s Gait Center for educational support; from Atlantic Physical Therapy for educational support and CPR training; from Rehab Care for educational support; and from Dominion Physical Therapy for scholarship support. Donations of money and therapist time and expertise are very much appreciated by faculty and students at ODU. There are positive changes on the horizon. The proposed PhD in Health Sciences in the College of Health Sciences will have a track in kinesiology and rehabilitation sciences directed by Dr. Steven Morrison. We anticipate admitting physical therapists and related professionals who will help us fill the laboratory with research activity. The master’s degree program in athletic training comes to us, changing our name to the School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training. This will strengthen collaborative research efforts and may provide interprofessional educational opportunities. We also anticipate opening an on-campus clinic in the fall semester. Drawing on the strength of our motion analysis lab and biomechanics expertise, we anticipate becoming area leaders in assessment and treatment of gait and balance disorders for children and adults. These three changes – the PhD program, expansion to include athletic training, and on-campus physical therapy clinic – will attract scholars and clinicians to ODU and will help strengthen our educational and research activities. My summary wouldn’t be complete if I didn’t mention community service activities of students and faculty. All DPT students are required to engage in service. Service learning projects at Prime Plus Norfolk Senior Center have benefited students and seniors. The two groups of students who traveled to the Dominican Republic this year felt they gained as much as they gave when they engaged in service learning with Physicians for Peace. Students also joined faculty at the Beach Health Clinic to deliver physical therapy care to uninsured adults. Faculty service included the usual committee work, but also community contributions as president of the Virginia Board of Physical Therapy (Dr. George Maihafer) and appointments on the Newport News Mayor’s Committee on Disabilities and the State Commissioner’s Minority Health and Health Equity Advisory Committee (Dr. Elizabeth Giles). It is a privilege to work with such an energetic and engaging group of students and faculty, and I look forward to next year.

Martha Walker, PT, PhD Associate Professor and Chair School of Physical Therapy

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Cytotechnology Dental Hygiene Environmental Health Health Sciences, Public Health Track Medical Technology Nuclear Medicine Technology Nursing Ophthalmic Technology Degree Completion

Dental Hygiene Health Sciences, Health Services Administration Track Nursing Graduate

MS in Dental Hygiene Doctorate of Nursing Practice Advanced Practice Nurse Executive MS in Environmental Health Family Nurse Practitioner Master of Public Health MSN, Nurse Administrator MSN in Nurse Anesthesia MSN, Nurse Educator MSN Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner PhD Doctor of Physical Therapy

ENROLLMENT INFORMATION Undergraduate Enrollment

by

Program

for

2011-12

Undergraduate Students

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Cytotechnology

12

10

7

6

Dental Hygiene

75

70

91

93

Environmental Health

27

21

27

22

Medical Technology

47

42

48

52

Nuclear Medicine Technology

21

23

18

12

Nursing

243

228

292

238

Ophthalmic Technology

9

9

11

11

Health Sciences

76

120

59

31

-

-

20

27

435

523

573

492

Health Sciences, Public Health Track TOTAL

College of Health Sciences 9

ENROLLMENT INFORMATION Graduate Enrollment

by

Program

for

2011-12

Total Headcount Breakdown: Post-Baccalaureate Professional and Graduate Degrees

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2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

MS in Dental Hygiene

13

20

22

20

MS in Community HealthEnvironmental Health

29

17

9

15

Master of Public Health

20

46

51

50

MSN in Nursing-Certified Nurse Practitioner

2

2

1

0

MSN in Nurse Anesthesia

49

39

19

23

MSN in Family Nurse Practitioner

97

99

121

123

MSN in Nurse-Midwifery

1

5

3

4

MSN in Nurse Administrator

19

17

15

17

MSN in Nurse Educator

37

28

28

20

MSN in Nurse Practitioner Women’s Health

16

19

15

12

Doctorate of Nursing Practice

0

42

36

32

PhD in Health Services Research

29

29

22

25

Doctor of Physical Therapy

127

128

130

127

TOTAL

439

491

472

345

ENROLLMENT INFORMATION Degree Completion

for

2011-12

Total Headcount: Degree Completion Dental Hygiene Health Sciences Health Services Administration Nursing TOTAL

2008-09 7 -

2009-10 9 22

2010-11 15 27

2011-12 17 33

163 170

155 186

110 152

143 193 College of Health Sciences 11

Graduation highlights

Mortarboards Spell Out “Dental Hygiene”

Mortarboards Spell Out “Nuclear Med”

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accreditations Degree and Program Accrediting Organization

BS, Dental Hygiene

Logo

American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation

ADA

BSN, Nursing

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

CCNE

BSN, Nursing

Virginia Board of Nursing

VBN

MSN, Nursing

Virginia Board of Nursing

VBN

BSNT, Nuclear Medicine Technology

Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology

JRCEPNMT

BS, Medical Technology

MSN, Nurse Anesthesia

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical NAACLS Laboratory Sciences

Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia COA Educational Program

MPH, Public Health

Council on Education for Public Health

CEPH

DPT, Physical Therapy

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy

CAPTE

Cytotechnology

Commission on Accreditation of CAAHEP Allied Health Education Programs

Ophthalmic Technology

MS, environmental Health

BS, Environmental Health

BS in Health Sciences

Commission on Accreditation of CAAHEP Allied Health Education Programs National Environmental Health Science and Protection Accreditation Council

ehac

National Environmental Health Science NEHS and PCA and Protection Accreditation Council Association of University Programs in AUPHA Health Administration

College of Health Sciences 13

DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAMS Licensure/Certification Exam Overall Pass Rates

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GRADUATion INFORMATION Graduates: Undergraduate 2009-12 2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Cytotechnology (C)

8

7

4

Dental Hygiene (DH)

46

41

42

Environmental Health (EH)

10

4

7

Medical Technology (MT)

19

22

21

Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT)

12

6

11

Nursing (N)

143

161

154

Ophthalmic Technology (OT)

1

3

4

Health Sciences (HS)

36

24

13

Health Sciences, Health Services Administration Track (HS-HSA)

2

25

25

Health Sciences Public Health Concentration (HS-PH)

0

0

4

277

293

289

TOTAL

Graduates: Masters

and

Doctorates 2009-12 2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

MS in Dental Hygiene (DH)

5

4

4

MS in Community Health-Environmental Health (CH)

7

5

1

Master of Public Health (MPH)

19

28

12

MSN in Nursing-Certified Nurse Practitioner (CNP)

0

0

2

MSN in Nurse Anesthesia (NA)

13

7

11

MSN in Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP)

27

41

41

MSN in Nurse-Midwifery (M)

0

2

2

MSN in Nurse Administrator (NAdm)

8

9

9

MSN in Nurse Educator (NE)

16

15

9

MSN in Nurse Practitioner Women’s Health (WH)

8

7

4

Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP)

18

26

*

PhD in Health Services Research (PhD)

3

3

3

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT)

40

43

41

164

190

139

TOTAL * not yet available

College of Health Sciences 15

Service and Engagement

By the Numbers

Senior nursing students completed nearly 7,200 hours of service through

Service and Engagement

year-long partnerships with nonprofit organizations, health care coalitions, and community agencies across Hampton Roads as part of the undergraduate community health curriculum. Students working as part of the Obesity and Injury Prevention Group were recently recognized with the Innovative Injury and Violence Prevention Award from the Virginia

8,380

Individuals received oral health education/screenings/clinical services, a donation valued at $65,480

Department of Health (June 2012) for their work with ForKids, a Norfolkbased organization whose mission is to “break the cycle of homelessness and poverty for families and children.�

Sharon Stull, assistant professor of dental hygiene, led the German study abroad program in July 2011.

Gayle McCombs, Tara Newcomb and Kendra Kleppe partnered with Physicians for Peace and the University of Nicaragua-Leon

6,000

Patient encounters in the on-campus Sofia and David Konikoff Dental Hygiene Care Facility

452

Alumni and professionals attended dental hygiene continuing education programs

to establish the first dental hygiene program in Central America in July 2011.

15

Nursing and physical therapy students participated in interdisciplinary study abroad Gail Grisetti (Leader), Janice Hawkins and Martha Walker led a collaborative effort of DPT and nursing faculty in conjunction with Study Abroad and Physicians for Peace to develop and implement an interdisciplinary spring study abroad course. Ten nursing students and five physical therapy students participated.

Physical Therapy faculty and students provided weekly services at Beach Health Clinic, a free clinic for uninsured individuals.

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$760

Donated to the March of Dimes from Student Nurses Association

130

People attended the first Dental Hygiene Student and Alumni Awards and Networking Event

Research and Grant Funding By Brendan O’Hallarn

Andrei Pakhomov, research associate professor at Old Dominion’s Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, was featured in the National Cancer Institute’s latest annual report, which speaks of his expertise in the field of electroporation. In a chapter of the NCI report, titled “Special Electric Signals Attack Cancer Cells with Lethal Force and Accuracy,” Pakhomov is cited as a pioneer in the field of electroporation, where living cells are exposed to extremely short-in-duration, high-voltage pulses of electricity. “Directing X-ray energy into the body has been a mainstay of cancer therapy since early in the 20th century, but an entirely different approach using electric pulses now shows great promise,” the annual report notes. It indicates that the Reidy Center is the first research center in the United States that is dedicated to this burgeoning field, quoting Pakhomov about the potential of electroporation as a disease killer. “The idea is to deliver electric pulses of extremely short duration through an electrode directly to a tumor,” Pakhomov said in the report. If the pulses last only a matter of nanoseconds (a few billionths of a second), they create an electric field that blows open pores in the cellular membrane and disrupts the internal workings of the cell. Nanosecond electrical pulses are bad news for the cancer cell in many ways, Pakhomov noted. For example, the cellular membrane normally balances electrically charged molecules inside and outside the cell, but when the pores open up, the cell loses control of what’s going in and out. This change in the permeability of the membrane leads to osmotic imbalance. Where “ions pour into the cell, followed by water, you get swelling, and more swelling until they eventually explode,” he said. “This is a form of necrotic cell death.” In 2010, Pakhomov received a four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to do broader research into nanoelectroporation. The $1.14 million grant for the project “Mechanisms and Implications of Nanoelectroporation in Living Cells” will allow Pakhomov and the Reidy Center to stay at the leading edge, worldwide, in studying what happens to living cells when exposed to nanosecond-duration, high-voltage electric pulses (nsEP). “We need to better understand what these pulses do to the cells,” said Pakhomov, who came to ODU in 2007 from San Antonio, Texas, where he worked at the Air Force Research Lab at Brooks City-Base and at the University of Texas Health Science Center. “We treat biological cells as ‘black boxes’ to explore nanosecond pulse effects.” This National Institutes of Health grant follows another NIH grant Pakhomov received in 2008 for research into using nanosecond pulses to kill cancer cells. The principal bio-effect of these pulses is the creation of tiny, stable, voltage- and current-sensitive pores in the membrane of cells, called nanopores. These pores remain in the affected membrane for long periods of time (minutes), to allow access to the cell itself through the membrane. The process, known as nanoelectroporation, allows for other testing mechanisms to be used on the cells, something that ultimately could promote the development of new medical and research applications using nsEP for deliberate modification of cell functions, particularly in nerve and muscle tissues. Pakhomov is the principal author of more than 100 publications and presentations about this field of research, and since 2004 has been an associate editor of the journal Bioelectromagnetics.

College of Health Sciences 17

Grants Awarded School of Community & Environmental Health

School of Nursing

Blando, J. (Co-Investigator). Violence Prevention in Healthcare Facilities. CDC/NIOSH, $390,956.

Fowler, C. Caregiver Quality of Life and Access to a Primary Care Provider. Old Dominion University Research Foundation, 6/1/11 – 7/31/11, $6,853.

Holloman, E. & Jeng, H.A. A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach to Understanding and Reducing Risks From Toxic Pollutant Exposure in the Southeast Community of Newport News, Virginia. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, CARE Level I Grant, 10/01/11 – 12/31/13, $100,000.

Garzon, L. (Principal Investigator), Rutledge, C., & Renaud, M. Training DNP Providers to Address Disparities with Technology. Department of Health and Human Services Advanced Practice Nursing Program, 7/2010 – 6/2013, $790,000.

Dental Hygiene McCombs, G.B., & Russell, D. Comparison of Handpiece Design on Forearm Muscle Activation. Dentsply International, Troy, PA, 6/2011, $25,000.

Karlowicz, K. (Principal Investigator), Benjamin, R.S., Palmer, K., Lee, A., & Barham, P. Technology Skill Development for Effective Nurse Communication. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, HRSA, Nurse Education, Practice and Retention, 6/2009 – 7/2012, $749,570. Poston, R. (Principal Investigator). Adolescent Experiences of Informed Consent and Assent in Oncology Research. National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Nursing Research, 1/2011 – 1/2012, (Pre-Doctoral Fellowship) $48,738.

Medical Laboratory & Radiation Sciences Heller, R. (Principal Investigator). Electroporation System for Cutaneous Gene Transfer. National Institutes of Health 1 R01 EB108020-01, 9/1/06 – 6/30/11, $1,300,000.

School of Physical Therapy

Heller, R. (Principal Investigator). Therapeutic Potential of IL-15 Plasmid Delivery to Tumors Using Electroporation. National Institutes of Health 1 R01 CA122528-01, 5/1/08 – 2/29/14, $1,656,605.

Kott, K. (Co-Principal), & Williams, B. (Principal). Designing, Maintaining and Evaluating a Family Support Access Expansion Center for Vulnerable African American Families in the Tidewater Region of Virginia. U.S. Department of Education, Children and FamiliesProjects of National Significance, 9/2010 – 9/2012, $500,000.

Heller, R. (Principal Investigator). Electro Gene Transfer for Coronary Artery Disease. National Institutes of Health 1 R21 HL089017, 9/1/08 – 10/30/13, (combined R21 and R33) $2,209,914.

McCombs, G. & Russell, D.M. Comparison of Handpiece Design on Forearm Muscle Activity During Dental Polishing. Contract with Dentsply International, Troy, PA, 6/2011, $24,572.

Heller, R. (Principal Investigator). Long-Term Inducible Expression of Therapeutic Genes Following Electroporation into Rat Muscle. Intrexon, 9/1/09 – 12/31/11, $238,000.

Morrison, S. (Co-Principal Investigator). Development of a Quality of Life Tool Sensitive to Cognitive and Physical Measures of Fatigue. National Institutes of Health (NIH R21), 2011 – 2013, $270,000.

Heller, R. (Principal Investigator). Bioelectrics Research for Casualty Care and Management. U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Act, 9/6/11 – 9/5/12, $1,049,000. Heller, R. (Co-Investigator). Flu Vaccine Technology Program. U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Act, 7/1/11 – 12/30/12, $263,000. Heller, L.C. (Co-Principal Investigator). Bioelectrics Research for Casualty Care and Management. U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Act, 09/06/11 – 10/05/12, $681,850. The goal of this study is to combine three independent wound therapies -autologous platelet rich plasma, nonthermal air plasma delivery, and growth factor gene therapy -- to disinfect wounds and increase wound healing.

18 www.hs.odu.edu

Morrison, S. (Principal Investigator). A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Cross-Over Study on the Effect of Pregabalin on Pain Related to Walking in Patients with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, 2011 – 2013, $564,000. Morrison, S. (Co-Principal Investigator). Project E-FIT: Exercise-Fall Intervention Training in Multiple Sclerosis Center on Health, Aging and Disability. University of Illinois, 2011 – 2012, $15,000. Morrison, S. (Consultant). Project FARMS: Fall Risk Reduction in Multiple Sclerosis. Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC), 2011 – 2012, $40,000. Russell, D.M. Use of a Virtual Environment to Regulate Walking in Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease. Summer Research Fellowship Program, Old Dominion University, 2012, $7,000.

GRANT FUNDING

2008

Grants Grants Requested Awarded 37 23

$ Awarded $ Awarded External Internal 1,489,960 266

2009

65

25

2,047,492

1,080

2010

55

26

3,093,212

0

2011

46

21

1,921,726

133,495

2012

30

17

2,398,827

40,758

$10,951,217 in Total Grants Awarded over the past five years College of Health Sciences 19

SCHOLARSHIPS & LEARNING Amanda Kimball, BSDH ’11, graduate student, and Allison Van Fleck, BSDH ’11 won Honorable Mention for the Dental Hygiene Student Merit Award for Outstanding Achievement in Community Health Dentistry at the American Association of Public Health Dentistry’s 2012 National Oral Health Conference, held in Milwaukee, April 30 – May 2, 2012. Kyle Viloria, junior, BSDH-entry level program, was an alternate student delegate representing District III at the American Dental Hygienists’ Association’s House of Delegates meeting in Nashville, Tenn., in June 2011. He also achieved early acceptance to dental school.

Nicole Pensinger and Anh N. Ho, senior dental

hygiene students, were selected to attend the Virginia Dental Hygienists’ Association professional development workshop held October 14, 2011, in Glen Allen, Va.

Lauren Sutherland, senior, BSDH-entry level

program, was a student delegate at the Virginia Dental Hygienists’ Association’s House of Delegates meeting in Leesburg, Va., April 13-15, 2012.

Amy Day was named Histotechnology Student of the Year.

Eric Jackson, first-year DPT student, received the

$2,000 Dominion Doctor of Physical Therapy Scholarship.

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Rosimar Zaragoza-Rivera,

senior Medical Technology student, was awarded a $1,500 scholarship by the Alpha Mu Tau Fraternity, a constituent of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) Education and Research Fund. The ASCLS is the national professional organization which represents practitioners in medical technology/ clinical laboratory science. The scholarship is awarded to deserving students in their last year of study in a National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science (NAACLS) accredited program. Ms. Zaragoza-Rivera has achieved a GPA of 3.7 and is an outstanding leader of the Medical Laboratory Science Student Association.

ODU students had a 100 percent pass rate on the first attempt on the 2011 National Board Dental Hygiene Examination.

SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS Staff Achievements Jane Plummer-Washington, School of Dental Hygiene, received a 10-Year Employee Recognition Service Award from Old Dominion University.

Trina Hawkins, Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, was elected president for the ODU Hourly and Classified Employee Association.

FACULTY & SCHOOL Achievements The Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene was selected by Inside Business, the Hampton Roads Business Journal, to receive one of their 2012 Health Heroes awards in February 2012. This honor is a culmination of the efforts of the faculty, students and staff in providing quality oral health care in our on-campus Sofia and David Konikoff Dental Hygiene Care Facility, as well as to local and global communities.

Margaret Lappan Green, adjunct professor, was given the W.S. Jackman Betsy Thomas, college resource manager, completed a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree in management in August 2011.

Award of Distinction, presented by the University of California of Pennsylvania, in June 2011.

Catherine Seifert, adjunct instructor, was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Dental Hygiene in July 2011. Professor Lynn Tolle received the , Community Service Award presented by the Virginia Dental Association, September 17, 2011.

Staff members were recognized at the Annual Awards Program sponsored by Human Resources in December for continuous employment at ODU. Staff members include Betsy Thomas, Dean’s Office, five years, Ann McNeal, 16 years, Sue Parker, 15 years, and Linda Wray, 10 years, from the School of Nursing, attended the recognition program sponsored by Human Resources December 14, 2011. The annual event honors employees who have reached milestones in their service with Linda Wray, Sue Parker and Ann McNeal, School of Nursing the University.

David Crouse, adjunct associate professor, was named an Honorary Member for Volunteerism by the Tidewater Dental Hygienists’ Association in December 2011.

Gayle McCombs was named University Professor effective in fall 2011. She is one of four University Professors in the College of Health Sciences.

Gianluca De Leo has been promoted to associate professor, with tenure. Steven Morrison has been promoted to professor. Karen Kott was promoted to associate professor with tenure.

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SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS College of Health Sciences 2012 Award for Excellence in Technology-Based Teaching went to Dr. Lynn Wiles, School of Nursing, and the Excellence in Teaching award went to Ms. Suzanne Van Orden, School of Nursing.

Jacqueline Sharpe was selected as the Most Inspirational Faculty member by the COHS honor graduate, Devon Taylor. The School of Dental Hygiene is pleased to announce the implementation of a state-of-the-art electronic patient record system, Axium. This dental school clinic management system is designed to support a paperless computerized environment in an academic setting. Axium integrates the clinical and operational functions necessary for an educational setting to facilitate the transfer of knowledge to a dental practice setting.

As part of the Dean’s Lecture Series, James S. Cain, MD, FACP, from Valley Nephrology Associates and an alumnus of ODU and EVMS, spoke on “Apolipoprotein L1 and its Connection to Trypanosomiasis and its Clinical Implications for the African American Dialysis and Transplant Population.” Faculty and students from Health Sciences, students from EVMS, and ODU graduate and undergraduate biology students attended the lecture.

Carolyn Rutledge received the University Doctoral Mentoring Award in 2011. Professors Charlene Brassington and Jim Blando, from the School of Community and Environmental Health, assisted the students with their participation and posters and were proud to show the professional community what a great program ODU offers in environmental and occupational health.

Donna Rose received the College of Health Sciences COHS Excellence in Teaching with Technology award in April 2011. Dr. Jacqueline Sharpe’s selection to the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) for undergraduate studies board is for three years. ACHE is an international professional society of more than 40,000 health care executives who lead hospitals, health systems and other health care organizations.

Chris Jones, senior industrial hygienist at Norfolk Naval Shipyard and current chair of the AIHA chapter, said the interaction with students was beneficial to both new and longtime members of association. Earl Waterfield, head of the Sewells Point Industrial Hygiene Division of the Naval Medical Center, said the student posters were educational and a great discussion starter among the professional industrial hygienists who attended the meeting.

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Professor Brassington, John McFarlane, Jeff Morelen, Megan Mercer, Chue Xiong, Sherleen Espinoza, Chris Irby, and Professor Blando

The BSHS Program received first-time accreditation from the Association of University Programs in Health Administration.

SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS The Old Dominion School of Nursing’s online graduate program earned No. 2 and No. 10 spots in the first-ever compilation of Top Online Programs by U.S. News & World Report. The ODU program ranked second among the nation’s nursing schools for admissions selectivity and 10th for student services and technology. “This public recognition by U.S. News & World Report highlights the quality, admissions selectivity, student services and technology of our graduate nursing programs and is a testament to our nursing faculty and students. We are thrilled that our peers recognize our outstanding success with distance learning and appreciate all of the support we have from ODU Distance Learning,” said Shelley Mishoe, dean of the university’s College of Health Sciences. The new ranking categories were created by the magazine in response to today’s high demand for education provided in a flexible manner. While U.S. News & World Report applied some of its ranking standards used for traditional schools, many new measures were developed to evaluate online programs. In order to be considered for the new rankings, online degree programs needed at least 80 percent of their course content available online. Online bachelor’s degree programs were ranked in three different categories: student engagement and assessment, faculty credentials and training, and student services and technology. The online master’s degree programs were ranked in similar categories, but were evaluated on student engagement and accreditation as opposed to assessment. There was also a separate indicator to rank admissions selectivity.

There were no numeric rankings for overall program quality this inaugural year. Instead, U.S. News created non-numeric honor roll lists of online bachelor’s degrees and master’s degree programs, using data collected from both for-profit and not-for-profit schools. For more information about the rankings methodology, go to http://www.usnews.com/onlinemeth. ODU’s nursing school began offering courses via distance learning in 1987 as a way to address the needs of “placebound” students by giving them an alternative to on-campus instruction. Over the years, the school has developed an excellent reputation for meeting the needs of distance learners, thanks to a cadre of experienced faculty members, many of whom were once distance learning students themselves. Regarding the new U.S. News rankings, Karen Karlowicz, associate professor and chair of ODU’s nursing school, said, “The rankings for the School of Nursing are evidence and confirmation of the faculty’s commitment to quality graduate nursing education, and their dedication to serving nurses throughout the commonwealth through online and distance programming.” ODU’s Distance Learning program furnishes university coursework via several modes, including online Web-based and video streaming, video conferencing, CD-ROM/DVD and two-way satellite delivery of classes to off-campus sites. Of the 24,000 students who currently attend ODU, more than 5,000 are enrolled in distance learning courses. More than 250 faculty members teach distance learning courses. The university offers 38 different programs via distance learning, including 16 bachelor’s degrees, 19 master’s degrees and three doctoral degrees. College of Health Sciences 23

Annual Giving

24 www.hs.odu.edu

Financial Status

Note: Revenue listed above includes amounts attributed to continuing education, Dental Hygiene Care Facility fees, and tuition from consortia programs.

College of Health Sciences 25

Global Health The College of Health Sciences has been actively engaged in several global health initiatives through partnerships and collaborations. In an effort to expand and coordinate our efforts, the college is launching a new Center for Global Health. An interdisciplinary task force met regularly this past year to conduct literary searches, perform a SWOT analysis, create the strategic plan, develop a budget, review work of other centers and interview candidates presented by the search committee for the director’s position. This task force has laid the foundation for the new center while the college continued its work in global health as presented in this report.

Since 2010, as part of the School of Dental Hygiene’s mission to serve the global community, an international partnership has been occurring with Physicians for Peace and the dental school at Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Nicaragua-León. This collaboration is resulting in the first dental hygiene program in Central America. While much of the foundational work has been done from afar, Professor Gayle McCombs, the project leader, Assistant Professor Tara Newcomb, and MSDH degree candidates Kendra Kleppe and Carmelo Padrino have visited Nicaragua to present the proposed dental hygiene curriculum to the dental school faculty, to work with the local dental community, and to teach. The goal of this partnership is to implement the dental hygiene program in 2013.

Professor Gayle McCombs teaching in Nicaragua

26 www.hs.odu.edu

Professor Patricia Hentosh, a faculty member in the School of Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences, traveled to Havana, Cuba, among 45 members of the American Association of University Women. The trip explored gender equity and the role of women in contemporary Cuba and the impact of education on their professional lives. The group met with female leaders in the Cuban educational system, government and law. Health outcomes and benefits for women were better in some cases than those in the U.S. An unexpected finding was the negative impact of the U.S.- imposed trade embargo on availability of drugs.

CHP 360, Introduction to Global Health, taught by Kenyette Barnes-Higgs in 2011-12, attracted 83 students. Tamarra Wilkes (Fall 2011) noted, “According to the World Health Organization (WHO 2009), some of the common social determinants of health include housing, family size, income levels and literacy levels. In Pakistan, the most common include literacy/ education, gender and poverty. Just like being poor makes one vulnerable, in Pakistan, being a woman rather than a man places you at a higher risk when it comes to health.” Faculty in the School of Community and Environmental Health and the Eastern Virginia Medical School’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology are conducting a study to determine the risks or benefits for pregnant women who practice “hot yoga.” The benefit of moderate exercise during normal pregnancies is established, but the effects of hot yoga have not been reported. The goal of this study is to provide information that will be helpful to clinicians and families in support of promoting healthy families.

Global Health Professor Ann Campbell, a longtime Operation Smile volunteer, traveled to Kathmandu, Nepal, to participate in its inaugural cleft lip education and surgical mission. During this trip, Ann was one of 27 medical volunteers from the United States, Canada and the Philippines that worked with a group of Nepalese medical and non-medical professionals to establish a sustainable medical program. The process of building hospitals and clinics in developing countries began long before the actual onsite visit. Education and training of volunteer staff, and transporting equipment and supplies require many hours of dedicated work. Campbell has worked with Operation Smile for over 15 years and served as a member on numerous missions, traveling to locations such as Venezuela, Thailand and the Dominican Republic. During the weeklong trip to Kathmandu, the team conducted educational sessions, mentored the local nursing staff and students, as well as performed surgery for 35 patients. One of the rewards for Operation Smile team members is to see and hear the life-changing stories of the patients who were beneficiaries of their care.

Professor Ann Campbell volunteering in Nepal

For the 10th year, faculty and student volunteers from the School of Dental Hygiene in partnership with area dentists of the Tidewater Dental Association, supported Give Kids A Smile, an annual National Children’s Dental Health Month event, provided to lowincome children who do not have access to care. Children from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Southeast Virginia participated in the free event which provided education, dental examinations, dental X-rays, pit and fissure sealants, and fluoride therapy. This year approximately $11,000 in free dental services were provided.

Child from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Southeast Virginia participated in Give Kids A Smile.

Dr. Anna Jeng’s research takes her to Taiwan where her project focuses on assessment of health effects of environmental pollutants on the reproductive and immunological health of men and women. The projects include graduate and undergraduate students and have included: 1) Health Effects of Air Pollutants in Urban Areas in Dr. Anna Jeng in Taiwan Southern Taiwan; 2) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Male Reproductive Health; 3) Assessment of Immunological Status of Coke-Oven Emissions; and 5) Effects of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons on Male Sperm Quality. Jeng’s work has resulted in successful partnerships with three universities (Kaohsiung Medical University, Chung Shan Medical University, and Kaohsiung Technology University), a governmental agency (Taiwan Council of Labor Affairs), and two industrial companies. The workers commonly exposed to these dangerous pollutants are less likely to receive health care and education to minimize their exposure risk. Through her projects, Dr. Jeng has been successful in securing funding for free health examinations for more than 150 low-income coke-oven workers during her visits to Taiwan. Additionally, she and the physician co-investigators have provided free consultations to workers about their health status and personal protection to minimize exposure to environmental pollutants.

College of Health Sciences 27

Global Health Associate Dean Richardean Benjamin, along with three other health care professionals, traveled to Grand Goavé, Haiti, on a medical mission in collaboration with the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, one of the more than 100 non-governmental agencies working in Haiti. During the weeklong trip, the team completed two days of school screenings at Siloé School and conducted two remote medical clinics, caring for over 137 patients. Grand Goavé, a rural town with a population of about 100,000 residents, is located approximately 40 miles south of Port Au Prince. Although not considered to be severely affected by the 2010 earthquake, the village had approximately 200 deaths as a result. The remote medical clinics were held at village churches (Mt. Tabor and Norgaissé) where patients with chronic illnesses (hypertension was most common) received medication management and the team treated minor acute illnesses such as upper respiratory infections. The team also included an orthodontist and dental assistant who performed extractions, fillings and some cleanings.

Associate Dean Richardean Benjamin screening at Siloé School in Haiti

28 www.hs.odu.edu

A medical mission to Santo Domingo was planned to conduct targeted training for the Physicians for Peace Resource Mothers. The interdisciplinary team included 10 nursing students (nine seniors and a junior) and five physical therapy students along with faculty members Gail Grisetti, chair Martha Walker, and nursing instructor Janice Hawkins. While the primary focus of the trip was instructing the Resource Mothers, students had the opportunity to see firsthand the barrios where the patients lived and to experience the food, culture and health issues of the people of the region. The Resource Mothers’ instructional program included open discussion, a written examination and a practical skills test that included taking vital signs. Topics included newborn assessment, and signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. The mothers provided topics for future classes such as CPR, sexually transmitted diseases, respiratory infections, preventing teen pregnancy, typhoid fever and physical therapy techniques for the infant. A graduation ceremony was the culminating event for this trip. Each Resource Mother was awarded certificates and a T-shirt with the Madres Tutelares logo. The mothers surprised the group with a sign which spelled “GRACIAS,” as an acronym to represent what they learned during the week.

Janice and Gail in Santo Domingo

Alumni Highlights Jennifer Rowland, PhD, MPH, DPT ’95, made a presentation on the use of gaming technologies to increase activity in non-ambulatory children and to decrease the risk of falls in older adults. John Hudson and others presented “Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Admitting Physicians: A Heuristic Approach” at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in Washington, D.C., in November 2011.

Physical Therapy Reception for 2012 Graduates The DPT class of 2012 assembled for a final group picture May 4. They finished their clinical internships and returned to campus for a reception in their honor.

Jacquelyn L. Fried MS ’76, chairman of the Department of Dental Hygiene, University of Maryland Baltimore, received the Old Dominion University School of Dental Hygiene Outstanding Alumnus of the Year Award in April 2011.

Jack Echternach, program founder, was presented with an award expressing gratitude for his mentorship of generations of physical therapists.

Jim Swanson, anatomy professor for all 30 years of program graduates, was presented with an award expressing gratitude for his excellence in teaching. Andrew Altman, class of ’95, was presented with the Outstanding Alumnus Award for his service and contributions to ODU.

Friends, family and faculty joined in congratulating graduates on their hard-earned accomplishments. Graduates enjoyed light refreshments and camaraderie while applauding award winners and getting final instructions from George Maihafer on how to proceed through the “hooding” ceremony for their doctoral degrees. Jacquelyn Gooden and Arielle Poe received Academic Achievement Awards for maintaining a 4.0 average through 117 graduate hours of classes. Maricel Navarro was selected by clinical instructors for this year’s Clinical Excellence Award.

The 30th anniversary of the Physical Therapy Program at Old Dominion University was celebrated September 2011. Alumni reunion celebrations included graduates from 1981, 1982 and throughout the program’s 30-year history.

College of Health Sciences 29

Publications Office of the Dean Xu, E., Wermus, M., & Bauman, D.B. (2011). Development of an integrated medical supply information system. Enterprise Information Systems, 5(3), 385–399. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17517575.2011.566630 Shah, M., Darby, M., & Bauman, D.B. (2011). Improving oral health in Pakistan using dental hygienists. International Journal of Dental Hygiene, 9, 43-52. Keskula, D.K., Mishoe, S.C., & Wark, E. (2011). Redefining faculty workloads in a physical therapy department: A case study. Journal of Allied Health. School of Community & Environmental Health Zhang, N., & Zhang, Q. (2011). Does Early School Entry Prevent Obesity Among Adolescent Girls? Journal of Adolescent Health, 48 (6), 644-646. Chen, Z., & Zhang, Q. (2011). Nutrigenomics Hypothesis: Examining the Association Between Food Stamp Program Participation and Bodyweight Among Low-Income Women. Journal of Family Economic Issues, 32, 508-520. Zhang, Q., Zheng, B., Zhang, N., & Wang, Y. (2011). Intergenerational Distribution of Income and Obesity. B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, 11(3), 1-16. Zhang, Q., & Fu, L. (2011). Review of the Multi-Level Factors Contributing to Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in the U.S. North American Journal of Medicine and Science, 4(4), 232-237. Pan, C.H., Chen, M., Ho, C.W., Huang, Y.C., Wu, K.Y., Jeng, H.A., … Chen, Y.M.A. (2011). Effects of glucine N-methylatransferase urinary 1-hydropyrens and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine levels after PAH exposure. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 53(7), 812-819. Bland, J., Bielory, L., Nguyen, V., Diaz, R., & Jeng, H.A. (2012). Anthropogenic climate change and allergic diseases. Atmosphere, 3(1), 200-212. Jeng, H.A., Pan, C.H., & Chao, M.R. (2012). 1-Hydroxypyrene as a biomarker for assessing the influence of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on semen quality and sperm DNA integrity. Journal of Environmental Health and Sciences, Part A., 48(1), 12-20.

30 www.hs.odu.edu

Blando, J., Bielory, L., Nguyen, V., Diaz, R., & Jeng, H.A. (2012). Anthropogenic Climate Change and Allergic Diseases. Atmosphere, 3, 200-212. DOI:10.3390/atmos3010200 Mansyur, C.L., Pavlik, V.N., Hyman, D.J., Taylor, W.C., & Goodrick, G.K. (2012). Self-efficacy and barriers to multiple behavior change in lowincome African Americans with hypertension. Journal of Behavioral Medicine. DOI:10.1007/s10865-012-9403-7. Siziya, S., Muula, A.S., Mansour, A., Rudatsikira, E., Nzala, S.H., Zyaambo, C., … Babaniyi, O. (2013). Forced sex among female adults in Zambia: Results from the Zambian Sexual Behavioural Survey, 2009. Int Public Health J. [In Press]. Muula, A.S., Rudatsikira, E., Babaniyi, O., Songolo, P., & Siziya, S. (2012). Prevalence and correlates for truancy among pupils in grades 7 to 10: Results from the 2004 Zambia School-based Health Survey. BMC Research Notes, 5, 48. Siziya, S., Rudatsikira, E., & Muula, A.S. (2012) Victimization from bullying among school-attending adolescents in grades 7 to 10 in Zambia. J Inj Violence Res, 4, 31-35. Goma, F.M., Nzala, S.M., Babaniyi, O., Songolo, P., Zyaambo, C., Rudatsikira, E., … Muula, A.S. (2011). Prevalence of hypertension and its correlates in Lusaka urban district: A population based survey. Int Arch Med., 4, 34. Nzala, S.H., Babaniyi, O., Songolo, P., Muula, A.S., Rudatsikira, E., & Siziya, S. (2011). Demographic, cultural and environmental factors associated with frequency and severity of malnutrition among Zambian children less than five years of age. J Public Health, 3, 362-370. Siziya, S., Muula, A.S., & Rudatsikira, E. (2011). Self-reported poor oral hygiene among in-school adolescents in Zambia. BMC Res Notes, 4, 255. Muula, A.S., Siziya, S., & Rudatsikira, E. (2011). Parity and maternal education are associated with low birth weight in Malawi. Afr Health Sci., 11, 65-71. Muula, A.S., Siziya, S., & Rudatsikira, E. (2011). Prevalence and sociodemographic correlates for serious injury among adolescents participating in the Djibouti 2007 Global Health School-based Health Survey. BMC Research Notes, 4, 372. Rudatsikira, E., Muula, A.S., & Siziya, S. (2011). Tooth brushing among adolescents in Jordan. Int J Child Adolesc Health, 4, 403-405.

Publications School of Dental Hygiene Newcomb, T., & Sokolick, T. (2012). Cultural Competency: How to incorporate different cultural beliefs and practice into the dental hygiene process of care. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 10(4), 58-61. McCombs, G., & Choe, K. (2011). Skin Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Strategies for You and Your Patient. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 9(7), 54-57. Lemaster, M., & McCombs, G. (2011). Discovering Plasma Medicine’s Oral Health Benefits. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 9(12), 40-43. Kott, K., & McCombs, G. (2011). Avoid Low Back Pain. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 9(1), 36-41. Tolle, L. (2012). Dental waterline safety. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 10(1), 36-41. DeBowes, S. (2011). The possibility of probiotics. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 9(8), 11-14.

Xiao, S., Guo, S., Nesin, V., Heller, R. & Schoenbach, K. (2011). Subnanosecond electric pulse causes membrane permeabilization and cell death. IEEE BME, 58(5), 1239-1245. Donate, A., Coppola, D., Cruz, Y., & Heller, R. (2011). Evaluation of a novel non-penetrating electrode for use in DNA vaccination. Plos One, 6(4), e19181. Marrero, B., & Heller, R. (2012). The use of an in vitro 3D melanoma model to predict in vivo plasmid transfection using electroporation. Biomaterials, 33, 3036-3046. Gilbert, R.A., Llewellyn, J.A., Schoenbach, K.H., Heller, L.C., & Hoff, A.M. (2011). Exploring Tissue Response to Field Mediated Plasmid Delivery. ECS Transactions, 35(7), 145-155. Heller, L.C., Edelblute, C.M., Mattson, A.M., Hao, X., Singh, T., & Kolb, J.K. (2012). Antibacterial effects of DC operated afterglow air plasma on opportunistic pathogens on the skin surface. Letters in Applied Micro, 54(2), 126-32. School of Nursing

School of Medical Laboratory & Radiation Sciences Somma, T. (2012). The Effects of Exercise Type on Postprandial Glycemia, Heart Rate Variability, and Mood in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes. Journal of the American Diabetes Association (submitted). Stacey, M., Osgood, C., Kalluri, B.S., Cao, W., Elsayed-Ali, H., & Abdel-Fattah, T. (2011). Nanosecond Pulse Electric Fields Used in Conjunction with Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a Potential Tumor Treatment. J. Biomedical Materials, 6(1), 011002. Stacey, M., Fox, P., Buescher, S., & Kolb, J. (2011) Nanosecond pulsed electric field induced cytoskeleton, nuclear membrane and telomere damage adversely impact cell survival. Bioelectrochemistry, 82, 131-134. DOI:10.1016/j. bioelechem.2011.06.002. Ferraro, B., Cruz, Y.L., Baldwin, M., Coppola, D. & Heller, R. (2011). Evaluation of delivery conditions for cutaneous delivery of plasmid DNA by electroporation using a multielectrode array. Gene Therapy, 18(5), 496-500. Guo, S., Donate, A., Basu, G., Lundberg, C., Heller, L., & Heller, R. (2011). Electro-gene transfer to skin using a non-invasive multielectrode array. J Controlled Release, 151(3), 256-262.

Bluestein, D.A., Healey. A., & Rutledge, C.M. (2011). Acceptability of Behavioral Treatments for Insomnia in Primary Care. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 24(4), 272-280. Bluestein, D.A., Healey, A., & Rutledge, C.M. (2011). Re: Sleep and the Family Doctor: Time to Lead [Reply]. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 24(4), 478. Bennington, L. (2011). Breastfeeding multiples. Newborn and Infant Nursing Reviews, 11(4), 194-7. Fowler, C., Biddle, W., Rutledge, C., & Galicia-Castillo, M. (2011). Caregiver quality of life and access to a primary care provider. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 59(4), S194. Healey, A., Rutledge, C.M., & Bluestein, D.A. (2011). Validation of the Insomnia Treatment Acceptability Scale (ITAS) in Primary Care. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings. DOI:10.1007/s10880-011-9257-0. Putnam, K., Magann, E.F., Doherty, D.A., Poole, A.T., Magann, M.I., Warner, W.B., & Chauhan, S.P. (2011). Randomized clinical trial evaluating the frequency of membrane sweeping with an unfavorable cervix at 39 weeks. International Journal of Women’s Health, 3, 287-294.

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Publications Morrison, S., Colberg, S.R., Parson H.K., & Vinik A.I. (2012). Relation between Risk of Falling and Postural Sway Complexity in Diabetes. Gait and Posture, 35, 662-668.

Tufts, K.A. (2012). Interview with Linda Burnes Bolton. Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, 23(2), 100-106. Hawkins, J.E., & Shell, A. (2012). Magnet hospitals are attracted to the BSN, but what’s in it for me? Nursing 2012, 42(3), 50-52.

Morrison, S., Tucker, M., & Barrett, R.S. (2012). From Tremor to Movement: Differences in Variability and Coupling during Bilateral Finger Actions. Motor Control, 16, 31-49.

Hawkins, J.E., & Vialet, C.L. (2012). Service-Learning Abroad: A LifeChanging Experience for Nursing Students. Journal of Christian Nursing, 10. 1097/CNJ.1090b1013e31823fabf31822.

Cortes, N., Morrison, S., Van Lunen, B.L., & Onate, J. (2012). Landing Technique Affects Knee Loading and Position During Athletic Tasks. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(2), 175-181.

Quinn, L., & Hawkins, J.E. (2012). Summer Nurse Externships: Research and Reflection. The Torch Convention Edition.

Morrison, S., Hong, L., & Newell, K.M. (2011). Similarity in the Dynamics of Contralateral Motor Overflow through Increasing Frequency of Movement in a Single Limb. Experimental Brain Research, 213, 403-414.

Rutledge, C.M., Renaud, M., Shepherd, L., Bordelon, M., Haney, T., Gregory, D., & Ayers, P. (2011). Educating Advanced Practice Nurses in Using Social Media in Rural Healthcare. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 8(1).

Sosnoff, J.J., Socie, M.J., Boes, M.K., Sandroff, B.M., Pula, J.H., Suh, Y., … Morrison, S. (2011). Mobility, Balance and Falls in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis. PLOS ONE, 6(11) e28021.

Schweickert, P., & Rutledge, C.M. (2011). Telehealth Versus In-Person Stroke Prevention Education in Elderly Adults in Appalachian Virginia. Telemedicine and e-Health, 17(10), 1-5.

Van Lunen, B.L., Cortes, N., Andrus, T., Walker, M.L., Pasquale, M., & Onate, J.A. (2011). Immediate effects of a heel-pain orthosis and an augmented low dye taping on plantar pressures and pain in subjects with plantar fasciitis. Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, 21 (6), 474-479.

Haney, T. & Tufts, K.A. (2012). Electronic Communication in Home Health: Implications on Parental Well-Being and Satisfaction. Home Health Care Nurse, 30(4), 216-224.

By the Numbers

School of Physical Therapy Kott, K.M., & Held, S.L. (2011). Commentary on “Relationship of Therapy to Postsecondary Education and Employment in Young Adults with Physical Disabilities.” Pediatr Phys Ther, 23, 186. Kott, K.M., Held, S.L., Giles, E.F., & Franjoine, M.R. (2011). Predictors of Standardized Walking Obstacle Course Outcome Measures in a Sample of Children With and Without Developmental Disabilities. Pediatr Phys Ther, 23, 365–373. Kott, K.M., & McCombs, G.B. (2011). Avoid low back pain. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, 36, 38-41. Maihafer, G.C., & Hahn, L.R. (2011). The Development of Sanctioning Reference Points for use in Board Disciplinary Decisions. Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy Forum, Spring. Katsumata, H., & Russell, D.M. (2012). Prospective versus predictive control in timing of hitting a falling ball. Experimental Brain Research, 216, 499-514.

32 www.hs.odu.edu

Scholarships and Learning

61 28 110 No. 1

Faculty Publications in 2011-12 Books and Book Chapters in 2011-12 Faculty Presentations made in 2011-12 in Certifying Exam Pass Rates

Books and Book Chapters Office of the Dean Benjamin, R., & Smith, M. (2012). The teaching role of faculty. In M. Smith (Ed.). Professional Legal and Ethical Dimensions of Higher Education. New York: Springer Publishing Co.

Darby, M. (Ed.). (2012). Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier, pp 1020. Haveles, E.B. (2012). Pharmacology, in Darby, M. (Ed.). Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier, pp 392-435.

Benjamin, R., & Smith, M. (2012). The service/practice role of faculty. In M. Smith (Ed.). Professional Legal and Ethical Dimensions of Higher Education. New York: Springer Publishing Co.

Thomson, E.M. (2012). Oral and maxillofacial radiology, in Darby, M. (Ed.). Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier, pp 173-217.

Hess, D.R., MacIntyre N., Mishoe, S.C., Galvin, B., & Adams, A. (Eds.) (2012). Respiratory Care Principles and Practice (2nd Ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Tolle, S.L. (2012). Dental hygiene care for clients with special care needs, in Darby, M. (Ed.). Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier, pp 696-760.

Chaudhary, B.A., Whiddon, S., & Mishoe, S.C. (2012). Polysomnography in D.R. Hess et al. (Eds.). Respiratory Care Principles and Practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences

Mishoe, S.C., & Beveridge, L.H. (2012). Decision Making and the Role of Respiratory Therapists as Consultants in D.R. Hess et al. (Eds.). Respiratory Care Principles and Practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Kolb, J., & Stacey, M. (2011). Subcellular Biological Effects of Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields. In Machala, Z. (Ed.). Plasma for Bio-decontamination, Medicine and Food Security, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series. Springer Publishing.

Chaudhary, B.A., Taft, A., & Mishoe, S.C. (2012). Obstructive Sleep Apnea in D.R. Hess et al. (Eds.). Respiratory Care Principles and Practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

School of Nursing

Mishoe, S.C., & Hernlen, K.M. (2012). Healthcare Trends and Evolving Roles of Respiratory Therapists in D.R. Hess et al. (Eds.). Respiratory Care Principles and Practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Mishoe, S.C. (2012). Critical Thinking in Respiratory Care in D.R. Hess et al. (Eds.). Respiratory Care Principles and Practice. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. Shuman, D. & Giles, E. (2013). Chapter on Cultural Health Influences. In Harris, N.O., Garcia-Godoy, F., & Nathe, C.N. (Eds.). Primary Preventive Dentistry (8th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson School of Dental Hygiene Thomson, E.M., & Johnson, O.N. (2012). Essentials of Dental Radiography for Dental Assistants and Hygienists (9th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. 436pp. Connolly, I.M. (2012). Head and neck anatomy and physiology, in Darby, M. (Ed.). Comprehensive Review of Dental Hygiene (7th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier, pp 124-146.

Bennington, L. (2012). Module 7. Mosaicism. In Lewis, J.A., & Keener, C. (Eds.). Genetics in Nursing. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Bennington, L. (2012). Module 16. Mosaicism. In Lewis, J.A., & Keener, C. (Eds.). Genetics in Nursing. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. Forbus, S. (2012). Maternal and Obstetric Disorders. In Harding, M., Snyder, J., & Preusser, B. Winningham’s Critical Thinking Cases In Nursing: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric (5th Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby. Ignatavicius, D., Workman, L., Conley, P., Lee, A., & Rose, D. (2012). Clinical Decision Making Study Guide for Medical-Surgical Nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (7th Ed.). Maryland Heights, MO: Elsevier-Saunders. Rutledge, C.M., & Rimer, D. (2011). Goth culture. In Levesque, R. (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Adolescence. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Co. Tufts, K.A. (2011). Putting the Essentials of Doctoral Education into Practice. The Power of Ten, 2011-2013: Nurse Leaders Address the Profession’s 10 Most Pressing Issues. Indianapolis, IN: Sigma Theta Tau International.

College of Health Sciences 33

Our Dean’s Office STAFF

College of Health Sciences Advisory Board

Sandra Breeden, MS, MEd, Director of Advising

Lois Kercher, Program Director, Sentara Healthcare

Sheila Carson, Technical Support

Michael Kerner, CEO, Bon Secours Hampton Roads

Connie Davis, Assistant to the Dean

Thomas Orsini, CEO/President, Lake Taylor Transitional Care Hospital

Katherine Ferrera, Advisor

Ray Pentecost III, Vice President/Director, Clark Nexsen

Helen Fillmore, Grant Writer

Linda Rohrer, President/Owner, DPS Inc.

Tammie Smith, Administrative Assistant and Program Specialist

Rony Thomas, CEO, LifeNet Health

Betsy Thomas, Business Manager

Karen Voogt, Physical Therapist Dr. Nancy Welch, Director, Chesapeake Health Department Dr. Gary Yates, Chief Medical Officer, Sentara Healthcare Dr. David Young, Retired Orthopedic Surgeon Art Zachary, COO, Rose and Womble Realty

34 www.hs.odu.edu

Health Sciences at a glance

David Russell, School of Physical Therapy

Devon Taylor inducted to the Upsilon Phi Delta Honor Society

Admitted Students Day

Christianne Fowler & Kimberly Adams Tufts, School of Nursing

Military Appreciation

Phlebotomy Class

Janice Hawkins, School of Nursing

Nursing Student Training in Santo Domingo

Steve Morrison, School of Physical Theraopy, assists a student

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2012 ODU COHS Annual Report