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March 15, 2013 // VOL. 1 // ISSUE 1

TOMS RIVER AREA • JACKSON • BRICK

• COASTAL BAR RIER ISLAND

OCEAN COUNTY MARCHES ON!

Toms River ... pg. 3

Beachwood ... pg. 9

Pine Beach ... pg. 25

Brick ... pg. 31

Jackson ... pg. 18

Island Heights ... pg. 23

South Toms River... pg. 30

Seaside Heights ... pg. 12

Ocean Gate ... pg. 27

Seaside Park ... pg. 14

Authentically Local News for Northern Ocean County www.OceanCountySignal.com

TOMS RIVER

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Toms River Police Chief Nominated to Run for Sheriff by Phil Stilton

The “Real” Jersey Girls Help Rebuild East Dover Firehouse by Phil Stilton TOMS RIVER - In the first week of March, a handful of college volunteers from Rutgers University assisted Laura Gonzales and her “Real Jersey Girls” with the rebuilding of the East Dover

Firehouse that was damaged during Hurricane Sandy. Ms. Gonzalez said she saw the department’s request for assistance on Facebook and mobilized her team to help. “[They] put their pink boots on the ground,” she said, and hung sheet rock, painted and

cleaned the firehouse. By the following week, dozens of college students from Iowa and Michigan were working with the “Real Jersey Girls” on several rebuilding projects arond the township.

Top: The Real Jersey Girls at a Fire Department drill held at the Toms River Fire Academy on Church Road on Tuesday, March 5th. Bottom: “Angels” from Rutgers University assist in the rebuilding of the East Dover Fire Department, Monday, March 5th.

Toms River Firefighters Awarded Medal of Courage for Hurricane Sandy Rescues The following is an account by Chiefs Richard Tutel and Robert Abrams of the East Dover Fire Company of acts of heroism by local volunteers in Toms River during Hurricane Sandy. On the evening of October 29, 2012 during the height of Super Storm Sandy, Ladder 2865 was dispatched to the south side of Route 37 to Riverside Drive for a report of two females in distress, trapped within their home. The crew of 2865 included Lt.Travis Seaman, Driver/Operator - Ex-Chief Andy Goresh, Ex-District Chief Sam Seaman, FF Pete Dowdell, FF Kyle Schmitt, and FF Joe Catapano. Upon arriving at the corner of Garfield and McKinley Aves, Lt. Seaman radioed that they encountered a rising body of water which prevented unit 2865 from proceeding down the street any further. He requested at that time unit 2806 be dispatched to our location with its water rescue equipment on it. Upon arrival of the water rescue equipment Ex-DC Sam Seaman and Lt. Seaman obtained a rescue board and they both proceed south down Garfield Ave. to Riverside Drive. They soon encountered

chest high water turning onto Riverside drive attempting to locate the address where the two females were reported to be in trapped. While Ex-DC Seaman and Lt. Seaman proceeded to affect the rescue Ex-Chief Goresh took command of the operation and requested Station 28 to dispatch their small boat to their location in case the rising waters became untenable. Once the victims were located Lt. Seaman and ExDC Seaman situated them on the rescue board and proceeded to float them out of harm’s way. When they turned onto Garfield Ave, the wind & currents made it increasing difficult to maneuver the board through the water. Without the benefit of protective waterproof gear, Firefighters Schmitt, Dowdell and Catapano jumped into the water and proceeded to help retrieve the victims, at the same time Firefighter Cardinale who had stationed himself midpoint between McKinley Ave. and Riverside Drive also rushed to their aid and brought them up to unit 2806 and safety. When these two victims were safe, Lt. Seaman received a report from Police

that more people were trapped near the lower circle, while attempting to get out of their homes. The crew of Ladder 2865 responded back up Garfield Ave to Morris Blvd., and under downed wires and fallen trees to the location just north of the lower circle. L t. Seaman and ExDC Seaman continued on foot down McKinley Ave. through the rising waters because the exact location of the family in distress was unknown. Once they arrived close to the lower circle, they observed a family trapped in a pick-up truck. Ex-DC Seaman proceeded to carry a juvenile victim on his back to safety while Lt. Seaman aided another juvenile and the adult passenger of the vehicle to safety. The actions of Lt. Seaman and Ex-District Chief Seaman in my opinion warrants they be considered for the Medal of Courage for extending themselves at great risk to themselves for their rescue of not less than five individuals from the raging waters that night. While the crew members of 2865 & 2806 assisted in getting the victims to a safety and out of continuing deteriorating conditions.

Toms River Fire Department’s color guard marching in the Seaside Heights St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

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TOMS RIVER - On Monday, Toms River Police Chief Michael G. Mastronardy was nominated by the Ocean County Republican Club to run as their candidate for sheriff in this year’s November election. One of his likely opponents will be Bob Armstrong, a Democrat who ran for the position last year. Armstrong said he will be in the running again,and hopes to be chosen as the Ocean County Democrat Club’s nomination at their annual convention later this month. Chief Mastronardy was appointed to his current position in 1992. Governor Chris Christie has yet to officially appoint an interim sheriff. Chief Mastronardy has gained a reputable public image in the past two years, leading his department through two major hurricanes and several floods, while being tasked for the safety of township of 90,000 residents, many of whom were negatively affected by Hurricane Sandy last fall.

Sheriff William L. Polhemus On December 14th, 2012, Ocean County Sheriff William L. Polhemus passed away just one month after he won his reelection bid. In the interim, Undersheriff William Sommeling is acting sheriff for Ocean County. Sheriff Polhemus graduated the New Jersey Police Academy in 1951 and was previously captain of the Seaside Heights Police Department after a 35-year career. In 1985, he became sheriff of Ocean County and oversaw the department as the county’s population nearly doubled during his tenure. Born April 7th, 1928, he is survived by his wife, Agnes, a Seaside Heights councilwoman.

The Peoples’ Pantry Reopens

by Phil Stilton

TOMS RIVER - In November, the Toms River School District opened “The People’s Pantry” in the Bellcrest Plaza. The goal of the pantry was to assist those affected by Hurricane Sandy with much needed food and supplies. In the months since, the pantry has expanded to help those in need around Ocean County and now serves 5,000 families according to the Pantry coordinator, Pat Donaghue. The pantry is run by the Toms River Schools Special Education PTA. On March 11th, the pantry relocated north to their new home thanks to Community Collaboration International and volunteers from AmeriCorps. “We serve up to 800 families per week, mostly Toms River families,” Donaghue said. To learn more, visit the Peoples’ Pantry on Facebook.

Top: Volunteers from Ameri-Corps assistin the cleaning and preparing of the new Peoples’ Pantry, located in the old Cost Cutters retail space on Fischer Boulevard in Toms River. Bottom: Student volunteers from Rutgers, working with “The Real Jersey Girls” paint the display window at the new Peoples’ Pantry. All photos by Phil Stilton, Ocean Signal.

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TOMS RIVER

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Toms River 1933

A 1933 Ford Model B sold for beterrn $490 and $650. It was the first low-priced mass market car to feature a v8 engine. This restored Model B commands a $66,000 price tag today. Photo Courtesy ClassicCars.Com.

Life in the township from late February and early March 1 9 3 3 a s co m p i le d f ro m sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life Prominent Toms River Family Settles Estate

It was reported that several members of the prominent Knox family here received bequests from the estate of their cousin, Miss Frances Adelaide Strong, of Albany, New York, who died on February 3rd, including $25,000 (approximately $438,000 in 2013 dollars) to Mrs. Mary Knox Buckwalter, $10,000 (approximately $175,000 in 2013 dollars) to Miss Gertrude E. Knox, and $5,000 (approximately $87,000 in 2013 dollars) each to Charles Rhodes Knox and Edward Prentiss Knox. The New Jersey Courier took the opportunity to recount the history of the Knox family, stating they had lived in Toms River since around 1918, coming from Point Pleasant, where their father, Rev. Dr. Knox, of Bloomfield, had a summer home. In 1933, Charles Knox was a longtime instructor at Princeton University and Edward P. Knox was a notable artist who was the first Toms River man to enlist in the first World War, after which he was transferred to the camouflage corps.

Paul Kimball Hospital in Dire Financial Situation

All local newspapers conducted a campaign to alert the public about the dire finances of Paul Kimball Hospital, Lakewood, which served the greater Toms River area and was in danger of closing due to the economic hardships of the Great Depression and increase of sick and injured residents as a result of undernourishment

Taking Care of the Needy An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a township-wide increase of 65, bringing the total amount in Dover Township on the list to 250 by February 1st.

A 19th Century Reflection

with spring in the air, the New Jersey Courier's editorin-chief, William H. Fischer, waxed nostalgic of his boyhood in Toms River in the the late 19th century, writing in his newspaper whether any other “ol'timers” recalled when “March time meant kite time [and] how we used to bother our mothers til we had flour to mix into paste, bother the storekeeper til we got a good stout piece of paper—not so easy in those days—get a piece of white pine, cut out the three sticks, and spend Saturday morning building a kite. Sometimes we found an old umbrella with reed ribs, and then we had a bowtopped kit [and] once the kite was built the attic was visited for rags to make the tail. And lucky

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was the boy with a nickel to buy a ball of twine.”

S p r i n g i s i n t he A i r Area residents noted the arrival of earthworms, a longer daytime period, the end of basketball and starting up of baseball and the growing interest and thoughts of boatmen and yachtmen to summer as signs that spring was about there.

Carsons go to D.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Carson drove to Balto, Maryland with their son to spend the weekend with relatives there, with the intention of driving to Washington, D.C. on Saturday, March 4th to attend the inauguration ceremonies of President Franklin D. Roosevelt as guests of Rear Admiral Cary T. Grayson, chair of the inauguration committee... Commander and Mrs. Franklin T. Berry attended the monthly dance of the Naval Air Station officers held at the Cranmoor Country Club on Saturday evening, February 25th... a fire broke out at the dump in the meadows off Water Street and was extinguished by the village fire company... numerous Gilford Park bungalow owners came down from their winter homes in the western and northern sections of the state to begin opening for the coming warm seasons... Charles Steitz and son drove to Trenton on Sunday, February 27th and returned the following day with the last of their furniture to permanently live in their Gilford Park home... Capt. Anton Heinen's small blimp, a 104-feet long vehicle that utilized a 100-horsepower, six-cylinder motor plus gondola to accommodate four people and was built in Atlantic City in 1930, was going under the auction hammer for the balance of charges owed on storage fees - $151.30. In the fall of that year, the captain brought the blimp here to Toms River, and while here the engine blew up. Starting over, he rebuilt the vehicle and started to exhibit it south to Florida in cities along the way, but snagged the gas bag against a tree in Murfreesboro, North Carolina, after which it was brought north and sat in storage ever since. The air captain founded a company to manufacture the "baby blimps" that he said could be kept in the backyard and utilized by families... the Capt. Joshua Huddy chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution announced plans to plant more Japanese cherry trees in Huddy Park on Arbor Day, April 14th, in line with the one planted there the previous year on that day. The group also scheduled a benefit show at the Traco Theatre with benefits going to the Ocean County relief program to aid those in need during the economic depression... a flat tire on a Nash sedan traveling along the Lakewood Road in the White Oak section of the township caused the vehicle to overturn in front of the Plaza Ser-

vice Station at around 9 am on Monday, March 6th. The five women passengers were from Mount Holly and were quickly pulled out of the car, with one taken to Paul Kimball Hospital in Lakewood for treatment of a head contusion... Toms River Volunteer Fire Co. No. 2 announced its annual St. Patrick's Day dance at Pinewald Villa in Berkeley Township... Commodore Crabbe was elected to a third term as director of the Cranmoor Manor Country Club, which today is the Toms River Country Club... Kenneth Applegate suffered a severe cut between two toes when an axe slipped as he was cutting wood...

Business The Great Depression

Following calls from the county level, town leaders and business owners here took up the campaign of “Renovise Ocean County” to solicit property owners with spare funds to hire local contractors for repair and otherwise improvement

Harvey McKelvey began construction on a brooder house (a heated enclosure in which to raise young livestock) for Jack Bull in Pleasant Plains... after being in operation through much of the 1920s and early 1930s, here, the Steiner & Sons Pajama Factory, famous for its “We Put the World to Sleep” company tagline, on Robbins Street, announced it would be closing its doors for good. The company took a financial hit with the stock market crash and subsequent economic depression before consolidating with the Liberty Corporation of Baltimore, Maryland, their former main rival, which began moving operations more to that southern state... in light of the mandatory banking holiday, the Traco Theatre on Washington Street announced it would accept checks in payment of tickets, with Manager Isidore M. Hirshblond stating he felt they would pay off without issue when the banks reopened, and that regular customers would be able to merely sign IOU's...

the plumbing... a rumor that circulated around the Toms River in early March that the Royal Pines Hotel in Pinewald, Berkeley Township, had closed was proved erroneous and several local business associations continued to hold their meetings there... it was announced that on Monday night, March 13th, the Toms River Kiwanis were to hear a talk by Yoskiyasu Kumazaha, executive secretary of the Japanese Chamber of Commerce in New York City and also general secretary of the Japanese Students Christian Association. The subject of the talk was to be the new Japanese state of Manchukuo... township resident David C. Brewer proved that scrips were nothing new to the area, despite the mandatory bank holiday imposed by President Roosevelt, and exhibited a scrip from 1837 between the Monmouth Purchase Company and F.W. Moore, of Manchester.

Sport

Manahawkin native and local sports sensation Roger “Doc” Cramer left to join the Philadelphia Athelti c s fo r s p r i n g t r a i n i n g in Fort Myers, Florida...

School

work as a means to boost the local economy in the face of the Great Depression. A committee was formed to match lists of contractors and their requested reasonable wages with property owners, and volunteers began canvassing door-to-door to solicit on behalf of the local available workmen. Robert E. Eagle and G. Rix Yard, of the Toms River Kiwanis, were selected to the committee's chairman and vice-chairman positions while Miss Clare Duval was elected secretary and Mrs. Ethel Broderman, of the Business and Professional Women's League, treasurer. Members of the George P. Vanderveer post of the American Legion were also represented... the Traco Theatre, which had in late February offered a children's matinee to benefit local needy families, donated over four barrels of food to South Toms River collected at the show.

Business Briefs of 1933

Earl S. Brownell applied for permission to build a gas service station on the west side of Main Street, on the third property south of Lein Street between the Kirkwyn and Phillip S. Bailey properties. It was held for consideration by the township committee... Pleasant Plains resident Richard Hopkinson received another lot of baby chicks from the Block Hatchery in Lakewood in late February... Gilford Park resident Walter Spindler, Jr. completed the foundation on his new home and was ready to start construction of the main areas...

the “Renovise Ocean County” movement in Toms River was temporarily postponed due to the banking holiday as nobody would know whether they would be able to withdraw money following the holiday to fund work around their properties... the New Jersey Courier columnist noted that the daily Lakewood Times & Journal newspaper had begun "edging into this territory" and that Tuckerton Beacon Editor George Willits Parker was a personal friend of famed and feared New York City columnist Walter Winchell, and they corresponded regularly... the Central House, a hostelry on Water Street, was to reopen on April 1st under management of its owner, Frank W. Sutton, Sr., after years of operation under Louis Shaw, who retired... the Ocean Electric Refrigerating Company set plans to move from Water Street into the Hensler Building store in a space vacated by Cooper's Florist... while repairs were being made on one of the Hecht Bros. egg trucks, in Pleasant Plains, a short circuit or backfire caused gasoline to ignite and the Pleasant Plains Volunteer Fire Company was called, but the fire, which was confined to the motor and one tire, was put out by Mike Hecht using a fire extinguisher before they arrived... Harry Clayton began building a bungalow on a lot on Clayton Avenue in Pleasant Plains purchased from Lester McKelvey. Alvin Clayton of the Cranmoor Manor section of the township installed

Donald MacQueen, editorin-chief of Toms River High School's Cedar Chest news digest, reported the second of three editions of the publication would arrive April 1st. In previous years, the digest was published five times each year, at Halloween, Christmas, winter, spring and at commencement, but that was not possible this year and only three were to be issued... the annual operetta was to be given on March 10th and 11th at the high school, and that year was the Belle of Baghdad, with “oriental and occidental ideas, folks, civilizations and costumes... pretty thoroughly mixed up in a delightful confusion”... Coach John Dalton planned an athletic demonstration at the high school gym at the end of March, including participation from all boys' gym classes and featuring a basketball game between the juniors and seniors plus clown acts, tumbling and a dumbbell exhibition.

Major Gen. Smedley Butler. Courtesy U.S, Marine Corps.

Admiral Farragut Planned

A group of Philadelphia men met with various business leaders and officials both in Dover Township and Pine Beach to discuss their plans to open a preparatory school with naval training on the site of the former Pine Beach Inn in that borough to be called Admiral Farragut Academy. Read the full story in Pine Beach 1933.on Monday, March 6th, retired USMC Major General Smedley D. Butler was the chief speaker at the meeting of the Toms River Kiwanis along with the group of people to further promote the proposed Admiral Farragut Academy in Pine Beach... Toms River High School announced it would accept IOUs as payment for the operetta.

Arts

It was noted that every Thursday afternoon when vaudeville performed onstage at the Traco Theatre, it was Charlie Werner's job as stage boss to arrange the acts in the order they appeared, with the general understanding that the act "next to closing" was the star.

Crime

Monday, February 27th was the first day the short-wave radio in the state police station at Toms River was placed in regular commission, and its first use was to communicate between the station and Sgt. John Crawford, who was in the field aiding with the search of four-year-old Joel Ridgway III (for related story, see Naval Air Station Lakehurst 1933) in Bamber Lake.

Government

Secretary of State Thomas A. Mathis left to join a party of New Jersey officials, including Governor Moore, who would be present at the inauguration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, March 4th... Section Fire Warden Erwin J. Clement, based out of Ridgway, Lakehurst and covering the boroughs of Beachwood, L akehurst, Pine Beach, Ocean Gate, South Toms River, Berkeley, southern Dover Township and northeast Manchester Township, asked the township committee for the use of out of work men to create fire lines, or breaks, in the wooded sections of the township if relief funds were approved by the state... Franklin H. Berry, a local young lawyer and first lieutenant in the infantry reserve, reported that any local young men between the ages of 17 and 24 interested in enrolling in the Citizens' Military Training Camps for the summer would be provided food, lodging, uniform, equipment and railroad fare to and from Toms River to attend... the township began cutting fire lines in the Cedar Grove section of town, with Wesley Clayton, district warden, overseeing the work performed by men from the relief list... the Toms River Public Library reported continuing increases in patronage as a direct result of the Great Depression, writing that it, “like all other libraries that supply books free, finds that its services are all the while extending. With lots of time on their hands, men and women out of jobs find that cheap amusements and pasttimes are necessary. Unable to spend money on these pleasures, they use the library more and more...” the road from Hooper Avenue to Silver Bay, then known as the Dan Polhemus Road, in Silverton, was to be oiled sometime in March to keep the dust down in the coming warm seasons... Ocean County Relief Director Mrs. Alice Fielder reported that since the turn of the new year approximately 20 woolen boys' suits and seven separate shirts and pants were made and distributed to needy children of the unemployed. The clothes were made from discarded garments donated to county relief, and sewing done in the county building at the corner of Washington Street and Hooper Avenue by local women also receiving aid from the county plus Toms River High School girls from the home economics department. Mrs. Fielder also reported a shortage of material for boys shirts.

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TOMS RIVER

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Disaster Recovery Ombudsman to Assist Residents with FEMA Issues

by Phil Stilton TOMS RIVER—In order to help the thousands of Toms River residents who have been negatively impacted by Hurricane Sandy, the township council this week voted to create the position of Disaster Recovery Ombudsman. The position is an effort by the township to better assist residents and business owners while they are attempting to recover from the Hurri-

cane. The ombudsman will assist residents who have been having difficulties navigating through the various federal, state and local rules and regulations. Not fully understanding the rules and regulations can negatively impact a person’s ability to rebuild their home or business. Regulations might also have a negative impact to the availability of aid, if not followed to the letter. According to the ordinance passed, the job will be a part

Township Remembers Peter Zarestky TOMS RIVER - Toms River Township’s Director of Public Works, Lou Amoruso and the township council honored the life and career of Peter Zarestky at their February 11th meeting. Mr. Zaestky died while working on a project for the municipality downtown on January 25th. After collapsing in the street from an apparent heart attack, fellow workers called 9-1-1 and responding Toms River police performed CPR on him until paramedics arrived and rushed him to Community Medical Center. “Pete was a very popular and hardworking guy and

the department of public works was like his family,” said Mayor Thomas Kelaher. “Apparently, he hadn’t felt well the day before [and] they said it was alright to take the day off, but and he came in the next day to get a job done - that’s the kind of person he was,” he continued. “He only had another year and a half left before retirement.” At the meeting, Mr. Zarestky’s family was presented with a plaque that read, “Peter ‘Peetie’ Zarestky; Toms River Township Public Works Department; January 3, 1989 - January 25, 2013; 24 Years of Dedi-

time position and will work outside of normal business hours. The part-time position will carry a salary of between $30,000 to $40,000. There will be no medical benefits. The position will be active only at times when it is warranted such as natural disasters and other emergencies. “It’s a great idea, assuming we can find somebody who meets the criteria for the job,” Mayor Thomas Kelaher said. “A lot of people have problems, especially with FEMA, maps, construction and insurance. They work during the daytime and they can’t come to town hall for assistance except nights or on weekends, so we thought, let’s get a part time guy who can meet with people in the evenings, either at town hall or at their homes and those residents who can’t come during normal business hours will have a real human being to speak with instead of making countless phone calls and leaving voice mail. Kelaher said the ideal candidate would be someone cated Service to the Township of Toms River.” “There wasn’t anybody in public works who didn’t like Pete, he was just a decent guy and a guy who just came and did his job,” said Mr. Amoruso. “I just want to take this opportunity to present this retirement plaque on behalf of all of us in public works and the township.” He is survived by his sister Karen and her husband Tyler Peirson, his nephew Dylan Peirson and his special sister Penny Peirson, all of Jackson, his brothers, Bruce and his wife Judy Evans of Cincinnati, Ohio and Craig Evans of Trenton.

Teamwork Nets Quick Arrest of Burglar by Jeri Morris TOMS RIVER- A Bayville m a n i s f ac i n g mu l t i ple charges of burglary thanks to an alert resident, reported Toms River Police Chief Michael G. Mastronardy. "This case is a prime example of teamwork in that the alert neighbor was instrumental in providing information that communication personnel distributed timely to street officers who worked with detectives to make a quick arrest that resulted in being able to return property to the victims," he said. On Friday, March 1st, a Lester Road resident received a call from a neighbor advising that a strange truck was parked in their driveway. The resident rushed home and found that someone had broken into the rear bedroom window and removed over $800 worth of jewelry. Officer Eric Divone responded to the call and was able to obtain a description of the vehicle and the license plate number from the alert neighbor. Within one and a half hours after the information was broadcast to all township officers and surrounding police departments, Beachwood Detective Sean Langan located and stopped the vehicle on Route 9 along with Berkeley Township Police. As a result, police were able to arrest William Needham, 26, of Mystic Court in Bayville and recover the jewelry that was stolen from the Lester Drive burglary. While police were interviewing the suspect, Officer Jason Stallworth was dispatched

to a burglary on Brookside Drive where the rear door was forced open and $1400 in jewelry was taken some time between Thursday and Friday afternoon. “As part of the investigation, detectives contacted a resident on Cedar Grove Road to advise them that their home was possibly burglarized. As a result, the homeowner determined that an Ipod and jewelry she thought was originally misplaced was actually taken in a burglary on February 18th,” Chief Mastronardy said. An investigation by detectives Chris Fluck, Roger Hull, Glen Lucas, Mark Bajada, Thomas DiMichele, the Ocean County Sheriff’s Department and Berkeley Township Police is ongoing, but as a result of current results, Mr. Needham was charged with multiple burglaries and is being held on $20,000 bail with no ten percent in Ocean County Jail.

Police Blotter Chief Mastronardy further reported the following recent activity of the Toms River Police Department:

Suspect Caught After Fleeing Accident Scene

On Thursday morning, February 28th, shortly after midnight, police responded to an accident at Hooper and Bay Avenue. While responding to the accident, officers James Robertazzi and Nathan Williams observed a 2011 Honda disabled in the roadway at Chestnut Street, and

two men fleeing the vehicle on foot. Approximately 10 minutes later, Officer Scali located the subjects near Bay and Hooper avenues. During the course of the investigation, the officers found that the suspect turned out of a restaurant just north of the Ocean County Mall, traveled south in the northbound lane and struck a curb, causing the vehicle to launch and strike a traffic light stanchion. John Haig, 22, of Hudson Street, Stafford Township was charged with DWI, leaving the scene and reckless driving. There were no injuries in the accident.

Police Make DWI Arrest After High Spped Chase

On Sunday, February 24th, Officer Frank Moschella responded to a report of a minor accident on Hooper Avenue near College Drive at 6:30 pm. While responding to the call, dispatch advised that a blue Chevrolet Camaro had left the scene traveling south on Fischer Boulevard. Officer Moschella located the vehicle and attempted to make a motor vehicle stop on Fischer Boulevard when the Camaro hit a curb near Bay Avenue and came to a stop. As officers were preparing to contact the driver, the driver sped off at 50 mph south on Fischer and then hit another curb at the East Dover Shopping Center, coming to a complete stop again. As officers approached, the car once again drove off and sped farther south on Fischer Boulevard at 70 mph. Finally, at Route 37 and

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with an extensive construction background and experience with dealing with the public to field calls and inquiries. They would also be required to be proficient in dealing with FEMA issues, insurances claims and building codes. “He would be like a liaison between the public and the township’s various departments,” Kelaher said. “Instead of having to be transferred around departments, the ombudsman will know who to contact in the township and will have access to each of the departments in order to most efficiently answer the questions from the residents. The decision sparked political debate among naysayers in the community. Kelaher says the job doesn’t replace the daytime support that is currently offered as some have suggested, but is intended to extend the support after-hours. He said he doesn’t read local blog posts by anonymous users, but when questioned about comments being left in opposition of this position, he dismissed it all as being politically motivated. “I don’t pay attention to it. What I pay attention to is the thousands of people who have been calling town hall looking for help and answers,” Kelaher said. “We had to take a room in town hall and turn it into a phone bank and it has been manned with class one police officers to answer phones. If we can have somebody to help those people, it’s a good thing. Any opposition to this job is purely political and somebody trying to make a case out of it. Since I’ve been mayor, we’re down 44 jobs through attrition. Creating a part time job where the person doesn’t get benefits and can help thousands of people, I’ll do that all day. This is a good thing.” Fischer Boulevard, the Camaro struck another curb, causing the air bag to deploy. Officer Moschella and Sergeant Scott Moeller quickly apprehended the driver, who was not injured. Thomas Hagadorn Jr., 25, was charged with DWI, eluding and other motor vehicle charges as a result of the traffic accident and pursuit that took place less than 15 minutes from the original accident called in.

Woman Arrested for DWI After Striking Tree

On Sunday, February 24th at 1:15 am, police responded to an accident on Washington Street and Caldwell Lane. Adrianne Wilkinson, 44, was westbound on Washington Street when the 2008 Jeep she was driving left the roadway and struck a tree causing the vehicle to overturn onto its side. Ms. Wilkinson was not injured. Officers Joe Mastronardy and Steven Schwartz charged Ms. Wilkinson with DWI.

Toms River Community Calendar Historic Presevation Commission Meeting The historic preservation commission will hold its next meeting on Monday, March 18th at 3:30 pm in the council meeting room of town hall on Washington Street. Planning Board Meeting The planning board will hold its next meeting on Wednesday, March 20th at 6 pm in town hall on Washington Street. Zoning Board of Adjustment Meeting The next meeting of the zoning board will be on Wednesday, March 20th at 7:30 pm in town hall on Washington Street. Easter Magic Show The Toms River Recreation Department will host its annual Easter Magic Show at the Toms River High School South cafetorium on Hooper Avenue on Saturday, March 23rd starting at 10 am. Free; includes magic show, treats and picture opportunities with the Easter Bunny. Breakfast with the Easter Bunny On Sunday, March 24th, come join the families of Toms River Volunteer Fire Company No. 2 as the Easter Bunny sits down for breakfast from 9 am to 1 pm in the Toms River Elks Lodge #1875 on Washington Street. Breakfast includes French toast, eggs, pancakes, sausage, bacon, coffee, juice and milk plus a free Easter Egg hunt for all kids. Prices are $8 for patrons 12 and older, $5 for children ages 5 to 12 and ages 4 and under eat free. All proceeds benefit the fire company. Rec Committee Meeting The recreation committee will hold its next meeting on Monday, March 25th at

called 911 after hearing the smoke detector beeping. Silverton, Pleasant Plains, Toms River 1 & 2 and East Dover fire companies extinguished the fire, which apparently started in the garage and also damaged a 2011 Toyota pickup truck that was parked in the driveway. Investigating are Detective Thomas DiMichele and the Toms River Fire Prevention Bureau.

Burglary Suspect Caught

On Wednesday, February 20th, police responded to a burglary in which a witness reported that the suspect fled

Fire Damages Home on Ashlar Way Police responded to a structural fire at 212 Ashler Way at 9:25 am on Saturday, February 23rd. Officer Mark Nater arrived on scene and found flames and smoke coming from a two car garage. A 33-year-old resident reported that he and another person in the home

on foot from the Church of Nazarene on Route 37 West towards the Wawa store. K-9 Officer Stephen Eubanks and his partner, Boris, tracked from the church to the home of Christopher Camargo, 18, of 11 Oakridge Parkway. Detectives Mark Bajada, Chris Fluck and Thomas DiMi-

7 pm in town hall on Washington Street.

Toms River Library Programs & Events Super Storm Sandy Tax Assistance Outreach Event IRS and other state agencies will be available to help individuals and businesses prepare their 2012 tax returns and to answer questions on other Hurricane Sandyrelated issues on Monday, March 18th from 6 to 8:15 pm. Representatives from the State Division of Taxation, Governor’s Office, An Evening with Guy Davis Recently featured on the Late Show with David Letterman, Guy Davis is a musician, composer, actor, director and writer, but most of all – a blues man. Join him on Monday, March 18th at 7 pm for an enjoyable evening of stories and songs. Please register. Claiming Sandy Losses on Your Federal Tax Return Join Michele Sheft, Master Tax Advisor with H&R Block, on Wednesday, March 20th at 7 pm to discuss the forms required for filing losses on your Federal tax return. Ms. Sheft will answer questions with respect to recent changes in the tax law and also show you how to calculate and claim a loss from Hurricane Sandy. Registration is required. P le a s e c a l l ( 7 3 2 ) 3 4 9 6200 to register. The Toms River Library is located on Washington Street in downtown Toms River. Does your group or organization want to see its events listed here? All events that are free and open to the public or non-profit/charity fundraisers are eligible for free placement. Write events@ ocsignal today!

chele then following up on the investigation were able to sign complaints for the church burglary. Police recovered a computer stolen from the church and the detectives were also able to recover property from a residential burglary that took place on Foxwood Drive in the Silver Ridge section in January. Mr. Camargo was charged with burglary and is being held in Ocean County Jail on $75,000 bail, with no ten percent option.

Burglary Suspect Caught

On Monday, February 18th, the Toms River Police Department was notified by the New Jersey State Police that a vehicle was submerged in the waters of the Barnegat Bay, north of the Tunney Bridge. The vehicle was found in the water approximately one hundred feet east of the shoreline and Pier One, according to Toms River Police Chief Michael Mastronardy. Toms River Police Corporal Paul Burkhardt of the police department’s dive team inspected the vehicle and found it was unoccupied. Police later learned the vehicle was stolen on January 23 and dumped, not washed into the bay by Hurricane Sandy.

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OCEAN COUNTY

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Ocean County Towns to “Paint the Town Pink” in May

Teens Use “Pier Pressure” to Raise Money for Sandy Victims by Christa Riddle TOMS RIVER–Known as “Generation M²” due to their heavy exposure to and use of media and technology, today’s kids ages 8 to 18 live a good portion of their young lives connected to iPods, computers, video games, tablets, and televisions. Many of these tweens and teens rely upon social media to keep them connected, informed, and entertained, while many adults shake their heads in opposition, wondering aloud if this is a healthy and constructive way for young minds to pass the hours. After all, what good can come out of all of this time spent idly socializing online? For 14-year-old Sara Brilliant and 16-year-old Amanda Kacperowski, two Ocean County teens, social media and technology proved to be major driving forces behind their brain child “Pier Pressure,” a hurricane relief concert the teen girls successfully planned, coordinated, and promoted in less than three weeks. Pier Pressure realized sales of 200 tickets and raised over $10,000 for the New Jersey Amusement Association First Responders Relief Fund and the Toms River Regional Schools Hurricane Relief Fund. Again, many adults were left to wonder how two teens could accomplish so much in such a short time that helped so many people throughout the community. Of course, the girls’ parents felt nothing short of utter pride and amazement at their daughters’ motivation and achievement. Prior to Hurricane Sandy, Sara and Amanda forged a friendship online, using tumblr, a micro-blogging and social media platform, to share their love of music and local bands. The girls never met in-person prior to planning for Pier Pres-

A worker in downtown Red Bank paints pink line down the center of Broad Street in 2012. Photo Courtesy of Paint the Town Pink.

Jackson, Toms River & Brick among towns to “Paint the Town Pink” in May Staff Report

sure, even though they live only five miles apart. Immediately after the hurricane left its indelible markings of damage along the Jersey Shore, the teens both witnessed personal stories of the storm’s devastation shared on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and tumblr. Discussing what they saw and how many from the community were hurting, they paired their creative minds to find a way to help those in need, and so began the speedy evolution of Pier Pressure. Sara and Amanda turned to technology to make their benefit concert a viable reality, using social media and email to contact and book local bands willing to help, as well as to spread the word and sell tickets for the December 1st event at Toms River Intermediate East. The old-fashioned way, Sara and Amanda also pounded the pavement, hanging fliers in restaurants, stores, and entertainment spots all over the Brick and Toms River areas. Their event even received promotion on local radio stations. The excitement and enthusiasm expressed by the fundraiser’s young founders spread with the same magnitude as the hurricane’s crashing waves as people from the area bought tickets to help their community while getting

to see local bands perform. Some of the bands who donated their talents included Honor Society, the main act, as well as Kicking Daisies, Reverse Order, The Dedication, and Over the Edge. “In addition to bringing us closer together as friends, the storm brought our community closer. It showed how you can help others and make a difference in their lives,” shared Sara, a student in Toms River North High School’s class of 2016 who wants to be an archaeologist, FBI agent, or film director after high school. Amanda, who plans to pursue a career in graphic design after she graduates from Monsignor Donovan High School in 2014, also commented, “The community and others around us were hurting, and we felt like we needed to put our time in to help. You should consider yourself lucky if the storm didn’t affect you.” Surprised by the success of their first fundraiser, the dynamic duo of Generation M² plans more benefits in the future. Sara and Amanda’s efforts and dedication show how the upcoming generation’s ingenuity and creative power can positively impact our world, as well as how technology and social media can bring people together during a time of need.

Headline News: 80 Years Ago This Week A look at national and worldwide events influencing local life and conversation in late February and early March 1933, as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room. A bill then making its way through the New Jersey State Legislature was to allow the consolidation of smaller municipalities as a means to save taxpayer's money, a concept first brought up several years earlier and much promoted... it was noted in multiple local newspapers that Adolph Hitler was appointed chancellor of Germany and began transforming the Weimar Republic into the Third Reich, the

Page 6

single-party dictatorship based on the totalitarian and autocratic ideology of Nazism... despite opposition by the League of Nation, Japan refused to back off its imperial conquest at Manchuria, China, forming the new puppet state of Manchukuo... Franklin Delano Roosevelt was inaugurated as President of the United States on Saturday, March 4th, with many residents here and across the country tuned in via radio – two days later, he instituted a mandatory bank holiday to stave off what had been a monthslong run on banks that further weakened the already depressed economy. As a result, banks had to submit financial statements

to prove their solvency to the federal government before they were allowed to reopen, if at all, and in the interim many local businesses began accepting checks to be deposited upon their reopening or scrips to show owed monies...

TOMS RIVER—Seven years ago, Meridian Health wanted to raise awareness for the importance of annual mammograms for women over forty, so they decided to “Paint the Town Pink” in downtown Red Bank, which they called “Pink Bank” for nine days in the month May. From its humble beginnings on Broad Street, the event has grown over the years to Monmouth Beach, Fair Haven, Atlantic Highlands, Rumson and Shrewsbury. This year, Meridian wants to paint downtown Toms River pink along with Brick, Jackson, Point Pleasant and several other Ocean County communities. “The goal was to turn Red Bank into Pink Bank to raise awareness to the importance of annual mammography,” said Tria Deibert, of Meridian Health. Deibert explained that Meridian Health studies had shown women over the age of 40 were not getting their mammograms when they should. She explained the rate was 66% for women over 40, but just 37% among those who were uninsured or under insured and over 40. “Those are the women who fall through the cracks who may not qualify for assistance programs,” according to Deibert. The goal of the “Paint the Town Pink” event is to raise awareness and encourage women over 40 to get their annual mammograms. “We encouraged all of the businesses to pink themselves, the businesses would pink their windows and offer pink specials, there was no money coming back to us, it was tied to their business,” she said. “We put pink piggy banks in all of their businesses and we raised money over the years to provide mammography for uninsured or underinsured women.” “We would want Toms River to become Pink River in May,” she told Mayor Tom Kelaher and the Toms River Township Council at the February 11th council meeting. Jackson Township Mayor Mike Reina says his town will embrace and support the event after a presentation was given at the Feb. 26 council meeting. Mr. Reina said it was an

important subject matter the entire town should embrace, “This is a program I would fully support it here. It’s a great cause for a very important issue and it could be good for the town.” Each year, Reina fields a team at Six Flags Great Adventure’s “Walk in the Park” to raise money for cancer research. The event encourages businesses in towns to do what they want and promote the event in creative ways. In the past, towns have painted a pink line down the center of the street in downtown areas, flew pink flags and some businesses even went as far as painting the walls of their businesses pink. School districts even got involved in the effort as Red Bank Regional High School painted their trademark cannons pink to “Sink Breast Cancer” in 2011. This year, Diebert says they are going to host a “Pink Your House” and “Pink Your Ride” contest, to include Toms River. “It’s a very important thing to promote and anything like this is worthwhile and whatever

we can do here to help get this up and running in Toms River and make it a worthwhile program, we’re happy to do it,” Mayor Tom Kelaher told the Ocean Signal. “Anything that can make people aware of health problems, especially breast cancer is something that is a worthwhile project for us.” In the past, Toms River has participated in the October breast cancer awareness events such as putting pink ribbons around trees and posts downtown, plus participating in events like Moser’s Miles. As far as painting the pink stripes down the middle of Main Street or Washington Street as they do in other downtown areas that participate in the event, Kelaher said he that would be up to the county and the state as Main Street is managed by the state and Washington Street is a county road. “Whatever we have to do to make this successful, we’re going to do it,” Kelaher added. Paint the Town Pink was created with the goal to encourage women aged 40 and older to pledge to have their annual mammogram, as well as raise funds to provide mammography to the uninsured and underserved in our community. Through a variety of special events and in-store specials from hundreds of businesses, the “Pink Your House” contest, and involvement from community groups, this year’s Paint the Town Pink will be “bigger and Pinker” than ever before! To sign up to Pink Your House visit www. PainttheTownPink.com.. “Make it something that fits your town,” Diebert added.

Tent City Under Fire by Lakewood Officials Staff Report LAKEWOOD - Lakewood inspection department officials were escorted by police last week as they served violation notices to Pastor Steve Brigham, who operates Tent City, a homeless camp here. The Lakewood Scoop (TLS) reported that officials from the Lakewood Township Division of Code Enforcement handed Mr. Brigham an envelope of papers containing code and other violations pertaining to the illegal tents at the encampment located in a wooded parcel of land on Cedar Bridge Avenue. TLS also stated that township and other officials over the last six weeks have been working diligently to find a solution to the problem, which has only grown into a greater concern for the well-being of the homeless as well as for the surrounding neighborhoods. Since the December township committee meeting, when multiple residents demanded action from officials, Mayor Albert Akerman and Committeeman Meir Lichtenstien held several meetings with other officials

and attorneys in an effort to bring the saga to an end. In recent weeks, the homeless camp was host to several incidents where camp structures burned to the ground, resulting in injuries. In December, a man and woman residing in the camp were stabbed and another resident died from hypothermia. Michael DiCocco, an associate of Bathgate, Wegener and Wolf, attorneys representing Lakewood Township in the matter, said Thursday was a follow up visit, adding that last week the township issued citations for numerous code violations including unsafe structures, building without a permit and other zoning violations. He also said that camp managers drilled a water well on the site without permits that has not been tested for water safety and quality standards by the township. Lakewood Township owns the property in which the encampment has been built. For updated news on this story, please visit the Lakewood Scoop at www.thelakewoodscoop.com.

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OCEAN COUNTY

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

the National Geographic “Diggers” Uncover LAKEWOOD Scoop Colonial Era Relics at Cedar Bridge Tavern Spoiler Alert: This article contains information about a recently aired NatGeo show by Phil Stilton

C

edar Bridge Tavern, located off Route 72 in Barnegat, has been hailed for many years by local historians as the site of the last battle of the American Revol u t i o n . A l t ho u g h General George Cornwallis surrendered his British army on October 19, 1781 at Yorktown, officially ending the American Revolution, minor skirmishes between American Militiamen and B r i t i s h L oy a l i s t s we re reported through the end of 1782. On March 24th, 1782, British Loyalists attacked and burned the village of Toms River after the locally infamous battle of the Toms River Block House, where Joshua Huddy was captured and subsequently hanged on April 12th on the beach of Sandy Hook Bay. New Jersey’s Pinelands was a s afe haven for Loyalists, supporters of British colonial rule. In the fall of 1782, Captain John Bacon, a notorious loyalist, reportedly sought refuge in the Pinelands around Manahawkin. On December 25th, 1782, Captain Richard Shreve and a small group of militiamen left Burlington in search of Capt. Bacon and his men. Unsuccessful in their search, the group headed

Local historians claim the final shots of the American Revolution were fired outside of the Cedar Bridge Tavern in Barnegat. Photo by Phil Stilton Ocean Signal Media Group.

back to Burlington, stopping reportedly at the Cedar Bridge Tavern before their trek back to Burlington. On their way out of the tavern, Capt. Shreve and his men were ambushed by Capt. Bacon. To their surprise, prior to their assault on the loyalist’s position, local townspeople came to his assistance. Capt. Shreve’s attack was halted and Capt. Bacon escaped. Having a bounty on his head, however, he was later captured and killed near Parkertown. That is how the story goes. Unfortunately for local historians, the actual location of the incident was never confirmed by archaeological proof. Several locations in the Pine Barrens are currently, or were at one time, referred to as Cedar Bridge. This past fall, George Wyant and Tim Saylor, hosts of the National Geographic television show Diggers,

visited the Barnegat site equipped with shovels and metal detectors in search of evidence to once and for all resolve the matter for local historians. While Tim Hart, director of the Ocean County Cultural and Heritage Commission, believes the Barnegat site is the actual location of the skirmish, he admitted in the program that in 30 to 40 years of research, no items from the colonial period had been recovered on the site. Initially, Mr. Wyan and Mr. Saylor began their search in the vicinity of the tavern, but found nothing but junk. The pair uncovered rusted old license plates, auto parts and other common refuse from the mid-20 century. After retracing the alleged steps of the participants in the battle, which had supposedly taken place at the nearby bridge, the pair then expanded their search based on possible trajectory paths.

Mr. Saylor began searching an old chestnut tree east of the tavern and unearthed two colonial era musket balls, both of which had been fired. Mr. Wyant’s search of an area where Capt. Shreve’s men had been ambushed from the north also yielded two musket balls. After digging up his find, Mr. Saylor speculated that “this could be the final musket ball fired of the Revolutionary War.” “We know something went down here,” his associate added. In all the pair found four musket balls, each weighing approximately 33.9 grams, matching those used of the period by British muskets. “We’ve been doing lots of studies here for the last 30 to 40 years,” Mr. Hart said. “This is the first thing that would have come up from here that actually could have been from that time period.” W h i le t h e ev i de n c e i s inconclusive in providing a definitive location of the incident at Cedar Bridge Tavern, or whether the Barnegat tavern is even the correct t avern, the find concludes that British era muskets had been fired in that location sometime in the past. C e d a r B r i d ge Tave r n is owned by the Ocean County Parks and Recreation Department and is under heavy video surveillance and regular security patrol. Trespassers are not permitted. ref: NJ Gazette, 1783; Stafford Township Historical Society.

Gov. Christie: 1,440 Sunken Boats in Barnegat Bay by Phil Stilton

State Begins Removing Homes and Boats from Barnegat Bay

Staff Report

SEA SI DE H E IGH T S – Speaking last month from the engine bay at the Seaside Heights Volunteer Fire Company, Governor Chris Christie announced his plan to begin the cleanup of New Jersey’s waterways affected by Hurricane Sandy. In particular, he addressed the Barnegat Bay, where a sizable portion of an estimated 1,440 sunken vessels lie beneath the surface of the water. The governor said the state will split the state into three regions – north, central and south – and will award bids to companies in each of those regions. “The amount of debris that needs to be removed is mind boggling,” he remarked. “In Mantoloking alone, 58 buildings were washed into bay

with 88 cars. There’s a lot of stuff down there, not to the mention all of the sediment washed from the beaches into the Barnegat Bay. Gov. Christie said cleanup will consist of two phases. In the first phase, debris will be removed from the water, followed by the dredging of sediment that was brought in by Sandy’s tidal surge that swept across the barrier island at a depth of nearly twelve feet in some areas, according to prior eyewitness reports conducted by the Ocean Signal. “We had about 10 million cubic yards of debris on land and we’ve removed a good portion of that already. That work will continue as well and now we’ll move into the waterways so hopefully we can have somewhat navigable Barnegat Bay in the summer. ”

Gov. Christie said that portions of the bay will have restricted access during the debris removal process. It was decided to use three companies for the project as a means to expedite the cleanup process. Crowder Gulf, an Alabama company specializing in disaster recovery and debris management has been tasked with removing boats and debris from the Barnegat Bay and the nearby waterways. Ash Britt, which has come under fire in local news media reports, is tasked with debris removal from the southern portion of the Barnegat Bay. The project will include removal of debris from marshlands and if necessary could involve the dredging of existing channels in the Barnegat Bay.

Pedestrian Struck by Vehicle on Ocean Avenue

A pedestrian was seriously injured at approximately 8:30 pm on March 4th at the intersection of Ocean Avenue and Pearl Avenue after a man reportedly walked into oncoming traffic. Hatzolah and Lakewood EMS responded to the scene.

Dog Involved in Infant Attack Put Down The dog who bit the ear off a child here earlier this year was put down by the family veterinarian, according to Lakewood Police Detective Paul Daly, who noted that the baby was recovering.

Lower East Side Deli Comes to Lakewood

The popular 1880 Deli of Manhattan’s Lower East Side set up shop in Lakewood earlier this month, opening its doors to the public on March 5th at 1880 West County Line Road. Owners Yitzy and Yechiel hired the former head chef of Max’s Steakhouse at Trump Plaza in Atlantic City, Master Chef Robert Coll, who also served as the former executive chef at the Box Tree Steakhouse in New York City.

Lakewood Says Goodbye to “Cardboard Bob” Robert Tobias, 57, a well known and respected Lakewood public works employee, died of cancer on March 4th. Affectionately known as “Cardboard Bob,” he was a driver within the department since 1997. Deputy Mayor Steven Langert said Mr. Tobias will be missed. “Cardboard Bob was a wonderful person and great employee,” he stated. “It’s a big loss for Lakewood.”

Police Chief Announces New School Safety Plan Lakewood’s top cop, Chief Robert Lawson, introduced a plan that will educate the Lakewood School District staff on safety and increase police patrols and presence around all of the township’s public schools. Lawson will also encourage Lakewood Police Officers to make voluntary random stops at schools to create a more visible police presence. The department is currently training two police officers in school security. The program also calls for officers to instruct administrators, teachers and students in the district how to perform the state’s four mandated security drills, including lock-downs, shelter in place, bomb threat and evacuation.

Lawson Denied Request to Skip Jury Duty Police Chief Robert Lawson thought his duties as Lakewood’s Chief of Police would be the golden ticket out of jury duty several months ago, but the court system disagreed. After receiving an excuse during the Jewish holiday season, Lawson received a second note a few months later. Lawson had to show up anyway. Ultimately, Lawson was excused as a juror when he said he could not be impartial regarding a case in a field in which he was very familiar with.

No More Warnings for Parking Violators A new township ordinance ends the warning period previously afforded parking violators in Downtown Lakewood. The township’s inspection department can now issue tickets without giving vehicle owners a warning. Officers will patrol metered parking areas for violations, but will not patrol for double parking and other similar violations. All stories in this column are provided by the Lakewood Scoop, the heartbeat of the Lakewood Community. Read all about the happenings in Lakewood every day online, at www. thelakewoodscoop.com or on their facebook page, The Lakewood Scoop. Photos are copyright and courtesy of The Lakewood Scoop.

The Sandy Ground Project: Where Angels Play

RAHWAY - Children across the tri-state area whose local playgrounds were destroyed by the forces of Hurricane Sandy last October will soon be able to return to those jungle gyms, swingsets and monkey bars if Bill Lavin, president of the New Jersey Firefighters’ Mutual Benevolent Association [NJFMBA], has anything to say about it. His organization, which is now gearing up to begin fundraising and rebuilding efforts for coastal play areas here, was originally dispatched to reconstruct playgrounds in affected coastal communities along the Gulf of Mexico after Hurricane

Katrina devastated the region in 2006 in a project called “Pennies for Playgrounds.” One of those playgrounds was at the North Bay Elementary School in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where the NJFMBA and approximately 20 firefighters traveled from New Jersey for the effort, which was undertaken in partnership with Save the Children and Mercy Corps. The NJFMBA also raised $400,000 for Save the Children’s after school and child care activity programs there. “We were blown away that people were still living in tents and children were going to school in trailers,” said Mr. Lavin, recalling a visit to

the region at the time. “But when we asked the children what they really needed, they all said a playground.” Following Hurricane Sandy along the Atlantic coastlines, Mr. Lavin said he learned that the Katrina-affected communities of Waveland and Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, “were collecting Christmas gifts for New Jersey children affected by the storm in an effort to pay it forward to those who had showed such kindness to them in their hour of need.” “The gesture from Mississippi was an absolute spiritual shot in the arm for the NJFMBA and the hundreds of members who had been serving the coastal communi-

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ties in New Jersey for the past six weeks in every capacity imaginable,” said the organization’s president. “Unfortunately, just as our members and their families were starting to get their second wind and make some sense out of the Jersey disaster, the unspeakable massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut was reported to the country.” As a result, the NJFMBA called the new effort “The Sandy Project: Where Angels Play,” and include raising enough money to build 26 memorial playgrounds dedicated to each of the 20 children and six teachers slain in that school shooting.

“Perhaps each playground can reflect the personality of the teacher or child for whom it would be named,” said Mr. Lavin, noting that the work would be undertaken by police officers, firefighters, teachers and volunteers. The fundraising goal to accomplish this mission has been set at $2 million and so far, according to Mary Kate Lavin, New Jersey playgrounds to will be rebuilt in Sea Bright, Union Beach, Highlands, Normandy Beach, Belmar and Point Pleasant. Others in New York and Connecticut were also named.

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OCEAN COUNTY

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

“Restoring the Shore” in Ocean County: Where is The Money Going? Robin Hood Foundation Gives $6.5 Million to County Charities Helping Sandy Victims

The following grants have been awarded to Ocean County based charities by the Robin Hood Foundation as of March 12, 2013. Source: Robin Hood Foundation. 21 Plus

$10,000

Big Brothers & Big Sisters of Ocean County

$100,000

Church of Grace and Peace

$25,000

Jersey Shore United

$500,00

Community Food Bank of NJ

$400,000

Community Health Law Project

$125,000

Community Services Inc

$50,000

Covenant House

$75,000

Deborah Heart & Lung Center

$375,000

Family Food Relief of NJ

$20,000

Fashion Delivers

$25,000

Food Bank of Monmouth & Ocean Counties

$215,000

Single Stop USA (Food Bank of Mon / Oc)

$450,000

Staff Report

Foundation of the Friendly Sons of the Shillelagh

NEW YORK CITY-The Ro b i n Ho o d Fo u n d a tion raised over $30 million dollars with their 12-12-12 concert held at Madison Square Garden. Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, Alicia Keys, Eric Clapton, Billy Joel, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Michael Stipe, Eddie Vedder and the surviving members of Nirvanna all performed in front of the sold out crowd. Afterwards, the Robin Ho o d Fo u nd at ion a n nounced that for the first time in their history, they wo u ld s u pp o r t ch a r i ties outside of New York. In the three months since the concert, $6.5 million dollars has been given to Ocean County based charities, representing over 20% of the money raised by the 12-12-12 concert. The foundation said more grant announcements will be made in the coming weeks and months.

Funtown Peers

$100,000

Homes for All

$130,000

Hometown Heroes of Ocean Gate

$300,000

The operators of a purported charity who claimed donations would aid victims of Hurricane Sandy were temporarily barred from soliciting additional donations and ordered to preserve the money and items donated to date following the court’s acceptance today of temporary restraints and other interim relief requested by the State and agreed to by

$15,000

Intersect Funds

$50,000 $300,000

Long Blue Line

$30,000

Mary’s Place by the Sea

$25,000

Museum of New Jersey Maritime History (LBI)

$15,000

New Jersey YMCA Alliance

$150,000

Ocean Community Economic Action Now (OCEAN)

$340,000

Ocean County College Foundation

$300,000

Ocean County Long Term Recovery Group Ocean Mental Health Services

$125,000 $25,000

Portlight Strategies, Ocean County

$25,000

Preferred Behavioral Health

$180,000

St. Catharine of Siena Church

the defendants. Defendants Hurricane Sandy Relief Foundation (“HSRF”) and its operators, John Sandberg and Christina Terraccino, also agreed to place the approximately $631,000.00 donated to date and any donations that come in after this point into an interest-bearing attorneys’ escrow account. Sandberg, 30, and Terraccino, 27, both residents of Sparta, also must deposit $13,596.53 into the escrow account. The State in its lawsuit filed on February

Feb 26

$750

Donated to Lavallette Volunteer First Aid Squad.

Feb 22

$1,000

$500 Donated to Bucket Brigade NJ & $500 Donated to Lavallette First Aid Squad.

Feb 20

$3,000

Purchased gift cards from Seaside Furniture ($1,500) & Gelco Furniture ($1,500) which were donated to ‘The Foundation to Save The Jersey Shore’.

Feb 18

$4,798

Purchased 75 rolls of dune fence ( ¾ of a mile ) at Jaeger Lumber & 750 wooden posts at The Home Depot, which were donated to Bucket Brigade NJ ( Ortley Beach ).

Feb 14

$1,461

Purchased household necessities at ShopRite & donated to People’s Pantry in Toms River.

Feb 10

$900

Purchased PetCo gift cards which were donated to Puppy Love Pet Rescue.

Feb 9

$4,000

Purchased $2,500 in Home Depot cards donated to Shore 2 Recover ( Point Pleasant) , & Purchased $1,500 in Stop & Shop cards donated to St. Paul’s Methodist Church in Bay Head.

Feb 6

$3,000

Donated to ‘Save The Jersey Shore’ to launch “Adopt A Home” program, which aims to supply building materials & reduce the financial burden on those with devastated homes.

Feb 2

$4,000

Purchased $2,500 Home Depot gift cards & $1,500 Wawa gift cards donated to Bucket Brigade.

Jan 31

$3,000

Mr. Bob Portable Toilets February lease payment on Barnegat Bay Island.

Jan 28

$5,000

Purchased AMEX gift cards donated to ‘Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Ocean County’.

Jan 25

$5,000

Donated to ‘Save The Jersey Shore’ Foundation, which then donated it to the FMBA’s playground project, ‘Sandy Ground: Where Angels Play’.

Jan 23

$400

Purchased Home Depot gifts cards donated to ‘ Coastal Jersey Parrot Head Club’.

Jan 21

$5,000

Purchased AMEX gift cards donated to ‘ Chris’s Fight For A Cure Foundation’ in Toms River.

Jan 19

$1,500

Home Depot gift cards donated to St. Rose Parish & School in Belmar.

Jan 18

$1,000

Walmart gift cards donated to Frog Pond Elementary (Delivered Lowe’s gift cards $1,075.00 which were donated by UAW Local 3000 ( Ford plant in Flat Rock, MI ).

Jan 14

$0

Delivered 5 pallets of Amway cleaning supplies (donated) to Silverton Park (Silverton), St. Peter’s Church ( Pt. Pleasant Beach), First Presbyterian Church (Manasquan), People’s Pantry (Toms River), Bucket Brigade (Ortley Beach).

Jan 13

$0

Delivered 6 pallets of Amway cleaning supplies (donated) to Union Beach, Kings of Kings Church (Manahawkin), Bucket Brigade NJ ( Ortley Beach ), Salvation Army Disaster Relief (Monmouth County),and to Save The Jersey Shore ( Sea Bright ).

Jan 10

$9,000

Donated to ‘The Foundation to Save The Jersey Shore’.

Jan 5

$1,000

American Express gift cards donated to Breakout Ministries Fellowship Church in Ocean Gate ( also handed them the $525.00 of gift cards which the UAW Local 3000 donated from the Ford plant in Flat Rock, Michigan ).

Jan 4

$7,280

January lease payment for Mr. Bob Portable Toilets on Barnegat Bay Island.

Jan 2

$0

Delivered pallets of jackets, shoes, & clothes to Brick High School & Southern Regional High School, which were donated by Vans.

$2,200,000

Point Pleasant Presbyterian Church

$10,000

St. Franics Community Center (LBI)

$70,000

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church

$35,000

St. Peter’s Foundation

$25,000

21, 2013, alleged that they had transferred $13,596.53 of HSRF donations into their personal accounts. “The temporary restraints we sought, and the Court approved, will ensure the donations made to date are preserved and maintained until a final resolution of the State’s Complaint. This is an important step toward ensuring that these donations go toward aiding Sandy victims as this organization represented to donors,” Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said. In addition to monetary donations, the State requested and achieved the preservation of the remainder of the approximately $400,000 in donated items now stored in

The following is a list of donations made by Scott Zabelski, owner of Blue Wave Printing in Toms River and founder of the popular local “Restore the Shore” charity fundraising effort that has raised over $500,000 and makes regular donations to locals in need. The local grassroots effort has been the most visible and prominent Sandy relief effort in Ocean County. The chart below represents donations made by Zabelski and Blue Wave Printing since January 1, 2013. It does not include donations made in 2012. Source: Blue Wave Printing.

$15,000

Little Egg Harbor

Fraudulent Sandy Charity Exposed by Attny General The following information was released by the Division of Consumer Affairs

Hope Center Jackson Women of Today

Top: Paul McCartney on stage at the 12-12-12 concert. Bottom: Madison Square Garden and Bruuuuuce. Photos Courtesy the Robin Hood Foundation.

$25,000

How Blue Wave Printing is Helping to “Restore the Shore”

a warehouse as well as unused gift cards. The Court ordered these items be donated to a registered charitable organization. The defendants also must post notices on the HSRF websites and Facebook and Twitter accounts stating that the Foundation is not a tax-exempt organization as defined by the IRS and that it has filed an application to obtain such status. The Court’s Order also requires the defendants to remove the website page titled “Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund” and to post notice that the Foundation is not affiliated with the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund.

NJ First Lady’s Hurricane Relief Fund, Under Fire, Issues Grants Staff Report TRENTON - News reports in the Asbury Park Press and Star Ledger last week criticized the New Jersey Hurricane Relief Fund, a ch a r i t y fo u nded a nd run by New Jersey First Lady Mary Pat Christie. The charity has raised over $32 million, but the reports criticized the lack of disbursement of funds to Hurricane Sandy victims in need of assistance. In response, the organization announced this week that $1 million in grants will be distributed to six county-based long-term recovery groups, including those in Atlantic, Bergen,

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Cape May, Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean Counties. The Ocean County group is led by O.C.E.A.N. Inc. President Ted Gooding with the United Way serving as the committee’s fiscal agent. Long term recovery groups are typically established after disasters have struck, in an attempt to allow local community groups direct aid to residents. The group consists of volunteer members, but may opt in the future to hire paid staff members to manage rebuilding projects. The group meets at 10 am on the first Thursday of each month at the Toms River Elks Lodge on Washington Street.

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BEACHWOOD

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Det. Oldham Retires After 29 Years

Beachwood Police Chief William Cairns (right) congratulates retiring Detective William “Bill” Oldham and presents him with his retirement badge at the February 6th meeting of the mayor and council. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

by Erik Weber BEACHWOOD - Borough residents and youths here lost a well-known and liked veteran of its police force with the retirement of Detective William "Bill" Oldham earlier this winter following a career that began in 1983 and was marked by regular assignments interacting with schoolchildren. Honoring the detective at the February 6th council meeting, Beachwood Police Chief William Cairns recalled starting in the department at almost the same time, nine months apart, when the agency was "at a very, very down time." "The agency had been through a terrible layoff, our department was reduced to half of its numbers, our dispatch was eliminated and we were driving around in handme-down troop cars where

the bumpers were falling off and there were holes in the floorboards," he said. "As you can see, thanks to everybody involved and the mayor and council, we've come a long way and Bill has come a long way." The chief stated that Det. Oldham was the borough's third of currently four D.A.R.E., or Drug Abuse Resistance Education, officers, being trained into the role in 1992. D.A.R.E. is a school based program founded on the west coast in 1983 and was later adopted by the borough police department and many other surrounding agencies. The detective later went on to become a certified instructor of the D.A.R.E. Parents Program. Besides his D.A.R.E. officer credentials, Det. Oldham was also "instrumental" in establishing the Junior Police Academy, a six-week

program that initially taught sixth graders in Beachwood Elementary School about the department, reported Lt. Robert L.Tapp. The program was so successful that it was later expanded to include the volunteer fire company and first aid squad, and is now presented to fifth graders in the elementary school as the Junior Emergency Services Academy. The detective was later the first school resource officer assigned to Toms River Intermediate South, which was opened in September 2005 and saw the district-wide addition of sixth grade to the regional middle schools from their original placement in the elementary schools. "He played a very big role as detective in the school resource officer [position] and did a great job," Chief Cairns said. "He dedicated a great deal of his career to the youth within our community as seen in many of his assignments," said Lt. Tapp. "The professionalism and dedication he showed during his career was always a compliment to the department." Besides his D.A.R.E., school resource officer and youth assignments, Det. Oldham was also a certified firearms instructor and training officer for the department. "There were a lot of people who were sad to see you go, myself included," added the chief. Det. Oldham was then presented with his retirement badge by the chief, who added, "may you carry it for

many, many years." "I'd like to say thank you to my family, they're so important to me," said the detective, before joking, "Chief you're the only one I couldn't get retired before I did." He then thanked his fellow officers, the PBA, everybody present and added, "retirement's pretty good." Mayor Ron Roma also read into record a proclamation thanking Det. Oldham for his "29 years of outstanding and meritorious service to the residents of the Borough of Beachwood," adding that in his career here he "became the familiar and friendly face of our Beachwood Police Department [who] served as an example to his peers and the residents of this community and this state both in his personal achievements and employment achievements with fairness and dedication." The mayor added that when he first moved to the borough in around 1993, Det. Oldham was the first officer he met when he made a call for service at the time. "What was the issue?" called well-known area contractor and borough resident David Lipton, from the back of the room. "I was complaining about a local builder," quipped Mayor Roma, eliciting hard and loud laughter from many present. Continuing on, the mayor added, "So the first impression I had of the police department in Beachwood was Bill Oldham, and it was a very good impression to say the least."

Beachwood Council Seeks Change in Public Notice Laws Governing Body Criticizes Lack of Coverage by Asbury Park Press; Mandate by State to Pay for Public Notices by Erik Weber BEACHWOOD - As has been a regular drumbeat here for years, governing body members took the opportunity of their January reorganization meeting to again knock the regional beleaguered daily newspaper, the Asbury Park Press, for failing to produce regular coverage of local and borough stories while at the same time holding its hand out for legal notice monies under state law. In recent years, the Asbury Park Press has attempted many initiatives to curb

their sharp loss of advertising revenue while often cutting whole sections from the publication, laying off reporting and editing staff and offering more purported "watchdog" and broad opinion-based content while attending municipal meetings and covering individual communities less. Many officials along the Toms River and Barnegat Bay have reported again and again to have gone years and whole terms without having seen or spoken with a single reporter or representative of that daily paper. Councilman Gerald W. "Jerry" LaCrosse, a regular detractor of the Gannett Company, Inc.-owned entity who has written letters to the state requesting the law be changed to allow public notices be published online for free on individual municipal or a single statewide website and carried by other interested publications providing

real community coverage, lit into their practices after casting a "no" vote to name the Asbury Park Press as official 2013 newspaper for the notices. "I do not like the idea of the taxpayers of Beachwood having to put money into the pockets of the Asbury Park Press for these announcements," he said, noting their costs ran into the many thousands of dollars annually. Mr. LaCrosse first voiced his dissent with the Monmouth County based publication shortly after being returned to the governing body in January 2011 following an absence that began with a 2006 election year defeat. He previously served seven terms as councilman. At the time, Borough Attorney William T. Hiering, Jr. stated that until the legislature changed state law, there was no other local publication meeting the criteria of

publishing at least 48 times per year and being available within the municipality to allow the borough to deny the Asbury Park Press its position as official paper, despite several other local print and online publications actively covering borough news. This year, Borough Clerk Elizabeth "Bette" Mastropasqua reported that there were several stalled bills awaiting movement on the state level to allow municipalities to self-publish online for the general public's direct access, but thus far none were making progress. Mr. LaCrosse and several other governing body members restated their disdain with supporting a publication that demanded money while having provided no real coverage for many years, and added that they would continue to urge their representatives to change the law.

Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno was present for the 2013 Beachwood mayor and council reorganization meeting on January 2nd. From left: Chief William Cairns, Councilman Gregory Feeney, Councilman Ed Zakar, Councilman Steve Komsa, Lt. Gov. Guadagno, Mayor Ron Roma, Councilman Tom Miserindino, Councilwoman Beverly Clayton, Clerk Bette Mastropasqua.

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Beachwood Community Calendar Council Meeting The mayor and council will hold their next meeting on Wednesday, March 20th at 7 pm in borough hall on Pinewald Road. There, the recreation commission will present winners of the annual Snowman Contest with awards. Meetings are always open to the public to share their ideas, opinions and questions regarding borough business. Borough Sees 96th Year The Borough of Beachwood marks its 96th year since incorporating as an independent municipality out of Berkeley Township in 1917 on March 22nd. Originally a resort town laid out and sold through a subscription promotion by the New York Tribune in 1914-15, it formally opened for property owners on Decoration Day (Memorial Day) 1915. Easter Bunny Breakfast The Beachwood Volunteer Fire Company will hold its annual all-you-can-eat Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on Sunday, March 24th from 8 am to noon at the firehouse on Beachwood Boulevard. Breakfast includes pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, coffee and orange juice with tickets costing $6 per person 8 years of age and up and $3 per child under 8 years. All are invited to bring their camera for pictures with the Easter Bunny. Mayo Park Egg Hunt The Beachwood Recreation Department will host its annual Easter Egg Hunt in Mayo Park, between Clubhouse Road and Beacon Avenue, at 1 pm. Beachwood residents welcome. A rain date has been scheduled for the following Saturday, March 30th at the same time and location. Land Use Board The next meeting of the borough land use board will be on Monday, March 25th

at 7 pm in borough hall on Pinewald Road. 2013 July 4th Fireworks Donations It's not too early to get in your donations for this year's fireworks display on the Toms River. Send checks to: Beachwood Fireworks on the Toms River, c/o Borough of Beachwood, 1600 Pinewald Ro ad , B e achwo o d , N. J. 08722. Each year's display (this is the 73rd, at least since it was officially recorded) is 100 percent funded through personal and business donations, and not through taxes.

Beachwood Library Programs & Events Knit Wits On Friday, March 15th at 10 am stop in the library to refresh your knitting skills, try some new techniques or learn from scratch. No registration is necessary Bedtime with Sparks Children, ages two to four, wear your pajamas and join Sparks, the library mascot, for some bedtime stories. This program is scheduled for Monday, March 18th at 6:30 pm. Registration is required. Rover’s Readers On Wednesday, March 20th at 3:45 pm, read to Taffy and Rusty, the library dogs. This program is for children ages 5 to 12. Registration is required Please call (732) 244-4573 to register or visit www.theoceancountylibrary.org. The Beachwood Library is located in the heart of the downtown on Beachwood Boulevard. Does your group or organization want to see its events listed here? All events that are free and open to the public or non-profit/charity fundraisers are eligible for free placement. Write events@ ocsignal today!

Pack 114 Blue & Gold

Beachwood-Pine Beach based Cub Scout Pack 114 held its annual Blue and Gold Banquet at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church here on Sunday, February 24th. The event included dinner, a cake decorating contest, skits (as can be seen here, with Scout leader Ben Zee aiding a group of boys prepare for theirs, above) and award ceremonies for achievements and projects. ERIK WEBER

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BEACHWOOD

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Jakes Branch Park Programs & Events

Sandy’s Impact Still Felt Along Riverfront

Night of the Stars If you are a budding astronomer, spend the night under the stars with A.S.T.R.A. (Astronomical Society of the Toms River Area) on Saturday, March 16th from 8 – 10 pm up on the 5-story observation tower. Volunteers will be on site to share their knowledge and answer your questions. You will be able to view the stars, planets and constellations through their telescopes or you can bring your own. This program is Free and is recommended for all ages. Please register. Live Animal Talks Meet the animals and get an up close look at the park’s inhabitants on Sunday March 17th at 1 pm. No registration is required and the program is free. Fireside Storytelling and Craftmaking On Thursday, March 21st from 10 - 11 am, join in for a story told in front of a warm fire inside the Nature Center. Afterwards, children ages 2 ½ - 5 years will get to make a craft related to the story. Registration is required. Snowman Photo Contest Send a picture of your best snow sculpture from this winder and you can win a fun prize! Awards will be given for most original, best traditional and kids under 5 division. Mail your photo to: O.C. Parks & Recreation, 1198 Bandon Road, Toms River, NJ 08753 Attn: Active Recreation. Entry deadline is March 31st. Registration Information Unless otherwise stated, all programs require registration along with payment in full at time of registration. Anyone attending a program or trip without registering in advance must pay by check or money order (cash in not acceptable). Participants will only be permitted upon availability. Registration for programs designated as “FREE” may be placed by calling Cattus Island County Park at 732-270-6960 on or after the registration date listed. Special assistance accommodations are available upon request. Registration location: Jakes Branch County Park, Beachwood (732) 281-2750 For program availability or a newsletter, please call 1-877-OCPARKS (627-2757) Toll Free or visit www. oceancountyparks.org.

by Erik Weber BEACHWOOD - When Hurricane Sandy served a direct blow to our area on October 29th and 30th, the barrier island and eastern bay communities were severely impacted, but its effects were also felt farther upriver in this community on the southern bank of the Toms River. On the morning of October 30th, residents and officials awoke to not only downed trees and powerlines borough-wide, but also a totally submerged beachfront and marina area. As spectators gathered atop the bluff and lower ridges over the beachfront and at the height of the inclines on Compass Avenue and Brigantine Street looking down at the marina that morning, it was yet unclear the full extent of damage. The Beachwood Community Center appeared as if an island, parts of the marina boardwalk had floated across the street and the northern edge of western T-dock was seen peeking above the waterline at a strange angle. At the beachfront, waves lapped over the entire parking lot and against the block wall below the letters that spelled out BEACHWOOD behind the flagpole, and only the top halves of the two shelters and playground slide were visible. When the river receded, it was learned that while appearing possibly unharmed, the community center indeed took on damaging water to its lower

Beachwood 1933

Life in the borough from late February and early March 1 9 3 3 a s co m p i le d f ro m sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life

An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a borough-wide report of 28 by February 1st, there having been no earlier reports... the New Jersey Courier reported that Lt. Cyrus Clendening and his wife moved from their home in Beachwood to the C.W. Byram house opposite Cranmoor on Washington Street in Toms River. Mr. Byram was confined with the flu and was staying with Dr. and Mrs. Nelson Newbury in their home on Barnegat Boulevard, here. Barely a

Page 10

month later, Lt. Clendening would be dead in one of the worst airship disasters in U.S. history. Years later, in the 1960s, a woman who stayed in the home they occupied in Beachwood, on Starboard Street, recalled in a popular national magazine article it being haunted when as a girl she and her family rented it later in the 1930s... Albert Neilson was building a playhouse for the Harjes children... numerous summer residents from the north began coming down to open their bungalows for the coming warm seasons... Herbert Skold of Kearney hitchhiked down to the borough to spend the last weekend of February here... several borough residents wrote home stating they were having a great time on vacation in Miami, where they also met some of

The morning after Hurricane Sandy hit, on October 30th, the Beachwood Community Center appeared to be an island on the river while sections of the marina boardwalk and T-dock could be seen partly above the high floodwaters of the Toms River. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

subfloor area; the marina's T-dock, lightpoles, electric utilities and boardwalk were damaged or destroyed up to where it met the higher boardwalk that runs alongside the shoreline from the foot of Beachwood Boulevard east to the entrance to Beachwood Beach; the eastern T-dock on the beachfront lifted up and floated all the way across the western marina cove area before coming to rest behind the community center, and sand had eroded down from a small section of the Windy Cove bluff onto the adjacent lower paver walkway. Also damaged beyond repair was a brand new video security system that a contractor had mostly installed along the marina and waterfront, which would need to be replaced. In the months that followed, Borough Engineer Jim Oris has repeatedly met with the borough's insurance company and representatives for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to go over repair costs that the borough expects will be 75 to 90 percent covered by federal aid when not covered outright by insurance. At the early February council meeting, the engineer stated that while keeping in mind the fast approaching summer season and traditional opening of the beachfront and marina area, he was working very hard to try and get the boat slips back and available to

patrons. Earlier this week, Borough Clerk Elizabeth "Bette" Mastropasqua stated the town hoped to have it rebuilt and opened by Memorial Day weekend or June 1st. Currently the community center remains closed as mold remediation efforts continue and the groups that used it for programs, meetings and events - including the monthly dances of the borough municipal alliance, now taking place at the firehouse far inland - have had to find other locations. Mr. Oris stated that the hall now stood in the velocity zone of FEMA's Advisory Base Flood Elevation [ABFE] maps released late last year and approved by the governor. Borough officials at the early February meeting debated the costs associated with either repairing the community center as-is and moving utility services to a higher level, raising the community center to above the base flood elevation, or demolishing the community center and rebuilding at an elevation higher than the ABFE zone. It was not then known whether the damages sustained on the structure were greater than 50% and thus made it necessary to do any more than make repairs and raise the utilities. All the wood from the marina boardwalk was carted away several months after the hurricane, and today sits closed off to the public

by plastic orange netting and poles. The gate at the entrance to the beachfront is also closed, as the electric utilities there were destroyed and need repair along with the T-dock there. Councilwoman Beverly Clayton thanked Mrs. Mastropasqua, Mr. Oris, Treasurer Elizabeth Sarantinoudis and Lt. Tapp for performing under the strain of multiple meetings and a constant flow of ever-changing information relating to storm recovery since late October. Earlier this winter, an already-planned and approved project to install a groin to the east of the beach T-dock was carried out, and today extends off the nearby playground area to curtail and stop the beach erosion that has eaten away at the once wide span of beachfront present in earlier decades of the 20th century.

their Beachwood neighbors... Mrs. George D. Siffert [nee Thomas, she was the daughter Samuel Bath Thomas, founder of Thomas English Muffins] entertained a party of eight ladies at a luncheon in the Royal Pines Hotel, Pinewald, on Friday, March 3rd, after which they played bridge... Mayor Joseph Rowe and Mrs. Louise Elizabeth Forster were married at their new home here on Saturday evening, March 4th, with Recorder William R. Leary performing the ceremony. The couple left the next day for a month-long honeymoon trip to Florida and Cuba...

weekend with his parents. He later worked for the New York Herald Tribune, part of the original newspaper that founded Beachwood as a land promotion in 1914-15 and where his father had a long career managing the comic strip syndicate, where he met his future wife, Patricia Hall (they married in 1939). During World War II he served as a deck officer in the Navy and later made his career managing an investment counseling firm before retiring in 1974. A sailor his whole life, he and his wife made their home in Massachusetts from 1949 to 1999, when they moved to Washington State to be closer to their children (Patricia died in 2003). He later died in 2010 at the age of 97...

166/9) in Beachwood and separately fined $3 and $5 following their arrest by Beachwood Officer Frank Turner... William South was committed to the county jail for observation before being transferred to the State Hospital at Trenton after taking a length of gas pipe and smashing to pieces virtually anything present at the gas service station he and his nephew, Henry South, Jr., ran at the western entrance to the borough (though unproven here, this is likely the site of today's Lightning Lube service station). It was reported that he became suddenly violent on Wednesday afternoon, March 1st and destroyed the light globes and glass cylinders on the row of gas pumps in front of the station, broke out the windows, overturned oil tanks and spilled out the oil before smashing the glass

School

Jules Bierach visited home from the Peddie School, Hightstown, in late February... Harry Parker Staton, Jr., or “Skip”, was home from the Ithaca School of Journalism to spend the late February

Crime

Two New York City men were found guilty of speeding on Route 4 (today's Route

In other recent activities of the mayor and council: • the council unanimously approved a resolution urging the president and federal government to approve a 90 percent reimbursement rate from the cost of post-Hurricane Sandy repairs through FEMA. • a resolution was also unanimously passed opposing a state bill promoted by northern legislators demanding free beach access and comfort facilities to the public in exchange

for financial aid for storm repairs, as it would place an undue hardship on all shore municipalities without funding beachfront safety, maintenance and operations. • efforts have begun by Mrs. Clayton to form a proactive committee interested in planning a yearlong celebration of the 100th anniversary of the incorporation of the borough in 2017. Anyone interested in serving on such a committee is invited to call borough hall. • Councilman Ed Zakar attended the installation dinner of the Beachwood First Aid Squad in late January and was presented a plaque thanking the borough for its support which he then passed on to the mayor and council at their early February meeting. • a suggestion was made by Mr. Zakar to have the borough start a practice of honoring volunteers when they reach milestones of service, such as 10, 15 and 20 years with the first aid squad and fire company, that can be presented by town officials at their annual installation dinners. • Councilman Steve Komsa applied for a $500 grant through the Ocean County Tourism Department to produce promotional materials for the annual Beachwood 5K and One Mile Fun Run, this year entering its second year and held in the fall. • Councilman Gerald W. "Jerry" LaCrosse, who had been involved with water quality testing and stormwater management along the riverfront and specifically beach area, stated that as a result of the hurricane it was questionable as to the local effects in the waters off the beach but that he would seek to continue his work with the Ocean County Health Department through this year where possible. • Regarding the ABFE maps from FEMA, Mr. Oris stated that possibly as many as 20 homes could be affected by the new base flood elevations, but Mr. LaCrosse pointed out that these appeared to include homes far above the riverfront on the bluff areas of town and farther inland than would ever be impacted. Mrs. Clayton pointed out that these homes were as much as 40 or 50 feet above the river.

on Officer Frank Turner's car when he responded to the scene. He was then subdued and taken away by Officer Turner and Officer Bryce Evernham of South Toms River. Friends of Mr. South reported he had been brooding and acting different leading up to his actions...

Government

The wife of Lt. Clinton S. Rounds, who spent the winter in the Brigantine hostel here, left on the U.S. Army transport Republic for California. The following month, her husband was due to leave for the west coast by motor. Two years later he would survive the crash of the U.S.S. Macon only to perish in 1942 when the non-rigid L-2 blimp he was piloting collided with a G-1 blimp over the Atlantic Ocean five miles off Manasquan during an experimental night flight...

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BARRIER ISLAND

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Barrier Island 1933 Life outside the Seasides along the barrier island from late February and early March 1933 as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life

Mantoloking Officials Get Birds-Eye View of Damage Ameri-Corps Volunteers Help Dig Out

By Phil Stilton ORTLEY BEACH– AmeriCorps volunteers from Utah, California and Washington State arrived this week on the barrier island to help residents dig out and clean up their homes and properties. With Ocean County response operations based out of a temporary command center in the vacant ambulance bays at the former Ortley Beach First Aid Squad building on the corner of 6th Avenue and Route 35 South, here, requests for help are nearly non-stop. “We’re a nationwide organization, consisting of volunteers and we’re sent to disaster areas like this all over the country when needed,” said Jim Carroll. ”We work with FEMA to figure out which neighborhoods need the most help and that’s why we’re here in Ortley Beach.” “Mostly we’ve been helping people knockout their houses, gutting drywall

and pulling up flooring and things like that,” he continued. “We try to get them to a point where they can start to rebuild and try to help them get back on their feet as quickly as possible.” One of the families they’re helping is Albert and Jenny Brogel, owners of their 2nd Avenue home for more than 40 years. Upon arrival, the AmeriCorps team grabbed their shovels and safety gear and removed a fence, which had been ripped from its concrete anchors and pushed against the house by surging flood waters, plus other objects blocking access through their front door. “We had 30 to 36 inches of water in our house. The house is gutted and we’re just waiting for the flood insurance, which we had very little of, but whatever it is, we have to deal with it,” Brogel said. “AmeriCorps has been wonderful with us.” “I’ve been here since 1948 – when I was a kid, the Sea-

side bridge was still wood and we [could] see it from our house; there was nothing here at all but big sand dunes,” Mrs. Brogel said, adding that she had become involved in AmeriCorps “through the president of the local taxpayer’s association, Kathy Barisciano; she’s been wonderful helping us get all the information we need during this time.” The first traces of what became AmeriCorps began with the National Service Act signed by President H.W. Bush in 1990 when he created the Office of National Service. Under President Bill Clinton, AmeriCorps was officially formed when two existing national service programs merged into one; the longstanding VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) program, created by President Lyndon Johnson in 1964 and the National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC). In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the federal agency that administers AmeriCorps, is coordinating its efforts with the Federal Management Agency (FEMA), National Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster, the American Red Cross, Points of Light, and state and local authorities. In addition, the agency is working with its state field offices and service commissions to deploy AmeriCorps and Senior Corps members. Thus far, 1,770 national service members have been deployed to states affected by Hurricane Sandy, and three teams were deployed to Ortley Beach.

Bucket Brigade Still Going Four Months Later Cassandra Vitale (3rd from right) and her Bucket Brigade are still donating their time and helping the residents of the Barrier Island. Originally, the group was based out of the Ortley Beach First Aid Station, but when that structure was demolished in February, Toms River officials secured a spot for the brigade in the nearby A&P parking lot. Vitale started her campaign to help others in the days after the hurricane by making coffee for the out of state electrical utility workers. Today, the group has helped hundreds of homeowners in the Ortley Beach area.

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Three months ago this week, members of Mantoloking’s borough council, fire department and OEM took a flight over their storm ravaged town. The flight was donated by Toms River resident Patrick Day, a partner of Liberty Helicopter Travel. Day and his company donated nearly 100 flight hours to local emergency services personnel in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

The Ortley Beach area saw some excitement when a small skeleton, initially believed to be that of a young baby, was found near the old rail station but later proven to be of a monkey... John B. Whiteman continued to keep up his job of making daily and nightly inspections of cottages in the Ortley Beach section of Dover Township in early March...

Business

Charles Hankins of Lavallette began construction on another boat, having recently sold several others he built over the early winter... several visitors stopped by Ortley Beach to alternately view available lots and inspect available rentals...

Government

Rebuilding the Hugh J. Boyd Elementary School Seaside Heights Elementary School Suffers Severe Water Damage During Hurricane Sandy to Reopen in September. By Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS – For students of the Hugh J. Boyd Elementary School, life as they know it ended on October 26th, 2012. Inside the now vacant and stripped school building, time stands still. Halloween decorations adorn the walls and calendars are still open to October. That Friday students left their school for the weekend prior to the arrival of a monster: Hurricane Sandy, which three days later sent a surge of ocean and bay water rising to just under four feet through the original, older part of the school and approximately one foot in the newer, higher sections, saturating flooring and carpets. Anything that could be salvaged now sits in boxes inside the multipurpose auditorium and gymnasium of the shuttered institution, which was built on the bay side of the borough at the corner of Barnegat and Fremont avenues in the late 1960s, replacing the outgrown 1920s-era four-room Seaside Heights Elementary School that stood on the ocean side at Sheridan Avenue and Ocean Terrace (it was later demolished and is now a parking lot). Hugh J. “Junie” Boyd was principal of that institution at the time of its closing, besides being one of three locally celebrated brothers known for their service on the borough’s beach patrol through much of the mid-20th century. Thomas Boyd, modern-day chief of police in the borough and son of “Junie,” last month addressed the students of the school at town hall. The

children were bused back to Seaside Heights to take part in a Christmas tree lighting celebration hosted by the borough and Seaside Heights Volunteer Fire Company. “The school is going to get totally cleaned up and fixed, you guys are going to go back to a brand new school, how great is that?” Boyd said to the children. “I’m sure my father is proudly looking down us and all the kids, because he loved the kids. I just want to thank everyone who has helped Seaside Heights.” It was the first time back home for many of the displaced children, and they we re g ree ted by S a nt a Claus, who handed out gifts to them. While the school is closed, students are attending classes at Central Regional High School in Berkeley Township. In January, several cases of books from the Library of Congress Surplus Books Program were donated to the school to help in the replacement of their library’s holdings, which were completely destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. The Library of Congress makes available extra copies of all published books in the United States for donation to qualified charitable organizations and schools. The books were delivered by Congressman Jon Runyan (R-NJ), who said he felt the school and its students would benefit from the program after learning of their losses. The clean-up operation at the school is being performed by All Risk Property Damage Experts of Somerdale, Camden County. At the time of the congressman’s visit, the school was completely stripped down to bare walls and all furniture had been removed. Crews also stripped the floors down to the concrete base and are cleaning mold and water damage. The school is expected to reopen in September of 2014.

The mayor and council of Lavallette passed on first reading the borough's 1933 budget with more than $35,000 cut out from an earlier one considered thanks to a new state law that allowed municipalities to fund over five years the unpaid tax revenue notes at least three years in arrears... Surfman William J. Lewis of the Chadwick Coast Guard Station was injured while climbing to the lookout tower when he slipped on the wet ladder and fell several feet... the Lavallette Volunteer Fire Company held a regular meeting in late February that included members of the Point Pleasant First Aid Squad, who provided service to the lower barrier island before Tri-Boro First Aid Squad was founded, giving instruction on the use of inhalators... several men receiving county relief due to the effects of the depressed economy were hired to repaint the Lavallette Volunteer

Community Calendar Council Meeting The next meeting of the mayor and council will take place on Wednesday, March 20th at 6 pm at the borough hall on the Boulevard. Residents are welcome and invited to attend and participate. Egg Hunt The annual Palm Sunday Egg Hunt will take place on Sunday, March 24th at 1 pm on the beachfront. This event is free. Age groups participating in the hunt have their own sections of eggs along Ocean Terrace, including: ages 0 to 2, Hancock Avenue; ages 3 to 4, Blaine Avenue; ages 5 to 6, Sumner Avenue; ages 7 to 8; Hamilton Avenue; ages 9 to 10, Lincoln Avenue; and special needs, Grant Avenue. Planning Board Meeting The planning board will hold its next regular meeting on Wednesday, March 27th at 6 pm in borough hall on the Boulevard. Open to the public. Easter Day Promenade Easter Day Promenade, held by the mayor and council and taking place Sunday, March 31st with registration at 11 am and parade at 1 pm beginning at borough hall on the Boulevard and Sherman Avenue. Redevelopme nt A ge n cy Meeting The borough redevelopment agency will hold its next meeting on Monday, April 1st at 5 pm in borough hall Open to the public.

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BARRIER ISLAND

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Seaside Heights Hosts Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade 29th Annual goes off without hitch; first since Hurricane Sandy

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BARRIER ISLAND

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Seaside Heights: The Months After Sandy by Christa Riddle SEASIDE HEIGHTS - “People assume everything is fine now in Seaside because the news has moved on from Hurricane Sandy to cover new stories, but it’s not fine. There is still so much to do in the area, and by summer, we would like to have it so the people here have a normal life again. We are trying to help put New Jersey back together, and we want people to remember what happened to the Jersey Shore,” commented Martin Resnick, owner of Flemington Department Store and a condominium in the Jersey Shore area. Although no longer a news headline, the impact of Hurricane Sandy’s devastation to Barrier Island communities such as Seaside Heights is still very much a reality to area residents, vacationers, community groups, and volunteers assisting with cleanup and restoration efforts. Flemington Department Store may be located one and a half hours northwest of Seaside Heights, but the distance between Resnick’s business and the Jersey Shore has not hindered his dedication of time and much-needed supplies to help those that played a vital role in saving the lives and properties of others before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy: the volunteer firefighters of Seaside Heights. After being contacted by Lou Nardone, honorary chief of Seaside Heights Volunteer Fire Department Station #44, with a request for replacement boots for the firefighters whose gear was ruined during storm rescue efforts, Resnick responded

by bringing clothing and boots in whatever sizes were necessary to outfit the volunteers. “Within two weeks of contacting Marty [Resnick], he provided us with anything we needed and asked for, no matter what the size. He has been amazing,” said Chief Nardone. Resnick’s donation efforts included bringing on board Carhartt, manufacturer of active-work apparel, who donated $25,000 in work clothing; securing contributions from other companies and businesses; and giving the firefighters his store’s industrial division’s sample set. Resnick has come to the area more than three times and has extended a commitment for future support. Many of Seaside Heights’s firefighters lost their own personal property and houses during the storm. According to Chief Nardone, the fire department itself has been severely impacted by Hurricane Sandy: “We have firefighters here who have lost their own homes and personal property, who are now living elsewhere until their residences are rebuilt. As a result of the storm, membership is down at a time when we need volunteers more than ever. But, we are proud to say that we have maintained 100 percent fire protection for our community, and that has been our goal, to keep our people safe.” In addition to volunteers like the local firefighters and Resnick, other community groups have remained dedicated to restoration efforts in Seaside Heights, such as Boy Scout Troop and Cub Scout Pack 21. Since the storm hit, the young scouts have

not missed a single opportunity to offer their time and commitment to their community, helping in any way they can, from assisting at shelters right after the storm to pitching in with cleanup efforts during weekends and time off from school. “Since before Christmas, the boys have had a table at the firehouse with cleaning supplies. They have willingly given their time during Christmas break and weekends,” commented involved parent Susan Bond-Masterson. “They have learned that you don’t always have to be a victim, that you can take a bad situation and make it a positive learning experience. The lesson here is that no matter what life throws at you, you can always do something to help someone else.” Businesses in the community, such as The Carousel Arcade of Funtown Pier in Seaside Park, are also fighting back with vigor to re-open and return to normal. For the 2013 season, The Carousel Arcade’s owner, Bobby Stewart, aims to have game stands and a dozen or so rides set up for the upcoming season on what is left of the pier, and he remains optimistic that the whole pier will be rebuilt over time. However, his arcade may not open until the 2014 season. “The arcade is completely gone, but it will be rebuilt. I already have two letters from antique equipment guys and plan to get as many flashbacks as possible to make The Carousel Arcade as close as possible to how it was before Hurricane Sandy,” shared Stewart. “The boardwalk is already being rebuilt, and that’s progress. At this point, we are done going backwards. We have

gone backwards far enough, and now we are all ready to move forward.”

Martin “Marty” Resnick, owner of the Flemington Department Store, paused for a quick photo while helping members of the Seaside Heights Volunteer Fire Company pick out some of the hundreds of brand new clothing items brought down from his store to help following Hurricane Sandy. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

Seaside Heights Easter Egg Hunt Scheduled By Seaside Heights BID SEA SI DE H E IGH T S - Chris’s Fight For A Cure Foundation is partnering up with Seaside Heights annual Easter Egg Hunt for the best Easter yet to come! Amazing sponsors such as Blue Wave Printing, Four Seasons Diner, Frankie’s Pizzeria, and many local contributors are making sure this is an event to remember! The annual Seaside Heights Easter Egg Hunt will not let Sandy get in the way of The Easter Bunny bringing eggs to the children. Chris’s Fight For A Cure Foundation will be providing lots of activities to keep the family entertained! We’ll have Free face painting, live music and pictures with the Easter Bunny. Donations are

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welcomed for those that want to help the community and affected families, we will collect any and all donations of non-perishable foods for The People’s Pantry that serves 4,000 families of our community. The highlight of this event will be a raffling of baskets. There will be baskets of toys, beach goods and many more as well as a silent auction for baskets containing an iPad, and other limited edition items. Follow the facebook page to see where and how to purchase your tickets to take home one of these one-of-a-kind baskets with you!!! The best part is that 100% of the money made by purchasing tickets will be awarded to affected families Easter morning at the Seaside Heights Borough Easter Parade.

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BARRIER ISLAND

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Funtown Peers Formed, Receives $100K from Robin Hood Foundation Post-Sandy funds to benefit residents and businesses

Seaside Park Community Calendar Recreation Center Open As of March 12th, the Seaside Park Recreation Center on J Street is reopened for children in grades 1 through 8 on Tuesdays from 5 pm to 8 pm. Family Bus Trip The Seaside Park Board of Education's Community Education Program will host a family bus trip to Liberty Science Center, Jersey City, on Saturday, March 23rd leaving at 8 am and returning at approximately 4 pm. Students in 6th grade and under attend free; parents and adults cost $10 each and include admission and transportation. Pre-registration deadline is Monday, March 18th. All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. To register, please call (732)793-7757.

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Life in the borough from late February and early March 1933 as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room. Life An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a borough-wide increase of 6, bringing the total amount here on the list to 134 by February 1st...

by Erik Weber SEASIDE PARK - Less than a month after Hurricane Sandy swept through this barrier island borough and caused heavy damage on its western bayside while dunes largely protected homes to the east, Mayor Robert W. Matthies issued a memorandum to governing body members signaling his interest in the establishment of a foundation to aid borough residents and businesses recover. Through the efforts of longtime community family members and brothers Vito and Vincent Gagliardi, Funtown Peers: Friends of Seaside Park, Inc. was formed as a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation following a trip here that inspired them to want to help those impacted by its wrath. Sixth Avenue resident Denise Koury stated "this had started basically as Vito and his brother have a long emotional relationship with Seaside Park" and were "rankled" by the repeat actions of state news media and politicians to regularly list those communities damaged by the storm starting in the north and ending at Seaside Heights. Ms. Koury was later tapped to be foundation president, serving alongside several other borough residents. Mayor Matthies commended the group on their work and stated that the borough was running into some difficulty with those who wanted to donate funds to aid those in town who most needed it, but there was no legal mechanism to do so as the borough could not accept the funds. The name, he continued, arose out of a need for an instantly recognizable concept that people across the region could identify with both Seaside Park and the hurricane's wrath. As a result, a one-off of the name of the famed amusement center located on the northern border of town, Funtown Pier, was created. Much of the pier and its attractions were lost or destroyed from pounding ocean waves, including the famous and popular Flashbacks section of the Carousel

Seaside Park 1933

Business Elmer E. Rue purchased six lots on Ocean Avenue, including both the northwest and southwest corners of N Street, owned by the estate of the late Stephen J. Clark of Philadelphia. The sale was arranged by Clayton N. Sterling, a real estate agent on Stockton Avenue, and it was noted that Mr. Rue alFor the first time since Hurricane Sandy, the public was allowed access to the Seaside Park boardwalk on January 19th. ready owned a great deal of property here at the time... ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL Arcade which featured several rooms of vintage video arcade and pinball machines and is owned by Robert "Bobby" Stewart, a Seaside Heights volunteer fireman. While busy planning for a fundraising event to be held at the Gran Centurions banquet hall in Clark, Union County, the foundation submitted an application to the Robin Hood Foundation for relief funds from proceeds of its 12/12/12 benefit concert broadcast live on that date from Madison Square Garden in Manhattan and featuring such local musicians as Bruce Springsteen and Bon Jovi. The day before the fundraiser, on February 21st, word was received that the foundation's relief application was approved and they would receive $100,000 to directly aid the residents and business owners of the borough through an application process now ongoing on the Funtown Peers website at www.ssp2013.com. On February 22nd, the event was held and featured food, drinks, live music from the Rick Cantor Band and a tricky tray auction including such prizes as signed photographs from professional athletes, a backstage experience at the Today Show and a weeklong vacation in Florida. Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno sent a letter welcoming those present and highlighting the borough's importance as part of the state's tourism industry, adding that the funds collected by Funtown Peers "will help in their efforts to revitalize their community and preserve its legacy for

Planning Board Meeting The next meeting of the borough planning board will be on Tuesday, March 26th in the borough meeting room on 6th and Central avenues with a workshop session beginning at 6:30 pm and regular meeting to commence at 7 pm. Consumer Awareness The Seaside Park Board of Education's Community Education Program will host a program on consumer awareness on Wednesday, March 27th at 7 pm in the Seaside Park School on 4th and Central Avenue. With the latest information on identity theft, senior fraud, and hiring home improvement contractors, program organizers urge residents to educate themselves, particularly in the face of costly repairs due to Hurricane Sandy.

all those who live, work and vacation there." Approximately 250 people attended and an early tally of revenue totaled about $23,000, according to Ms. Koury, who stated at the February 28th council meeting that the monies available between the event and the Robin Hood Foundation would "not make anybody whole, but we're going to try to help you out the best we can." In other news of the Seaside Park mayor and council: No New Business in Bathhouse As a result of Hurricane Sandy pushing hundreds of gallons of sand into the ocean-facing side of the bathhouse building between the municipal parking lots on North Ocean Avenue, the borough council passed a resolution authorizing the borough engineer to prepare specifications and advertise for bids for the reconstruction of the structure inclusive only to the lavatories and the future use of the former business areas for beachfront storage. Councilwoman Nancy Koury stated that the scope of the project was limited as the damage incurred on the business facility present until the hurricane destroyed it had deterred the town from wanting to spend the money for its continued operation. In mid-February, a team of volunteers from Americorps were in town and

helped remove sand from the bathhouse to aid towards its restoration. Several other areas receiving restoration resolutions passed by majority vote of the governing body at their February 28th meeting included roads and sidewalks, public parks and the lifeguard station. Police Update Chief Francis Larkin reported that he was continuing to request the presence of state police while the beaches remained closed to the public and owners of damaged properties continued to make repairs, as he felt “the more visibility we have, the better. Summer personnel are working around the clock on 12-hour shifts and the more we show the colors the better - we haven’t had any issues with looting or burglaries” since the his previous report in late January. Councilman David Nicola reported on police activity and chose to compare numbers from January of this year to January of the previous year, including: calls for service - 1,006 last year versus 650 this year; motor vehicle summonses - 340 last year versus 137 this year; and 26 criminal arrests last year versus 5 this year. Beach & Boardwalk Access Chief Larkin stated that 1.3 miles of the boardwalk were in good condition while the remaining 0.4

mile, broken up in various sections, needed to be rebuilt and when the span opened possibly at the end of March, the damaged sections would be coned and taped off from pedestrian traffic. Council President Michael Tierney added that the damaged sections of the boardwalk would have to be rebuilt using the same type of material they were composed of, either wood or composite wood, in order to be covered by future Federal Emergency Management Agency [FEMA] reimbursements. The targeted date for the boardwalk to be completely restored is May 24th, the Friday before Memorial Day, he said. As for beach access, the borough police chief said the Department of Environmental Protection would cover the cost of continued debris cleanup along the shoreline until April 1st, as debris taken to sea by the hurricane was still washing up on beaches statewide, and Mr. Nicola reported that inspections using sonar equipment would soon take place to determine what is in the water on both the ocean and bay side prior to reopening the beaches for public access. Mrs. Koury also noted that the borough engineer planned to have the reconstruction of the 14th Avenue pier on the bayside completed before summer.

Government The Seaside Park council, during its Saturday afternoon meeting in early March, considered and approved a petition by Island Beach Stages, a bus service company running between Philadelphia and the shore peninsula, to use some streets here for its pick up and drop off stops. Prior permission had been granted by Seaside Heights and other communities in the western portion of the state, including Mount Holly... Mayor A.E. Wickham reported the owners of the old Manhasset Hotel site were repairing the sidewalk of the property on Sixth Avenue. The hotel was destroyed by fire two years earlier, on Easter in 1931... the mayor reported that $550 would be needed in emergency relief aid for April and the council adopted a resolution to ask the state relief fund for that amount... Recreation Department Ms. Koury reported that the recreation department was beginning to reactivate for the coming warm seasons and looking into what programs and events could be held following the effects of the late October storm town-wide. She stated that she was aware the vendors for the farmers’ market were interested in returning, but had not yet heard about the antique vendors for that show, and that she was finding out how many teachers were going to return to summer camp and whether most or all of the previous year’s 146 campers would be able to return, depending on their dwelling conditions locally. The recreation center was also due to open in midMarch. Reality vs. Media Perception Concern was expressed over the continued preference of statewide and regional media agencies to focus on the damage of the hurricane rather than the progress, reconstruction and reopening of many homes and businesses locally, and Mrs. Koury stated that the Summer in the Park Business Association was anxious to get word out that Seaside Park would be open and wellready for the summer.

Council Meeting The mayor and council will hold their next regular meeting on Thursday, March 28th at 7 pm in the borough council chambers at 6th and Central avenues. The public is welcome to attend and share their opinions or questions. Beach Badge Sales The 2013 pre-season beach badges are now on sale at the information window inside the Seaside Park Police Department, located at 6th and Central avenues from 10 am to 1 pm, Monday through Friday, except on March 27th, April 4th and April 18th. Prices are: $50, seasonal up to June 15th; $55, seasonal as of June 15th; $20, senior citizen; $35, weekly; and $10, daily. Cash or check accepted only (the latter with driver's license and phone number). Questions? Call Seaside Park Borough Hall at (732) 7933700.

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BARRIER ISLAND

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Seaside Heights Mayor Welcomes Vistors; Stresses Safety During Reconstruction by Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS-—Mayor Bill Akers says visitors to Seaside Heights, which sustained moderate damage from the ocean to the Barnegat Bay during Hurricane Sandy, are welcome, but advises them to obey the rules and be mindful of safety when they visit. With what seems like a never ending construction project for the borough and local businesses, Akers said his job is to make sure the town can continue welcoming guests while simultaneously keeping them safe. Akers said visitors should stay off the beach and away from boardwalk construction areas, but are free to enjoy and patronize local businesses while the town continues rebuilding. “We want to balance this. We want to make sure that our visitors and people are safe out there, so we have to have some enforcement,” Akers said. “But we also don’t want to deter anyone from coming here, so we’re trying to balance that. We want them to come and see what’s going on, but we want them to be safe.” The hot spot of activity in the borough is along Ocean Terrace where utility crews, building contractors, debris removal trucks and heavy equipment mingle with visitors and pedestrians seeking to get a glimpse of the boardwalk and beach. “We know that until the boardwalk is back, Ocean Terrace is going to be extra

St. Patrick’s Day crowd assembles at Jimbos, on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights. Like most Seaside Heights venues, it was standing room only into the night across the borough.

crowded,” the Mayor added. “We also have to be very mindful about cars and pedestrians mixing.” Akers stressed the importance of staying off the beach and out of the way of the construction crews. “You cannot go on the beach, it’s 100% off limits. It’s not safe. It’s a working construction site. We do not want people going on the beach yet.” Akers said. He added, “But you can see what’s going on from inside the businesses, Lucky Leo’s and the Beachcomber for example. [Michael Carbone] has done a wonderful job with the Beachcomber, you can go upstairs and it’s a beautiful view up there.”

From atop the Beachcomber, patrons can see all of the work being done from the Casino Pier south to the Funtown Pier. Businesses in the borough are slowly but surely coming back online, including Lucky Leos, Original Steaks, Klees and Hemmingways, Bamboo and Akers said Spicy’s Cantina, on the boardwalk is getting close to being open. Akers said that when it comes to booking your summer vacation come to Seaside Heights because he’s confident motels, rentals, restaurants, clubs and the boardwalk will be open for business by Memorial Day. “There’s no reason to alter plans.” He said.

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Page 15

JACKSON

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Hydroponic Farming Coming to Jackson Township Staff Report

Jackson’s “We are Team Jersey” Helping Sandy Victims Repair Homes

Staff Report JACKSON—After being stuck in their house for days after Hurricane Sandy in Jackson Township, Shannon Ruvelas decided she needed to get out and help. She started by bringing out hot coffee, hot cocoa and sports drinks to nearby utility workers. From there, she and her team, which calls itself “We are Team Jersey”, ventured beyond Jackson. “Once we

were able to escape Jackson, we found friends that were in need,” Mrs. Ruvelas says of her tale that brought her from bringing out coffee to gutting homes across the Jersey Shore. Days later, they were helping storm victims clear out houses on the barrier island. “Every day since then, we’ve had groups of people volunteering, sometimes six, sometimes two hundred,” she said. “They go out every

Crawford Rodriguez Elementary School fourth grader Eric Applebaum receives a proclamation from the Jackson Township Council on behalf of Mayor Michael Reina for his work to raise money for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Jackson 4th Grader Recognized by Township By Dave Weiskopf In February, Eric Applebaum, a fourth grader at Crawford Rodriguez Elementary School was reognized by the Jackson Township Council for his efforts to raise money and awaress for Musular Dystrophy. Eric was diagnosed with Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) Disease a neuromuscular disorder at the age of 7 months old. According to the Na-

Page 18

tional Institute of Health, CMT is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 2,500 people in the United States. The MDA funds research in an effort to find a cure for CMT. Between 2006-2009 Eric under went a series of serial casting in an effort to loosen his heal cords at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). During one of the casting processes Eric took

single day and make a difference in people’s lives. We rip up carpet, flooring and sheet rock...Most of the time these are people without insurance and without money from FEMA because it’s not their primary residence.” Since the storm, We Are Te a m Je r s ey h a s b e e n helping rebuild the Jersey Shore one home and one family at a time.

part in his Karate class and earned his yellow belt while casted. In 2010 the doctors recommended surgery, as the casting was not as effective as hoped. In the fall of 2010 Eric underwent surgery at CHOP on two occasions to loosen his heel cords. Eric is also a member of Cub Scout Pack 152 where he is a Wolf Scout. In Jan. 2010 Eric was part of Team Muscle and was partnered with Jay Feely of the NY Jets at the time for a fundraising event at Chelsea Piers. Labor day of 2010 saw Eric’s debut on national television when he introduced Tony Orlando on the MDA Telethon from New York. In August 2010, Eric was able to attend the weeklong MDA Summer Camp program made possible by the generous donations from these events. At the MDA Camp, Eric and his fellow campers shared a unique experience away from home; this was a truly rewarding experience for Eric and his fellow campers. Most recently Eric was named the local Ambassador for MDA. Two years ago, he raised $ 195,000.00 for the MDA. Eric’s team raised $ 1,590.00.

JACKSON – Once home to thousands of acres of chicken, cranberry, feed, livestock and vegetable farms, this township’s long history and tradition as a farming community can be hard to see today, as most of the agricultural acreage succumbed to residential and commercial development in the past 30 years. But now the future of that industry could soon be coming to Jackson in the form of a hydroponic farm, with a company that identifies itself as Pure Foods Realty submitting an application to the township to build a such a nursery on a 6.1 acre parcel of land on Herman Road. Seeking a preliminary and final major site plan approval in order to construct the greenhouse warehouses necessary for hydroponic vegetable production, Pure Foods Realty’s proposal calls

for five nurseries in which a hydroponic gardening system would be constructed for the growth of leafy vegetables, mushrooms, tomatoes and strawberries. If approved, the project would be built in five phases, with each phase including one of five planned greenhouse and warehouse structures. Each structure will also contain a packaging and shipping area for wholesale distribution. An office for administrative offices would also be con-

structed by Pure Foods Realty. Several hydroponic farms exist statewide, including Village Farms in nearby Eatontown, Monmouth County. The specialized farming method allow growers to cultivate their crops without the worry of such environmental pollution as fertilizer run off while at the same time reducing the amount of water needed. Other benefits include an easier harvest, stable crop yields and limited need for pesticides.

Jackson Goddard Helps Ronald McDonald House By Diane Holzlein On Sunday, Feb. 24, the PTO president and seven faculty members from The Goddard School located in Jackson cooked up a storm at the Ronald McDonald House in Long Branch. The volunteers made a variety of items including salad, baked mac & cheese, chili, roast turkey with gravy, potatoes, vegetables, chicken, cupcakes and cookies for the families staying at the Ronald McDonald House. The meal preparation was part of an ongoing partnership between The Goddard School located in Jack-

son and Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC). In January, to celebrate 25 years of service as the leader in early childhood education, The Goddard School located in Jackson kicked off the national organization’s 25th anniversary festivities with a special fundraising campaign to benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC). Children, families and friends of the school participated in a "Hop-A-Thon" to raise nearly $900 for their local RMHC chapter. In addition to monetary donations, students at The Goddard School created

birthday cards to be distributed throughout the year by RMHC directors to pediatric patients or family members celebrating birthdays during their, or a loved one’s, hospital stay. On Sunday, the volunteers delivered more than 175 hand-made cards. The school also donated fresh fruit and dry goods such as cereal, peanut butter, jelly and granola bars to the families. The school has also started a Pop Tab collection that they pledge to maintain throughout the year.

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JACKSON

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Dump Truck Drives Through Bus Stop; Driver Charged with DUI

Shortly after children boarded a Jackson Township school bus on February 26th, a dump truck roared through a nearby telephone pole, across the spot where the children had waited at their district assigned school bus stop and into a tree, approximately 100 feet beyond the corner. Students were not prese nt at t he t i me a nd no injuries were reported. The accident happened early Tuesday morning at the intersection of Cranberry Harvest Court and East Veterans Highway. Sgt. Brian Geoghegan of the Jackson Township Po-

lice Department said the driver of the truck was arrested for DWI, pending the results of blood samples. The truck was owned by Marlin Construction Services of Jackson. The truck is suspected to have left the Marlin property located on nearby Whitesville Road, also in Jackson. A call made to Marlin Construction Services on Tuesday was not returned. The section of East Veterans Highway has been of concern to residents and local officials through the years. In April of 2012, a $3,325,000 bond to resurface that portion of East Veterans Highway and improve safety conditions of the sharp curve was issued by the Board of Chosen Freeholders. To date, the project has not yet been

Jackson Police Blotter

completed. A call made to the office of County Engineer’s office was not returned. In 2011-12, the Jackson School District performed a school bus stop consolidation and audit, but Superintendent Tom Gialanella said the bus stop at this location was not affected by the bus stop consolidations. The stop was at that location both before and after the consolidations took place. Gialanella said students are allowed to stand 20 to 30 feet back from the stop if they wish to and that buses will wait for them to board. “Unfortunately, we can’t predict when or where an accident could take place – be it on East Veterans Highway or on a quiet cul-de-sac,’’ Gialanella said. “The best we can do is evaluate each stop on an individual basis and make sure each location is safe.’’

On Friday, March 1st, a 60-year-old male resident of East Orange was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Jackson. He was lodged in the Ocean County Jail when he was unable to post bail. On Friday, March 1st, a 23-year-old male resident of Jackson was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Manchester. He was processed and released after posting bail.

Compiled by Jeri Morris JACKSON - The following is a sample of incidents that the Jackson Township Police Department recently responded to or were involved with. This does not represent all of the calls for service that were responded to during this time period. On Sunday, March 3rd at 1:05 pm, officers responded to a residence on Sunnybrook Road on the report of a disturbance being caused by an alleged intoxicated male. Officers made contact with the male and during the investigation, narcotics paraphernalia was observed. A further search yielded four marijuana plants, approximately eight ounces of suspected marijuana, morphine syringes and Fentanyl patches (prescription narcotic pain medication). The 51-yearold male was placed under arrest and transported to headquarters where he was processed. He was charged with possession of marijuana (over 50 grams), possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a CDS without a prescription. He was issued a summons complaint and released pending a court appearance. The investigation is ongoing at this time and additional charges are pending. On Saturday, March 2nd at 12:02 am, officers responded to Plasner Court on the report of a female overdosing on heroin. Jackson Township First Aid Squad also responded, reviving the female and transporting her to the hospital for treatment. During the investigation, a hypodermic syringe and other paraphernalia were recovered. The 33-year-old female was issued a summons charging her with possession of hypodermic syringes and possession of a CDS. A 32-year-old man also at the scene was placed under arrest and charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a CDS. He was issued a summons and released pending a court appearance. On Saturday, March 1st a res-

ident of Azalea Circle made a report of theft. A package left at the residence by UPS containing jewelry valued at over $500 had been stolen. On Saturday, March 1st a 21-year-old male was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Jackson. He was processed and released after posting bail. On Saturday, March 1st, during the course of a motor vehicle stop on South Cooks Bridge Road, a 59-year-old female was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Toms River. She was processed at headquarters and released after posting bail.

On Friday, March 1st at approximately 5 pm, police conducted a surveillance detail in response to complaints of illegal narcotics activity taking place in the Stop and Shop parking lot on West County Line Road. Officers observed what appeared to be a narcotics transaction between occupants of two vehicles and conducted a motor vehicle stop with a 2008 BMW. Further investigation revealed that the driver had purchased Suboxin pills from the subject she had met with. The 49-year-old woman was placed under arrest and charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance.

On Friday, March 1st at 10:49 am, officers arrested a 44 year old male during the course of a motor vehicle crash investigation after discovering an outstanding warrant for his arrest out of Tinton Falls. The male was processed at headquarters and turned over to Tinton Falls Police when he was unable to post bail.

On Thursday, February 28th at 2:37 am, while checking a suspicious vehicle in the Stop and Shop parking lot on West County Line Road, a 23-year-old male was arrested on an outstanding warrant out of Howell Township. The male was processed at headquarters and released pending a court date as per Howell Police Department.

On Friday, March 1st at 11:07 am, officers responded to the Jackson Memorial High School on a report of a student who made threats against a school security officer. During the investigation, an 18-year-old male was charged with terroristic threats. A violation of probation warrant was also issued by Ocean County. He was processed and later lodged in detention on the charges.

On Thursday, February 28th at 10:15 am, officers responded to the Jackson Memorial High School on the report of a student being detained after being found to be in possession of a straw with suspected narcotics residue on it. The student was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia on a juvenile complaint and released to the custody of a parent.

On Friday, March 1st at 1:41 pm, officers investigating a suspicious person on Violet Lane arrested a 43-year-old male on an outstanding warrant out of Freehold Borough Municipal Court. The male was processed at headquarters and released after posting bail. On Friday, March 1st, during a motor vehicle stop on Aldrich Road, officers arrested a 24-year-old male on an outstanding warrant out of Neptune Municipal Court. The male was processed at headquarters and released after posting bail.

On Thursday, February 28th while patrolling on Anthony Way, officers arrested a 42-year-old male on an outstanding warrant out of Chesterfield. The male was processed at headquarters and released pending a court date. On Thursday, February 28th at 11:39 pm, officers responded to an address on Clover Hill Drive on a report of a burglary and theft. The victim reported that unknown person(s) made entry to the residence and stole property valued at $3,500.

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Page 19

JACKSON

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Township Briefs The following items are portions of public notices issued by the Township of Jackson, The Jackson School Board or from meeting minutes of governmental bodies in the township. On February 25th, the Jackson Township Planning Board granted preliminary and final approval for a car wash to be built on the property of Wayne Bryant Automotive (Jackson Firestone) on County Line Road. The construction will be an addition to the existing structure. On February 25th, the Jackson Township Planning board granted preliminary and final approval to Pure Foods Realty of Lakewood for the construction of a hydroponic farm and wholesale distribution facility on Herman Road in the northern section of the township. T he Jack s on Tow n sh i p MUA has announced the authorization of the issuance of a bond valued no more than $1,340,000 through the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust Financing Program. The New Jersey DEPis seeking public input on its intent to approve an air pollution control pre-construction permit for the construction of the Forever Remembered Pet Cremation facility to be built at the old Cassiville Post OFfice. The business plans to install and operate a pet crematory with an incineration capacity not to exceed 100 pounds. The facility will monitor temperature and the hours of operation with a built in recording system to ensure that the emission limits of the permit are not exceeded. The address of the facility is 520 West Veterans Highway. Copies of these documents and additional information on this draft permit can be obtained by calling William Kuehne (609-633-8247). The draft permit is also available for inspection at the Central Regional Field Office, 22 South Clinton Avenue, Trenton, NJ 08625-0407 (phone number 609-292-3187). If you would like to inspect the draft permit at either location, please call in advance for an appointment. All persons, including the applicant, who believe that any condition of the draft preconstruction permit or the Department’s tentative decision to approve this permit is inappropriate, must raise all reasonable issues of concern and submit all arguments and factual grounds or materials supporting their position during the public comment period. Any comments on this draft permit must be received within thirty days of the date of this notice and addressed to William Kuehne, Bureau of Air Permits, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, 401 E State Street, 2nd Floor, PO Box 420, Mail Code 401-02, Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0420. The Jackson Township council has reduced the number of members and township employees to serve on the Economic Development Committee to 11, to include 4 residents of the public, two appointed by the mayor and two appointed by the Jackson Township Council. The board approved the measure at the March 12th council meeting.

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Jackson Township Community Calendar Planning Board The planning board will hold its next regular meeting on Monday, March 18th at 7:30 pm in the main meeting room of the municipal building on West Veterans Highway. Meetings are open to the public. Environmental Commission On Tuesday, March 19th at 7:30 pm, the environmental commission will hold its next meeting at the municipal building on West Veterans Highway. The public is encouraged and invited to attend. B u d g e t Wo r k s h o p On Thursday, March 21st at 6:30 pm, the township budget workshop will be held in the main meeting room of the municipal building on West Veterans Highway. The public is encouraged to attend.

Jackson Library Programs & Events AARP Tax Preparation Assistance The AARP Tax Aides will be at the library on Thursdays, March 21st and 28th from 9 am to 12 noon to provide free tax preparation services to the public. Appointments are required and can be made by calling 732-928-4400, extension 3808. There are no age, residence or income restrictions for this program that will continue to run every Thursday through April 11th. Drop-In Open Playtime On Wednesday March 20th from 2 – 3:30 pm, children ages 1 to 6 with a parent or caregiver can enjoy open play with a variety of fun and educational toys. This unstructured program provides the opportunity for preschoolers to develop and have fun in a community space and allows local families with young children to meet each other. Parents/ caregivers must stay with their children at all times. No registration is required. Knit Chat Chain On Monday, March 18th at 6:30 pm, join a fun group of hook and needle experts and learn how to knit or crochet or just brush up on an old skill. Everyone is welcome to come, make new friends, have a few laughs and learn a new skill. Wool donations are also welcomed. Weather Bear - Stories & Craft Share stories, finger plays, flannel graphs and more

with your child on Tuesday, March 19th at 10 am. Afterwards you will make a craft that reflects the theme of the story. This program is for children ages 30 months to 3 ½ years and lasts one-half hour. Registration is required. Benefits Check Up - Plus Senior Scams A presentation will be held on Tuesday, March 19th at 2 pm covering how seniors can find and receive the benefits they may be eligible for. Seniors will also learn how to protect themselves from the latest scams and fraud. The National Council on Aging sponsors this program. Please register. Internet Basics On Tuesday, March 19th at 2 pm, learn the basics on how to browse the Internet. Please register. IRL: In Real Life Presented by The George Street Playhouse This production, being held on Tuesday, March 19th at 7 pm, investigates how students can take an active role to end cyber-bullying. Program is recommended for ages 11 – 18. Registration is required. Te e n Ad v i s o r y B o a rd ( TA B ) Me e t i n g On Tuesday, March 19th at 7 pm, come in and chat with your fellow teens about the library. This is a fun way to meet other teens in the neighborhood, earn volunteer hours and work on library programs. Recommended for ages 12 - 17. New members are always welcome and registration is required. Fr ie nd s of t he L ibr a r y The next meeting of the Friends of the Library will be held on Thursday, March 21st at 7 pm. Meetings are held monthly for this active group that champions the library and organizes projects such as the annual book sale to provide additional resources and fund special purchases. New members are always welcome. Please call (732) 928-4400 to register or visit www. theoceancountylibrary.org. The Jackson Library is located on 2 Jackson Drive, off West Veterans Highway. Does your group or organization want to see its events listed here? All events that are free and open to the public or non-profit/charity fundraisers are eligible for free placement. Write events@ocsignal today!

Juveniles Charged with Robbery O n Mo n d ay M a rc h 1 1 , 2 0 1 3 at 6 : 0 8 p m , O f f i cers responded to a residence on Larkspur Lane on the report of a Robbery which had just taken place. Upon arrival, Officers spoke with a juvenile and a parent who reported that the juvenile had been confronted by two suspects just outside the residence who had attempted to rob him. It was reported that one suspect had what appeared to be a black handgun and the other had an AK-47 type rifle. When the suspects told the victim to empty his pockets, he ran back into the residence. He was chased by one of the suspects but was able to close the door before they got inside. The victim also reported that just after the incident, he observed a red vehicle leave the area at a high rate of speed. The

victim provided officers with descriptions of the suspects, who were known to him, and a description of the vehicle. Officers responded to Willow Point Drive where it was believed the suspects were at and located two of them and took them into custody. A third suspect was taken into custody a short time later. A 2008, red Nissan Altima was impounded and officers also seized an Airsoft rifle replica of an AK-47 and an Airsoft replica of a Glock handgun. A 14 year old and 15 year old male were taken into custody and charged with Robbery and Possession of a Weapon for an Unlawful Purpose. A 17 year old male was taken into custody and charged with Conspiracy to Commit Robbery. They were processed and transported to juvenile intake in Toms River.

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JACKSON

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Aftermath of the five-alarm fire in Harrison on Monday, March 11, 2013. Here, Felix Mendoza, second from right, a singer/entertainer at Pepe’s BBQ, thanks Firefighter Steve Fostek for retrieving his laptop--which still works-- for him from inside the burned-out restaurant. Reena Rose Sibayan/The Jersey Journal

Former Jackson Firefighters On Scene in Harrison Five Alarm Fire and Explosion By Phil Stilton HARRISON--Steve Fostek, a Jackson Township resident who works for the Harrison Fire Department here was one of the first responders in the city to arrive at the five alarm blaze. The fire, which sarted on March 10th, at approximately 11:00 am started in a two story brick building on Frank E. Rodgers Boulevard when a passing Harrison police officer noticed smoke coming from the structure. Firefighters from surrounding towns and counties were called in to assist Harrison as the fire spread to an adjacent building which housed Pepe’s BBQ restaurant. At one point during the fire, the heat rose on the second floor and an order was issued to evacuate. During the evacation, a backgdraft occurred, creating an explosion that injured four firefighers. Fire department officials later s aid that none of the injuries were serious. By 4:30 pm, the fire was

placed under control, but Fostek says he and his fellow firefighters were still on scene the following morning while the building was still smoldering. 17 people were left homeless after approximately 40 people were evacuated from the buildings. On Monday, Fostek, a former Jackson Mills Volunteer Fire Company member was featured in the Jersey Journal newspaper with Felix Mendoza, a singer and entertainer at Pepe’s BBQ. Mendoza thanked Fostek for retrieving a laptop from the fire, which he said still worked, according to the Journal. Matt Maroney, another former Jackson firefighter was also called to the scene of the fire. He said he was not present during the explosion, but was recalled to work after the incident and assisted in putting out the fire. Fostek, a full time fireman moonlights here in Jackson as a real estate agent for Keller Williams of Western Ocean County’s

Jackson 1933 Life in the township from late February and early March 1 9 3 3 a s co m p ile d f ro m sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life Needy List Grows as Depression Drags On

An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a township-wide increase of 56, bringing the total amount here on the list to 315 by February 1st... Harry Davidson of VanHiseville was driving his horse along a roadway in Lakewood when it dropped dead in the harness... Mrs. Charles Peterson, Mrs. Lulu Schneffer, Mrs. Gertrude Katte and Mrs. Joseph Glasco pieced a patch quilt to donate to the county auxiliary of the Paul Kimball Hospital for sale to raise funds there... a forest fire in Holmanville burned over most of Hart Isle Manor in late February.

Traco Theater Daytrip

Mrs. Lambert Youmans and son, Mrs. Harold Jamison and son, Mrs. Otto Youmans and Joseph Youmans, all of Cassville, traveled to the Traco Theatre in Toms River to take in a show on Friday evening, March 3rd... the Forestry Club in Cassville

had an exhibit on display at the Trenton Fair and at Atlantic City during the PTA of New Jersey meeting... John T. DeBow was confined to his home under the care of a physician after suffering a serious injury on Friday, March 3rd when he fell and struck his head on a log, knocking him unconscious.

C a rd P a r t y a t Fi re house a Success

The card party held at the Whitesville Volunteer Fire Company in early March was a resounding success, with approximately 200 patrons participating and money and prizes awarded, including a 25-lb. turkey, homemade cakes, a live duck, a flock of baby chicks and the door prize, a young pig... Whitesville Boy Scouts' Scoutmaster Stanley Scull and troop chased after a young pig won by Scout John Onley when it escaped to nearby woods from a doghouse built for its shelter on a Saturday afternoon in early March... Members of the Whitesville Athletic Club were scheduled to meet on the ballfield Wednesday evening, March 8th, to burn off brush and prepare the fields for the season's coming baseball games... the Whitesville Volunteer Fire Company met and made plans to set up a siren to test in the near

Jackson office, located in the Stop & Shop plaza on West County Line Road. Incidentally, Fostek is also the Real Estate Correspondent for the Ocean Signal.

Harrison firefighter Steve Fostek, a Jackson resident, rests after his department battled a five alarm fire which took over five hours to put under control. Photo by Chris Torello.

future... a pancake and sausage supper held by Cassville's Patriotic Order Sons of America in their hall on February 24th netted $42...

Business

Harold Stevens of the Egg Cup Poultry Farm, Whitesville, was noted to spend one day each week in Bayonne, where he established a business route and recently had been seen surveying potential property in Dover Township to expand his poultry and egg production business... Mr. and Mrs. William Waugh had steam heat installed in their Cassville home in late February...

School

The Cassville school Parent Teacher Association had electric lighting installed at the schoolhouse, with Mr. E.E. Cross of New Egypt performing the work...

Government

On Sunday evening, February 26th, the Whitesville Volunteer Fire Company was dispatched to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Denton for a chimney fire, Once extinguished, Mrs. Handekopf treated the volunteers to hot coffee...

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Page 21

JACKSON

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Jackson Officer Nominated for Brigadier General Promotion by Matt Genovese TRENTON--Governor Chris Christie has nominated NJ Air National Guard Colonel, Kevin Keehn, to be the NJ Air National Guard's newest Brigadier General. Colonel Keehn assumed command of the 108th Air Refueling Wing based at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in 2012. The 108th is an Air National Guard unit and a reserve component of the Air Force's Air Mobility Command with over 1,300 personnel assigned to it. Keehn is responsible for two flying units, the 141st Air Refueling Squadron and the 150th Special Operations Squadron. He also commands more than 25 support units which include the Air National Guard's first Contingency Response Group. Keehn is a 1975 graduate of Jackson Memorial High School. He enlisted in the Air Force after his graduation and served four years on active duty as an in-flight refueler. After his honorable discharge from active duty, Keehn enlisted in the NJ Air National Guard. He

was commissioned as an officer in 1984 and earned his pilots wings that same year. According to a spokesperson at the 108th Air Refueling Wing, they will not have any further informa-

tion about the nomination for promotion until the process is complete. Additional information will be available when Colonel Keehn has been officially promoted to Brigadier General.

Jackson Fire Departments: Incident Blotter from spreading further into the building by Howell fire units from Southard, Adelphia, Freewood Acres and Ramtown with several hand lines and aerial/roof operations. Station 55 was cleared from the scene at 0550 hours.

A structure fire on Woodlane Road on February 27th. Photo Courtesy of Jackson Fire District No. 3.

The following incidents are provided by the vaarios Jackson Township fire companies. To have your fire company’s blotter in our next issue, send incident reports to blotter@ocsignal.com. March 3: Winding Ways A female homeowner was injured in an early morning two-alarm house fire in the Winding Ways section of Jackson on Sunday, March 3, 2013. Fire fighters from Jackson Station 55 and Whitesville Station 57 were dispatched to the 5:15 a.m. alarm and encountered a volume of fire coming from the Penny Lane home’s garage, living room, and attic area. Two Emergency Medical Technicians from Quality Medical Transport, Inc. arrived just prior to the fire department and helped the female resident out of the house to safety. She was then transported to the hospital. An adult son also living in the house escaped without injury. A second alarm was sounded bringing Jackson Mills Station 54, Cassville Station 56 and the Southard Fire Department to the scene. Jackson Police officers responding to the scene also assisted the nearby neighbors out of homes located adjacent to the structure on fire. The main fire structure suffered substantial damage including destroying a vehicle parked in the garage, while the adjacent homes only experienced exterior heat exposure damage.

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Initial arriving fire fighters were presented with a heavy fire condition ��� with exposures located within 15 feet to the left and right of the home. Their quick knockdown of the fire prevented it from spreading inside the other homes. Two Jackson fire fighters had minor injuries. The cause of the fire is under investigation by the Ocean County Fire Marshal’s Office. March 9: Howell Mutual Aid Station 55 was dispatched to a working structure fire at the Moon Motel 4650 Route 9 South in Howell for a RIT assignment on Saturday morning March 9 at 0416 hours. Captain Jack Siedler and the crew on 5521 were positioned on the “C”side of the structure at the Incident Command Post. The fire originated in a second floor motel room and extended into a balcony eave/soffit around a parapet wall but was stopped

February 27: Woodlane Road A structure fire reported on Woodlane Road February 27th at 8:28 pm was knocked down quickly by Sta. 55 firefighters. The fire was contained to a bedroom and hallway but the rest of the home sustained moderate heat and smoke damage. The fire was investigated by Jackson Fire Safety and Police, OC Fire Marshal, Sherriffs Dept and Prosecutor. The cause is suspicious and is still under investigation by the OC Prosecutors Office. February 13: Westlake O ve n Fi re C rews f rom 5511, 5541, and 5701 under the direction of IC Captain Ed Moore did a great job on a February 26 12:10 p.m. oven fire in a Shadow Creek Ct. single-family residence in Westlake. A fire in the range was out on arrival but resulted in heavy smoke in the residence. A female homeowner escaped with minor injuries and did not require hospital transport. Crews ventilated the house. The damage was contained to the range with no extension. Feb 18: Fire Elections Fire District No.3 annual budget vote passed. Elected Commissioners were Steven Gibson and Scott Jordan.

Fire broke out at the Kings World Furniture store in Howell on July 6, 1978. Jackson fire companies assisted and it took three full days to put the fire out. Photo courtesy Jackson Fire District No. 3.

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ISLAND HEIGHTS

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Sandy-Damaged River and Bay Electric Service to Be Repaired

By Erik Weber The blackout along the riverfront present here since the night of October 29th will soon be given the “all clear,” and electric lights repaired and turned on to brighten the night. During their February 26th meeting, the borough council met and considered several proposals for repairing the damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy, including the destruction of the electric system in the Central Avenue pavilion and along the River

Avenue boardwalk. Additional damage there included bulkhead capping that floated away, breakage by a motorboat that crashed against the bulkhead west of the yacht club with its trailer attached before finally losing the trailer offshore and coming to rest directly on top of the boardwalk, loose and raised boards at odd angles, the near total destruction of flooring on the first floor of the recently restored historic pavilion, and a half-circle area of decking directly north of the pavilion on River and

Island Heights 1933 Life in the borough from late February and early March 1933 as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life

An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a borough-wide increase of 30, bringing the total amount here on the list to 115 by February 1st.... Amanda Viereck, 74, widow of the late John Viereck, Sr., died at her home here on Monday, Feburary 27th. Her maiden name was Fink. Born in Cincinatti, Ohio, she later moved to Philadelphia and finally arrived in Island Heights with her husband and family in 1907. Mr. Viereck was a baker and confectioner and his wife actively helped his business in both work and management duties. She left behind two sons, John F. of Toms River and Louis, of Island Heights, in addition to a number of grandchildren. A daughter, Mrs. Howard Siddons, died in 1931. Burial was in Riverside Cemetery, Toms River... Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hoover closed their Germantown home and returned to their borough cottage for the coming warm seasons... Philadelphia Mayor J. Hampton Moore and his wife visited their son, Edward, and children here on Sunday, February 26th... a very successful card party was held by the fire company ladies auxiliary at the firehouse, with 11 tables in play and residents from around the river in attendance. Mrs. M.J. Muthig of Beachwood won the door prize and thet prize cake was won by Charles Conklin. Refreshments were served after the games...

Business

The Leming Agency reported the sale of the Carson property on Simpson Avenue to J. Clement Poulterer of Phil-

adelphia... alterations were begun on Frank Hoover's cottage on the bluff by contractor T.H. Wallace... Samuel E. Leming, former stationmaster of the Island Heights depot for the Pennsylvania Railroad, returned to duty in early March for the Lavallette and Seaside Heights stations...

School

The three teachers from the Island Heights School voluntarily took ten percent cuts in pay as a result of the ongoing depressed economy... in the last week of February, the upper classes elected the staff for their school paper, The Salt Air Times, including editor-in-chief, Winifred Irons; art editors, Emma Muller and Alice Olsen; joke editor, Roy Denzer; reporters, Mildred Forrester, grade 7; Charles Eckhardt, grade 6; Doris Worth, grade 5; Oliver Wallace, grade 4; Doris Wilbur, grade 3; Richard Conklin, grade 2; and Eleanor Applegate, grade 1.... it was announced that the school would be represented in the county spelling contest by 8th grader Alice Olsen, and Harriet Elms acting as alternate, on April 7th...

Government

The State Utility Board announced a new hearing on March 7th on the removal of the Pennsylvania Railroad bridge span that ran between Pine Beach and Island Heights until service was canceled a year and a half earlier. Residents and officials of Island Heights held on to hope that either the Pennsylvania Railroad would resume running trains across it or that the county would take it over and utilize it as the foundation for a highway bridge across the river, while local boat- and yachtsmen, including Toms River Yacht Club Commodore Edward Crabbe and Island Heights sailor Edwin J.

Central avenues that floated all the way down to an open lot on the corner of River and Chestnut avenues, four blocks away. Electric service was also knocked out by the hurricane at the Lake Avenue boat dock, where a half-dozen outlets needed to be reinstalled and service rebuilt, and at the pavilion on Summit Avenue Beach, which was picked up and moved off its foundation northwest to a new location alongside Dillon’s Creek, where Mayor Jim Biggs directed public Schoettle, wanted it removed to open up unimpeded access on the river. Since the cessation of train service, on June 1st, 1931, passengers had to transfer from Toms River station (located in South Toms River on the site of what today is the South Toms River Sewerage Authority on South Main Street) and board buses to Central Avenue here. Neither the county nor state government was interested in covering the cost of converting it into a highway bridge, as the span was too narrow, nor was the Pennsylvania Railroad interested in resuming service nor paying for the bridge's removal. The New Jersey Courier reported that the bridge was originally installed on the Toms River against the wishes of local residents approximately 50 years earlier, who fought bitter court battles against it, and therefore the railroad should be responsible for taking it out. A new argument raised in early March related to the burgeoning plans to establish a preparatory school with naval honors, Admiral Farragut Academy, in the former Pine Beach Inn opposite Island Heights. It was stated that the school, if established, would want the bridge removed and that further, seaplanes from Naval Air Station Lakehurst could possibly utilize the river with the bridge out. The fight over the bridge was not a new one for Island Heights, despite the cessation of train service only occurring the previous year. In the early 1920s, it was reported that the railroad company wanted to remove the bridge but started what became, by 1933, a decade-long battle with the borough to keep it despite declining passenger patronage. In the early years, the borough won, but the continuing sharp decline spelled doom for the bridge and train service to Island Heights... Albert Wood, while working on the boardwalk at the end of February, accidentally

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works crew to provide it a new foundation and abandon the old location in the weeks following the storm. For the past several weeks, members of the department of public works have been busy removing the damaged wood from the pavilion and fixing and repairing where possible, but Councilman Brian Taboada stated, “they already demolished [the flooring] and as soon as the joists are in we want to run conduits into it - they will actually need to do that prior to them placing the floor on.” The borough received two bids for the three project, from Linesider Electric of Shark River Hills, Neptune, Monmouth County and John E. Camburn & Son of Island Heights. In the River Avenue lighting project, needed repairs and replacement included the electric service located on the first floor of the pavilion and across from Ocean Avenue on the boardwalk, service at the West End dock, and the rewiring of 24 pole lights. On Lake Drive, repairs were needed to the underground service located near the lightpole at the entrance to the dock, and six evenly spaced outlets replaced. On the Summit Avenue Beach pavilion, repairs were needed to reinstall mast service on the pavilion, including reinstalling four outlets and a lighting fixture. Total cost of the three projects from the two contractors came to $33,915 through L i ne s i de r a nd $ 3 4 , 7 0 0

through Mr. Camburn. Following a discussion of the pricing, Mr. Silver noted that Mr. Camburn’s firm offered a great deal more work and protective equipment upgrades for only slightly more than Linesider’s proposal, as seen in his detailed, typed proposals, including moving the service for the pavilion and River Avenue lighting up from the first floor to the second floor of the structure and into a secure watertight container, thus making it far less susceptible to future storm damage. Councilman Peter Kier noted that Mr. Camburn’s typed proposal was also far more detailed than the handwritten one provided by Linesider. Mr. Silver requested that the borough hire Mr. Camburn due to the professionalism of his proposal and quality and breadth of work offered among the proposals

received. The council unanimously approved his proposal with the added request of including a motion sensor on the second floor of the Central Avenue pavilion to deter trespassers after curfew, which residents nearby said was an ongoing issue. In other actions of the borough mayor and council at the late February meeting: Public Works Requests The council unanimously approved several purchase order requests from the department of public works, including a 48-inch panic bar at the post office delivery door for $564 from Mr. Keys; new Cooper vehicle tires for $924 from Edward Tire Co.; and a vehicle maintenance bill from Midas Auto Service on Route 37 for $648.30. Continued on page 24

struck himself in the mouth with his ax, breaking off two of his teeth... the main point the utility board was interested in during the March 7th meeting regarding the railroad bridge span between Island Heights and Pine Beach was whether the bus service between Toms River station and Central Avenue here was "adequate and satisfactory." There Mr. Schoettle stated he used the bus service frequently and that it was very satisfactory, and nobody from the bridge-supporting Island Heights group present, numbering between 50 and 100 and including Mayor A.B. Smith, had any issue with the service nor the apparent cessation of train service as they wanted the bridge to remain for future motor vehicle traffic. Borough Solicitor Walter Carson however insisted that the bus service was not satisfactory and that the trains should be restored because Pine Beach and Island Heights should be connected, however, Mr. Schoettle gave the board approximately 200 letters from summer residents of the borough who supported its removal. Pennsylvania Railroad Superintendent James Osborne Hackenburg, of the Philadelphia Terminal Division, told the board that the railroad would remove the bridge or leave it in the river, whichever they preferred, only that they did not want to be responsible for maintaining it or running rail service to Island Heights any longer. Commodore Crabbe further argued for its removal, stating it was a navigational hindrance to all boat traffic on the Toms River. Freeholders Howard Applegate and Harold Brinley were present for the hearing but did not make any statements. The board closed by stating a decision on whether the bridge would be removed would be made in the following two weeks, per a request for more time by Solicitor Carson...

Page 23

Island Heights

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Island Heights Council News Continued from page 23 Just Say No to Benny Bill A resolution was unanimously passed opposing a state bill promoted by northern legislators demanding free beach access and comfort facilities to the public in exchange for financial aid for storm repairs, as it would place an undue hardship on all shore municipalities without funding beachfront safety, maintenance and operations.

Local businesses also sprang to the aid of area residents in need in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Left Bill Roncskevitz and his crew at Ocean Security Systems, Island Heights, present the Racinelli family of the Gilford Park section of Toms River with a donation to help them recover from losses suffered when water rose at their home on the northern edge of Dillon’s Creek, almost directly opposite Mr. Roncskevitz’s business. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

Water Treatment Plant Cost Increase Also unanimously approved by council was a water treatment plant replacement modification no. 5, which provides a flushing system to prevent the lime chemical feed system from clogging and modifies the filter face piping to enable the water treatment plan to operate automatically. As a result, the overall contract for the plant construction increased by $25,539.76 for a new total of $1,911,519.44. Public Works Vehicle & Financing Chief Financial Officer Louis Palazzo stated he was approached by Jon Brodbeck of public works who stated that one of the department’s trucks was in poor shape and becoming unserviceable but was needed for future work, including plowing snowfall on borough streets. The state contract on vehicle purchases had however just listed new trucks, including a Ford F350 basic four-wheel drive with a diesel engine model, for $21,000, which would likely come to a total of $27,000 with the plow ac-

Page 24

cessories needed. Mr. Palazzo said he was looking into leasing the truck for its useful life span of five years rather than absorbing the cost into one budget year, but Borough Attorney William T. Hiering, Jr. stated he was unsure whether that was permitted. Mr. Palazzo said he would speak with the borough’s bond council regarding the legalities on how to finance it to give the least amount of impact on the budget. New Police Vehicle Speaking further on vehicle purchases, Mr. Palazzo stated that while in a meeting with Councilman Joe Rogalski, liaison to the police department, and Lt. Kevin Arnold, they learned that the engine of the Dodge Durango police vehicle was severely compromised and would require a replacement. From the state contract, the chief financial officer said they were looking at a new four wheel drive Ford Interceptor sport utility vehicle. Mr. Kier asked if an engine rebuild on the Dodge would be impossible, and Lt. Arnold stated that he had gone to three car service garages for quotes but that they were having a hard time finding the engine and that Dodge had essentially stopped supporting that year. The council voted unanimously to purchase a new police vehicle after Mr. Palazzo finds out how to best legally finance it. New Computer Firm Sought Mr. Silver stated he they were having some difficulties with the firm currently hired to maintain

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PINE BEACH

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Pine Beach Fire Company Hall to Close

Members of the Pine Beach Volunteer Fire Company assembled for a group photo around Santa, who is good friends with Councilman Barry Wieck, in December during the town-wide free Santa breakfast, which may turn out to be the last event held in the hall. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

by Erik Weber PINE BEACH - Citing increasing costs, members of the Pine Beach Volunteer Fire Company voted Thursday night, March 7th to officially close down their meeting hall on Prospect Avenue. The structure was built in 1958, expanded in 1974 and named Schiel Hall in honor of longtime chief and company secretary Charles Schiel, who served from 1939 to 1971. Councilman and past company chief Barry Wieck reported at the Monday night council work meeting that the hall would have all the water drained from its heating system and electric service shut off to try and reduce the average $1,200 monthly utility bills the company pays throughout their facility. "It was all built before people were concerned about the cost of energy so there's no insulation," he said. "It's cool in the winter and warm in the summer, just the opposite of what you want." "We're going to have to move the general election back to here," the former chief added. Councilman Robert Budesa asked whether the fire company was still pursuing the sale of their lots across from the firehouse, which were commonly used for parking during events at the hall. "They're still pursuing it but nobody's interested," replied Mr. Wieck. In other news from the early March work meeting of the mayor and council: FEMA Maps Mayor Lawrence Cuneo brought up the idea of the governing body adopting the Federal Emergency Management Agency [FEMA] Advisory Base Flood Elevation [ABFE] maps, adding that the land use board spoke about the issue at their meeting the previous Thursday evening. "They wanted one change, to put into it stating just to follow the maps as adopted so that we don't have to keep coming back to update it," he reported. "They didn't like it, but that's the hand we're dealt right now so in order to try and help the residents with this we should adopt these so people, if they need the ICC [FEMA's Increased Cost of Compliance] money to help raise their houses, they can get that and other people can get flood insurance." Council President Richard "Ritty" Polhemus asked the mayor whether he knew how many homes in Pine Beach would be affected by the advisory maps. "We're trying to get an exact number but Jack [Mallon, of the borough's engineering firm of Ernst, Ernst & Lissenden] thought about 30,"

the mayor said. "He said no more than 30 but he thinks less than that." He added that residents may go onto the FEMA ABFE website at www.region2coastal. com and enter their address to find what projected flood zone they may be in. Mayor Cuneo stated that while the maps were released shortly after the hurricane, the agency had been working on them for some time prior to that and "it just happened to be New Jersey's turn to get it." The ABFE would not be official for some time, as new preliminary flood insurance rate maps are due to be completed later this summer, after which a regulatory process that could take up to a year and a half will begin, allowing the ABFE to possibly be lowered before final adoption sometime in the second half of 2014. A second topic discussed at the land use board meeting, the mayor reported, was the idea of waiving height restrictions only for those homeowners who had to raise their homes to comply with the new ABFE standards, as other local waterfront communities have done in recent months. It was decided they would seek out some of the ordinances adopted by nearby municipalities to possibly write one of their own. Reassessment Mayor Cuneo reported that the borough, which had recently undergone a town-wide property reassessment to go into effect in 2014, showed a loss of approximately 20 percent in value, from $306 million to between $240 and $244 million. "Nornally we don't like to see that but in this case it's going to be okay for us - it brings the properties into line where they should be so people aren't overly assessed and those who appeal get the benefit of it while their neighbors are paying more than they should be," he said, adding that the lowering of the assessment "should hopefully ease some of [the regional school tax] burden we have to take over because of the less valuation than the other towns." The other towns within the regional district that are taxed based on the combined total valuation include Beachwood, South Toms River and Toms River. Swim Clinic Due to the issues ongoing on the bayside of the barrier island due to the effects of Hurricane Sandy, a company that holds swim clinics for triathlon participants previously held in Lavallette applied for permission to hold the classes in the waters of the Toms River off Pine

Beach instead, stated Mayor Cuneo. "They get people in to show the transitions between swimming, biking and running," he continued, noting that they had requested permission to run the classes on Saturdays throughout May. "I don't think it's a bad thing for us from the perspective of it helps," said Mr. Budesa. "I don't think it will hurt to get some people over to this side, maybe 50 people, to show off our town," added Mayor Cuneo, stating that they would need to park in appropriate areas and not in areas where they might receive a ticket for parking in a parking permit area. "The last thing we want is to invite them into town and here's a ticket - that's not the goodwill we're trying to spread," he laughed. Borough Clerk Charlene Carney asked whether the classes could be held at Avon Road Beach due to the large and underused parking lot there. "Yeah, probably Avon so they can go swim in either direction they want," replied the mayor. Capstan Avenue, Pine Beach The previously contested property owned by the Suarez family was brought up at the meeting, as the Northern Ocean Habitat for Humanity [NOHFH] had taken it over and were actively engaging the Pine Beach and Beachwood governing bodies regarding utilities, municipal services and taxes. The property, which for years was a hotly debated issue between the town and its owners, is located on a parcel of land at the eastern end of Capstan Avenue, in Beachwood, but within the boundary of Pine Beach and surrounded by the wooded area adjacent the elementary school. The current structure there was built sometime in the mid-20th century, and due to its location, NOHFH must depend upon Pine Beach to either provide services in a hardto-reach location or enter into an interlocal agreement with Beachwood for them to provide utility hookup and service plus trash and recycling pickup. NOHFH is a non-profit ecumenical housing ministry that works in partnership with low-income households to improve the housing in which they live by providing the capital and skills needed to renovate or build simple, decent homes for those who are without adequate housing at an affordable price. On the difficult property location, Mayor Cuneo stated that "we don't run anything [utilities] through there and for garbage and recycling and everything else, the way the street dead-ends and the way the property dead-ends in

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Beachwood, we don't access it in Pine Beach." He added that the improvements proposed by the nonprofit were already approved by the land use board and Beachwood neighbors who attended the meeting spoke in favor of the project. Due to both governing bodies using the same law firm of Hiering, Gannon and McKenna of Toms River for legal services, it was accepted that a resolution would be brought before the council at their Wednesday night regular meeting to approve the hiring of Kevin Sheehy of King, Kitrick, Jackson & McWeeney of Brick to handle the agreement. Mr. Sheehy is currently the borough's land use board attorney, and the mayor and council felt his familiarity to the property as well as Pine Beach in general would allow him to "do a fine job." False Alarm Fines Mr. Polhemus reported he was contacted by Pine Beach Volunteer Fire Company President Jay Sonnenfeld regarding the introduction and adoption of an ordinance affixing fines to properties that produce multiple false alarms for emergency services. "I know a particular home, since the beginning of January, they've responded to four times," he said. "Mostly it's not the residents, it's their aids there doing cooking and setting off the alarms or smoking in the house - unfortunately at these types of homes they don't have a choice, they have to respond." The council president added that the danger and expense of having fire company members rushing in their personal vehicles to get to the station and then rushing in the apparatus to respond to the scene of a false alarm multiple times was a detriment across the board, and that Mr. Sonnenfeld was looking into other area municipalities that have a similar ordinance they are looking to have introduced. "I think it's a low threshold, like two times and you pay $100 or something [starting with the third]," said Mr. Budesa. Pine Beach Police Chief John M. Sgro stated that sometimes responding officers are able to hold the engines back when a false alarm is suspected, but that at least the chief or an official from the company still must respond even in their own vehicle as the police are neither trained nor authorized to make a determination on a fire service call. Mr. Polhemus stated that they would look to collect more information from ordinances of other municipalities and further the effort to address the issue at their next work meeting at the end of Continued on page 26

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PINE BEACH

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

This photograph, taken from the 1935-6 Admiral Farragut Academy yearbook, shows the cadet officers before Farragut Hall, formerly the Pine Beach Inn. In late February 1933, a group of Philadelphia men first approched Inn owner Albert Schweigert about purchasing his hotel and rear property for what would become America’s first preparatory school with naval training.

Life in the borough from late February and early March 1933 as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life

An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a borough-wide report of 10 by February 1st, there having been no earlier reports... Alfred W. Scott, a resident here, wrote from the Hawaiian Islands stating he was having a “delightful trip” around the world... Mr. and Mrs. Richard Montgomery sent out unique birth announcements for their son, Richard Jr., in the form of blueprints, to friends and family members across the borough. Mrs. Montgomery was formerly Margaret Hottenstein of Riverside Drive... David Hottenstein was studying medicine in Munchen, Germany... Mr. and Mrs. Hornor were injured on a Friday evening in early March when their car left the highway opposite Cranmoor Manor in Toms River, dropped into a deep embankment and crashed into a tree. Both were taken to Paul Kimball Hospital, Lakewood...

School

A group of Philadelphia men, who through much of the month of February had been negotiating with Albert Schweigert, owner of the shuttered Pine Beach Inn, announced their plans to establish a naval school on the Pine Beach shore to be named Admiral Farragut Academy. First introduced to the area by Toms River resident Reginald C. Potter, the group was impressed by the location and held a meeting on Saturday, February 25th with Frank W. Sutton, Jr., of the First National Bank of Toms River; Robert E. Eagle of the Toms River

Kiwanis; Dover Township Committee Chairman John J. Ewart, R.C. Potter; William H. Fischer and C.M. Elwell of the New Jersey Courier, Fred G. Bunnell and James Maitland of the Toms River Sun before later meeting with Pine Beach Mayor LeRoy Hutchinson and members of the borough council the same day. In discussing the likely success of the school, the group referred to the 532 military schools present in the United States at the time, none of which offered preparatory naval training. The New Jersey Courier reported that the men were involved in the construction and operation of the Valley Forge Military Academy in Devon, Pennsylvania, in 1928 and that in the short period since its doors opened approximately 400 boys had enrolled and the surrounding area saw an economic boom. That school, too, had its start in a shuttered hotel – the former Devon Park Hotel, which burned in a fire in January 1929 and forced the school to move to its current campus location in Wayne, Pennsylvania in the former Saint Luke's School. The Philadelphia men, including publicity director Frank E. Rice, noted they had already discussed their plans with the Navy, which had given its full support and agreed to assign an instructor and lend approximately $100,000 worth of equipment, including one of the Eagle class patrol crafts (commonly known as sub-chasers and build during and for World War I) and several cutters, launches and other small craft. A small gunboat was also to have been provided by the Navy for use by the school when Barnegat Inlet was dredged and deepened to allow its access to Pine Beach. The young men attending the school would wear jeans when cruising and

when being taught to maintain their engines, whites for classes and naval blue and green dress uniforms for ceremonies. It was also stated that the close proximity of Naval Air Station Lakehurst would allow the school to potentially have students attend ground and flight training there. The campus plan, as presented, was that the school would take over the inn for the main school building and another block behind it, also owned by Mr. Schweigert, where a gymnasium and barracks would be eventually constructed. The low land where Popular Pond is filled in, the New Jersey Courier continued, would be made into an athletic field, and the borough would be asked to allow the closing of the street between front inn property and back block. At the outset, it was determined that the preparatory academy would operate on a normal September to June schedule, with a summer school offering short courses from June to September for younger boys. The men added that they “had the assurance of high authority that if the school located here, Barnegat Inlet would be deepened to allow the incoming vessels of at least six feet draft.” Further proposed were a seawall boathouse and docks in front of the hotel to house the naval equipment, the wall being 100 feet long and at least 30 feet deep. Supporters of the school included Brigadier General Cyrus S. Radford, General Smedley Butler, both retired from the Marine Corps; Gene Tunney, a former Marine and famous boxer, A.J. Drexel Biddle and one of the DuPont family of Delaware. The school group stated that with an enrollment of 300 young men in the academy fall through spring and an 200 boys over the summer, and that 50 students were already secured

for the first semester in Fall 1933. All figures were based on their actual experience at Valley Forge Military Academy and in published reports of similar military schools. The backers also noted that besides spending a large amount of money locally and housing several hundred boys from well-off families, oftentimes those families moved nearer the school their children were attending to be closer to them, thus boosting the local economy further. An earlier location for the school was on the River Severn in Maryland, across from Annapolis Academy, but they were unable to get the land. After seeing the Pine Beach site, the men stated that they were glad as it was more desirable in many ways than the Maryland site... on Monday, March 6th, retired USMC Major General Smedley D. Butler was the chief speaker at the meeting of the Toms River Kiwanis in the World Restaurant inside the Marion Inn on Main and Water streets, Toms River, along with the group of people to further promote the proposed Admiral Farragut Academy here, including Brigadier General Cyrus S. Radford, ret., H.E. Reice, Edgar C. VanDyke, Edgar C. VanDyke, Jr., and Robert Adams in addition to Pine Beach Mayor LeRoy Hutchinson, Pine Beach Inn owner Mr. Schweigart, and several borough residents. Gen. Butler "told of his experiences as a Marine for thirty-five years, and told the 'inside' of much of the foreign history of the country; he insisted that a big navy was a guaranty of peace, and for that reason he endorsed the Navy school as one step toward a better Navy; he gave Gen. Radford the highest endorsement. Gen. Radford briefly told the purpose of the school, and Mr. VanDyke explained the proposed financial setup and the plans for starting the school in a small way and building it up if and when the demand for more pupil space was shown." The group said the school depended upon the raising of $10,000 in funds locally and $15,000 by the proposed school board, which would include Gen. Butler, Mr. Tunney, and Anthony J. Drezel Biddle, among others. Conversion of the hotel and construction of further initial facilities were estimated to cost $125,000. After the meeting concluded some of the guests and members remained excited and talking for another hour about the proposed Admiral Farragut Academy... with the end of the 1933 school term it was reported that Toms River High School teacher and borough resident Miss Emelia C. Reeves would have completed her 30th year of teaching, and 11th within the township school...

Pine Beach Fire Company Hall to Close Continued from page 26 March. Trees, Trees Everywhere Borough resident, Toms River High School South senior and regular environmental volunteer Lindsey Van Zile reported to the governing body that her parents had attended a New Jersey Tree Foundation meeting for her and received "tons of information about Arbor Day" and signed up to receive many free trees, approximately 100, to plant across the borough or just for residents to plant in their yards. She added that she spoke with Pine Beach Principal Tricia Tutzauer about getting schoolchildren involved in an Arbor Day project there and was also interested in working with local scouting organizations for further planting opportunities. After various council members joked that they should plant a number of them along Riverside Drive particularly between the mayor's house and his family's view of the river, Mayor Cuneo stated that one good area could be along Washington Avenue adjacent the soccer fields and spectators bleachers as they could provide shade where there currently was none. Mr. Wieck stated another idea would be to advertise for residents to pick up the trees free at the annual town-wide yard sale to plant in their yards. "You've almost single-handedly taken care of cleaning up Pine Beach, between picking up garbage and planting," said Mr. Polhemus. "We're proud of you." Beach Replenishment Mary Jane Steib stated that possibly $40,000 or more could be allocated for beach replenishment in the coming year, depending whether it could be entered into the budget - depending upon the impact of the town reassessment - or acquired through a capital improvement ordinance, the latter of which could allow more money to be utilized. Sign or Home Councilman Andrew Keczkemethy stated that two residents had approached him asking whether signs present on several undersized lots within the town advertising homes to be built to suit on them could be removed. "As long as the signs are conforming with our ordinance regarding signs, we can't do anything," replied Mr. Budesa. "So we have to live with the signs for the next 40 years?" asked Mr. Keczkemethy. "The sign would be better than a house," said Mr. Budesa. Independence Day Parade Planning Mr. Wieck stated that the first Fourth of July event meeting was slated for March 20th at 6:30 pm in borough hall and asked for anyone interested to attend who had a suggestion for a theme, a grand marshal or to volunteer.

Pine Beach Community Calendar Rabies Clinic The borough will hold its annual rabies clinic on Saturday, March 16th from 1 to 2 pm at the borough public works yard on Pennsylvania Avenue. Cat and dog license renewals were due in January, and as of March 26th summonses will be issued for any animals without current licenses. While the clinic is open to all members of the public, only Pine Beach residents will have the opportunity to license their pets. Easter Egg Hunt The annual Easter Eg g Hunt Scramble held by the borough will take place on Sunday, March 24th at Vista Park on Riverside Drive and Midland Avenue starting at 1 pm. All borough children and their families are invited. Council Meeting The next work meeting of the governing body will take place on Monday, March 25th at 7:30 pm in borough hall on Pennsylvania Avenue. The public is invited and encouraged to attend and participate in their local government. Offices Closed Good Friday Borough offices will be closed for the Good Friday holiday on March 29th. Land Use Board The borough land use board meeting will hold its next meeting on Thursday, April 4th at 7:30 pm in borough hall on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Beachwood Library Programs & Events Knit Wits On Friday, March 15th at 10 am stop in the library to refresh your knitting skills, try some new techniques or learn from scratch. No registration is necessary Bedtime with Sparks Children, ages two to four, wear your pajamas and join Sparks, the library mascot, for some bedtime stories. This program is scheduled for Monday, March 18th at 6:30 pm. Registration is required. Rover’s Readers On Wednesday, March 20th at 3:45 pm, read to Taffy and Rusty, the library dogs. This program is for children ages 5 to 12. Registration is required Please call (732) 244-4573 to register or visit www.theoceancountylibrary.org. The Beachwood Library, which also serves Pine Beach, is located in the heart of the downtown on Beachwood Boulevard. Does your group or organization want to see its events listed here? All events that are free and open to the public or non-profit/charity fundraisers are eligible for free placement. Write events@ocsignal today!

Three generations of the Russell family, of Pine Beach, enjoyed an unexpected day of iceboating on the Toms River off Avon Road Beach on January 27th along with borough resident and friend Gene Jardel (not pictured).

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OCEAN GATE

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Historical Society's 25th Year by Erik Weber OCEAN GATE - It started with the railroad station and today includes a full Pennsylvania Railroad caboose and full museum packed with reflections of the lives and memories that built this resort over 100 years ago, starting before it became a borough. In early 1988, working on a conversation inspiring her to want to save the railroad station after watching it sit in the public works yard, Pearl Green and several other likeminded residents grouped up and incorporated the Ocean Gate Historical Society by the end of February, and the next summer their ranks had grown to 68, with members petitioning the borough to release the station and dedicate a portion of town property for its reestablishment and restoration as a museum

Obituaries Ronald J. DiStefano, 66

Ronald J. DiStefano, 66, of Toms River died suddenly on February 7th, 2013. Born in Plainfield in 1946, Ron lived in Kennilworth, Roselle Park and Westfield before moving to Toms River in 1993. Mr. DiStefano was employed many years with Anthony Sylvan Pools of Manalapan. He proudly served his country in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War. He was an avid fisherman and boatman but mostly enjoyed spending time with his family. Surviving are his loving wife of 41 years, Elaine Thompson DiStefano; two children, Dawn DiStefano and, Brian and Trish DiStefano; his sister Sharon Scaglione and two grandchildren, Riley and Thomas.

for Ocean Gate's past. Though 25 years have passed since that initial spark of inspiration, and many who started it all have also passed into those same pages of Ocean Gate history, Lou Purcaro, the current society present, announced the organization's intent to celebrate and mark its 25th year during the coming warmer seasons. "We have about 10 or 12 charter members around and actively involved," he stated at the late February council meeting," and we want to try to do something over there - we may ask the borough to have the street for a while, nothing too elaborate, but something to celebrate it." "We do have a committee of about four or five people and we are looking for others interested," the president continued. "We'd really appreciate it - just some ideas on what to do to celebrate

the history of Ocean Gate." He added that he'd like to see all Ocean Gate organizations to participate in the event, even to set up a table and inform residents about their work. "That's part of the history of Ocean Gate, to know what's available in town and how it got started," said Mr. Purcaro, adding that he would also appreciate a liaison to work with the society from the governing body. The next meeting of the Ocean Gate Historical Society will be on Tuesday, March 19th with dinner at 6 pm and a program an hour later. New members are always welcome as are anyone interested in working on the borough history celebration later this year. The historical society can be reached by leaving a message at (732) 269-8040.

Funeral services were provided by Mastapeter Funeral Home, Bayville. Entombment was at Ocean County Memorial Park, Toms River.

War. Surviving are his wife of 56 years, Eva; six children and their spouses, Michele Hawkins, Donna Marie Pulos, Denise Papiernik, Lisa Yannazzone, Stephanie Jensen and Christopher Pulos; five sisters, Catherine Harootunian, Mary Gemgnani, Della Sommers, Victoria Vuono, and Helen Kehayes. Also surviving are ten grandchildren, one great grandson and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services were provided by Mastapeter Funeral Home, Bayville. Burial was in St. Joseph Cemetery, Toms River. In lieu of flowers, donations in Spiro’s name to: Wounded Warrior Project, 370 Seventh Avenue, Suite #1802, New York, NY 10001, {www.woundedwarriorproject.org}.

Spiro “Sonny” Pulos, 80

Spiro Pulos, 80, of Ocean Gate, known as Sonny, died on Friday, February 22nd, 2013. Born in Newark in 1932, he was a resident of Ocean Gate since 1967. Mr. Pulos was a Master Plumber who owned and operated Spiro Pulos Plumbing and Heating in Ocean Gate for over 30 years. He was an active member of his community serving as building inspector, volunteer fireman and member of the historical society. He was also well known in town for his morning flag raising ritual at his home. Spiro proudly served his country in the U.S. Marine Corp during the Korean

Recent Borough Council News In other news of the mayor and council meeting from late February: In Remembrance Mayor Paul Kennedy asked that borough residents keep the DiStefano and Pulos families in their thoughts and prayers, as Councilman Brian DiStefano's father, Ronald, a Toms River resident, had died suddenly earlier that month at the age of 66, as had longtime well-known resident Spiro "Sonny" Pulos, who was 80. Swimming Beach Water Quality Councilman James McGrath stated that he called the county health department concerning the water quality off the beachfront following Hurricane Sandy, and that "there is no bacteria in the water; it is 100 percent clean," adding that they would test the waters monthly until July and then increase testing to twice monthly. Public Safety Report Councilman Dave Kendrick, chair of the public safety committee, reported that during the month of January, the Ocean Gate Police Department made seven warrant arrests, three arrests for controlled dangerous substances, four driving while intoxicated arrests, and answered 175 calls for service. Historical Society Building Insurance East Bayview Avenue resi-

dent Lou Purcaro, who is also the president of the Ocean Gate Historical Society, asked for an update on that organization's request that the borough place their buildings, which are only open approximately 25 days per year and stand on borough-owned land but maintained by the historical society, onto the borough's insurance as the $1,700 annual bill was very difficult for the organization to pay. The two structures maintained by the society include the 1909 Pennsylvania Railroad depot-museum and newer Pearl Green museum. Mr. Purcaro added that it would be "helpful" if the public works department could help the society by cutting the lawns between the buildings there as well. Mayor Kennedy replied that Borough Attorney James Gluck was waiting on word from Trenton with regard to the artifacts stored within the buildings and expected to have an answer at the early March council meeting. For more information on the current historical society news, which will be celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, please see the related story in this section. Civic Club Schedule Approved The Ocean Gate Civic Club submitted its 2013 schedule of activities, including their annual Loin of Pork fundraiser dinner on April 13th in Adrian Hall, the beach movie night at the end of the summer season on August

24th (and with a rain date of August 31st) and several others that were unanimously approved by the borough council. Property Cleanup Volunteers Mayor Kennedy reported that a group from an organization called Community Collaborations would be volunteering with approximately 100 young adults in early March to help residents do cleanup of their properties as a continued effort following the hurricane. They were to stay in a warehouse facility on Fischer Boulevard in Toms River while utilizing Adrian Hall in Ocean Gate for meals. Monmouth Ave. Drainage Improvements The $300,000 state grant for road and drainage improvements to Monmouth Avenue awarded to Ocean Gate in early October through the efforts of Mayor Kennedy would begin soon see work begin on the project. Egg Hunt Note Councilwoman Joella Nicastro stated that the egg hunt this year would begin at 1 pm rather than noon because the previous year there was some "havoc" when the historical society breakfast ended at noone and the other began at the same time. FEMA Inspectors Mayor Kennedy reported that a team of 10 to 14 Continued on page 29

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Page 27

OCEAN GATE

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Robin Hood Foundation Gives $300K to Aid Sandy-Impacted Ocean Gate Residents

Earlier this month, Mayor Paul Kennedy (far right) posed with members of Toms River-based Hometown Heroes and New Jersey Hope and Healing, two organizations helping borough residents recover from the effects of Hurricane Sandy. The mayor and two groups spent the morning outside the post office meeting residents. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

by Erik Weber OCEAN GATE – Nearly four months after Hurricane Sandy pushed the Toms River and Barnegat Bay through the front door and out the back of many homes along the beachfront and estuary areas here, Mayor Paul Kennedy announced via press release late Monday night that the Robin Hood Foundation, using monies raised from the 12/12/12 hurricane relief benefit concert in New York City, has awarded the borough a $300,000 grant “to get people back in their homes.” “Funds will go towards items like hot water heaters, furnaces, insulation, electrical wiring, sheetrock, flooring, et cetera,” he stated in the release, noting that the homeowner would have to file an application with Toms River-based Hometown Heroes to be considered for the program, which may also cover utility bills and clothing as needed. Hometown Heroes, he continued, would “pay the contractors directly

for work performed—no money will be given directly to any homeowners [and] the grant funds are only available to homeowners’ primary home. No secondary or vacation homes quality.” “There is a maximum amount that each household will be eligible for—all of the specifics will be spelled out through the application process through Hometown Heroes,” the mayor stated in the press release, noting that the grant funds require certain requirements be met. “I will be the only representative of the borough designated to act as liaison between the homeowners and Hometown Heroes.” Reached following the publication of his release, Mayor Kennedy, who is also the borough administrator, stated that while laid up sick at home with the flu and watching the 12/12/12 concert broadcast live from Madison Square Garden in Manhattan, he began to brainstorm how he could utilize their efforts and make a difference together for the resi-

dents of his town, which he served first as councilman beginning in the mid-1990s and recently as mayor, now in his second term. After repeatedly e-mailing contacts at the Robin Hood Foundation over the two-week period following the concert, which raised $50 million and featured many rock and pop music acts including local New Jersey musicians Bruce Springsteen and Bon Jovi, the mayor stated he heard back and began a series of weekly conference calls and daily e-mails and phone calls to make the organization understand the unique needs of Ocean Gate. The borough, which while located on the mainland on the Toms River and Barnegat Bay west of the Barnegat Peninsula, known commonly as the barrier island where very severe destruction occurred, had received severe flooding and damage to many of its homes dating back to the early 20th century along its main riverfront and marshland area neighborhoods. “They listened and listened

all the way through the process,” Mayor Kennedy recalled. “They were interested. The people that I dealt with were very considerate and somewhat demanding of facts, and I gave it all to them.” He stated that his main contact at the Robin Hood Foundation was Sunny Longbons, and at Hometown Heroes, Mike Thulen, Jerry Conarty, Mike Schwartz and Jen Barna, the latter of whom he said were “good people I’ve known for quite some time – all believers in helping out people in need, and Ocean Gate has its share.” Hometown Heroes can be found online at www. njhometownheroes.org or by calling (732) 473-9400. Ocean Gate homeowners affected by Hurricane Sandy who wish to take advantage of the grant program are encouraged to contact with nonprofit and file an application for aid. Mayor Paul Kennedy also provided his contact information to homeowners who have further questions about the program, including his e-mail, ogmayor@ verizon.net, and office number, (732) 269-3166 ext. 28. The borough also recently held an open public information session at the Ocean Gate School including representatives from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Ocean Gate Construction Department, local building contractors and charitable organizations to provide insight into the aid available and process homeowners would go through to restore their homes under current and new codes, including the Advisory Base Flood Elevation maps. This meeting was recorded by the Ocean Signal and is available on YouTube by searching Ocean Gate Restore Meeting.

Life in the borough from late February and early March 1933 as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life

An increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a borough-wide report of 51 by February 1st, there having been no earlier reports... members of the Ladies Civic Club held a card party at the West Philadelphia home of Mrs. L. Mann... various residents began making their way to the borough to open their shore cottages up for the coming warm seasons...

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Mr. and Mrs. William Wagner visited the borough in late February to check up on progress at their new riverfront home under construction west of Monmouth Avenue... Mayor H. Warren Mease and his daughters, along with Charles Guttentagg, town founder and chief of police, and his wife, enjoyed the warm sun and bathing at coast resorts in Florida... Mr. and Mrs. K. Gramalis of Maple Shade were in town Thursday, March 2nd to look over their lots on Monmouth Avenue they had recently purchased from Havier and Zakauskas of Philadelphia... a jigsaw puzzle fad that struck the nation came to town, with one unnamed resident on Longport known to sit with

Breakfast with the Easter Bunny The Ocean Gate Historical Society will host its annual Breakfast with the Easter Bunny on Sunday, March 24th from 9 am to noon at Adrian Hall on East Cape May Avenue. Cost is $6 for adults, $3 for children 12 and under. Proceeds will benefit the society and its drive to preserve borough history. For tickets or more information, please call Rosemary at 732-269-8899. Easter Egg Hunt Scramble Ocean Gate's annual Easter egg hunt scramble will be held on Sunday, April 24th at 1 pm at Adrian Hall. Only borough children up to the 6th grade are eligible for the egg hunt. Council Meeting The next meeting of the mayor and council will be held on Wednesday, March 27th at 7 pm in borough hall on Ocean Gate Avenue. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. Board of Education Meeting 2013 School Budget Hearing The Ocean Gate Board of Education will hold a school budget public hearing on Wednesday, March 27th at 6 pm in the grade school on West Arverne Avenue. Further, the board has canceled their regular meeting of March 20th and rescheduled it for March 27th beginning at 7 pm, following the budget hearing. The public is invited and encouraged to attend and participate. Grandparents' Day Ocean Gate School Ocean Gate School will host its annual Grandparents' Day on Thursday, March 28th with registration at 9 am, breakfast at 9:15 am, the student concert at 10 am and tours from 10:15 to 11:15 am.

Berkeley Library Programs & Events Famous Women Scavenger Hunt Stop in to the library anytime from now until March 30th and join in on the Famous Women Scavenger Hunt. Find the pictures in the library and match it up with what these famous women did. If you find all of them, you will win a prize. All ages are welcome. Music and Movement Preschoolers, ages 1 to 5, and their parents are welcome to enjoy rhythm activities and music with Joan Seele-Goold on Friday, March 15th at 10:30 am. Class size is limited for this program. Registration is required.

ABOVE: Code Enforcement Official Paul Butow and a member of his staff spoke with residents after a FEMA information meeting held by the borough at Ocean Gate School on February 13th. RIGHT: (from left) Mildred “Millie” Sheppard and Roger Love were returned to serve another term on the land use board.

Ocean Gate 1933

Ocean Gate Calendar of Events

her daughter until the early hours of the morning putting the puzzles together... Mrs. Mary A. Cleary, of Philadelphia and a wellknown summer resident here, died in her city home on March 3rd following a short illness. Prominent in the M.E. Church both there and in Ocean Gate, she was also a member of the Ladies Auxiliary, and was survived by her husband, Sigmund... Mrs. Linda Smith, 71, a wellknown summer resident of Lakewood Avenue in Ocean Gate from the early 1910s until 1932, died March 7th...

Business

Chris Angerer began construction of a porch on the home of Mrs.

Alice Kerns on Point Pleasant Avenue...

Sport

The Ladies Auxiliary of the Ocean Gate Yacht Club announced a luncheon and cards at the Philadelphia home of C.H. Crist on March 8th, as it was common for summer residents of this area to gather in their winter homes in the months leading up to the new season...

School

On Thursday evening, February 23rd, following a meeting of the Ocean Gate School board, a Parent Teacher Association was formed with a larger number of parents present, organized by Mrs. Oula White-

head, vice-president of the school board. A committee of three, including Mrs. Leon Bach, Mrs. George Beidelman and Mrs. Dilkes were appointed to select the officers at an upcoming meeting... borough resident and Toms River High School student Paul Page was named as one of the leading parts in the school play... at the mid-year mark, it was reported that several students from the borough were neither absent or late, including Laura Beidelman, Junior Page, Charles Page and Andrew Alonzo...

Crime

An unknown individual stole wood from the wood pile located behind the church...

Film and Photograph Conversion Saturday, March 16th from 12 to 3 pm, bring your old films and photographs to the library and transfer them on to DVDs. Processing will be done by Digital Memory Media and 20% of the collected proceeds will be donated to the library. The first 20 arrivals will received a free 1 GB flash drive. This event is sponsored by The Friends of the Berkeley Library. LEGO® Club The library will provide Lego® bricks for imaginative play on Monday, March 18th at 4 pm. Your creation may be displayed at the library. Recommended for ages 6 12. Registration required. The Yarn Dolls On Monday, March 18th, from 6:30 to 8:30 pm join in and knit or crochet with the Yarn Dolls. This group meets once a week to brush up on an old skill, meet new people and have a few laughs. You are welcome to bring your unfinished projects with you. Girl Power Movie PIXAR’S BRAVE Celebrate Women’s History Month with a Disney movie presentation of Pixar’s Brave on Tuesday, March 19th at 6 pm. Pixar's Brave won the Oscar for best animated feature film at the Academy Awards. This presentation is recommended for ages 13 – 18. Registration is required. Cuddle Up for 1’s and 2’s! Cuddle up with your little one on Wednesday, Wednesday, March 20th at 10:30 am and share stories, rhymes, songs and finger-plays. This program is for children ages 12 to 36 months. Please register, as class size is limited. Ocean County Master Gardeners Help-line Table On Wednesday, March 20th from 12 – 3 pm, the Ocean County Master Gardener program will be available to answer gardening questions such as how to deal with saltwater damage to your plants. This is a walk-in program for anyone interested in becoming a master gardener. Woof Tales: Read to a Dog On Thursday, March 21st at 4 pm, all young readers are welcome to take turns reading to the therapy dogs. Please register. Please call (732) 269-2144 to register or visit www.theoceancountylibrary.org. The Berkeley Library is located on Station Road in Berkeley Township. Does your group or organization want to see its events listed here? All events that are free and open to the public or non-profit/charity fundraisers are eligible for free placement. Write events@ ocsignal today!

Government

During the monthly meeting of the Ocean Gate Volunteer Fire Company in late February, a great deal of discussion was held over raising funds to meet the necessary payments still due on the new apparatus... the fire company began burning off high grass in areas throughout the borough to prevent possible forest fires in the coming warm seasons... on Wednesday, March 8th, local volunteer fire companies were called to the Narragansett Avenue section where a fire of unknown origin started in the high grassland. With a high wind blowing from the northwest, the fire was put out before gaining much headway...

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OCEAN GATE Continued from page 27 FEMA-financed inspectors would inspect every home in the borough they were permitted into by the property owners to give fair assessments and help the borough move forward following the hurricane. New Fulltime Employee George Alvarez, a part-time worker within the public works department, was hired as a full time laborer effective March 1st at a rate of $16 per hour, with a pay increase to $18 per hour upon obtaining his commercial driver's license. Mayor Kennedy commended Mr. Alvarez for his work within the borough especially after Hurricane Sandy, stating that "in my eyes he has proven himself to be worthy of a fulltime job." His sentiments were echoed by several governing body members. World's Largest Yard Sale The 2013 "World's Largest Yard Sale" hosted by the Ocean Gate Recreation Committee was approved to be held on Saturday, August 3rd between 8 am and 4 pm and with a rain date of Sun-

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Ocean Gate Borough Council News

day, August 4th for the same hours. Further details listed were that only Ocean Gate businesses may set up sidewalk displays along Ocean Gate Avenue; no outside vendors are permitted to set up a display in the yard sale; the usual fee of $5 per household was waived and the yard sale not counted in the permitted two per household per year; and parking regulations of parking decals within the municipal lots on Angelsea, East Bayview and Wildwood avenues were waived between 8 am and 5 pm but that metered parking would be enforced.

pointed - Mildred Sheppard and Ruth Gibadlo - with terms expiring on December 31st of this year.

Ocean Gate Day The 2013 Ocean Gate Day was approved to be held on Saturday, August 10th from 8 am to 10 pm and with a rain date of Saturday, August 17th for the same hours. Parking regulations requiring vehicle decals in the municipal parking lots on Anglelsea and East Bayview avenues were waived from 8 am to 11 pm.

Beach Prisms Ocean Gate Avenue resident Katharine Ranuro inquired about the procedure behind the Army Corps of Engineers' Coastal Area Facilities Review Act [CAFRA] application to install beach prisms along the riverfront, as she felt they were "overstepping their boundaries" by applying on behalf of the borough, and she further didn't feel the prisms would be attractive nor very effective. Mayor Kennedy replied that he had been speaking with

New Municipal Alliance Volunteers Two new members of the municipal alliance were ap-

Front Yard Setbacks The council unanimously introduced an ordinance that would increase the front yard setback for new construction on properties within the borough from 15 to 20 feet. A special meeting of the planning board was scheduled for March 12th to allow for further discussion on the matter before it would be brought back to the council for public comment and possible adoption.

the Department of Environmental Protection and that different procedures may instead be engaged anyway, adding that the monies may be used from a decade-old beach replenishment project that was unsuccessful. Ms. Ranuro then questioned whether the beach prisms had ever been brought up at previous council meetings, as she regularly attends and had no recollection of them. At the previous council meeting, which Mayor Kennedy was absent from, Mr. McGrath, upon learning of the CAFRA application for the prisms, grew agitated and stated that he was unaware of the prisms and did not feel they were brought up at prior meetings, either. Mayor Kennedy, answering Ms. Ranuro at the late February meeting, stated that he had reported it in meetings, mentioned it in his regular letters to residents, and added that the idea first was brought up by a resident approximately three years earlier. Ms. Ranuro stated she felt the public should have been informed more often about the prisms and other ongoing business in the borough. She

SOUTH TOMS RIVER South Toms River 1933 Life in the borough from late February and early March 1933 as compiled from sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

Life

Charles Feeney, relief director for the borough (in charge of distributing aid to needy families affected by the ongoing depressed economy), received more than four barrels of packaged food as a result from a recent children's matinee benefit show held at the Traco Theatre in downtown Toms River, which had children bring the donations that were then brought on the Traco delivery wagon over the bridge... an increase of 1,155 needy people was made to the county emergency relief roster in January 1933, with a borough-wide increase of 159, bringing the total amount here on the list to 267 by February 1st... Miss Gracia Woordward, daughter to Councilman and Mrs. Arthur P. Woodward, here, was married to Theodore Klein, of Philadelphia, on Saturday, February 25th by borough recorder J. Lester Yoder. Mr. Klein was studying law, was employed by the Dover Drug Company and was a nephew of Mrs. Arthur Rovner of this borough... the body of borough resident Capt. Joe Hulse was discovered in a wooded area near Asbury Park in early March. The captain was residing at the Truex home for the aged and incurable at Wayside when he reportedly wandered away the previous fall. Barely more than a skeleton covered by the Truex home clothing was found, which was later retrieved by Toms River funeral director C.P. Anderson for burial at Chatsworth on the property of a cousin, Mrs. Hart. The New Jersey Courier reported Capt. Hulse to have been "one of the old-time baymen, of whom there were many in the fifty or sixty years just past. In summer he sailed a party boat for fishing and beach parties, and in winter caught oysters, clams or eels.

He was noted as a party boat master, and many in this section, as well as many parties from the cities, went out with him on the bay. His last venture in this line was when he bought the famous catboat Gem, in her day one of the three fastest catboats on the Jersey coast, and turned it into a "kicker" boat to take out parties. [The Lakewood Citizen added that the captain sailed some of the fastest yachts on the Barnegat Bay and had won many trophies at Toms River Yacht Club in his time.] He had a small home in South Toms River. In his old age his mind wandered and Mayor H.G. Flint, after looking after him for some time, thought he would be better cared for in the Truex home, and that he was unfit to live alone." The previous September, the captain thought it was time to go eeling, as he had done many years before, and told the folks at the Wayside home that he had to get his eel pots ready for fall and winter. Shortly afterward he disappeared, and when Mayor Flint was informed, he had the territory surrounding his home searched, but with no results. He had no known living relatives... Julius Glover, 44, died at Paul Kimball Hospital early in the morning of March 10th following complications from a car accident on February 14th. Well known here, he spent 12 years as a fireman for the Jersey Central Power & Light plant. He left behind his wife, Esther, who was also in the accident...

Government

The borough began leasing from the State Board of Commerce and Navigation all the land between Mathis Plaza and Jakes Branch for the construction of boat berths there. Two berths were already leased by owners of large boats, and the slips were to be built along the state highway and have walkways in between where boats could tie up for the winter or summer. At the time, there existed a high demand for slips along the Toms River...

South Toms River Community Calendar Land Use Board Meeting Canceled The March 12th land use board meeting, to be held in the cafeteria at the South Toms River Elementary School on Dover Road, and carrying an application by Wawa Inc. to construct a new retail food market and gas station location on Dover Road between Chamberlain Street and Railroad Avenue, has been canceled. The next regularly scheduled meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 16th at 7 pm in the elementary school. Council Meeting The next meeting of the Mayor and Council will be held

on Monday, March 18th at 7 pm in Borough Hall. Meetings are open to the public to share their ideas, opinions and questions regarding borough business. Sewerage Authority The next meeting of the borough sewerage authority will be on Tuesday, April 2nd at 7 pm in the Sewerage Authority on Mill Street. Recreation Commission The recreation commission will hold its next meeting on Wednesday, April 3rd at 7 pm in the Recreation Center on Drake Lane. The public is invited and encouraged to attend and participate.

Mayor Joseph M. Champagne “high-fived� a student from South Toms River Elementary School during a regular monthly awards ceremony held before borough council meetings to recognize high-performing pupils there. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

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Page 29

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Residents and Visitors Flood Boro Hall for Wawa Application

Meeting Halted; Hearing Carried to Future Date in Larger Venue by Erik Weber SOUTH TOMS RIVER - A use variance and major site plan application that would bring a new 5,000 square foot combination retail food and 8-pump, 16-dispenser fuel service operation by Wawa Inc. on Dover Road, here, attracted just under 200 people to the land use board meeting in borough hall where the proposal was to be heard on February 20th. The use variance was requested as the land is located in both the Highway Development (HD) and single family residential zoning districts under the current borough ordinance. An additional minor bulk variance was also requested. As board members watched with visible surprise, the meeting room filled beyond capacity with residents and a large amount of non-residents aligned both for and against the application. By ten minutes before the meeting's start, the back foyer was filled and more people began arriving and waiting outside. Officials present stated that they did not recognize the majority of those at the meeting as being from South Toms River, and it was known by the general community that there was a great amount of opposition from Dover Road business owners and their associates, including those who also owned convenience stores and gas stations, as they felt the approval of Wawa would result in a sharp drop in traffic to their businesses. Steven Nehmad, representing Wawa Inc. from the Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic County-based legal firm of Nehmad, Perillo and Davis, appeared before the board and stated that while the site was located in a split use zone within the borough, it was also located west of the Garden State Parkway and thus in the boundaries of the protected pinelands region that allowed the use of

such a site for their proposal, particularly as, he said, their ordinances were not certified by the commission. According to the Comprehensive Management Plan of the Pinelands Commission, as authorized by the 1979 Pinelands Protection Act and federal National Parks and Recreation Act of 1978, "local governments will be primarily responsible for implementing the Plan. to attain that degree of local involvement and responsibility, the Act set forth a procedure under which county and municipal master plans and land use ordinances are made consistent with the Plan. While some of the Plan's provisions are mandatory, such as the density limitations and the requirement that growth areas accept development credits, many other aspects are intended to give municipalities resource management goals to work toward as they revise their land use regulations... if a municipality does not revise its plan and ordinances as required by the Pinelands Protection Act, the Commission is required by law to enforce the Plan's minimum standards verbatim." Mr. Nehmad noted that if approved, Wawa Inc. would improve the site, located between Chamberlain Street and Railroad Avenue on Dover Road, by "investing four to five million dollars in your community" through the construction of the franchise and addition of hundreds of plants, trees and shrubs in a comprehensive landscaping design. Edward J. Liston, Jr., an attorney based on Hooper Avenue in Toms River, approached the board as representing the owner of the Dover Road 7-11 and Lukoil station, and stated that the room capacity was in violation of the fire code and requested the meeting be adjourned until a later date and location could be advertised for and held to accommodate members of the public. He then went on to state that borough ordinance does not allow "two uses on the same lot and there is an argument tonight about whether or not the convenience store

and gasoline dispensing are tow uses or not," and then accused the applicant of attempting to push the proposal through a loophole with the Pinelands Commission. While Mr. Liston and Mr. Nehmad disagreed on the land use jurisdiction under the borough and Pinelands Commission, several of those present began to continually call out and yell over top of the proceeding against the Wawa applicant, which continued through much of the meeting despite attempts by board members to control the meeting. After more arguing over the application between the two attorneys, Mr. Liston requested his earlier statements about the legal room capacity be revisited, and Mayor Joseph Champagne asked for an authorized member of the South Toms River Police Department to make an assessment and determine whether the meeting could continue. Upon reviewing the room and those present in the foyer and outside the building, Lt. Daniel Evanowski stated that the fire code of 90 persons had been broken and the building would need to be evacuated. The meeting was then halted and application carried to a future meeting date to be determined in a larger public space, and the majority of those present left before the meeting restarted to handle several other smaller matters of business. Following the meeting, an online social media page often used by current and former residents of South Toms River to communicate, on Facebook, became a public battleground of opinion between opponents and supporters of the Wawa application, and where several proactive supporters decided to band together and wear Wawa shirts at the next meeting. The next meeting of the South Toms River Land Use Board, at which time the Wawa Inc. site plan and variance use request will be heard, will take place on Tuesday, April 16th at 7 pm in the cafeteria of the South Toms River Elementary School on Dover Road.

Borough children played in the snow at Brookforest Beach Park on Brookforest Drive, here, following a winter nor’easter earlier this year. Brookforest Beach is a former public bathing beach located on the jakes Branch tributary of the Toms River. It was known as an active spot until at least the 1970s, and since then has been enjoyed as a wild nature area by visitors, hikers and paddlers. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

Page 30

SOUTH TOMS RIVER First Aid Squad Welcomes New Horton Ambulance

by Erik Weber SOUTH TOMS RIVER What started as an basic equipment request several years ago became a journey of self-improvement and today South Toms River First Aid Squad volunteers can hold their heads a little higher as they transport patients in a decked out new ambulance with all the latest in safety features. Squad Chief Robert M. Krohn recalled a time in 2010 when the group first asked for the new apparatus from the borough council only to be rejected, with some officials stating that the organization wasn't performing at an optimum level. "So in 2011 we did a big push to get all our calls answered and I think we missed like 40 to 60 calls out of around 600," he said, a sharp improvement from prior years. "That was our biggest push, and I went to the town and said 'we stepped up to the plate' and one of the councilmen said, 'okay, well I think now is the time.'" T he req ue s t wa s a g a i n brought up for a vote and the governing body approved the motion to go out for bid on the new vehicle. Following what Chief Krohn said was at times a mountain of paperwork, VCI Emergency Vehicle Specialists of Berlin, Camden County submitted the lone proposal on a generic bid package as required by law. The most important aspect of the bid specifications was safety for both the patients and squad members, as the oldest of the squad's fleet, a 1995 Ford E350 chassis with a McCoy Miller MiniMod box, regularly jostles passengers around on calls and generally did not meet contemporary safety and

comfort standards. "It was a big push to get the safest ambulance on the street for the residents of this town, and that's why when you look at the truck, everything's reflective, everything's safe, and there are airbags in the patient compartment for the caregivers if there's a rollover incident or anything like that," the chief said, noting that annually there were approximately 900 ambulance crashes, and "we don't want to be one of those statistics where one of our members ends up dead." In December, the new ambulance, a 2012 Horton model box mounted to a 2011 Ford E350 chassis, was just about finished at the factory in Grove City, Ohio, when VCI flew Chief Krohn out to do a final inspection before driving it back to New Jersey. "The handling of the truck compared to our old 1995 is second to none," he said. "We were taking turns and the truck felt like it stayed level the whole time - you take a turn with the other ambulance and you feel like you're going to tip over. It's just a matter of the weight; that box isn't heavy enough for that chassis [and] the sciences in 1995 compared to today are so much different." The final cost of the vehicle was approximately $140,000. "I was explaining to [Mayor Joseph M. Champagne] that this box on the back of this chassis can be remounted onto another chassis up to five times, so in the future it's going to be a saver for the taxpayers because it's less money they're going to have to put on the tax bill for the capital budget," Chief Krohn stated. "When residents call 9-1-1 for their loved one, when we show up with our Horton ambulance they're going to be guaranteed one of

the safest ambulances there is. Horton crash tests their ambulances up to 35 [g-force units] and they have rollover protection." Another safety feature bringing the new vehicle ahead of the curve are reflective chevrons located at the rear of the vehicle, a standard of the National Fire Protection Association [NFPA] but not yet adopted by the regulatory specifications known as "Triple K" that govern ambulance design. The squad, which now has three ambulances, will utilize its oldest, the 1995 model, for support work in the field as needed, and Chief Krohn said they were looking to mill and grade the area to the west of the squad building on Dover Road for use as a carport to house it. The second squad ambulance is a 2003 Ford E350 chassis with a Horton box, and the first responder vehicle is a 1997 Chevrolet Tahoe. In 2012, the South Toms River First Aid Squad answered 622 calls for service and had 28 calls go to mutual aid (commonly referred to as "turnovers" when another nearby squad takes the call). Chief Krohn said some of the mutual aid calls were because the squad already had a crew on a scene when a second request came in. The South Toms River First Aid Squad can be found online at www.strfas.org. Members are always welcome, and free training provided. The squad is also currently holding a Yankee Candle fundraiser sale until April 3rd to benefit their volunteer operations. Donations are gladly accepted in the form of checks mailed to South Toms River First Aid Squad, P.O. Box 57, Beachwood, N.J. 08722.

(From left) South Toms River Volunteer First Aid Squad Chief Robert Krohn joked around with Mayor Joseph Champagne after receiving delivery of the squad’s new ambulance earlier this winter, as members of the borough squad and Beachwood Volunteer First Aid Squad stood nearby. ERIK WEBER / OCEAN SIGNAL

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BRICK

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Plans Announced for Former Pathmark Site in Brick Township

by Phil Stilton BRICK – Bob Smith, attorney for M&M Realty Partners, LLC of Piscataway presented the newest plans during a recent township council meeting for the redevelopment of The Marketplace at Forge Pond at the site of the former Foodtown plaza on Route 70, here. The 14-acre site at the intersection of Brick Boulevard and Route 70, which was most recently used as a post-Hurricane Sandy debris removal site by FEMA and Ash Britt is shaping up to be a complex with striking similarity to the Pier Village in Long Branch. Previously, the builder and the township envisioned a hotel and conference center

at the location, but Mr. Smith said that based on M&M’s own feasibility study and one done by Brick Township, it was not economically feasible to build such a project at that location. The new plan calls for 31,268 square feet of retail space, topped off by 72 apartments in a three-story building at the front of the property along Route 70. To the rear of the property, the site will consist of 192 condominiums. Mr. Smith identified one problem in the project – a three-acre easement at the front of the property, owned by the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT). In many commercial developments along the state highway, the NJDOT has sold

back this easement to developers, but in this case, the attorney said the DOT had rejected the builder’s initial request. He and M&M Realty requested the township council modify the redevelopment agreement in place for the site and assist the developer in obtaining the easement from the NJDOT in a cooperative effort since the project will create jobs, housing and ratables for the township. It was also requested that the township consider the newly proposed redevelopment over the earlier hotel and conference center one. The site was designated by the township council as in need for redevelopment and described as blighted. In the fall of 2010, M&M Realty

Brick Diver’s New Book Shows Undersea Jersey Shore

by Christa Riddle BRICK--After the terror of Hurricane Sandy, the oncethought timeless treasures of the Jersey Shore became more precious than ever. The scars left behind by the super storm—toppled landmarks, ravaged homes, endless piles of wreckage and torn-apart boardwalks—will once again become our riches, thanks to the determined and spirited communities that have already began the process of rebuilding. Yet somehow, despite all of the turmoil and

unfathomable changes that took place along our coast in October, the green-blue, salty waters of the Atlantic Ocean continue to ebb and flow, licking the inflicted shoreline much like an injured cat cleaning its wounds. As coincidence would have it, Jersey-Shore resident, scuba diver and underwater photographer Herb Segars debuted his book, Beneath the Garden State: Exploring Aquatic New Jersey, only six months before Hurricane Sandy hit, paying testament to the hidden jewels that subsist in abundance below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. The book features over 230 color photographs capturing familiar and unfamiliar wildlife subjects that dwell in the Atlantic waters off of the Jersey coastline, along with Segars’s anecdotes and personal accounts. Segars’s photos borderline the magical as he brings to life the mysterious creatures living below the surface of the Atlantic, subjects that most of us never get the chance

to encounter or appreciate, such as a monkfish devouring a whole black sea bass and a sea star sprouting new limbs. Segars’s photographs include snapshots of fish, invertebrates, turtles, sea horses, dolphins and whales. Commenting on his book, Segars shares, “I worked all of my life towards this book. I like it because divers can show friends what they see. I also want non-divers to say, ‘Wow, I didn’t know we had this in New Jersey.’ My goal is to show people what’s here, to reveal what they otherwise would never get a chance to see. I find that children really take to the book because kids have a strong ability to focus. They love to observe and ask questions. After all, they are the ones that are going to someday change the world.” For three decades, Segars has combed the Jersey shoreline’s artificial reefs, made of sunken subway cars, tanks, tug boats and ships, searching for the often-allusive photo of something never seen before. “I have favorite places, but I like going someplace new, not knowing what I’m going to find,” shares Segars. “Wildlife photography, especially underwater, is difficult to time. You never know when you will encounter that special moment, and that is why you have to dive a lot. That is why it took me 30 years to accumulate the pictures for this book. Some things I have only seen once

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demolished the former buildings on the site at a cost of $1 million at the request of the council. If the developer is unable to acquire the easement from the NJDOT, the plans for the project will have to be modified, to allow room for parking, said Mr. Smith, adding that those modifications would be in the form of the elimination of 38 apartments and more than 10,000 square feet of retail space, an option he noted the builder does not want to proceed with, but could be faced with under the current circumstances. “We have been trying our darndest to get NJDOT to do the right thing at this site. The front of the property is owned by NJ DOT,” the attorney said. “While we can do a good project without that strip of property, we can do an even better project with it. We have gone to the DOT with the township to try to get them to move on it, we have not been successful in doing that.” Richard Redding, a leading fiscal impact expert in New Jersey, prepared a fiscal impact statement for the township, which Smith referred to, stating, “No matter which way you do this, the positive fiscal impact to the three levels of government, school, county and municipal, ranges between $400,000 and $490,000 in the plus. This is a great project that will provide good

housing and good retail for Brick Township – this can be a positive development for the town.” The 192 condominiums in the rear of the development would consist of one and two bedroom units ranging between 900 to 1,200 square feet each. Ron Allenbach, Director of Engineering for Edgewood Properties, a subcontractor of M&M Realty, described the condominiums as a gated community and a “Class A” project. “It’s not going to be a project where we build apartments with white formica cabinets and countertops,” he said. ”This is not something that is going to be slapped up and rented out for $800 per month. We’re in this for the long haul.” Edgewood was the builder of the Market Place at Brick on Route 70, home to Costco, Dick’s Sporting Goods and The Christmas Tree Shops. “We’re ready to start now,” Mr. Allenbach said. “We’re ready to start getting our approvals, the principal is ready for shovels in the ground as soon as we get approvals. It’s not Brick Township that is holding us up, but state government always can manage to get in the way.”| Prior to construction, the site needs to be raised to a recommended elevation increase of five feet to be brought into compliance with the new FEMA flood zone maps. The engineering director said the

builder was willing to begin bringing in fill to raise the elevation of the property prior to approvals. Residents who questioned the loss of the hotel claimed the site is big enough for a hotel. Mr. Smith explained that the site is more than big enough for the hotel and conference center, but two financial consultants’ feasibility studies showed that there is not enough business in the area to support such an entity at the location. That study is available for review at the township clerk’s office and could soon be available on the township website. Mike Tulane, a former Brick Township councilman and township municipal utilities authority commissioner said that the township council should remain steadfast behind the redevelopment plan to build a hotel and banquet facility and criticized the study, citing other area regional hotels being built. Mr. Smith reiterated to the council that not only did the builder conduct a feasibility study, but the council also conducted their own. “Prior to M&M saying they didn’t think a hotel conference center would work [and] had their commercial department solicit all the major hotel chains in the country whether or not they would be interested in the site,” he said. ”No one was interested in the site.”

during all of the years I have been diving, and I will never see them again. Once-in-alifetime moments are what I look to capture and share.” Segars’s love of the water began at a young age, when he would go swimming in a small pond near his home in South River, New Jersey. “This was the first place I snorkeled. One summer, I made it my project to raise from the bottom of the lake an old boat filled with rocks,” recalls Segars. “The boat’s wood was waterlogged, and even though I removed the rocks, the boat stayed where it was.” Around 1980, in the Cayman Islands, Segars headed underwater for the first time with a camera. The snapshots fell short of his expectations, but his interest in capturing marine life through a lens had only just begun. Segars took a diving course in Grand Cayman and became certified to dive. “I had to be actively doing something while diving, and I was already interested in photography,” says Segars. Soon, Segars started exploring the waters off of the Jersey Shore, an area convenient location-wise but difficult to photograph underwater due to low light and poor visibil-

ity. “Either you love to dive here, or you hate it,” comments Segars. “There is no in-between. And, of those who love it, only a small percentage are photographers. I am happy that the number continues to grow due to digital photography.” The artificial reefs and 2,000-plus shipwrecks off of the Jersey coastline provide underwater wildlife havens; a good num-

her own. Segars has not been diving since Hurricane Sandy and will not do so until June or July. However, he expresses concern that the Barnegat Bay will take a long time to recuperate from all of the sediment and sand that now covers the underwater ecosystems due to storm surges. “You have eel grass covering the bay’s floor. Certain marine life use this eel grass for food, homes and protection. With the eel grass covered by sand and sediment, this dependent wildlife may not survive. This affects the entire underwater food chain in the area,” tells Segars. He also notes that the sediment has raised the water level, which causes a risk for future flooding; if the bottom of the bay is dredged to alleviate this problem, it will greatly impact the bay’s underwater eco systems. For more information about Herb Segars and his new book, Beneath the Garden State: Exploring Aquatic New Jersey, as well as a sampling of his awe-inspiring photography, be sure to visit his website at www.gotosnapshot.com.

ber of these are captured in Segars’s book. Segars likes to keep his dives to depths of 80 feet or less so he can spend more time taking pictures. “One intriguing dive for me was off the Long Branch coast, where two pre-Civil War locomotives rest on the bottom of the ocean, side by side. No one knows who built them, when they were actually built or how they wound up on the bottom of the ocean,” shares Segars. Segars also likes photographing tug boats; his wife, Veronica, has one of

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SPORTS

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 SPONSORED BY ALL SHORE MEDIA. VISIT WWW.ALLSHOREMEDIA.COM FOR DAILY SHORE CONFERENCE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS NEWS.

Brick Memorial State Champs By Bobb Badders All Shore Media For 371 days, Brick Memorial’s wrestling team had one singular, unified goal: return to the NJSIAA Group IV final and complete a task left unfinished last February. “We had a thirst from the beginning,” said sophomore Alec Donovan. “Our goal was to get back here. And this time win it all.” Another chapter in the storied history of Brick Memorial’s wrestling program was written Sunday evening at Pine Belt Arena. And as it so often has in the past, the defining moment will be talked about for years to come. Donovan matched up with Southern Regional junior Zach Wilhelm, a state medalist in 2011 and a Beast of the East medalist this season, at 138 pounds with the Mustangs holding a seven-point lead. Donovan

good shape but Wilhelm is a tough competitor,” said Brick Memorial head coach Dan O’Cone. “We knew it was a toss-up.” The call did not sit well with Southern Regional head coach John Stout, who was adamant that it was not a pin. Donovan had not been awarded two points for a takedown prior to the fall. However, a wrestler doesn’t have to be taken down to be pinned from the neutral position. “I’ve been involved with wrestling for 32 years and I know what a pin is, I’ve seen it a thousand times, and it wasn’t even close to being a pin, especially in that situation,” Stout said. “He didn’t even call two for the takedown. And I know you don’t have to be taken down to be pinned, however, it wasn’t even close.” “I couldn’t really see what it was, it was right in front

Photos by Doug Bostwick, Sports Shots WLB. Brick Memorial celebrates after winning the Shore Conference Tournament Finals at the Poland Springs Arena, Toms River.

scored a takedown in the third period to force overtime, and in sudden victory he pinned Wilhelm out of a scramble with one second left on the clock to send Brick Memorial on its way to a 34-27 victory and the 2013 NJSIAA Group IV title. Donovan etched his name into Mustangs lore by effectively clinching Brick Memorial’s eighth state championship. Wilhelm was almost in on a takedown late in overtime but Donovan countered with a whizzer and a single on Wilhelm’s right leg as he attempted to scramble out of harm’s way. Wilhelm tried to reach over the top as Donovan drove forward, but the Mustangs sophomore rolled through and sat his hips out while hooking Wilhelm’s right leg. It happened in a flash and in the nick of time, the fall coming at 6:59, to give Brick Memorial a 28-15 lead with four bouts remaining. “Actually, in the practice before this my coach (Brian Grainer) got me in that same position and I picked it up out of nowhere and hit it here,” Donovan said. “There’s no name for that, I just caught his arm and turned him.” “We know (Alec) is in

of them,” O’Cone said. “I can only go by what the officials say. Of course if they say it’s a pin I’m not going to argue with that. I do think he had the two (points for a takedown).” Brick Memorial won seven of the 11 contested bouts against the Rams, including bonus points from Nick Costa at 195 and Joe Ghione at 120, for the second win over its Class A South rival this season. Mustangs senior Matt Moore was awarded a forfeit at 220 pounds while Brick Memorial forfeited the final two weights to Chris Serpico and Gerardo Jorge at 160 and 170, respectively, after Cliff Ruggiero’s 8-1 win over Jake Campana at 152 pounds clinched the match. The eighth title for Brick Memorial is also its third under O’Cone and third in six seasons. It places them tied for fifth in state history with South Plainfield and Kittatinny, which also have eight. “It has been an almost unquenchable thirst for me, personally,” O’Cone said. “I haven’t been able to sleep, I haven’t been able to eat, I haven’t been able to dream about anything else but coming here to wrestle and

erasing the chalkboard and writing something new. It’s been a weight on my shoulders that, as a professional, I couldn’t wait to get back here and get rid of.” We’ve been waiting for this moment ever since last year,” Maliff said. “We took advantage of it, wrestled our toughest and came out on top.” Southern, which won the Group IV title in 2005, saw its bid for the program’s second state title thwarted again by one of its familiar foes. The Rams made four straight Group IV finals from 2006 through 2009, losing twice each to Jackson Memorial and Brick Memorial. Despite injuries and a lineup that seemed to be in constant flux, Southern rallied late in the season to top a solid Shawnee program and capture its ninth South Jersey Group IV title. In the group semifinals, the Rams knocked off perceived favorite Hunterdon Central, which was coming off its second victory over Phillipsburg this season and had only lost to top-ranked South Plainfield. “I’m proud of how we wrestled, couldn’t be more proud,” Stout said. “They went on a great run and had a great tournament as a team. We’ve got to keep our heads up going into districts and keep wrestling at the same level.” A program that was established in 1981, Brick Memorial has enjoyed tremendous success basically from its inception. It won its first group title in 1986, the first of five under legendary head coach Tony Caravella. The Mustangs have enjoyed great continuity, as well, with just three coaches in their history. Caravella retired from head coaching after the 2003 season with 325 wins, two teams that finished No. 1 in New Jersey and a massive shadow cast over those who would follow him. Current assistant coach Dean Albanese took over for three seasons before O���Cone came over from Point Beach to start the 2007 season. In that span he has guided the Mustangs to three Group IV titles, two Shore Conference Tournament championships and piled up 147 wins. “To look at that trophy case before I started, it looked like an insurmountable task,” O’Cone said. “And I don’t ever think I’ll fill it up as much as coach Caravella did, but to win three state titles makes me feel personally like I can stand up to the standards he left.” O’Cone’s biggest problem now will be enjoying the win. He admitted he has to fight off urges to think ahead to the District 23 tournament even in the immediate moments after winning a state title.

Read the Ocean Signal Online www.oceancountysignal.com

Piners Shore Conf. Champs Piners Win First Shore Conference Tournament Since 1991

By Matt Manley All Shore Media Following his biggest win since becoming a head coach at the beginning of the 200708 season, Lakewood head coach Randy Holmes struck a Superman-like pose for the camera, revealing a goodluck charm under his formal, buttoned-down dress shirt. Under his suit and tie, Holmes wore an old graphic t-shirt with a team photo of Lakewood's 1991 Shore Conference Tournament championship team, on which Holmes starred as a senior guard. “I was going through my tshirts this morning, and this one was at the bottom of the drawer,” said Holmes, who wore the shirt for the first time ever on Saturday. “It was in a plastic bag that was making a lot of noise at the bottom of the pile. I pulled it out and sure enough, it was this shirt. I figured it might be a good luck charm.” Twenty-two years after leading the Piners to an SCT title as a player, Holmes watched as his team turned in a relentless defensive performance that sparked the Piners to a 39-33 win over Point Pleasant Beach to end the two-decade championship drought. “This one feels great as a coach,” Holmes said. “Just

the joy of being the leader of a group of young men, giving them the blueprint and them following it, I’m just very excited about it. I’m happy for the guys. I’m happy for my players because they deserve it.” Davis - whose older brother Jarrod was a 1,000-point scorer, won an NJSIAA Central Jersey Group III championship in 2010 and took the Piners to the SCT semifinals in his senior year in 2011 has come off the bench during his two varsity seasons and has had game in which he has not played at all this year. Saturday, however, the 6-foot-3 senior got a chance to play against a tall, athletic Point Beach team and he made his mark on both ends of the floor. During a 9-0 run to close the first half, Davis hit a long twopoint shot, a three from the top of the key and set up Craddox for an easy lay-up with a nice interior pass. “I told Erick to just be ready because you’re going to have an opportunity,” Holmes said. “Malik (Mendez) was turning the ball over a little bit, so I went to Erick and said, ‘Go ahead, this is your show right now. You’re a senior and you can’t get this back. At the end of this game, you can’t tell me I

didn’t give you a chance. So go in and do what you do.’” That 9-0 run gave Lakewood a 17-12 lead at halftime and was the beginning of a larger 18-3 run that built a 26-15 Lakewood lead early in the third quarter, the largest lead of the game. Point Beach chipped away over the next quarter-and-a-half and cut the Lakewood lead to 34-31 on a corner-three by Farrell that bounced off the back rim and dropped through. Farrell then ran down the long rebound on Davis’ missed three and dashed through an apparent seam to the front of the rim, but Davis ran him down and pinned his left-handed lay-up attempt against the backboard and Craddox grabbed the rebound before getting fouled. Craddox hit both free throws with 39.1 seconds left to stretch the Piners’ lead to five. Point Beach’s last lead of the game was a 12-8 advantage early in the second quarter before Lakewood grabbed control with the 18-3 run. Farrell had the most efficient offensive game for the Garnet Gulls, finishing with a game-high 12 points on 5-for-13 shooting while also adding six rebounds. The rest of the team shot just 7-for-31 (23 percent) from the floor and 2-for-12 (17 percent) from behind the 3-point arc. The win not only ended a 22-year SCT drought, but it also put to rest two years of frustration for many of this year’s players. Lakewood will now enter the NJSIAA Tournament next week riding high as the No. 1 seed in Central Jersey Group II. “It was tough losing the last couple of years and that definitley made us work harder,” Beverette said. “It feels good to leave here knowing my team is on top.”

BJ Clagon Wins Second State Title Toms River South Senior BJ Clagon Finishes with Second State Wrestling Championship in Atlantic City. See Results on Page 36 Photo by Cliff Lavelle

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SPORTS

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Jackson Liberty and Monsignor Donovan Cheerleaders Show Shore Spirit at Atlanta Nationals Cheerleaders from Jackson Liberty High School and Monsignor Donovan High School show off their Jersey pride together at the Cheersport National High School Cheer Championships in Atlanta, Georgia. Howell High School went on to win the national championship with a 77.85 final score, but Monsignor Donovan finished second with a 76.71 score. Jackson Liberty finished third with a score of 76.66, closing out a very close competition where the Jersey Shore took the top three spots in a field of national competitors.

Flyers Sign Former Jackson Memorial HS Goaltender

Photos courtesy Philadelphia Flyers

Former Jackson Memorial High School goalie Anthony Stolarz has signed with the Philadelphia Flyers after being drafted by the team in the 2012 amateur draft.

The Signal Wants Your Sports News Unlike traditional news media, the Ocean Signal is community driven. That means we’re interested in what’s going in our community. We all live and work in the towns we serve and we’re always on the lookout for a new story. Whether it’s your child hitting two home runs in a little league game or the signing of a professional sports contract, we treat all news tips the same, with special care and attention. While we may enjoy professional sports, let those other guys cover the New York Yankees or New York Mets, we’re interested in the Toms River, Brick, Beachwood and Jackson Little League Yankees. We’re more insterested in the Shore Riptide and Toms River Blackhawks than the New Jersey Devils and we care more about Angels, Green Dragons, Jaguars, Raiders and Indians than we are Giants, Jets or Eagles. Also unlike most newspapers, we use as many sports stories submitted by readers as we can. As spring approaches, we’d love to hear from your baseball team, lacrosse, softball and spring football. We’re also interested in amateur action and racing sports. So send your sports news to sports@ocsignal.com today or call 732-833-2365 to learn more about opportunities for your team or league.

Page 34

For advertising call The Ocean Signal 732-833-2365

SPORTS

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

High School Happenings

SPONSORED BY ALL SHORE MEDIA. VISIT WWW.ALLSHOREMEDIA.COM FOR DAILY SHORE CONFERENCE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS NEWS.

Toms River High School North’s Zach Molloy wins gold at states in the 100 yard freestyle competition.

Thomas Farrell Jr., of Monsignor Donovan signs letter of intent to play football at Division II Stonehill College.

Brad Henson, guard for Monsignor Donovan’s football team will play football in September for the UNC Tarheels.

Monsignor Donovan basketball player Dana Carbone scored her 1,000th point on February 21st.

Toms River South’s Christopher Marco will be continuing his track and field career next year at Notre Dame University.

Three Toms River North soccer players sign letters of intent. Left to right: Danae O’Halloran, University of North Carolina; Meg Larson, Seton Hall and Jenna Lobello, St. Francis University. Send your High School Happenings to sports@ocsignal.com

Lakewood BlueClaws Hot Corner: BLUECLAWS NEWS

BlueClaws Auditioning for Cheer Performance Team

Brick Resident Named New GM of BlueClaws

“An Experience of a Lifetime” LAKEWOOD-Take your cheer skills to the next level this summer with the Lakewood BlueClaws. The Lakewood BlueClaws proudly showcases their talent at select BlueClaws home games under the lights in front of thousands of fans just prior to the firework shows. Dancers ages 8-18, also perform half-time shows for the Harlem Globetrotters, Arena football and other college and pro sports events. The instructors for the dancers are past and present dancers and choreographers from major sports franchises and other professional venues. Dancers practice at the BlueClaws Stadium once or twice a month on weekends to learn pro level choreography. he program offers convenient monthly pay plans so that the dancers may enjoy an experience of a life time."

About this Section:

The BlueClaws hot corner is not affiliated or associated with the Lakewood BlueClaws professional baseball club. The section contains both original images by the Ocean Signal and photos and imagery made available by the Lakewood BlueClaws. During the season this section will have biweekly BlueClaws updates. Send us your BlueClaws fan photos at any time to sports@ocsignal.com to be our BlueClaws “Fan of the Week”.

BlueClaws to Help Restore the Shore Opening Weekend at FirstEnergy Park will have a decided Restore the Shore theme. BlueClaws players and coaches will be wearing special Restore The Shore jerseys April 4th -

7th, with the jerseys to be auctioned off to benefit BlueClaws Charities Restore The Shore efforts. The backs of the jerseys will have the names of different towns in Ocean and Monmouth Coun-

ties that were impacted by Hurricane Sandy (including Brick, Seaside Heights, Point Pleasant, Pt Pleasant Beach, Toms River, and many others). Please note that the determination of which jerseys will be worn by which players will not be made until days before Opening Day. There will be 50 jerseys auctioned off, and this includes all jerseys worn over the weekend by BlueClaws players and coaches (some will not be game-worn). The auction will be silent and run over the four days of Opening Weekend, with bidding beginning on Opening Day, April 4th and closing on April 7th.

Read the Ocean Signal Online www.oceancountysignal.com

By Phil Stilton LAKEWOOD—Between 2006 and 2010, the Lakewood BlueClaws won three South Atlantic League championship titles, include back-toback wins in 2009 and 2010. In the past two seasons, the BlueClaws have struggled. Last year, they finished the first half of the season with a 26-43 record. They didn’t fare much better in the second half, finishing at 36-33, just 3 games over .500 for a combined season record of 62-66 and a fourth place finish. I n 2 0 1 1 , t h ey f i n i s h e d with an overall record of 68-69 record, after finishing at the bottom of the SAL in the first half. In February, the BlueClaws announced they had replaced longtime GM Geoff Brown who left the team after Brown announced his resignation on January 22nd and accepted a position as Senior Associate Athletic Director / Chief Marketing Officer with Rutgers University. Brown was the team’s only GM, since their inception in 1999. Brandon Marano was announced the team’s new General Manager. Marano, previously the

team’s Assistant General Manager of Operations, becomes the second General Manager in team history. “This is an extraordinary opportunity and one that I am humbled to accept,” said Marano, a life-long Jersey Shore resident. “I have worked with Geoff for 12 years and have seen the extent of his impact on the BlueClaws and the area in general. “As they say, however, ‘The Show Must Go On,’ and it will. BlueClaws fans are the best in Minor League Baseball and they deserve the tremendous organiza-

tion and entertainment that we plan to provide. “We also look forward to continuing our working relationships with the Township of Lakewood, our corporate partners, and the Phillies.” One of the first employees hired by the BlueClaws, Marano has been with the team since September of 2000. He has overseen the Operations Department, including ballpark maintenance and gameday staff, since the team’s inception, while also serving as a member of the corporate sales team. Brandon currently resides in Brick with his

Winter at the Park: Snow falls at First Energy Park on Friday, March 8th, blanketing the field with a white coat. Top: BlueClaws celebrate 2010 South Atlantic League championship victory. Photo by Phil Stilton, Ocean Signal.

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SPORTS

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Around the Shore Conference...

WRESTLING REGION 6 FINALS

2012-13 High School Winter Sports Final Standings BOYS SHORE CONF. BASKETBALL

SHORE CONFERENCE WRESTLING

CLASS A SOUTH

CLASS A SOUTH

145: #1 (Sr) BJ Clagon (TR South / 40-0) p. #3 (Sr) Spencer Young (Jackson Memorial / 28-8) :31 3rd Region 6 Title For Clagon

SHORE CONFERENCE ICE HOCKEY CLASS A SOUTH

W

L

W

L

W

L

W

L

W

L

T

W

L

T

x-Toms River North

25

4

13

1

x-Brick Memorial

21

2

6

1

x-Brick

16

5

5

10

1

1

Jackson Memorial

22

6

12

2

Toms River South

22

3

6

1

Brick Memorial

13

10

2

9

2

1

Southern Regional

15

10

9

5

Jackson Memorial

14

7

5

2

Southern Regional

13

7

2

6

3

2

Brick Memorial

12

11

7

7

Southern Regional

11

5

5

2

Toms River East

11

9

3

5

4

3

Toms River South

10

11

7

7

Brick

16

5

3

4

Toms River North

7

12

2

4

7

1

Lacey

10

13

6

8

Toms River North

11

10

2

5

Jackson Memorial

5

15

2

3

9

0

4

17

2

12

9

15

1

6

Toms River South

0

21

0

0

11

0

Toms River East

Lacey

BOYS SHORE CONF. BASKETBALL

SHORE CONFERENCE WRESTLING

CLASS B SOUTH

CLASS B SOUTH

SHORE CONFERENCE ICE HOCKEY CLASS B SOUTH

W

L

W

L

W

L

W

L

W

L

T

W

L

T

x-Lakewood

26

3

13

1

x-Jackson Liberty

13

5

7

0

x-Wall

18

7

3

8

1

1

Point Boro

14

7

11

3

Point Boro

13

4

6

1

Point Boro

15

7

2

8

2

0

Jackson Liberty

13

11

9

5

Barnegat

14

12

5

2

Monsignor Donovan

13

10

1

7

3

0

Manchester

12

11

8

6

Central Regional

9

18

3

4

Jackson Liberty

9

12

1

3

6

1

Monsignor Donovan

10

14

8

6

Pinelands

7

14

3

4

Manasquan

5

14

0

3

7

0

Central Regional

8

13

4

10

Manchester

7

13

3

4

Freehold Boro

1

17

1

0

10

0

Pinelands

3

22

2

12

Lakewood

4

17

1

6

Barnegat

5

19

1

13

Monsignor Donovan

2

17

0

7

Got sports news to report? Send it to news@ocsignal.com.

Boys Basketball All-Shore / All Division

Girls Basketball All-Shore / All Division

Shore Conference Players of the Year Tyrice Beverette, Sr., G, Lakewood and Anthony Firkser, Sr., G, Manalapan

Shore Conference Player of the Year Kelly Hughes, Sr., G, Point Boro

Coach of the Year Randy Holmes, Lakewood All-Shore First Team Tyrice Beverette, Sr., G, Lakewood Jimmy Walsh, Sr., F, Manasquan J.R. Hobbie, Sr., G, Manasquan Brandon Federici, Sr., G, Colts Neck Anthony Firkser, Sr., G, Manalapan All-Shore Second Team Matt Farrell, Jr., G, Point Beach Solly Stansbury, Sr., F/C, Toms River North Damien Singleton, Sr., G, Toms River North Mike Gesicki, Jr., F, Southern Eric Carter, Jr., C, Jackson Memorial Coaches All-Division Teams CLASS A SOUTH First Team Solly Stansbury, Sr., F/C, Toms River North Damien Singleton, Sr., G, Toms River North Mike Gesicki, Jr., F, Southern Eric Carter, Jr., C, Jackson

Page 36

Memorial Tymere Berry, So., G, Toms River South Second Team Mike Golden, Sr., G, Brick Memorial Nick Specht, Sr., G, Jackson Memorial Kyle Carrington, Jr., G, Toms River North Marquis Davis, Jr., G, Toms River South Zach Policastro, Sr., G, Southern Player of the Year Solly Stansbury, Toms River North Coach of the Year Rory Caswell, Toms River North CLASS B SOUTH First Team Tyrice Beverette, Sr., G, Lakewood Kyle McGarry, Sr., F, Point Boro James Sofield, Jr., F, Jackson Liberty Mason Jones, Sr., G, Manchester Damiun Moore, Sr., G, Manchester Second Team Jared Craddox, Sr., F, Lakewood Ben Watson, Jr., C, Lakewood Andre Taylor, Sr., G, Point Boro Malik Mendez, Sr., G, Lakewood Evan Lang, So., G, Central

Coach of the Year Joe Montano, Red Bank Catholic All-Shore First Team Kelly Hughes, Sr., G, Point Boro Katelynn Flaherty, Jr., G, Point Beach Marina Mabrey, So., F, Point Beach Hannah Missry, Sr., G, Jackson Memorial Grace Fallon, Jr., G/F, Red Bank Catholic All-Shore Second Team Lyndsey Rowe, Sr., G, St. John Vianney Tara Inman, Sr., G, Holmdel Caroline Corcoran, Sr., F, RBC Jackie Dluhi, Sr., F, Middletown S. Dana Carbone, Jr., G, Msgr. Donovan All-Shore Third Team Grace Stant, So., G, Rumson-FH Ivy Harrington, Sr., F, Neptune Lauren Postell, Sr., F, Matawan Camerin Spahn, Sr., G, Freehold Kerry Malleck, Sr., F, Point Boro Coaches' All-Division Teams CLASS A SOUTH First Team Hannah Missry, Sr., Jackson Mem. Kendall Kauffman, Sr., TR North Stephanie Mason, Sr., Jackson Mem. Amanda Timmes, Sr., TR South Kristen Kennedy, Sr., TR East

Second Team Victoria Alvarez, Jr., TR South Anna Bojakowski, Jr., TR South Allison Spaschak, Jr., Southern Christina Gerew, Sr., TR North Mary Kate Sullivan, Sr., TR East Player of the Year Hannah Missry, Jackson Memorial Coach of the Year Sarah Knight, Toms River South CLASS B CENTRAL First Team Katelynn Flaherty, Jr., Point Beach Marina Mabrey, So., Point Beach Sarah Kurtz, Jr., St. Rose Brynn Bresnahan, Sr., Ranney Kat Phipps, So., St. Rose CLASS B SOUTH First Team Kelly Hughes, Sr., Point Boro Dana Carbone, Jr., Msgr. Donovan Kerry Malleck, Sr., Point Boro Kyasia White, Sr., Jackson Liberty Rachel Iozzia, Sr., Central Second Team Kelly Milana, Sr., Msgr. Donovan Samantha DeCapua, Sr., Barnegat Lauren Hughes, Sr., Point Boro Jess Macchi, Sr., Point Boro Brianne Allender, Jr., Central Player of the Year Kelly Hughes, Point Boro Coach of the Year David Kasyan, Jackson Liberty

NJSIAA Wrestling Medal Winnters 2013 NJSIAA Tournament Medal Winners 1st Place 145: (Sr) BJ Clagon (TR South) 2nd Place 113: (Sr) Kevin Corrigan (TR South) 3rd Place 138: (Sr) Rich Lewis (TR East) 4th Place 106: (So) Mike Russo (Jackson Liberty) 132: (So) Zach Hertling (Ocean Township) 195: (Sr) Matt Moore (Brick Memorial) 5th Place 138: (Sr) Brian Hamann (Jackson Memorial) 6th Place 160: (Sr) Dan Wojtaszek (Brick Twp) 170: (Sr) Tyler Richardson (Brick Memorial) 7th Place 182: (Jr) Nick Costa (Brick Memorial) 8th Place 126: (Sr) Alec Huxford (Jackson Memorial)

152: #6 (Sr) Chris Serpico (Southern / 26-5) d. #5 (Sr) Jake George (Long Branch / 33-6) 3-2 Serpico's 1st R6 Title, and his 2nd medal (4th-2012) / George 2-Time Runner-up 160: #1 (Sr) Dan Wojtaszek (Brick Twp / 32-3) d. #2 (Jr) Joey Schultz (Howell / 33-7) 3-0 2nd R6 Medal for Wojtaszek and his 1st Title 170: #2 (Sr) Dae'Sean Brown (Neptune / 36-2) d. #1 (Sr) Tyler Richardson (Brick Memorial / 32-4) 11-4 Neptune's first Region Champ since 1995 and career win #100 for Brown 182: #1 (Sr) Nick Zak (Jackson Liberty / 35-0) d. #3 (Jr) Nick Costa (Brick Memorial / 24-2) 4-2 2nd R6 Title for Zak 195: #3 (Jr) Mike Oxley (CBA / 33-3) d. #1 (Sr) Matt Moore (Brick Memorial / 30-1) 5-3 1st R6 Medal for Oxley / 3rd R6 Medal for Moore; 2-Time Runner-up 220: #3 (Sr) John Seidle (Neptune / 30-7) d. #1 (Jr) Tyler Poling (Brick Memorial / 22-6) 8-6 Seidle avenges D23 Final loss for 1st R6 Medal / 2nd R6 Medal for Poling (4th-2012) Hwt: #1 (Sr) John Appice (Manalapan / 35-1) d. #6 (Sr) Trevor Finn (Middletown South / 29-7) 7-1 2nd R6 Championship for Appice 106: #1 (So) Mike Russo (Jackson Liberty / 35-0) d. #2 (Fr) Owen McClave (TR South / 37-3) 1-0 2nd Medal for Russo; 1st R6 Title 113: #1 (Sr) Kevin Corrigan (TR South / 36-1) p. #7 (So) Nasiyr Brown (Neptune / 21-6) 3:40 3rd R6 Title for Corrigan 120: #1 (Jr) Joe Ghione (Brick Memorial / 35-2) p. #3 (Sr) Pete Ottaviano (Colts Neck / 31-8) 5:34 2nd R6 Title for Ghione and his 3rd R6 Medal 126: #6 (Jr) Ryan Budzek (Pt. Boro / 28-2) d. #1 (Sr) Alec Huxford (Jackson Memorial / 11-3) 5-3 SV 1st medal for Budzek / 2nd medal for Huxford 132: #7 (Sr) Ben Esposito (Howell / 38-1) d. #4 (So) Zach Hertling (Ocean Township / 27-3) 3-2 1st Title for Esposito (4th-2011) / 2nd medal for Hertling (1st-2012) 138: #2 (Sr) Rich Lewis (TR East / 31-0) d. #1 (Sr) Brian Hamann (Jackson Memorial / 31-4) 4-3 3rd R6 Title for Lewis / 3rd medal for Hamann (1st in 2010 & 2012) Scores and stats provided by AllShore Media and Shore Conference Wrestling. www.allshoremedia.net www.theshoreconference.com

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SPORTS

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 SPONSORED BY ALL SHORE MEDIA. VISIT WWW.ALLSHOREMEDIA.COM FOR DAILY SHORE CONFERENCE HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS NEWS.

Thunder in the Pines: New Egypt Speedway Racing in Ocean County returns March 16th at New Egypt Speedway with the Cabin Fever ROC Modifieds and Sportsmans races and continues all summer long in the pines of New Egypt. On any given Saturday night, if you’re traveling in the northwest corner of the county, you might hear what is commonly referred to as the “Thunder in the Pines”. No, it’s not ordinance testing at one of the nearby military installations or low flying cargo jets, but good

clean dirt track racing fun. Now, you don’t need to be from New Egypt, Manchester or Jackson to enjoy a night out at the New Egypt Speedway, located of course, nearby New Egypt. Races are generally kept to just a few laps and when there is an endurance race, you can sometimes visit the pits and check out the cars up close and personal. It makes for a great week end outing for the whole f a m i ly, e s p e c i a l ly o n e with young boys like ours. Originally built in the 1950’s as Fort Dix Speedway, it was a D shaped dirt track. In the 1990’s the speedway was enlarged and reconfigured into its current 7/16th mile D shaped clay speedway that has been in cont i nuo u s op e r ation now since 1998. Throughout the year,

you can catch special events such as mud hops and demolition derbies each season. For the young kids, the track hosts the New Egypt Speedway’s Kid’s Club with Ralphie the Racer. It’s a group for ages four to 10 and they gather twice during each Saturday night race in the picnic area. Kids get to ride through the pit area in the Fan Van and meet the drivers and see their cars up close. The Kids Club members then are treated to arts, crafts and games with activities supervised by Ms. Kim and Ms. Dawn. A yearly Kids Club membership costs just $10. The action on the track can sometimes be intense with tightly packed and close races with of course, the occasional turnover or crash. On average, 130 cars compete each weekend, plus the track hosts occasional Sunday and mid-week competi-

tions with some of the top national tours in the country. The racing is diverse at New Egypt, including Big Block Modifieds, sportsman racing, sprint cars, classic cars and of course, if you missed it the first time, mud hops and demolition derbies which are always fun.

If you plan on bringing your family to the speedway, get ready, get set and have a great night of racing in your own backyard. The track is just minutes across the Jackson border. Some tips for the family at the track? Bring bug spray. After all, you will be in the middle of the Pine Barrens on a hot summer night. Consider bringing ear protection for kids as it can get loud at times. Younger kids love wearing their favorite race car clothing, so dress them up in their Lightning McQueen or Mater shirts. The best thing about the speedway is you can pack your lunch or dinner and take it in with you. If not, they also have a fully stocked snack stand. We’ve now been to the track several times this summer and had a blast each time. You can of course come and go as you please, stay for just a couple races or make a night out of it, but one thing is certain, you can’t beat the action for the price and the locations!

Photos by Jim Brown. jimbrownracingphotos.com. MARCH-APRIL SCHEDULE FOR NEW EGYPT SPEEDWAY MARCH 23 Cabin Fever - ROC Modifieds/ ROC Sportsman 5:00PM $25.00

MARCH 30 Open Practice APRIL 6 Opening Day 358 Modifieds, Sportsman, Street Stocks 6:00PM $20.00 APRIL 13 358 Modifieds, FASTRAK Crates, FASTRAK Late Models, 305 Sprints, HCI/Spike-N-Go Rookies 6:00PM $20.00 APRIL 20 358 Modifieds, ARDC, Sportsman, Street Stocks 5:00PM $23.00 APRIL 27 Little League Night - 358 Modifieds, FASTRAK Crates, FASTRAK Late Models, 305 Sprints, HCI/Spike-N-Go Rookies Kids 16 and under in uniform receive FREE General

Jackson Recreation Basketball Team Makes Pixie Dust for Angelina

By Phil Stilton JACKSON—When Angelina Roberto was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on December 10, 2012, friends and family of the two year old girl rallied together and began raising funds for parents Crystal and Ed Roberto. They started a “Go Fund Me” page and set out to raise $10,000 for the young parents. By February, through contributions from the Jackson area community, they have raised over $25,000. After learning of the effort, Rich Gardella, who coaches the basketball team of Angelina’s big brother, Dante, 8, decided he and his team would get involved as well. They renamed their team “Team Angelina” and set out to raise money at their team’s games, held at the Switlik Elementary School in Jackson. In their first game, since learning of Angelina’s condition, Gardella had Team Angelina Shirts printed and the boys were given

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permission by the Jackson Recreational Basketball League to wear them. “We want to raise awareness and do some fundraising for Angelina,” Gardella said. “We and some volunteers from the Ryan J. Mogila Foundation came out and we’re here to support her, her family and brother Dante, who is on our team.” Gardella founded the Ryan J. Mogila Foundation in 2012, in honor of former Jackson Memorial High School basketball standout

Ryan Mogila who passed away last March. Angelina is also the granddaughter of Jackson Township Mayor Michael Reina. The family has set up a facebook page called “Pixie Dust for Angelina” to give updates on her condition and treatment. She has been receiving treatments at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the family reports she is making great progress after two months of treatment.

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ENTERTAINMENT

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Bamboo Reopens Bigger and Better, Bamboo Reopens with New Addition

Jackson’s 21 South Parties Like It’s 1899 Rumspringa? Amish Outlaws left Lancaster to rock the English world 10 years ago By Phil Stilton JACKSON—While the cast of the television show Amish Mafia have recently made a big splash in the entertainment blogosphere with their hit Discovery Channel this year, another band of Amish have been rocking the east coast for over ten years. “Straight Outta Lancaster”, the Amish Outlaws, a band that features real ex-Amish community members, have gone from the fields to the stage, even earning themselves the “Top Entertainment Pick” award by New York Magazine in their annual Winter Weddings issue in 2012. Unlike Lebanon Levi and his small gang of Amish tough guys who claim in the television show to run Lancaster County with an iron fist, the Amish Outlaws rule the stage and the audience at each of their performances. While the Amish Mafia are out tossing buggies, running hut parties and making sure there’s no adultery in their community, the Amish Outlaws made sure the English, that’s what they call non-Amish Americans, patrons at 21 South had one of the wildest nights out in Jackson in 2013.

Three members of the five man band are ex-Amish, including lead singer Brother Hezekiah, bass player Brother Ezekiel and keyboardist Brother Amos. According to Hezekiah, the three had left the Amish community years ago in search of a new life and were brought together ten years ago through the love of “English” rock music, a taboo in Amish society. As an Amish kid growing up, he said he had very limited access to rock music, but would sneak out with his friends to the local clubs and heard a new calling in life, one far from the hard life in the Amish community to a hard life on the road as a musician. As far as the Amish Outlaws ever bringing their road show back home to Lancaster, Hezekiah said, it’s doubtful. “Probably not,” he said. “It depends on the situation, but I’d say that’s not going t happen. We actually have a big Amish following in Maryland and they come out for us. They’re a different type of Amish down there. Like, the guy I met once at a gas station, he had a Back Street Boys kind of beard, so clearly he’s able to use the good razors, plus all the Amish girls he was with were smoking hot…I mean way too hot. They even had tans and not the tan you would get outdoors, they went to the tanning salon, just they’re wearing an Amish outfit. Maybe they got some different rules,

even the fact that they were at a gas station.” While fans of bands sometimes come to shows in costume, the band says that quite often people come out to their shows with Amish style clothes, especially in Maryland. “There’s a possibility I might move to Maryland one day and run for Congress. It’s ridiculous how much of a following we have there,” he added. What should you expect at an Amish Outlaws performance? “We get people motivated and really moving, really shaking on the dance floor,” Hezekiah said in an interview with the Ocean Signal. “I think because of that, generally

we’ve had success everywhere we’ve played.” The Outlaws play a wide range of covers from Dropkick Murphy’s to Elvis to Toby Keith to Dr. Dre to Marvin Gaye, but you won’t hear them play any of the Amish classics. In case you’re wondering whether the television show, Amish Mafia is actually real, Hezekiah says he doubts it, but if it is, it’s not sanctioned by the community like it’s portrayed on television. “I never saw anything like that when I lived there, so I’m going to say it’s probably not true. I left 20 years ago, so anything can happen, but I‘d say no,” he said.

By Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS--After being snowed out on their first planned Friday night dance party a week earlier, the Bamboo Bar in Seaside Heights hosted Fireball Friday on February 15th. Brian Huntenburg, manager at the club said they’re back and ready to continue the party that was interrupted when Hurricane Sandy shut them and the rest of the barrier island down last fall. The Bamboo Bar hosted their grand reopening on Saturday, February 2nd. “Opening weekend was unbelievable,” Huntenburg said. “The response has been great here. We had a set back with the weather the second weekend, but this is our third weekend open. People could not wait to get back to Seaside.” The Bamboo Bar will be open Friday and Satur-

day nights going forward, weather permitting and are planning a large St. Patrick’s Day party on March 9th. Huntenburg says it is one of the biggest days of the year for the club and they will have entertainment and food all day long, including live bands, Irish food and live dj’s both upstairs and downstairs. The party runs from 10 am to 10 pm. “The whole place is open, including the new addition we put on last summer and it’s going to be a great view of the parade.” “People in Seaside, whether you’re on the boardwalk or not, the people here are resilient and excited for it to come back,” Huntenburg said. “The nostalgia is coming back, the people are coming back and it’s a great thing for the town.” The club, which is two blocks away from the beach and boardwalk sustained only minor damage during the hurricane.

Is Amish Mafia Fake? The hit cable television “reality” series Amish Mafia has come under intense scrutiny of late and internet researchers have concluded the show is indeed fiction. In the opening credits, the show alerts viewers of selected reenactments, but the show closes with another disclaimer that reads, “re-creations are based on eyewitness accounts, testimonials and the legend of the Amish Mafia.” The show repeatedly refers to the law enforcement agency “Lancaster County Police”, which does not exist. Lancaster County District Attorney Craig Stedman said his department’s liaisons to the Amish community are unfounded. Ad-

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ditionally, in the Lebanon Daily News, East Stroudsurg’s Police Chief Steven Echternach says not only is the show fake, but it’s an exploitation of the Amish culture, Police records uncovered have shown that the cast of the Amish Mafia has an extensive petty criminal past filled with disorderly conduct and driving under the influence charges. Hollywoodite.com has been extremely critical of the show and has produced numerous public documents and photos that prove the show is a complete fabrication including show star Esther Freedman’s recent profile and dating ad posted to the Plenty of Fish dating website.

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ENTERTAINMENT

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

MTV Spring Fix Coming to Six Flags Great Adventure MTV Spring Break Special Filming This Week, Ends with Concert March 23 JACKSON—Spring Break is coming to Jackson this spring. With the devastation at the Jersey Shore, a common venue for MTV television productions over the years, the network announced it will be hosting a “Spring Fix” event this march here. For years, Seaside Heights has been a fixture on MTV, dating back to 1998 when the first “Summer Share” series at the MTV beach house. “Spring Fix,” will kick-off on Sunday, March 17 and culminate on Saturday, March 23 with a special concert at Six Flags Great Adventure. MTV cameras will be on the ground capturing all the “Spring Fix” activities, and the network expects celebrities, politicians and

more to stop in and take part. All of the “Spring Fix” coverage will air during a special “Spring Break” themed week on MTV. “We’re thrilled to partner with our audience and United Way to provide desperately needed help to communities in need following Hurricane Sandy,” said Stephen Friedman, President of MTV. “These young people are skipping the typical spring break parties to give back, and we’re honored to spotlight their work across our network.” MTV’s “Spring Fix” efforts are a continuation of the sustained effort by MTV to help rebuild Seaside Heights, New Jersey, and other areas devastated by Sandy. In November 2012, dozens of stars, artists and organizations joined with MTV for an hourlong fundraising special, “Restore the Shore,” which helped raise desperately needed aid to help rebuild

the heart of the Jersey Shore. Additionally, MTV partnered with Omaze. com to let viewers bid on six different experiences – from tickets to the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards to a Manicure with Snooki – as part of a raffle with proceeds going to Architecture for Humanity’s seaside rebuilding fund. Park President John Fitzgerald tells the Signal, “Six Flags has been an integral part of the shore community since opening in 1974. While the park was fortunate to be spared Sandy’s wrath, many of our employees and neighbors were deeply affected. Some of our neighbors remain in great need. We’re thrilled to partner with MTV, mtvU and the United Way to celebrate the strength and resilience of our shore community. It should inspire action and help raise funds to rebuild our beloved Jersey coastline. “

Surf Taco Hosts Mardi Gras Celebration in Jackson Top: B Soul Collective was jamming out at Surf Taco’s Jackson restaurant on South Hope Chapel Road. They played a selection of New Orleans style music to celebrate Fat Tuesday with the locals. Photo by Phil Stilton. Right: Surf Taco’s Seaside Park restaurant, which was damaged during Hurricane Sandy, is being rebuilt. The company says they are hoping the restaurant will be opened by Memorial Day, until then, you can have “Good Food” with “Good People” at their Silverton and Jackson Township locations. Photo by Surf Taco.

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ENTERTAINMENT Martell’s Tiki Bar Rebuilding After the Storm

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Staff Report After losing their party deck to Hurricane Sandy, Martell's Tiki Bar in Point Pleasant, like many other affected barrier island businesses, is continuing their slow road to recovery. From early aerial photographs, the damage to the beachside bar looked devastating but according Assistant General Manager Ed Brannigan repairs are expected to be completed by Easter weekend, March 30th and 31st. The good news for fans of the bar and restaurant is that Martell’s is now open on weekends while crews rebuild the deck that was lost during the storm. “We’re open now! On the first nice day, we can open the main tiki bar [and] Dr. Chico is coming,” said Mr. Brannigan. “On March 23rd, we’re hosting beers on the boards, a great outdoor beer festival on the boardwalk.” At midnight on October 29th, Brannigan said he received a text telling him the pier was gone, but he wasn’t able to confirm that news until two days later when access was granted by the borough. Upon arriving, he found that the damage to the indoor portion of the bar

and restaurant was minimal even though the ocean destroyed the pier deck. “We got lucky,” the assistant general manager said. “It could have been a lot worse and fortunately we fared better than some other places in other parts of the island, but we’re very fortunate.” “We had to do a lot of clean up outside, but inside it was just cleaning windows and there was no structural damage to the building itself, other than the pier.” he added. As far as the deck goes, Mr. Brannigan said when customers come back this summer, it will be complete and better than before. “I’m going to fix it, it’s going to get done and it will be business as usual here,” he stated. The indoor restaurant is now open on weekends for lunch and dinner and Martell’s is playing it by ear for now, letting the weather and the crowds dictate how long they will be open each weekend. “We open at 11, but we’ll be closing between 4 and 6 pm depending on how things are going and of course what the weather’s like," Mr. Brannigan continued. "We’re pretty much sticking to that routine as we have every other year, before Sandy.”

L ive b a n d e n te r t a i n ment returns regularly in the first week of May. “The township council tried passing the 2 am ordinance last year, then the state stepped in and put a hold on it, but we stayed open last year until 2 am," he recalled. "They passed it locally, but the ABC overrode them and eventually the town council reversed their decision.” When asked whether or not he’s worried about the borough council creating ordinance that could curb his business, Mr. Brannigan said, “Well, it’s done now, but you never know in this town. Anything can happen.” Since opening, the restaurant has been sporadically busy as curious onlookers come in to see what’s going on. “It’s actually good because the big misconception up north is that the Jersey Shore is destroyed," he stated. " They see Seaside and other places, but they don’t see that right here we didn’t do too bad, considering, and we’re expecting a really great year here.”

Not Exactly Carnegie Hall: The Nerds Rock Jackson Since 1985, The Nerds have been rocking the Jersey Shore and beyond with their strange blend of pop and classic rock, at a time when Michael Jackson, Madonna and New Wave ruled the airwaves. A few years later, the band was playing a sold out performance at New York’s famous Carnegie Hall, appeared on Good Morning America and were the wedding band for “Stuttering” John Menendez of the Howard Stern Show. After putting out an original cd, their first, nearly ten years later, the band decided to stick with the cover band theme. Over the years, the band has gained a large following and have aged like fine wine, some would say. On March 1st, the Nerds performed once again to a standing room audience at Jackson’s 21 South. While 21 South is not exactly Carnegie Hall, it’s a great out of the way spot to see more popular bands in a smaller venue.

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ENTERTAINMENT

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Barrier Island Open For Business Photos from top to bottom: Jimbos in Seaside Heights opened in time for the March 9th St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

Spicy Cantina Returns! Six Feet of Ocean Water Leaves Five Feet of Sand and 40 feet of Missing Basement Wall at Boardwalk Restaurant and Arcade. by Phil Stilton Wayne Cimorelli, owner of Spicy Cantina and Coin Castle arcade in Seaside Heights hosted a St. Patrick’s Day parade celebration four months after Hurricane Sandy nearly destroyed his business. The storm dumped over five feet of sand and flooded with over six feet of ocean water in

the restaurant, Cimorelli says construction work at the boardwalk favorite is nearly complete. The basement of the establishment suffered two twenty foot holes where the rising ocean broke its way through the decades old concrete block foundation. “We had over $1,000,000 worth of damage, but we’ve been able to rebuild, despite that we’re still waiting for insurance,” Cimorelli said. “The basement was completely flooded, but now we have all new walk-ins and it’s completely rebuilt and we remodeled the old Spicy, it’s beautiful.” Cimorelli said that much of the damage sustained to

his restaurant and arcade were not covered under insurance, especially in the basement where they kept their storage. Spicy will be open weekends for the near future. The upstairs section was still under construction days before the parade, , but he greeted guests to a full opening for the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Live entertainment returns to Spicy on March 16th with a performance by an Elvis impersonator. As for the arcade, Coin Castle sustained minor damage in the hurricane that was limited to the roof and water damage from the leaking roof according to Cimorelli.

JR’s Ocean Bar & Grill suffered minor flood damage during Sandy and was preparing finishing touches on both portions of the business over the past week. Inside view of the bar located inside JR’s Ocean Bar and Grill.

Nearby Marathon Steaks was also opened in time for St. Patricks Day (not pictured).

Beachcomber Bar and Grill owner Michael Carbone who braved the hurricane in the restaurant’s second floor apartment is pictured here with his son and two employees. Beachcomber was among the first business to reopen in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.

The Parlor Arcade in Point Pleasant was the first arcade in that borough to reopen in the aftermath of Sandy. Owned by Jenkinson’s, the Parlor Arcade joins the Jenkinson’s Aquarium, Jenkinson’s Bar and Jenkinson’s Sweet Shop.

Steve Whalen, owner of Lucky Leo’s arcade in Seaside Heights was among the very first businesses to reopen on the island. Whalen said his staff had to fix damaged arcade machines and dry out their flooded business but was spared any major damage.

Seaside’s Original Steaks and Steaks Ulimited opened a week apart in December. Both restaurants initially provided lunch to the recovery workers in the borough and satisified curious appetites once the general public started arriving in January.

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TRAVEL

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Piers Announce Tentative Plans for 2013

Great Adventure Landmark Demolished by Harry Applegate, GreatAdventureHistory. com JACKSON—One of the original landmarks of Six Flags Great Adventure is no more. On January 22nd, crews at the Jackson theme park demolished the Conestoga Wagon to make room for the new Safari Off Road Adventure loading and unloading area. Built in 1974, the Conestoga Wagon was designed to be a larger than life snack stand serving Mexicanstyle refreshments in the Rootin' Tootin' Rip Roarin' section of the park. Its location outside the main gates to the Great Arena made it a popular stop for guests on their way to and from the shows and spectacles presented daily in the early years. It still serves the same function with the Northern Star Arena now serving as the park's concert venue. One of the earliest planned elements of Great Adventure, the Conestoga Wagon was originally planned as the "Chuck Wagon" in the Enchanted Forest, the idea was incorporated into the Rootin' Tootin' Rip Roarin' section of the theme park, and opened in July of 1974. From the very start, the Conestoga Wagon was one of the park's signature larger than life structures, and its original elaborate and colorful paint scheme made it one of the most eye catching structures in a park filled with over the top architecture. The details of the Conestoga Wagon were quite amazing and authentically detailed. Large details like the hitch in the front, and the axels underneath, and

small details like the hardware of the boxes made the structure something special. The Conestoga Wagon served as one of the park's main snack stands in the early years, serving the thousands of guests seeing shows every day in the Great Arena. The patio areas were filled with rustic tables and chairs and umbrellas in coordinating red and yellow to match the bright colors of the Wagon and the Super Teepee next to it. Over time, the unique paint scheme was replaced with more subdued colors, and for a while a wood grain finish in an attempt to make it look more realistic. As time went on and the park expanded in other directions, the Great Arena was relegated to use primarily for concerts, and foot traffic past the Conestoga Wagon decreased. Increasingly it would be closed for parts of the day or even for days or weeks, and the building showed signs of neglect, with more theme elements being removed and generally looking like a shadow of its original glory. Since then, the building has been repaired and repainted, and with the increased traffic

through the area since the addition of Medusa in 1999, has become one of the more important food stands in the park again. Still larger than life after more than 30 years, the Conestoga Wagon stood as a reminder of how big Warner LeRoy's dreams for Great Adventure were. The Wagon still is one of the most photographed structures in the park, with many groups posing in or on the over sized wheels. The menu served hasn't changed much over the years with an emphasis on "portable" foods that can be carried into the Arena or enjoyed at the surrounding tables. About: Harry is the cocreator of GreatAdventureHistory.com along with Tom Benton. For years, the two have chronicled the details and history of the theme park in amazing detail and accuracy. You can learn more about the history of Great Adventure at www.greatadventurehistory.com.

This early park postcard shows the original paint scheme of the Conestoga Wagon and adjacent Super Teepee

SEASIDE HEIGHTS--On Memorial Day, visitors to the barrier island can expect to enjoy the rides on the lower deck of the Casino Pier, but the will have to wait until 2014 for the nearby Funtown Pier. Toby Wolf, the spokesperson for Jenkinsons, which owns and operates the Casino pier said she is expecting the rides on the lower deck to be open

in time for Memorial Day. The upper deck, which sustained the most damage, will be rebuit after Labor Day and is expected to reopen in 2014. The company is feverishly working to replace and repair the damaged portions of the lower deck. To date, most of the rides of have been removed from the pier and the southern section of the lower deck

has been completely gutted and needs to be rebuilt. While Casino Pier has received the bulk of the attention in the national and even international news media, to the south, the Funtown pier sustained a considerable amount of damage that sent many of its rides into the Atlantic Ocean during Hurricane Sandy.

Surviving Sandy: The Boardwalk Carousels

Rebuilding Ocean County’s Boardwalks

Top: View of the Jet Star rollercoaster with the Casino Pier in the foreground and Funtown Pier in the background. Upper Middle: The carousel inside the Carousel Arcade pavillion on the Funtown pier survived Hurricane Sandy despite the building collapsing just a few feet beyond the ride. Lower Middle: The Casino Pier carousel managed to get through Sandy from above, but the basement below which houses the ride’s eletrical components was flooded. Bottom Right: Construction progress on the Point Pleasant boardwalk continues at a steady pace. Bottom Left: Workers begin construction of the Seaside Heights Boardwalk. Both boardwalks are expected to be open in time for Memorial Day.

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EDUCATION

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

School Groups March in Seaside Heights St. Patrick’s Day Parade Toms River High School East Marching Raiders

Monisignor Donovan Senior Finishes 2nd in National Essay Contest Submitted by Madeline Kinloch Toms River, February 17, 2013- Kristen Borowski of Toms River, a senior at Monsignor Donovan High School placed 2nd in the National Voice of Democracy Essay Contest sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW). Kristen took first place at both the local and district levels to advance to the National level. At a reception held in Mt. Laurel, New Jersey, Kristen was awarded a $4,000 scholarship for her 2nd place finish. At Donovan, Kristen is an honor student and member of the National Honor Society, as well as belonging to the Academic Challenge team and chess club.

Jackson’s Teacher’s of the Year Recognized by Council

OCVTS LAW & PUBLIC SAFETY PROGRAM

Toms River High School North Marching Mariners

Shawn Levinson, Marilyn Ribera, Jason McEwan, Jamie Rodriguez, Naomi Fletcher, Marie Wardell, Stephanie Mezza, Alice Menafra, Margaret Bonilla and Eileen Wyer were recently recognized by the Jackson Township Municipal Council for their achievement being named their respective school’s “Teacher of the Year”. Eleen Wyer ofJackson Memorial High School was named the Jackson School District Teacher of the Year.

School News Briefs Jackson Band Director Inducted into Hall of Fame By Phil Stilton

Toms River High School North Military Club

Brick Middle School Robotics Club Takes First Place at OCVTS Competition

Brick Township’s Veterans Memorial Middle School Robotics Club attended a competition at Ocean County College which drew over 80 students from middle schools and high schools in Bayville, Barnegat, Brick, Toms River, and the Ocean County Vocational & Technical High Schools. The Cougars won first place among the middle schools and finished third overall beating 16 out of 20 high school teams.

Jackson Memorial High School Band Director Harold “Bud” McCormick was selected to the United States High School Band Director’s Hall of Fame earlier this month. McCormick is the first band director from New Jersey to ever win this award. In February, McCormick was presented with a Distinguished Service Award for 2013 by the New Jersey Music Educator’s Association. In January, the Jackson Jaguar Marching Band marched in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasdena, California. “The fact that Mr. McCormick has earned these distinctions makes perfect sense to us here in Jackson because we have witnessed firsthand his passion and creativity,’’ said Superintendent of Schools Thomas Gialanella. “His talent and dedication are an inspiration to our students and the district is thrilled to see him be recognized for his service to students and his contributions to musical excellence.’’

Brick Township School District has announced that all elementary schools of our district will offer Full Day Kindergarten beginning in the 2013-14 school year. The Jackson Township School District has announced that in the 201314 school year, the McAuliffe Middle School will test a new pilot schedule that will decrease the number of classes in a day from 7 to 5, not including lunch. The goal, according to the district is to extend literacy time each day to increase student achievement. There will also be an increased time in band and chorus programs. A Jackson Township School District security committee comprised of administrators and parents with expertise in the realm of school security and law enforcement have been working to evaluate our district’s security procedures and equipment on March 21st. The Ocean County College (OCC) Athletic Hall o f Fa m e C o m m i t te e i s accepting nominations for the OCC Athletic Hall of Fame. An Induction Ceremony &

Dinner will be held o n We d n e s d ay, November 20, 2013. Ocean County College is hosting an Annual American Sign Language (ASL) Rock & Roll Fundraiser Show on Saturday, April 6 at 7:00 p.m. at the Toms River High School North Auditorium, 1245 Old Freehold Road. Proceeds will benefit the Ocean County College ITP Club and the Wounded Warrior Project. Brick Memorial High School has launched a new Project Graduation website at www. bmpg.org. Project Graduation is a national project that promotes a drug and alcohol free graduation for high school students. OCVTS is now enrolling 7th through 9th graders for the 2013 Marine Science Summer Research Experience, a hands on field research summer camp. Visit www.ocvts. org for more information.

Got School News to Share?

Email your school news to schoolnews@ocsignal.com for consideration in the next issue of the Ocean Signal .

Mayor Kelaher Thanks Students for their Generous Donations By Debbi Winogracki, Toms River Township TOMS RIVER–After Hurricane Sandy struck our area, teachers and volunteers from the Toms River Regional Schools, under the direction of Tammi Millar, started the People’s Pantry. The organization takes donations for displaced area residents needing food and supplies. The North Dover Elementary School students were asked by their PTO to bring in certain items to donate to the People’s Pantry. Mayor Tom Kelaher joined Mrs. Thomas’s second grade class to thank them for their support. Kelaher said, “I continue to be so impressed by the spirit and generosity that exists here in town.” Mayor Kelaher spoke to the class about Hurricane Sandy, and the second-graders shared their stories about friends and family members who were impacted by the storm. The students from North Dover Elementary School donated supplies ranging from paper towels to First Aid Kits.

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BUSINESS

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Business Slowly Returning to Normal on Barrier Island First Boardwalk StandS Open After Hurricane Sandy By Phil Stilton SEASIDE HEIGHTS – Boardwalk stand operator Vinny Scuzzese isn’t waiting until the boardwalk is rebuilt in Seaside Heights return to his livelihood of 20 years. Mr. Scuzzese, who operates his stands on the boardwalk south of Jimbo’s restaurant, on Friday brought two of his stands to the rear of his property in the parking lot along Ocean Terrace where he will give post-hurricane curious tourists an outlet to play some good oldfashioned Seaside Heights boardwalk games of chance in makeshift stands. While he and his helper, Matt, set up his two stands, many passersby already stopped to ask if they were open. The gamestand operator said he should be complete by Saturday morning and return as time and availability permit.

Vinny Scuzzese (right) and helper Matt paused during work to open the first gamestand ready for patrons following Hurricane Sandy, located in a parking lot on Ocean Terrace near Jimbo’s.on Sherman Avenue. Phil Stilton/Ocean Signal.

Realtors Optimistic About Summer Rental Availability

By Phil Stilton

The second boardwalk stand to open in Seaside Heights was this wheel game inside Coin Castle.

NEXT ISSUE: We will take a look at how local marinas are rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy destroyed thousands of boats and damaged their structures, docks and bulkhheading. Photo: Bulkeading crew installs new bulkhead at Harbor Yacht Club in Brick Township.

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Agent Kim Valentini hangs keys for available rentals at Seaside Realty. Phil Stilton / Ocean Signal

SEASIDE HEIGHTS – Seaside Realty owner and MTV Jersey Shore liaison Michael Loundy said he expects a good rental season in here this summer despite the destruction unleashed by Hurricane Sandy nearly four months ago. On Friday, January 11th, his rebuilt office on the corner of Boulevard and Kearney Avenue reopened for the first time since the storm pushed three feet of water inside, requiring a complete gut and reconstruction. As contractors made finishing touches around the space last Friday morning, he and his agents returned and were almost immediately inundated with phone calls for summer rentals. Many calling in expressed concern about local amenities severely affected by the storm, including restaurants, clubs and boardwalk availability, all of which Mr. Loundy said should be back in business by Memorial Day. “As far as inventory of our housing stock, at this point, we’re at 70 to 75 percent with our existing landlords and we’re hopeful that number will just get better,” he said. “We’ll

be ready for anyone who comes down.” In January, the borough’s governing body met and awarded a #3.6 million contract to rebuild the boardwalk to Sidd & Associates of Millstone Township, following a traditional municipal bid process. Several other real estate firms up and down the barrier island also reported in. In Seaside Park, Heather Moffitt of Citta & Moffitt Realtors said she, too, received numerous calls for summer rentals in recent weeks, adding that her office was completing the finishing touches on the way to reopening for the 2013 tourist season. Jeff Hallamore, broker and office manager of Diane Turton Realtors in Lavallette, said that despite losing the entire first floor of the business they were able to operate out of a makeshift apartment-turnedoffice on the second floor to book rentals for the upcoming season. “As far as rentals go for this year, we’re getting a lot of calls from our past renters [and] we are, at this point in time, taking reservations,” he said. “We have properties that are available and not damaged in Lavallette and we have owners who say they might

be available by Memorial Day; others may be ready by July, so for those, it’s a moving target.” The broker added that out of area renters aren’t quite sure about what to make of the damage done to the borough and in surrounding towns or how it can impact their vacation. “People aren’t aware of just how much devastation there is down here. Some people call us thinking that two months have past and everything is back to normal, but it’s not,” Mr. Hallamore continued. “It’s part of the education process. We’re encouraged and think we’ll have a busy season in Lavallette, but Ortley is a whole different ballgame” He said the Lavallette borough government was working closely with businesses to ensure a smooth path for them to finish their repairs and re-open. “Lavallette borough has been amazing,” the broker stated. “They’ve done a great job and have been very supportive of the businesses and want to see us get back open.” Back in Seaside Heights, Mr. Loundy said his prized rental property, the Jersey Shore house from MTV’s hit reality television show, will soon be available.

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BUSINESS

| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

What to do When You Can’t Pay Your Mortgage

By Steve Fostek Ocean Signal Real Estate Correspondent My husband lost his job almost 9 months ago. We did not have much in savings. We were able to pay the mortgage for the first couple of months, but we can no longer afford to. We are a couple of months behind on our mortgage and we don’t know what options are available to us. Can you please help? Well the good news is that you are not putting your head in the sand. Unfortunately a lot of people don’t want to deal with the situation and they ignore it. Then the situation gets worse and harder to get out of. There are several options for you. The first option is to call your lender. Explain exactly what is going on with your husband’s job and your situation. The lender may restructure your loan; reduce the interest rate or a combination of a couple of things. They can put the amount that you are delinquent to the back of the loan. All lenders operate differently so it is hard to say how willing your lender will be to work with you. If you do not make head way with your lender or the new terms

still will not work then you have other options. These options include but are not limited to refinance, sell, short sale, deed in lieu of foreclosure, foreclosure or just walk away. Another lender may or may not be willing to do a refinance. The last few years have seen a decline in housing prices. Although prices are starting to come back it is slow in coming. Some homeowners owe more than their house is worth. The next option would be to sell and buy something cheaper or possibly rent. If you cannot sell your house for what you owe than you can consider a short sale. What this means is that you ask the lender to allow you to sell the house for less than what is owed. If they agree than usually you walk away owing nothing. They forgive the loan difference from the sale and what is owed. You will usually walk away making nothing, but some lenders offer incentives to do a short sale. You would do this to save your credit going forward. It will not erase the lates, but it will show paid in full. You could also turn the deed in to the lender in exchange for them forgiving the loan. You would have to

check with the lender to see if they would be willing to do this. Or you could go through the foreclosure process. Currently in NJ it is taking over 2 years for foreclosures to be fully processed. This is not a guarantee of time, but more of an average. You may get to stay in the house longer, but will affect your credit much more. The last option would be to just walk away. These are some options that may help you out until your husband finds another job and you get back on your feet. If you decide to not work out your current loan than the first thing you should do is to contact a Real Estate Agent and ask for their help. One thing you want to ask them is if they have experience in doing short sales. Most good agents should have the National Association of Realtors SFR designation. This shows that they have taken classes in the subject of short sales. The other thing that you should do is to call a Certified Public Accountant to see what if any tax implications there might be. I hope this helps you and your family during this difficult time.

Do you have business news to share? You can send your business news and briefs to biz@ocsignal.com for consideration in the next issue of the Ocean Signal news magazine. In our next issue we will start our “Biz Blotter” which will have short excerpts of business related news from around Ocean County.

Ask the Architect: Restore the Shore

By Paul Rugarber Ocean Signal Home & Building Correspondent Dealing with the destruction on a daily basis that we at the Jersey Shore have experienced, I want to help others to understand what is needed to rebuild their homes. I will review some of the major questions I have been receiving regard-

ing what needs to be done in what order and with what agency. Many owners are eager to rebuild, but are finding it frustrating and difficult to get answers to their questions in order to determine what the regulations are, what they should be doing, and how long it will take. One of the first decisions you should make is whether your house needs to be raised above the new Base Flood Elevation (BFE) height. There are a few guidelines to be aware of for this requirement. According to NJ State law, if your house has received substantial damage from the storm and is under the new Base Flood Elevation height, then you need to lift your house to bring it into compliance.

Well that certainly raises a lot of questions! What is ‘substantial damage’ you ask? It is defined as “damaged by flood to the point that repairs will cost 50 percent or more of the building’s tax assessed value”. This is the building portion of the assessment, not the land value. So who determines this percentage of damage? Each town has a Floodplain Management official who can be reached at the building department and he can make the determination. If it is clear that you have substantial damage, you can have your engineer or architect issue a letter to the town stating that you are over the 50 percent and you will be lifting your house. If you are not sure, contact your town and they will send someone out to assess the damage. Your insurance company should have done an assessment as well that you can use to determine this value. The second part to this issue is what your existing house height is and what the new BFE height is in your area. To determine this you will need a current Flood Elevation Certificate, which a surveyor can provide, to see how high your house is in relation to the new flood map heights. Governor Christie has re-

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cently declared that NJ has adopted the latest Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) maps, so there is no longer a guessing game as to what height the final numbers will be. I recommend hiring an architect that is well versed with these issues as it will simplify everything for you and they can get these questions answered so you are not left wondering how to proceed. Another item of note is that a Coastal Area Facility Review Act (CAFRA) permit is not required to rebuild or raise your house as long as you stay within the existing footprint. If you want to expand, you may need a CAFRA permit, but this determination can be made by your architect or the town building department. Insurance is the most confusing issue that homeowners are dealing with currently and the driving factor for the increased building heights. Life safety is certainly an issue, but the catastrophic cost to rebuild is the major issue. The standard homeowner’s policy does not cover any flood related damage. Many people have flood insurance as well, which covers up to $250,000 worth of building damage. If you have purchased the personal property provi-

sion then you may have $100,000 of additional coverage for items such as furnishings and clothes. Your policy needs to be assessed on a case by case basis and your insurance agent should guide you through this process. If you have the Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) clause in your policy, then FEMA will grant an additional $30,000 toward lifting your house if it needs to be lifted. This too has many requirements associated with it so you must talk to your insurance company and FEMA about this item. Two important notes here: First is that if you are to receive this ICC grant, then you must have all of the approved paperwork from FEMA, prior to lifting the house, otherwise they will not give you the money. Secondly the $30,000 grant is part of the $250,000 flood insurance policy, so if you have maxed out the policy, you will not get an additional $30,000. If you are applying for FEMA aid, then you will need to know what your insurance company is covering and also apply for the Small Business Administration (SBA) loan prior to FEMA issuing you money. (www.disasterloan.sba. gov/ela/) Depending upon who you talk to at FEMA, you may get different answers regarding what they will cover and how much,

but they have a maximum grant of $31,400 (this is different from the lifting grant). They have many requirements as to eligibility, so talk directly to them or go online to www.disasterassistance.gov. Hire a good architect that can guide you with all of these items and assist along the way. Trying to do this yourself is very confusing and time consuming. Have patience – everyone is in a rush to get back together, but it unfortunately is not a quick process. Knowing the steps to take will help you gain an appreciation for the many items needed to pull this recovery together. We at PDRdesigns are committed to treating everyone with respect and honesty. We would be honored to help you put your lives and homes back together. Please contact us with any questions you may have or to schedule us to come out to review your project. Paul D. Rugarber is the owner of PDRdesigns LLC, a Design / Build company located in Jackson, NJ. PDRdesigns specializes in creative residential Architecture and Construction. They can be reached at (732) 773-3000 or on the web at www.PDRdesigns. com.

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JOINT BASE

the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

Joint Base Airman Awarded Bronze Star for Afghanistan Service

by Pascual Flores Joint Base MDL Public Affairs JOINT BASE MDL -- Col. Richard Williamson, 305th Air Mobility Wing commander, presented the Bronze Star Medal and two foreign awards during a recent ceremony held at the base. The Bronze Star Medal recipient, Staff Sgt. Mark Kosisky, 305th Aerial Port Squadron air transportation specialist, also earned the bronze level German Armed Forces Proficiency Badge and the Romanian Defense Intelligence Emblem of Honor Medal, for his actions while deployed to Afghanistan from April 25 to Nov. 4, 2012. "It felt great to receive the award in front of my peers and the wing commander," said Kosisky. "I was truly humbled and honored. Kosisky deployed for seven months as the Movement and Air Liaison NCO

Col. Richard Williamson, 305th Air Mobility Wing commander, awards Staff Sgt. Mark Kosisky, 305th Aerial Port Squadron air transportation journeyman, the Bronze Star Medal Jan. 31, 2013.(U.S. Air Force photo by Wayne Russell/Released)

in-charge of Combined Special Operations Task Force-Ten during combat operations supporting International Security Assistance Force. Kosisky led the Kabul International Airport Movement Team processing 55,000 short tons of inbound cargo and 133,000 short tons of outbound cargo in support of the Assistance Force during his deployment. He was responsible for ground and air operations which maintained supply lines to 10 locations, six detachments and five partner nation units. Whether it was ammunition and cargo, or personnel conducting battlefield circulations throughout 10 provinces in Afghanistan, Kosisky used knowledge

Joint Base 1933

Life on the base and related naval operations from late February and early March 1 9 3 3 a s co m p ile d f ro m sources within the Toms River Library's Wheeler Room.

AIRSHIP COMES EAST It was reported that the Navy's newest dirigible, the U.S.S. Macon, could go to Lakehurst rather than Sunnyvale, California, as originally planned, following a suggestion by Representative William H. Sutphin of Matawan, Middlesex County, a member of the house naval affairs committee who stated the U.S.S. Akron could instead fly to the west coast in early spring and the Macon be stationed here. The Macon was then undergoing preliminary trials near its home base in Akron, Ohio. Rep. Sutphin further referenced the older, more tested base of operations available at Lakehurst as a benefit over the newer facilities in California, and that all factories manufacturing parts for the Macon were located in the east.

LAKEHURST LAYOFFS Twenty-nine civilian employees of Naval Air Station Lakehurst were laid off in mid-February due to a shortage of funds as a result of the economy and subsequent budget constraints at the base... despite earlier re-

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USS Macon (ZRS-5) flying over New York Harbor, circa Summer 1933. The USS Macon crashed on February 12, 1935 and two of its 76 crew members perished. Photo courtesy of US Naval Historical Center.

ports stating that the air station would close its doors as a result of constrained funding in the depressed economy, it was reported that Secretary of State Thomas A. Mathis visited Washington, D.C. and acquired the news that upon speaking with several senators, the base would not be on the cut list if the Navy's budget were reduced by five percent... in late February, the county board of freeholders approved plans drawn by Harry C. Shinn, county engineer, to construct the "Lakehurst Hangar road," subject to approval by the state highway department. The plans for the new road called for the extension of a road already partly constructed from Ridgeway Boulevard, leading into downtown Lakehurst, north past the hangar and ending in a wooded area. That roadway, known today as South Hope Chapel Road/County Route 547, was extended to connect with Ridgeway Road to decrease the land vehicle travel distance between the base and Lakewood by a mile and a half. It was also extended farther north to the northern end of Ridge-

gained as an aerial porter to help coordinate all ground and air movements for the task force. The Bronze Star Medal is a decoration authorized by Executive Order No. 9419 Feb. 4, 1944, and is awarded to a person in any branch of the military service who, while serving in any capacity with the Armed Forces of the United States, has distinguished themselves by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, in connection with military operations against an armed enemy. The medal is the fourthhighest combat decoration and the ninth-highest U.S. military award in order of precedence (combat and non-combat).

way Boulevard, creating the fork in the road that exists today... Jeanette Whitton Moffett, wife of Admiral William A. Moffett, was announced to christen the Navy's newest airship, the U.S.S. Macon, in early March in Akron, Ohio. At the time, neither the admiral nor his wife knew that a little over a month later, Admiral Moffett would be dead along with 72 others in the worst naval airship tragedy in U.S. history.

MARINES SEARCH FOR LOST RIDGWAY BOY

Approximately 100 Marines stationed at Lakehurst were sent by the truckload to aid in the search of a four-yearold boy, Joel Ridgway III, from Bamber Lake who, in one newspaper report, wandered away from his father who was cutting wood in the early afternoon of Monday, February 27th. The boy, after accompanying his father into the woods, said he wanted to return to the car but instead went for a walk. A second news article stated that he was already sleeping in the car while his father was cutting the wood some distance away and when he returned he found the child missing. When his father failed to find the boy shortly thereafter, he called the state police, who in turn called the naval base and other local police and volunteers from the Barnegat, Lakehurst and Forked River areas. At 9:30 pm, the boy was found sitting on a railroad embankment in Pasadena, eight miles away from where his father's car was parked, by Andrew Anderson and Horace Snyder of Whitings. It was doubted that the boy could have made it through the windy and cold night, and he was taken to the Loris Potter farm in Pasadena to recover until his parents arrived, who later said they couldn't thank the search and

Army Sgt. Michael Skelley and Spc. Christine Hoyt, right, representing the 77th Special Troops Battalion, Army Reserve, won the Best Warrior Competition Feb. 24, 2013, at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. The three-day competition consisted of sev(U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Morris/Released)

Soldiers vie for best warrior spot by Staff Sgt. Shawn Morris 99th Regional Support Command The Army Reserve's 77th Sustainment Brigade hosted its Best Warrior Competition Feb. 22 through 24, 2013, here. The Best Warrior Competition tests Soldiers' military knowledge, skills and physical fitness. The competition has two categories for the competitors. Specialists compete in the Soldier category and sergeants through sergeants first class compete in the

NCO category to determine the top enlisted Soldiers in both the junior enlisted force and within the NCO Corps. Sgt. Michael Skelley and Spc. Christine Hoyt, representing the brigade's 77th Special Troops Battalion, won the competition. The three-day competition comprised events ranging from land navigation, weapons qualification, Army physical fitness test, Army warrior tasks, 10k road march, personal appearance board, drill and ceremony and a written exam. Soldiers

participating in the competition competed against each other for accuracy and speed as many of the events were timed. Army NCOs must be able to set an example for the soldiers under their charge and be physically capable to lead. The competition's goal is to test the courage of these leaders. The winners will advance to the 316th Expeditionary Sustainment Command's Best Warrior Competition, scheduled to be held in late March at Fort Devens, Mass.

rescue team enough. The New Jersey Courier took the opportunity to report that the missing boy was a descendant of Capt. Joel Ridgway of Barnegat, keeper of the life-saving service at Barnegat Inlet, who, in 1887, took his lifeboat out in one of the worst snowstorms ever recorded to the Austrian bark Kraljevica, where it was stranded on the Barnegat shoals. There the captain found the ship deserted as its crew had taken a longboat and drowned. During the attempted rescue, Capt. Ridgway's lifeboat capsized on the shoals, three of his men drowned and he and three others survived and made it to “North Point o' Beach� where they were taken ashore by the Forked River station crew.

as Assistant Secretary of the Navy for seven years and through World War I following an appointment by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913... the wife of Lt. Clinton S. Rounds, who spent the winter in the Brigantine hostel in Beachwood, left on the U.S. Army transport Republic for California. The following month, her husband was due to leave for the west coast by motor. Two years later he would survive the crash of the U.S.S. Macon rigid airship only to perish in 1942 when the non-rigid L-2 blimp he was piloting collided with a G-1 blimp over the Atlantic Ocean five miles off Manasquan during an experimental night flight... Dr. Davies of the air station considered setting up a private practice in Toms River... the U.S.S. Akron left for Panama on March 9th to land officers of the Navy construction division of the bureau of aeronautics to inspect sites for a mooring mast there, with Commander F.C. McCord in control. Its route was to first take it to Miami, Florida and then arriving in Panama on around March 14th. Commander Garland Fulton and Lt. Commander Thomas, of Washington, and Lt. Com-

mander H. V. Wiley, executive officer of the Akron, would land in Panama via the small aircraft carrier in the dirigible's hull and piloted by Lt. D.W. Harrigan and Lt. R.W. Larson. Following a day at the canal, the airship was to return to Miami around March 16th and then fly back to Lakehurst... nine students graduated from the Parachute Material School on the base on Monday, March 6th following the successful completion of free fall jumps from 2,000 feet. Instructor Weiss, aviation machinist and pilot, made the first jump from the non-rigid airship (read: blimp) J-3, followed by the students in pairs and trios. No injuries were reported... details on the christening of the U.S.S. Macon in Akron, Ohio for March 11th were announced as including two of 48 carrier pigeons released to bring the news to Macon, Georgia, the airship's namesake; the naming of the ship by Mrs. Moffett; the inflation of twelve gas cells inside the vessel with helium to bring it three to four feet above the ground; and a silver service presented to the new airship as a gift by Mayor G. Glen Toole of Macon, Georgia.

CAPTAIN COULTER

Lt. and Mrs. Howard N. Coulter and daughter Gloria left in early March for Akron, Ohio, where the lieutenant was ordered to become communication officer on the U.S.S. Macon airship following the completion of his assignment as a student officer on the U.S.S. Los Angeles airship. He later became Capt. Coulter, commander of Fleet Airships Pacific during World War II... the contract for the construction of the Cathedral of the Air was warranted complete following a final check by its architect, Paul Philippe Cret... it was announced that the U.S.S. Akron would fly down to Washington, D.C. to be present at the inauguration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt on Saturday, March 4th. USS Akron on a flight in 1932. Photo courtesy of US Naval HIstorical Center President Roosevelt served

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JOINT BASE Ex-butcher turned Sailor now sutures service members by Airm an 1st Class Ryan Throneberry Joint Base MDL Affairs JOINT BASE MDL -- Lt. Gen. Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller, a highly decorated U.S. Marine Corps officer, once said, "There's no better in the business than a Navy corpsman." A hospital corpsman is a medical specialist who serves with both Navy and Marine units. The Navy corpsman rating has a storied history and will soon celebrate its 115th birthday. Petty Officer 2nd Class Joseph Pulliam, who calls New Orleans home, is a hospital corpsman attached to Ma-

me by my rate, HM2. As they got to know me better, the mutual respect grew." Corpsman work in a wide array of medical capacities, including shore establishments such as naval hospitals and clinics, aboard ships and as the primary medical caregivers for Sailors downrange. Pulliam said his favorite part of his job is helping people, which is why he originally sought out information on medical jobs in the Navy. Prior to his enlistment, the "Big Easy" native worked as a meat cutter in butcher shops and grocery stores. "It definitely is an interesting transition now that I think about it," said Pul-

Petty Officer 2nd Class Joseph Pulliam, Marine Aircraft Group 49 hospital corpsman, takes a blood sample from Lance Cpl. Jordan Helsel, MAG-49 administrative specialist, Feb. 14, 2013, at the MAG-49 building on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J. A hospital corpsman is a Navy enlisted medical specialist who serves with Navy and Marine Corps units. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan Throneberry/Released)

rine Aircraft Group 49 here. "We work in various facets of the medical field anywhere from managing medical records to performing minor procedures," said the corpsman. "It is our job to keep our Sailors or Marines fit and ready to serve to the best of their abilities." Corpsmen are referred to as 'Doc' while serving among Marines; a term which shows mutual respect between the Marines and their caretaker. "Doc was a title I had to earn while stationed here," said Pulliam. "When I first got here, they just called

l i a m . " B e i n g a fo r m e r butcher certainly lends to the fact that I have no fear of blood whatsoever. Suturing or plugging open wounds doesn't bother me at all." Pulliam sees as many as 10 to 50 Marines a day as part of his duties at MAG-49; a number he says is small compared to his first tour of duty aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier. Close to 7,000 Sailors are on a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, with only about 15 corpsman and a handful of nurses and doctors.

Pulliam spoke of one occasion aboard the Roosevelt which he said he will always remember as his proudest moment as a Corpsman during which he assisted in the medical evacuation of a fellow Sailor. The Roosevelt was off the coast of Virginia when, during an exercise, a crewmember started to experience extreme abdominal pain. When X-rayed, doctors found the patient had numerous gall stones and needed to be immediately flown back to Naval Station Norfolk. Pulliam was chosen to ride along on the CH-53 Sea Stallion for the two-hour trip back to shore. His job was to provide the patient with intravenous painkillers every 20 minutes through an IV on his hand. "The fact they trusted me with such a task so early in my career really added to my confidence and love of my job overall," said Pulliam. Another memorable Roosevelt experience occurred when one of Pulliam's friends fell overboard while working on the flight deck. The Sailor was carrying heavy chains used to tie down aircraft when he was dragged overboard off the aft side; falling almost 90 feet into the water below. He was knocked out on impact. "Luckily he was wearing his float coat or he might have been sucked down by the rotors," said Pulliam. "Because I knew him, I was selected to help him back to operational status through physical therapy and rehab. Needless to say, my time on the Roosevelt was pretty interesting." Although Pulliam thoroughly enjoyed his time at sea, he said being detached with a Marine unit is by far his favorite yet. "It's a different beast," said Pulliam in reference to being stationed with a Marine unit. "I feel like the mentalities vary between the blue side and green side. During my time at MAG-49, I have really come to enjoy working with Marines and I hope to continue to do so in the future."

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| the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013

Navy Capt. William Bulis, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst deputy commander, celebrates Read Across America Day March 1, 2013. Children from the base community experienced an interactive reading of “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish� by Bulis as Thing 1, Andrea Cramer, and Cat in the Hat, Lt. Col. Gene Mattingly, 87th Mission Support Group deputy commander, acted it out. (photo by Wayne Russell/Released)

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the Ocean Signal | Friday March 15, 2013 |

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Ocean Signal - March 15th 2013 - Vol. 1 Issue 1