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2| SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014

Save on school supplies during sales tax holiday Staff report

he sales tax holiday for back-to-school shopping will be Aug. 1-3 this year. The sales tax exemption covers: ■ Computers and related accessories for $750 or less per item ■ Shoes, clothes and accessories of $100 or less ■ School supplies that cost $15 or less For more information, go to dor.myflorida.com/dor/ tips/pdf/tip14a01-04_full_ list.pdf.

T

ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

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Make sure your child is enrolled and ready The checklist includes registration forms, proof of immunization and proof of physical exam. By John Patton Correspondent

hile the first day of school on Aug. 18 is all about the kids, the lead-up has some requirements for parents and guardians, as the Marion County Public Schools system has created a four-step checklist to ensure each child is properly enrolled. The initial step involves filling out two online forms. First, type in the student’s personal information in the highlighted fields of the enrollment registration form, located at www. marion.k12.fl.us/parents/ RegistrationForm.pdf. A Spanish version can be found at www.marion.k12.fl.us/parents/ RegistrationFormSp.pdf. Then, fill out the emergency contact form (www.marion.k12. fl.us/parents/EmergencyContactForm.pdf for English, www. marion.k12.fl.us/parents/ EmergencyContactFormSP.pdf for Spanish). Second, save the forms to your

W

COMING SOON!

BRUCE ACKERMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE

Ryan Furlong, 12, right, grimaces as he gets the HPV vaccination from Rachel Thompson, an RN, at the Marion County Health Department in Ocala last July. As part of enrollment, parents must bring proof of immunization on a Form 680 to the student’s school. computer for personal recordkeeping. The third step is to print out the forms.

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Finally, at any time before school begins, take the completed enrollment registration form and emergency contact form

along with proof of age (kindergarten students must turn 5 on or before Sept. 1, 2014) and proof of immunization on a Form 680, which can be obtained at the Marion County Department of Health (1801 SW 32nd Ave., Ocala), to your student’s school. Additionally, proof of a physical examination within the last year is required, and if documentation can’t be provided, an examination must be scheduled in the next 30 days. Academic history, special education information and proof of Marion County residency also are required. If you are not the legal guardian/residential custodial parent of a student, or there is a court decision regarding the release of information related to custody/restraining orders, state law requires either Court Custody Documentation stating specifications, a Department of Children and Families Placement Letter or Educational Guardianship (notarized documents stating parent/legal guardian of student is incarcerated) be provided. Do all of this, and parental homework is done. Then, it will be the students’ turn.

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■ Registration information,

Page 2 ■ Test preparation, Page 3 ■ Start times, Page 4 ■ School

calendar, Page 5

■ Names to know, Page 6 ■ Election information, Page 6 ■ New ■ Field

school leaders, Page 6 trips, Page 8

■ Cool

notebook ideas, Page 10 ■ How to get kids organized, Page 11 ■ Getting your child ready for kindergarten, Page 12 ■ After-school snacks, Page 13 ■ Study abroad, Page 14 ■ Kids’ study desks, Page 15

-Pay Cart Fee Only $14.95Offer good 6/1/2014- 8/31/2014

Call Collared 352-347-1271 for tee times shirts, no jeans, no cutoffs.

COVER ART: Illustration by Rob Mack/Staff CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: John Patton, Marian Rizzo and Joe Callahan EDITOR: Dave Schlenker COPY EDITOR: Sharon Sullivan

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Portal helps students prepare for new standardized testing By Joe Callahan Staff writer

arion County school administrators say a new state portal that shows Florida Standards training assessments will be a valuable tool in preparing students for next spring’s new era of standardized testing. The new assessments replace the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT), which was retired in the spring. The new Florida Standards curriculum is geared toward more critical-thinking concepts. The following resources are available on the portal: TRAINING TESTS: These are designed to help students, parents and teachers become familiar with question formats and the delivery system of the

M

Check out the portal www.fsassessments.org computer-based test, known as a CBT. The tests are designed by the American Institutes for Research. DRAFT TEST DESIGN SUMMARY/ BLUEPRINTS: The test design summary and blueprints will provide more detailed assessment information, including the percentage of items in each content category, cognitive complexity and a general number of test items. DRAFT TEST ITEM SPECIFICATIONS: These specifications define the content and the format of the assessment and test items for each grade level and subject. DRAFT MATHEMATICS POLICIES

AND MATERIALS: This document describes policies and materials specific to the mathematics assessments, such as calculators and reference sheets. In the fall, the state Department of Education will release enhanced practice tests for students, in sufficient time for students to become familiar with the new features prior to testing. A public comment period to gather feedback runs through Sept. 5. The public comment form is located on the portal. A longer version of this story was published in the July 10 edition of the StarBanner. Joe Callahan can be reached at 867-4113 or at joe.callahan@starbanner.com. Follow him on Twitter at JoeOcalaNews.

Communities host back-to-school parties for families To help get parents and students into a school state of mind — and donate supplies for students in need — Marion County community groups host back-to-school bashes. As of press time, two are scheduled: SHORES BACK 2 SCHOOL BASH: Party and school-supply giveaway, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 2, Silver Springs Shores Community Center, 590 Silver Road, Ocala. Free backpacks, food and entertainment. (687-3553 or 426-5712) BACK-TO-SCHOOL BASH: Party and supply give-away, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 9,

CORRESPONDENT/FILE

Yveleise Townsend, 2, enjoys hula-hooping along with the help of her mother, Yvonne, as her older brother, Archie, looks on as families enjoyed the Back-to School Bash at the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Complex last August. Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Complex, 1510

NW Fourth St., Ocala. (368-5505)

Education Department

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4| SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014

Start and ending times for public schools ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Anthony Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Belleview Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Belleview-Santos Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. College Park Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Dr. N.H. Jones Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Dunnellon Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. ISTOCKPHOTO.COM East Marion Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Hammett Bowen Jr. Fessenden Elementary: Eighth Street ElemenElementary: 7:45 a.m. to tary: 8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Emerald Shores Elemen- Fort McCoy K-8: 7:45 a.m. 2:05 p.m. Harbour View Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. to 2:05 p.m. tary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Greenway Elementary: Evergreen Elementary: Legacy Elementary: 7:45 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m.

2012 AAU National Champions

2013 AAU National Champions

2014 AAU National Champions

Powerhouse Gym 1433 SW 15th Ave. 34474 2014 Mini-Club Volleyball Parent Meeting/Team Placements Saturday August 16th Parent Informational Meeting 9am August 16th Registration (10U – 11U – 12U) 9:30am – 10am Team Placements (10U – 11U – 12U) 10am – 12pm Registration (13U – 14U – 15U 16U) 1:00pm – 1:30pm Team Placements (13U – 14U – 15U 16U) 1:30pm – 4:00pm LAST CHANCE PLACEMENTS – August 23rd All Ages 10U – 16U 9am – 12pm

Ocala Power United Volleyball Mini Club Season is geared toward younger players 8 - 16 years old (not on a High School Varsity Roster) that want to develop their skills and play volleyball in a safe, fun and competitive environment. Teams practice twice a week and will compete in 4 tournaments in September and October. Mini-Club will stress development and playing time opportunities. It will be led by our 3 Time National Championship Ocala Power United staff maintaining the same training philosophy utilized in the regular club season.

Visit www.ocalapowerunited.com for more information Or contact Bill Littell: (352) 615-9814 Like Us on Facebook

a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Madison Street Elementary: 8 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. Maplewood Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Marion Oaks Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Oakcrest Elementary: 7:55 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. Ocala Springs Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Reddick-Collier Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Romeo Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Saddlewood Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Shady Hill Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. South Ocala Elementary: 7:55 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. Sparr Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Stanton-Weirsdale Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Sunrise Elementary: 7:45

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a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Ward-Highlands Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m. Wyomina Park Elementary: 7:45 a.m. to 2:05 p.m.

9:35 a.m. to 3:40 p.m. Osceola Middle: 7:50 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.

HIGH SCHOOLS Belleview High: 9:20 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Dunnellon High: 9:10 Belleview Middle: 9:25 a.m. to 3:35 p.m. a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Forest High: 8:45 a.m. to Dunnellon Middle: 9:20 2:55 p.m. a.m. to 3:40 p.m. Hillcrest: 9:05 a.m. to 3 Fort King Middle: 9:25 p.m. a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Lake Weir High: 9:15 a.m. Fort McCoy K-8: 7:45 a.m. to 3:40 p.m. to 2:05 p.m. North Marion High: 9:20 Horizon Academy at a.m. to 3:20 p.m. Marion Oaks: 8 a.m. to Marion Technical Insti2:20 p.m. tute: 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Howard Middle: 9:35 Vanguard High: 8:35 a.m. a.m. to 3:35 p.m. to 3:05 p.m. Lake Weir Middle: 9:20 West Port High: 9:25 a.m. a.m. to 3:25 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Liberty Middle: 8 a.m. to Community Technical & 2:20 p.m. Adult Education: 8 a.m. to North Marion Middle: 10 p.m.

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SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 |5

Marion County Public Schools 2014-15 Calendar August Thursday, Aug. 7: New teachers report to school

Tuesday, Aug. 12: All teachers report to school

Monday, Aug. 18: First day of school

emergency make-up day, if needed)

Thursday, Nov. 27, and Friday, Nov. 28: Thanksgiving, no school

March

December

no school

Wednesday, Dec. 10: Early release Monday, March 30, through Friday, Friday, Dec. 19 through Friday, Jan. 5: April 3: Spring break

September

Winter holiday break

Monday, Sept. 1: Labor Day holiday Wednesday, Sept. 10: Early release day Friday, Sept. 19: District in-service day,

January

no school

October Wednesday, Oct. 1: Early release Friday, Oct. 24: No school Wednesday, Oct. 29: Early release

November Wednesday, Nov. 12: Early release Wednesday, Nov. 26: No school (weather

Wednesday, March 18: Early release Friday, March 27: Teachers’ workday,

Monday, Jan. 5: Classes resume Friday, Jan. 16: Teachers’ workday, no

May Wednesday, May 6: Early release Friday, May 22: No school (weather emergency make-up day, if needed)

school

Monday, May 25: Memorial Day, no

Monday, Jan. 19: Martin Luther King Jr.

school

Day, no school

Friday, May 29, through Monday and Tuesday, June 1-2: Semester exams for

Friday, Jan. 30: District in-service day, no school

grades sixth through 12th

February

June

Wednesday, Feb. 11: Early release Monday, Feb. 16: Presidents’ Day, no

Wednesday, June 3: Last day of school Thursday, June 4: Teachers’ workday

school

From the

CORRESPONDENT FILE

Kindergarten students play with puzzles on the first day of school last year at Legacy Elementary School.

and the Halifax Media Group

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6| SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014

New leaders Eight Marion County schools will have new principals in the 2014-15 school year, which begins Aug. 18. Elementary ■ Belleview-Santos:

Fredna Wilkerson Park: Cassandra Boston ■ Dunnellon: Gay Street ■ Evergreen: Erin Quainton ■ Greenway: LuAnn Clark ■ Hammett Bowen Jr.: Teresa Forsyth ■ Harbour View: Heather Guest ■ College

Middle ■ Liberty: Jennifer

Sibbald

Three School Board seats up for grabs in election Staff report

hree School Board seats are up for grabs in the upcoming August election. ■ District 3: Bobby James (incumbent), Jan Moerlie, Jim Touchton and Ed Wilson. ■ District 4: Chase Basinger, Jamie Bevan, Angie Boynton (incumbent) and Diane Schrier. ■ District 5: Ron Crawford (incumbent) and Kelly King. The latter race will be decided for good on Primary Election Day, which is Aug. 26. In the other races, a candidate must get 50 percent of the votes plus one; otherwise, the top two voter recipients will proceed to the November general election. School Board elections are nonpartisan, and all

T

Temple Beth Shalom Ocala Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood

www.jewishocala.com

registered voters can vote. The Marion County League of Women Voters has taped a televised candidate forum that will air at 2 p.m. today on the Marion Education Channel. All candidates were invited, but not all participated. The Marion Education Channel can be found as follows: ■ Brighthouse Channel 198 ■ Comcast Channel 99 ■ Cox Communications Channel 12 ■ Cablevision of Marion County Channel 13 ■ Oak Run and Pine Run Channel 99 ■ Ocala Palms Channel 11 ■ On Top of the World Channel 60. ■ Over the air, with a digital converter box, on Channel 7.1

1109 N.E. 8th Avenue 352-629-3587

We invite you to worship with us every Friday at 7:30 PM and on the upcoming High Holidays Affiliated with the Union for Reform Judaism

High Holy Days 5775/2014

Erev Rosh Hashanah

August 31st – Saturday Sep 20th - Saturday 8:00 PM Slichot Program, 8:00 PM Selichot Program, 10:30 PM‚ 11:00 PM Service 10:30 – 11:00 PM S’lichot Service Sep 24th - Wednesday September 4th – Wednesday PM Erev Rosh Hashanah 7:30 PM7:30Erev Rosh Hashanah Service Sep 25th - Thursday September 5th – Thursday AM Rosh Hashanah Day I, 9:30 AM9:30Rosh Hashanah Morning Day I followed bybyTashlich Tuscawilla followed Tashlich atatTuscawilla ParkPark Sep 26th6th - Friday September – Friday AM Rosh Hashanah Day II Day II 9:30 AM9:30 Rosh Hashanah Morning Sep 28th8th - Sunday September – Sunday PM Cemetery Service 1:00 PM1:00Temple Cemetery Service

Rabbi Ze’ev Harari

Rabbi Ze’ev Harari and Musical Soloist Ellen Allard

September 13th – Friday Oct 3rd - Friday Erev Yom Kippur 6:30pm 7:30 PM Erev Yom Kippur, Kol NidreService – Saturday Oct 4thSeptember - Saturday 14th 9:30 AM Yom Kippur Morning 9:30 AMSaturday Yom Kippur Morning Service 4:00 PM Afternoon service, 4:00 Yomfollowed KippurbyAfternoon Yizkor YizkorPM service, Neilah andService, Break-the-Fast followed by Ne’ilah Service and Break-the-Fast

Oct 10th - Friday 7:30 PM Sukkot Celebration Sukkot / Simchat Torah

th Sep Oct 20 16thFriday, - Thursday7:30 10:00PM AMSukkot MorningCelebration Service and Sep 26th Thursday, 10:00 AM Morning Service Yizkor service and Yizkor service Oct 17th - Friday 7:30 PM Simchat Torah Celebration Sep 27th Friday, 7:30 PM Simchat Torah Celebration

Religious School Registration, Open House Meet and Greet Sunday, 11th,17th 2013from from10am-12noon 10am-12noon Sunday,Aug August 1st day of Religious School • Sunday, Sunday, September Aug 18th, 9:30 – 12:30 PM 7th,AM 2014 from 9:30am-12:30pm Teaching Hebrew, History, Customs & Ceremonies Visit us at www.jewishocala.org• Membership Info: 352-629-3587

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Names to know SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS ■ District 1 — Nancy Stacy Nancy.Stacy@marion.k12. fl.us 812-2723 ■ District

2 — Carol Ely Carol.Ely@marion.k12.fl.us 288-0860

■ District 3 – Chairman Bobby James Bobby.James@marion.k12. fl.us 427-3781 ■ District 4 — Vice Chairwoman Angie Boynton Angelia.Boynton@marion. k12.fl.us 817-9986 ■ District

5 — Ron Crawford Ron.Crawford@marion.k12. fl.us 401-7698

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS George Tomyn George.Tomyn@marion.k12. fl.us 671-7702 DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT, CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION Rick Lankford Rick.Lankford@marion.k12. fl.us 671-7705 DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT, OPERATIONS Chester Gregory Chester.Gregory@marion. k12.fl.us 671-7720 TRANSPORTATION SERVICES BUS INFORMATION 671-7050

Stacy

Ely

James

Boynton

Crawford

Lankford

STUDENT SERVICES Mark Vianello, executive director Mark.Vianello@marion.k12. fl.us 671-6868 Tomyn

R U O F O L L A LOOK FORCTIONS IN THE SPECIAL SE AND ON

. ness or service si u b r u o y e is n advert ITED! M I sk how you ca L a d S n I a 2 E 1 C 0 A .867.4 Hurry, SP Just call 352

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Giveaways available while supplies last. No purchase necessary to enter or win. Sweepstakes entry on August 2nd, 2014 from 10am–2pm only at participating Cox retail locations —Millerville, Pensacola on Bayou and Ocala. Open to legal residents of Cox serviceable areas of Baton Rouge, LA, Pensacola and Ocala, FL 18 years of age or older at time of entry. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes subject to Complete Official Rules. Sponsored by Cox Communications Louisiana, LLC, Cox Communications Gulf Coast, LLC and CoxCom, LLC. *Accessory cable offer available 8/1/14 – 8/31/14 at participating Cox retail locations only. Cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion, while supplies last. Selection varies by location. Other restrictions apply.©2014 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014

8| BACK TO SCHOOL

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Field trips provide fun, learning for kids outside the classroom Teachers find local venues are great places to take their students set on taking his intensive reading students to Marion Theatre to see a teen-appropriate film that’s been adapted from a novel they’ve read. He said he’d like to follow that up with a Starbucks run. “Kids love Starbucks,” Steffey said. “And, Marion Theatre is both historic and within walking distance. One of the problems with field trips is you have to get buses and come up with gas money. I would love to take my kids to Universal or Disney, but the state doesn’t want them to miss that

much class time. This kind of thing, we can get in and out and back to the school for lunch. The goal is to use what we have around us without worrying about buses and transportation.” Holly Yokum, a teacher of gifted students at several Marion County schools, also targeted a nearby venue for a field trip last May, when she took 32 students from South Ocala Elementary School to the Appleton Museum of Art. “Not only did they tour the museum,

they also did a study on a piece of art that was on display, and they had an art lesson while they were there,” ne of the ways teachers Yokum said. “I wanted them to make learning more interexperience the culture of going to the esting to their students is Appleton, but I also wanted them to by taking them out of the leave with something they had classroom and into the real created. I didn’t want them to miss this world. They take field trips great museum that we have in our to art museums, concert own backyard. They were so thrilled, halls, farms, and even they just kept repeating that they movie theaters. wanted to come back soon with their David Steffey, an Osceola Middle families.” School teacher, already has his mind Mary Britt, executive director at Ocala Civic Theatre, said she has seen a slight drop in attendance with the school field trips that come annually for the Tampa-based Bits ‘N Pieces DOUG ENGLE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE puppet shows. Redeemer Christian School students admire a painting entitled “Notes of “We have 10 performances and can Love,” by Italian artist Francesco Vinea, during a field trip to the Appleton accommodate 4,000 students,” Britt Museum in Ocala. said. “We’re still seeing more than 3,000 students every year, but it has dropped off a little because of the cost Matt Lane, director of psychological of transportation and ticket prices. and social work services for the Tickets are only $5, but to some kids Marion County School System, said that’s like $1 million. We work with the greatest benefit is that field trips the schools. From the first time the bring to life what’s being taught in the theatre started doing this 20 years classroom. ago, we’ve made allowances for “If they (students) are studying a students” who need financial help. particular topic and then go on a field As an additional help, the theater has trip, they’ll never forget it when it’s started doing free in-school programs experienced like that,” Lane said. that include instructional materials “There are social impacts on students for the teachers to use, Britt said. as well, primarily in the way of “What we’ve discovered is, there’s team-building and working together. definitely an interest,” she said. They have to cooperate with each “These kids are our future audience. If other, listen and follow directions, they’re not exposed to it when they’re and work together as a team, and HOLLY YOKUM, teacher of gifted students at they’re having fun while they’re doing young, they don’t even know to seek it Marion County schools it. out as an adult.” Ever since Petting Zoo Ocala opened “I have the utmost admiration for parents. at the end of August, private and teachers who plan these field trips,” “We give information on the animals Lane added. “I’ve gone on some with public schools have been organizing and where they come from, so the kids my kids. I’ll never forget the trip to class trips to the facility. Marica Palacio, who co-owns the zoo with her learn a little geography as well as the Washington, D.C., and the teachers at care of the animals,” Marcia Palacio husband, Luis, said Blessed Trinity Shady Hill that organized that. To this said. “They can do a round-the-world BRUCE ACKERMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE Summer Camp has planned a vacaday, my kids remember things they trip when they come here, with Third-grade students from Marion Oaks Elementary School try to get the attention of chickens in an enclosure tion period field trip, and The Virtual learned on that field trip. So, I know animals representing Australia, during their field trip to the Petting Zoo Ocala on West State Road 40 in Ocala last May. About 93 third-graders from School has booked a visit for the fall from a first-hand experience the value Africa, Egypt and Peru.” the school took their field trip to the zoo, which is owned and operated by Luis and Marcia Palacio. for more than 70 students and their of it, as well.” By Marian Rizzo Correspondent

O

“I wanted them to experience the culture of going to the Appleton, but I also wanted them to leave with something they had created. I didn’t want them to miss this great museum that we have in our own backyard.”

DOUG ENGLE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE

A pedestrian makes her way by the Marion Theatre in downtown Ocala. David Steffey, an Osceola Middle School teacher, plans on taking his intensive reading students to Marion Theatre to see a teen-appropriate movie that has been adapted from a novel they’ve read.

SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014

8| BACK TO SCHOOL

BACK TO SCHOOL | 9

Field trips provide fun, learning for kids outside the classroom Teachers find local venues are great places to take their students set on taking his intensive reading students to Marion Theatre to see a teen-appropriate film that’s been adapted from a novel they’ve read. He said he’d like to follow that up with a Starbucks run. “Kids love Starbucks,” Steffey said. “And, Marion Theatre is both historic and within walking distance. One of the problems with field trips is you have to get buses and come up with gas money. I would love to take my kids to Universal or Disney, but the state doesn’t want them to miss that

much class time. This kind of thing, we can get in and out and back to the school for lunch. The goal is to use what we have around us without worrying about buses and transportation.” Holly Yokum, a teacher of gifted students at several Marion County schools, also targeted a nearby venue for a field trip last May, when she took 32 students from South Ocala Elementary School to the Appleton Museum of Art. “Not only did they tour the museum,

they also did a study on a piece of art that was on display, and they had an art lesson while they were there,” ne of the ways teachers Yokum said. “I wanted them to make learning more interexperience the culture of going to the esting to their students is Appleton, but I also wanted them to by taking them out of the leave with something they had classroom and into the real created. I didn’t want them to miss this world. They take field trips great museum that we have in our to art museums, concert own backyard. They were so thrilled, halls, farms, and even they just kept repeating that they movie theaters. wanted to come back soon with their David Steffey, an Osceola Middle families.” School teacher, already has his mind Mary Britt, executive director at Ocala Civic Theatre, said she has seen a slight drop in attendance with the school field trips that come annually for the Tampa-based Bits ‘N Pieces DOUG ENGLE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE puppet shows. Redeemer Christian School students admire a painting entitled “Notes of “We have 10 performances and can Love,” by Italian artist Francesco Vinea, during a field trip to the Appleton accommodate 4,000 students,” Britt Museum in Ocala. said. “We’re still seeing more than 3,000 students every year, but it has dropped off a little because of the cost Matt Lane, director of psychological of transportation and ticket prices. and social work services for the Tickets are only $5, but to some kids Marion County School System, said that’s like $1 million. We work with the greatest benefit is that field trips the schools. From the first time the bring to life what’s being taught in the theatre started doing this 20 years classroom. ago, we’ve made allowances for “If they (students) are studying a students” who need financial help. particular topic and then go on a field As an additional help, the theater has trip, they’ll never forget it when it’s started doing free in-school programs experienced like that,” Lane said. that include instructional materials “There are social impacts on students for the teachers to use, Britt said. as well, primarily in the way of “What we’ve discovered is, there’s team-building and working together. definitely an interest,” she said. They have to cooperate with each “These kids are our future audience. If other, listen and follow directions, they’re not exposed to it when they’re and work together as a team, and HOLLY YOKUM, teacher of gifted students at they’re having fun while they’re doing young, they don’t even know to seek it Marion County schools it. out as an adult.” Ever since Petting Zoo Ocala opened “I have the utmost admiration for parents. at the end of August, private and teachers who plan these field trips,” “We give information on the animals Lane added. “I’ve gone on some with public schools have been organizing and where they come from, so the kids my kids. I’ll never forget the trip to class trips to the facility. Marica Palacio, who co-owns the zoo with her learn a little geography as well as the Washington, D.C., and the teachers at care of the animals,” Marcia Palacio husband, Luis, said Blessed Trinity Shady Hill that organized that. To this said. “They can do a round-the-world BRUCE ACKERMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE Summer Camp has planned a vacaday, my kids remember things they trip when they come here, with Third-grade students from Marion Oaks Elementary School try to get the attention of chickens in an enclosure tion period field trip, and The Virtual learned on that field trip. So, I know animals representing Australia, during their field trip to the Petting Zoo Ocala on West State Road 40 in Ocala last May. About 93 third-graders from School has booked a visit for the fall from a first-hand experience the value Africa, Egypt and Peru.” the school took their field trip to the zoo, which is owned and operated by Luis and Marcia Palacio. for more than 70 students and their of it, as well.” By Marian Rizzo Correspondent

O

“I wanted them to experience the culture of going to the Appleton, but I also wanted them to leave with something they had created. I didn’t want them to miss this great museum that we have in our own backyard.”

DOUG ENGLE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER/FILE

A pedestrian makes her way by the Marion Theatre in downtown Ocala. David Steffey, an Osceola Middle School teacher, plans on taking his intensive reading students to Marion Theatre to see a teen-appropriate movie that has been adapted from a novel they’ve read.

BACK TO SCHOOL

10| SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014

OCALA STAR-BANNER | www.ocala.com

Add zing to notebooks, store-bought or DIY Kids can trade their standard notebooks for something snazzy and more personalized. Frecklebox’s personalized notebooks for school children include fun dinosaur and animal print patterns.

By Kim Cook The Associated Press

hen it’s time to start stocking the school backpack, it’s easy to just grab a stack of plain, boring notebooks. But since kids have to tote these things to and fro every day, why not trade the standardissue ones for something snazzy and personalized? There are plenty of eye-catching options to buy or to make yourself. At Zazzle and Cafepress, you can upload favorite images and decorate custom journals and notebooks with different fonts and colors. There also are fun backgrounds like chevrons, animal prints, sports themes and nature motifs that can be jazzed up with monograms or catchphrases. (www.zazzle. com; www.cafepress.com) Frecklebox offers cute, 50-page, wide-ruled spirals printed with owls, hearts, flames, robots, camouflage, flowers and other kid-centric patterns for grades 2-8. They can be personalized with names or initials in a variety of styles. (www.frecklebox.com) My Paper Monkey’s got some fun designs, including sporty cartoon dinosaurs for the younger set, and star, splatter and checkerboard designs for older kids. Names can be ordered in cool fonts that resemble graffiti, industrial

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Monogrammable notebooks for back-to-school come in a variety of cool designs including geometrics and animal prints. Kids also can design their own by uploading photo collages and adding type. stamps or pretty, Parisiennestyle script. (www.mypapermonkey.com ) Add your name to a chalkboard image of inspiring words on a notebook at Tinyprints, or choose from designs like

patchwork, meadow or feathers. (www.tinyprints.com) If your kids are crafty, consider making a notebook or journal from scratch using recycled paper. Magazines, scrapbook paper and maps make good

cover art, and can be cut into geometric shapes or left intact; apply to chipboard or cardboard, add blank or lined paper, and secure. Online tutorials suggest binding them with staples, duct tape, brads, book rings, wire, elastic or stitchery. (www.babbledabbledo.com) Yarn and ribbon make pretty patterns on a plain book. Create stripes of color, or make a bunch of little bows or loops as embellishment. You can affix bandanas or cloth napkins in zingy

PHOTOS BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This photo provided by Frecklebox.com shows personalized notebooks and book markers. Geometrics and graphic prints put a preppy spin on notebooks that can be personalized with kids’ names or initials.

If your kids are crafty, consider making a notebook or journal from scratch using recycled paper. designs. Glue on buttons, sequins or shells. Or give a composition book about three coats of chalkboard paint and add a bulldog clip to hold some chalk so you can carry an always-ready art space. Find some craft pipe cleaners and create a colorful, textured notebook cover. Or add a rainbow of rubber bands to a notebook cover to hold clips and pencils. Is there some material or felt lying around the house? Cover a book with soft velvet and add a stamped design of leaves for a luxe little book you’ll love to get to work in. Or if you like to sew, cut out a felt cover and embroider it closed around the edges; add a pocket for an eraser or pen. (www.spoonful.com) Got a favorite cereal, cookie or other food that comes in a box? Cut it up and grab the Mod Podge adhesive to make fun notebook covers that will remind kids that home, and snack time, await at the end of the school day. (www.mypaperpony.blogspot.com)

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Experts help kids become more organized By Katherine Roth The Associated Press

uccess in school often depends on how well a student manages to organize everything from demanding schoolwork to a dizzying array of after-school activities to technological distractions. That’s a lot to ask of a child, or even of busy parents. For those with disposable income, a new breed of experts is stepping in to help: professional organizers for kids. “Nine years ago, when I started Order Out of Chaos, I had to explain to people what a professional organizer was. Now, it’s not what’s an organizer, but who’s your organizer?” said Leslie Josel of Mamaroneck, New York, who offers to help kids manage everything from elementary school to dorm life. “As parents, we walk into the house and say, ‘Go get your soccer cleats,’ ‘Go get your dance things,’ ‘Do your homework,’ ” Josel said. But organization is like a muscle, she said, “and if you’re the one spewing all those instructions out, the only one working out that brain muscle is you. You’re ending up nagging instead of training.” Ask children before they head out the door what they think they will need for the day. “After a while, it becomes as much of a habit as brushing teeth or putting on a seat belt,” Josel said. And come up with systems for paper and time management at home and at school. “If it takes your child more than two steps to do something, they’re not going to do it,”

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Organizers say many students have difficulty visualizing time. This Time Timer Plus, which comes in a variety of sizes, helps give a visual sense of time. It also can be used to help students play “beat the clock” with themselves to help get work done. PHOTOS BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

This undated photo provided by Order Out of Chaos shows the launching pad area. Everyone should have a designated “launching pad,” professional organizers say, where everything that goes in and out of the house is kept. she said. Many of the hundreds of professional organizers nationwide are mothers or former teachers who have helped children deal with “executive dysfunction,” the technical term for the

problem. Some earn certification from groups such as the New Jerseybased National Association of Professional Organizers or the St. Louis-based Institute for Challenging Disorganiza-

Once students get to middle school, where they’re expected to juggle several different classes along with various after-school activities, it helps to use an academic planner that keeps track of afternoon and evening events as well as long-term assignments.

tion. Often, professional organizers are hired to help kids with special needs. But they are increasingly invited to speak at parent-teacher associations and community groups to offer general tips. “Academic tutors help with science or math ... but the study skills part of the picture has been a no man’s land,” said Kathy Jenkins, who runs the Richmond, Virginia-based company The Organizing Tutor. Some tips from her and other experts:

Managing their stuff At home, each student in the household should have a “launching pad” and portable storage system. A

A launching pad can be a bench or box by the front door or bedroom door that holds everything that goes in and out of the house. launching pad can be a bench or box by the front door or bedroom door that holds everything that goes in and out of the house: library books, backpacks, cellphone, soccer cleats. “For this population, the more time they spend looking for something, the less remaining stamina they have to do what they need to be doing,” Josel said. The portable storage station should be a clear box with everything needed to get homework done. “It’s essential to have one box per student, not one per household,” Josel said. “An elementary student

might have glue and colored pencils, while a middle schooler might need a Spanish dictionary and a calculator.” Boxes should be labeled — but not by parents — with the child’s name and a list of contents. “Have your child fill the box and label it. It’s part of the ownership process,” Josel said. Boxes should be portable because although some students work happily at the same desk each evening, for others, “it really helps if you change workplaces not only every day, but for every study subject,” Josel said.

Study tools Although organizing systems vary with the individual’s learning style, some frequent recommendations for students are: ■ Use a planner that includes after-school activities as well as homework assignments. ■ Use reinforced binder paper, Jenkins says, so papers don’t fall out or get crumpled because one hole is ripped. ■ Vertical, clear-plastic student envelopes can hold a textbook, notebook and papers so that nothing is forgotten. They’re easily pulled out of backpacks or lockers, can be color-coded, and are easy to carry between classes. ■ A binder with attached accordion file can be used for all subjects or for each subject. They come in various colors and have room to file papers in a hurry, so they don’t get lost. ■ For time management, organizers often recommend a timer and a vibrating watch.

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Some homework before the start of kindergarten By Allison Klein Special to The Washington Post

s your child ready for kindergarten? It’s the first rung on the academic ladder, and sometimes parents wonder whether their children are primed for the academics or the social interactions in a kindergarten classroom. At this stage, the two are woven so closely together, said Jack McCarthy, managing director of AppleTree Institute for Education. “It’s like saying, ‘What’s more important, hydrogen or oxygen?’ ” McCarthy said. We talked to a few educators and experts in the field about areas parents can work on to help prepare kids. We picked eight of them to share with you. Some may surprise you. CITIZENSHIP: Teachers want students to be aware of their community and be willing to be a part of it.

I

ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

Before your child starts kindergarten, you can make sure they love to read and that they understand books. They want children to understand they are an important part of a larger group. Give your kids simple jobs around the house that help the household. Explain why it

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is an important job. Examples include making their bed, clearing their dishes from the table and cleaning up toys. EMPATHY: Understanding others’ feelings is an

important part of forming and sustaining friendships. Kids who are aware of others’ emotions are able to play more fluidly. Talk to your children about their own emotions and help them identify them. Also talk about others’ emotions. SCIENCE: Have conversations with kids about vegetables, herbs, fruits and grains. Explain which foods are more healthful than others and why. Take a trip to the grocery store to explore various foods. If you are able, plant a food you can grow and enjoy together. MATH: A kindergartener should have a basic understanding of numbers. When you walk up stairs, count with him. When you give him crackers or berries, count with him. Add a few, take a few away, and count with him. BOOKS: Reading is a sensitive topic in kindergarten. You can help your children by making sure they love books (read to

them!) — and that they understand books. They should know what an author and an illustrator are, they should understand the dedication page and they should know that they read from the left to the right and the top to the bottom. They also should have phonological awareness of letters and rhyming words. FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS: Your children should be able to follow two-step directions such as “take off your shoes, and come sit at the table.” In school, they will be asked to complete many tasks on their own and regulate their emotions. Be sure they are able to take their shoes and coats on and off, and zip their backpacks without help. They also need to know how to take turns with friends. FINE MOTOR SKILLS: Teachers say some kids’ fine motor

skills aren’t as strong because they spend so much time with screens. Some kids learn their letters and numbers from a computer or tablet and are not given as many opportunities to write and draw. Give your children crayons and paper often. Let them write letters, draw sunsets, make self-portraits and sometimes just scribble. GROSS MOTOR SKILLS: Give them plenty of unstructured outdoor play. Let them run and jump and imagine and create outside. When kids are able to run and play on their own they get to know their own bodies and limitations, practice balance and gain strength. Oh, and when they exercise a lot, they sleep much better — something both kids and parents will appreciate.

ISTOCKPHOTO.COM

It is good to have conversations with kids about vegetables, and it is great if you are able to plant a food you can grow and enjoy together.

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SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 |13

Make kids a healthy after-school snack that eats like a treat By Alison Ladman The Associated Press

he words hungry kids heading home from school hate most? “Have a piece of fruit.” Afterschool snacks are one of the toughest terrains for parents to navigate. The kids want a treat, but parents — mindful that dinner is just around the corner — want to keep it healthy. So we decided to come up with a healthy, filling snack that kids would still consider a treat.

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These chocolate and granola covered frozen bananas are a healthy snack that eat like a frozen pop with a hit of chocolate. If your kids aren’t into granola, you could substitute chopped nuts, crushed whole-grain pretzels or even raisins or dried cranberries.

FROZEN CHOCOLATE GRANOLA BANANAS Start to finish: 20 minutes, plus freezing Servings: 4 1 cup (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate bits 2 tablespoons orange

juice 2 bananas 1 cup granola Line a small pan with waxed paper. Bring a small saucepan of water (about 1 inch) to a simmer. In a small bowl, combine the chocolate bits and orange juice. Place the bowl over the pan of simmering water. Stir continuously until melted and smooth. Peel the bananas, then cut each banana in half crosswise. Insert a fork into one end of each piece. Dip each banana into the

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chocolate mixture, using a spoon to scoop the chocolate over the banana to make sure it is completely covered. Roll the coated banana in the granola, then place the forked and coated bananas on the prepared pan. Freeze.

Nutrition information per serving: 350 calories; 130 calories from fat (37 percent of total calories); 14 g fat (8 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 THE ASSOCIATED PRESS mg cholesterol; 59 g carbohyParents will consider them a healthy, fi lling snack, but drate; 6 g fiber; 33 g sugar; 5 g kids will consider Frozen Chocolate Granola Bananas protein; 10 mg sodium a treat.

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Kids studying abroad are never out of touch By Beth J. Harpaz AP Travel Editor

generation ago, students on semesters abroad were practically incommunicado, aside from airmailed letters and one or two calls home. These days, from the minute the plane lands, kids studying overseas are connected with home via Skype, Facebook and messaging apps like Viber and WhatsApp. Has technology altered the semester abroad by making it impossible to immerse yourself in another culture? Or does staying in touch simply increase comfort levels, easing both homesickness and parental worries? Jane Tabachnick of Montclair, New Jersey, remembers airmailing letters to her parents when she studied in Paris for nine months at age 21, long before the cellphone era.

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“I knew they were worried and that they’d be waiting by the mailbox,� she said. “It seemed like an eternity between letters.� It was different when Tabachnick’s 21-year-old daughter lived in Russia and Paris as part of her studies at Rutgers University. They often conversed by Skype or GoogleChat. “My daughter is very mature and level-headed and I’m not a big worrier, but I’m a parent, and she’s across the world, and it was just so easy to be in touch,� Tabachnick said. Robbin Watson was forced to give up screen time with the home crowd when her laptop was damaged during a semester in Italy six years ago, when she was 19. “I was devastated at first, wondering to myself, ‘How will I know what’s going on at home? How will I Skype my friends?’� she recalled.

But as time went on, her experience in Rome “drastically changed. I began to go out more, no longer running home from class to hop online. I no longer thought about what was going on at college, and soon, I began to not even care.� Looking back, she’s grateful that her laptop was damaged. Her advice for semester abroad: “Get rid of your smartphone. The whole point of studying abroad is to immerse yourself in the culture, the people, the language. Once you have Skype, Facebook and constant calls from parents, I think it really takes away from the experience and becomes a huge distraction.� Staying in touch is important to Daniele Weiss, 19, a New York University student who spent the spring semester in Florence and is now in Israel for the summer.

     

        

      

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“My mom needs to hear from me every night before I go to sleep,� she said. From Italy, six hours ahead of her parents, she’d call in the morning before her dad went to work and then text throughout the day. She said most of her fellow American students also “stayed in contact with everybody from home. It was very comfortable and so easy. It’s not like I felt like I was missing out on the immersion. But I wanted to share things with my mom.� Jason Fischbach, 24, studied in Sydney, Australia, during his senior year at Babson College in 2010-2011, and stayed in touch with family through Facebook and Skype, though he tried to limit it: “I was able to keep myself from getting homesick, without really watering down the experience.� But, he added that others did fall into the “traps� of too much screen time: “People would get back from class and hop on Skype/Facebook with family and significant others. People would skip social outings or classes to reach back out to people at home. Evenings would be spent on social media.� Annmarie Whelan, a spokeswoman for Forum Education Abroad, which develops standards for education abroad programs, acknowledges that students miss out if they spend too much time online with folks back home. On the positive side, she added, some students gain confidence dealing with unfamiliar situations if they can process the experience with someone they know.

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SUNDAY, JULY 27, 2014 |15

Bedroom desk? It’s somewhere under all that junk By Diana Marszalek The Associated Press

lyssa Kimble, a soon-to-be sixthgrader in White Plains, New York, says she uses the desk in her bedroom for “everything” — creating lesson plans for her make-believe school, writing stories and storing stuff. Everything, that is, except homework. “Usually, my desk is covered with things, a computer isn’t nearby, and my mom isn’t there to help me,” Alyssa says. So, she prefers doing homework at the kitchen table. Although bedroom desks remain common, many kids don’t use them for their intended purpose. Thanks to laptop computers and more casual living spaces, they often opt to do homework in kitchens and family rooms, on couches or on beds, turning their desks into depositories for books, toys and crafts. What that means for study habits depends on who’s doing the work, educators and parents say. “I could always get my homework done wherever I was. But some kids, especially if they have ADHD or another disability, can benefit from doing homework at a specified location like a desk because it tells them, ‘This is the spot where I focus,’” says Ellen Pape, a La Grange, Illinois, school reading specialist. “Separating it from other locations gives kids more of a straightforward definition of expectations,” she says. Melissa Kaufman of Santa Clara, California, says that where her daughters — Rebekah, 14,

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and Sarah, 11 — do their homework reflects their different needs and study habits. Kaufman bought Rebekah a desk several years ago because letting her work at the kitchen table in their small house became too hard on the rest of the family. “It meant nobody could do anything in the kitchen

or living room until homework was done because it would be distracting,” she says. But having “a nice big desk surface” did little to change that. “I don’t think she did her homework at her desk more than once,” Kaufman says. Initially, Rebekah resisted being isolated from the rest of the family.

And although today Rebekah does do homework in her room, it is usually on her bed. The desk is where she puts “the four outfits she tried on earlier that day and rejected.” But Kaufman says she doesn’t fight it. “She has still managed to get excellent grades, despite what I would consider less

than stellar study habits and environment, so we have to let her go with what she is comfortable with,” she says. Sarah, on the other hand, “needs much more help and encouragement to get her homework done, so doing it in isolation in her room is not really an option” — meaning she’s back at the kitchen table, Kaufman said. Sarah’s desk has suffered a fate similar to her sister’s; it’s covered with piles of books, art supplies and knickknacks. Tami Mount, a New York-area educational consultant, says it’s important for children to have a quiet, dedicated workspace, but it doesn’t matter where

that is. “All the tools they need to do their homework, like scissors, rulers, erasers and pencils, should be organized in a place they can be easily retrieved. You don’t want to spend 15 minutes looking for tape,” she says. But some kids work better in an environment where there is, say, music playing or a parent nearby, than isolated at a desk, Mount says. “A quiet desk, a busy kitchen, Starbucks or the living room floor. Like adults, kids find a place that is comfortable and productive,” she says. “And if the living room floor is not proving productive, try something else.”

All levels Ages 3 & up

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This photo courtesy of Michael & Melissa Kaufman shows the cluttered desk belonging to their ninth-grade daughter, Rebekah. Although the Kaufmans bought Rebekah the desk so she would have a place to study, she prefers doing homework on her bed.

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2014 Back To School Special Section • Ocala, FL