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THISWEEK COVER PAGE 10

THE 100 BEST HOOSIER ALBUMS EVER

We’ve made our picks. Now let the arguments begin. • By Kyle Long and Katherine Coplen

NEWS...... 06 ARTS........ 16 MUSIC......26 THE JAZZ KITCHEN TURNS 20 MUSIC PG. 26 Info on three different jazz shows By Rita Kohn, Chris Murray

THE INDIANAPOLIS BLACKSTOCKINGS SPORTS PG. 16

WHY LOCAL CAN’T SAVE US FOOD PG. 24

DRAFT DAY FILM PG. 22

Marking the 125th anniversary of Indy’s first African-American baseball club

Kevin Costner’s in a film about sports. Surprise!

By Ryan Whirty

By Ed Johnson-Ott

STAFF

“Local” and “organic” don’t always equal “better” by Neil Charles

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Vol. 25 Issue 4 issue #1151

Copyright ©2014 by NUVO, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission, by any method whatsoever, is prohibited. ISSN #1086-461X

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WHAT’S ONLINE THAT’S NOT IN PRINT?

HAMMER ON LETTERMAN

THERE’S A HOLE IN THE BUDGET

THE MILLER TIME PODCAST

The backstory on Dave and Hoosier TV.

Fixing streets after the Winter of the Polar Vortex is costing us big.

The Pacers’ biggest fans on how to stop the suckin’.

By Steve Hammer

By Hannah Troyer

By Jon and Flava Dave

WTF?

WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY ABOUT WHAT WE HAD TO SAY

Letters to the editor should be sent c/o NUVO Mail. They should be typed and not exceed 300 words. Editors reserve the right to edit for length, etc. Please include a daytime phone number for verification. Send email letters to: editors@nuvo.net or leave a comment on nuvo.net, Facebook and Twitter.

Editor’s Note: In response to David Hoppe’s column “Bringing guns to school makes us safer, right?” (NUVO.net, March 30)we received the following:

Gun control / homicide control “A study done last year by Boston University confirmed the obvious, finding that between 1981 and 2010, states with more guns had higher homicide rates.” FALSE! Since firearms ownership is based on estimates … there is no Federal firearms registration. The inconvenient facts: California, which received a grade of 81 out of 100 from the Brady Campaign for its gun control laws, had a homicide rate of 4.9 per 100,000 and 1,792 firearms homicides in 2011. The National homicide rate was 4.8 per 100,000. California the Brady Campaign’s highest rated stated but it did not receive a score of 100. This is likely because California

WE ‘EFFED UP!

It happens sometimes, we apologize, carry on ...

doesn’t ban all civilian firearms. Citizen disarmament zealots and their organizations would argue that California has a high murder rate because of their metropolitan areas (SMSA.) However, Texas has the most SMSAs and receives a score of 4 out 100. Yet, the homicide rate in Texas was 4.4 per 100,000 in 2011. The Brady Campaign views Vermont as the worstcase scenario, and they give Vermont a score of 6 out of 100 for its firearms laws. However, though citizens in Vermont are free to carry firearms both openly or concealed without a permit, and despite the fact that they are free to carry their firearms in restaurants that serve alcohol and even while consuming alcohol, the homicide rate in Vermont was 1.3 per 100,000 in 2011. The rate for the nation was 4.7 per 100,000. Of the eight homicides that were committed in Vermont in 2011 four were committed with firearms. Gun control does not equal homicide control. — William Ewart • The photo of the Brickyard Battalion on page 12 of the last edition of NUVO (April 2-9) should have been credited to Stephanie Griggz.

APRIL 11 & 13

ENSEMBLE VOLTAIRE LATE BLOOMERS

Both Jean-Philippe Rameau and Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach only became composers of grand works long after they had established themselves as performing musicians. Join us for this tribute to all who come to do great things later in life. FRIDAY, 4/11, 7:30 PM

SUNDAY, 4/13, 7:30 PM

INDIANAPOLIS

INDIANAPOLIS

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH

HISTORIC ATHENAEUM

(317) 808-BACH (2224) | INDYBAROQUE.ORG

4 THIS WEEK // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

VOICES THIS WEEK

VOICES

DEAR STATE DEMS: DON’T RUN AWAY FROM OBAMACARE D

ear Indiana Democrats, There’s been a lot of speculation lately about how you should position yourselves in relation to the president. It seems that President Barack Obama is making many of you nervous. The guy’s popularity (never on solid ground in Indiana) has taken a nose dive. Republicans are expected to use the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) like a whoopee cushion to embarrass you. We all know about the problems the ACA had with its roll-out. Not only that, the law was all but written by private health insurers and big pharma. This made it more about Provide protecting these industries’ profits than reforming our health care system. Finally, the Obama Administration has had to offer up so many tweaks, extensions and other revisions to the law, peoples’ confidence in its reliability has been tested. Republicans have made things worse. Instead of working to strengthen the law, they have engaged in a concerted campaign of misinformation in an effort to sabotage the law’s chances for success. Remember Death Panels? That’s not Obamacare. That’s what you get when your private insurance company denies you coverage for a treatment or medicine. As for Medicaid, thanks to our governor’s decision to reject federal monies, many Hoosiers who need coverage will have to do without — or move to Kentucky. You should call Republicans on this — and on their one-note threat to repeal a law that has already helped people with pre-existing conditions, kept young adults on their parents’ plans, and enabled the self-employed to finally get coverage that really is affordable. But this isn’t all you should do. I know that many of you are probably

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DAVID HOPPE DHOPPE@NUVO.NET David Hoppe has been writing columns for NUVO since the mid-1990s. Find him online every week at NUVO.NET/VOICES

relieved that the ACA passed its first real test on March 31. Obama predicted 7 million people would sign up for coverage by that date, and that’s what happened. While we still don’t know how many of those folks were young, or previously uninsured, this is still good news. It shows that a substantial number of Americans want a better deal on health coverage than they’ve been offered under the old employerbased scheme. That scheme is part of the problem. One of Obamacare’s weakest links is the

Medicare for everyone. extent to which it perpetuates employer-based plans. This reduces company profitability and cuts employee takehome pay. For large nonprofit organizations, it’s a budget buster. The ACA’s unwillingness to cut the knot linking health care with employment was a huge failure of nerve. You Democrats should admit this. Then say what needs to be done: Provide Medicare for everyone. Scott Weiland (http://madvilletimes. com/2014/02/smart-policy-weilandsmedicare-choice-act-offers-competition-cost-control/) is campaigning for universal Medicare as he runs for an open US Senate seat in South Dakota. Medicare is tried and true; ask anyone over the age of 65. By making it available to every American, we would automatically expand the coverage pool, driving costs down, while protecting providers through federally guaranteed payments. We know this works. Why not make it work for everyone? Democrats, don’t run away from Obamacare. Call it the first step on the road to security Hoosiers really want. n NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // VOICES 5

NEWS

WHAT HAPPENED?

PHOTO BY MIKE ALLEE

A minority for the majority Between two and three dozen local representatives of the NSAF (National Allegiance for Solidarity and Freedom) assembled Downtown Saturday on the Soldier and Sailor’s Monument steps. Protestors passed out literature and took turns at a makeshift podium to speak out on topics as diverse as political corruption to the use of GMOs in the food supply. Several masked participants carried signs advocating for a variety of ideas, including: “Support Medicaid Expansion” “Legalize the Constitution” “People Over Politics” and “You Matter.” Photographer-At-Large Mike Allee captured the group’s messages in a slideshow posted at NUVO.net. A March against the Mainstream Media is planned for April 19 and organizers plan to continue demonstrations Downtown on the first Saturday of every month. New life for Old City Hall Built in 1909 as the home for city government until Indy Gov moved to the City-County Building, Old City Hall has also served as a home to the Indiana State Museum and the Indianapolis Public Library’s main branch. Now a new initiative is working to bring the building back into service on behalf of the city’s cultural life. Five planners have taken up residence at Old City Hall and each is in charge of one of the following themes that will serve as elemental building blocks to Plan 2020, a long-range comprehensive bi-centennial planning effort for Indianapolis: Live Indy, Love Indy, Work Indy, Serve Indy and Connect Indy. In addition, the building is also open to the public from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., both as gallery space that will highlight current projects and community-based initiatives and as public meeting space for groups working on projects aimed at improving Indy’s quality of life. For information on using the space, email Alex.Miser@indy.gov. State revenue still lagging State tax receipts beat projections in March — but not enough to clear Senate Appropriations Chairman Luke Kenley’s concerns about the state’s finances. Revenue topped $1.02 billion last month — about 1.4 percent more than estimates released last December. That’s also 11.6 percent more than in March 2013. One may think that sounds like good news. “But it’s actually not,” the Noblesville Republican said. “Not if you dig deep into the numbers.” For the fiscal year — which began July 1 — total tax collections are still about $71 million behind the estimates used to write the current two-year budget. —REBECCA TOWNSEND, MIKE ALLEE, LESLEY WEIDENBENER 6 NEWS // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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INDIANA’S LEADING POLITICAL UNDERDOG IS AT IT AGAIN Andrew Horning attempts to end taxpayer-funded primaries

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LIBERTARIAN POLITICS Libertarian Party of Marion County Convention See facebook.com/indylp. org for more info.

B Y REBECCA TO W N S EN D RTOW N S E N D @ N U V O . N E T

or about two decades now, Andrew Horning has tried to draw public awareness to and ire over certain advantages the state's major political parties have built into Indiana Code. His most recent attempt targets the taxpayer funding of primary elections for Republicans and Democrats, which Indiana Code mandates, while the law states the minor parties slate their candidates during their own privately hosted conventions. The Marion County Clerk's Office estimates it costs about $1 million to host most election — primary or general — in the county. The Marion County primary election is set for May 6. As a perennial Libertarian candidate (with prior affiliation with the GOP), Horning last ran against Joe Donnelly and Richard Mourdock for the U.S. Senate seat vacated with the GOP primary ousting of Sen. Dick Lugar, R-Ind. He now returns to the 2014 election as the Libertarian candidate for the Indiana 8th Congressional District, taking on the Republican incumbent, Congressman Larry Buschon, and Democrat Tom Spangler. Horning is currently waiting to hear if the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana will help him with his case. NUVO caught up with Horning during a telephone interview on Monday. Here are some edited excerpts from that conversation: NUVO: Why now? ANDREW HORNING: It's not the first time I've tried this kind of thing. The Indiana Constitution specifies socialized justice. It's supposed to be available without purchase — it is supposed to be even more free than our public school system. And if you think about how many things are totally opposite and backwards... I've been trying to get lawsuits off the ground based on these kinds of things for about 20 years. Far more important than one person or any one cause, there is kind of a

• Sat., April 12, 10 am – 1 pm. Southport Library Libertarian Party of Indiana State Convention. See lpin.org/ events/2014convention for more info. • April 25 – 27 Caribbean Cove Hotel & Conference Center , 3850 Depauw Blvd For general voting information visit indianavoters.com. NUVO: I'm not sure they'd describe themselves that way.

Andrew Horning

PROVIDED BY THE STATEHOUSE FILE

gestalt that has to happen; there has to be a public mood to change this, which is why for years when I've run for office, I've disassociated from the idea that it has anything to do with me. It's all about our heart and mind; that's what's reflected in politics. And, right now, the mood is pretty numb where people allow anything — just anything. The kick-in your door, no-knock raids … you know that is unconstitutional, right? It's not like there's any question about that, it's just who's got the will to do anything about it? I do, but I can't do it by myself and I don't have the money… For many years I've looked into ballot access issues — and lots of political parties have. But they always run into the same issue: The attorneys who will take such cases get paid about $600 an hour. And that makes it the realm of only Democrats and Republicans — and the lawyers themselves are only Democrats and Republicans. How do you fight this situation? The judges are appointed by Democrats and Republicans – and they are Democrats and Republicans. You are fighting this massive crime ring.

HORNING: If you are mafia boss, you don't call yourself a common criminal – you are organized, not your typical criminal. What really is the difference when you've got a monopoly on power and you're not obeying any laws and are in fact violating written laws left and right? You can call yourselves the government because you have power to do so, but the difference morally and legally between that and a bunch of criminals who got powerful enough to kick out the government … you're really talking semantics now. NUVO: How's the election season coming so far? HORNING: Larry Buschon, the incumbent, is trying to hide. NUVO: He won't debate you? HORNING: A debate would also an admission that I'm a candidate. The Bloody 8th is geographically the biggest in the state — running north of Terre Haute to the Southwest part of the state and east to Owen County. The Democrat, Tom Spangler, will be unchallenged in the primary. This frustrates me: We've had fewer and fewer debates for years and years. Voters are not showing up to stuff anymore. I've been to forms where there are far more candidates than there are spectators. It's embarrassing. Where are you voters? You are supposed to be hiring people — you need to be paying attention. n

THIS WEEK

Wed., April 9, 6 p.m. at Central Library, Riley Room, 40 E. St. Clair Street. FREE. Gen. Colin L. Powell Dinner and Lecture Tickets See stewardspeakers.org for more info the Steward Speakers series. Thu., April 10, 6:45 p.m. Indianapolis Marriott, 350 W. Maryland St. $125 Cash available for Creative Placemaking The city’s artists, nature buffs, designers and planners are encouraged to help build awareness of and appreciation for Indy’s rivers and creeks through the art of creative placemaking. This workshop, featuring national and local speakers includes lunch and parking. The theme also ties into their next 5x5, $10,000 funding opportunity — proposed deadline April 27. Proposals are due May 1. Visit ourwaterways.org. RSVP is required at rowworkshop.eventbrite.com. Also, the next 5x5 $10,000 funding theme is “re:Connect,” inspired by ROW’s mission to improve the urban experience through waterway awareness. 5x5 proposals are due April 27; the top five submissions will compete live for funding. See 5x5indy.org for more details. Sat., April 19, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Eiteljorg Museum

THOUGHT BITE ARCHIVE Pop quiz: What’s so liberal about being conservative with the expenditure of young American military lives and what’s so conservative about being liberal with the expenditure of young American lives? (From the week of Sept. 17, 2003) – ANDY JACOBS JR.

NUVO.NET/NEWS Vast majority of educators receive high ratings by Jacob Rund and Lesley Weidenbener Supreme Court uncaps individual election spending By Mary Kuhlman More than 100 dogs headed northeast for adoption By Hannah Troyer

VOICES • Letterman born of TV’s ‘70s Hoosier heyday - By Steve Hammer • Cross district teacher comparisons ineffective - By Lesley Weidenbener

GALLERIES • Indy Eleven Inaugural Ball • Indiana University vs. Indy Eleven - by Mark A. Lee 8 NEWS // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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STRANGE FRUIT T

The enduring legacy of a terrible event in Indiana history

BY ED W EN CK EWENCK@NUVO.NET

he lyrics of “Strange Fruit,” the song that turns 75 this year, illustrate in no uncertain terms the truth of white America’s historical heathenism: Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black body swinging in the Southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees. Pastoral scene of the gallant South, The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth, Scent of magnolia sweet and fresh, And the sudden smell of burning flesh! The lyrics of the song, penned by Abel Meeropol, a New York City schoolteacher, had originally been published as a poem under the title “Bitter Fruit” in 1936. Meeropol wrote the verse as a reaction to one of the most startling photographs of a crime scene ever shot, the hanging of two black men from a tree in the center of Marion, Ind. on Aug. 7, 1930. A cold, hard look at Indiana history will serve as a centerpiece in this year’s Holy Week Celebration at Christian Theological Seminary with “Strange Fruit: Encountering the Mystery of the Cross Through the Arts.” At 7 p.m. on April 14 and 15, CTS will host programs using music, dance, spoken word, and film to meditate on the connections between “Strange Fruit” and the legacy of Jesus’ crucifixion. The 12-minute film “Strange Fruit” is the brainchild of CTS faculty member Frank Thomas. Thomas drew his inspiration from the work of another theologian, an author from Union Theological Seminary named James Cone. A Cone lecture, which eventually became the book The Cross and the Lynching Tree “created a ripple effect that really gave birth to a conversation about how American history and our struggles in terms of race relations, in terms of slavery, in terms of bigotry, in terms of violence can and should be understood,” said CTS President Matthew Boulton. “… Christianity for centuries has tried to uncover questions about violence, guilt and forgiveness. “Thomas put together — with a col-

RTESY OF CTS)

Celebra Brazil Kickoff Party! Wednesday’s party unleashes a series of programs to feature Brazilian culture throughout April and May, including Discovering Brazil Through Hip-Hop; Earth & Art: Exploring the Indiana/Brazil Connection; Muraquitã amulets of the Amazonian Tapajos women; contemporary collage; folk art prints; Brazilian dance; and Portuguese-English bilingual storytime.

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LAWRENCE BEITLER (COU

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league of his — a sermon on film, a short film honoring the 75th anniversary of Strange Fruit … his interpretation really drew on not only James Cone but a deeper history of Christian interpretation in order to honor the song but also this chapter in Indiana history.” The film, produced with help from local public television station WFYI, has already been shown to various congregations around Central Indiana. “It’s getting a really powerful reaction … many people are totally unaware of the whole narrative [of] these lynchings in Marion,” Boulton said. Writing under the name Lewis Allan, Meeropol cast the photo as an artifact of Depression-era Dixie although the shot had been taken in Indiana, a state regarded then and now as “Northern.” He was overcome with revulsion at the cavalier attitudes expressed by the white faces in the crowd: Some are old, some are young, some are nonplussed, some are grinning broadly. One man points toward the two dead, bruised and bloody African-American men hanging from the tree behind him. The pointing man gazes toward the camera confidently. None of the faces of the living appear to express remorse. After Meeropol added a melody to “Strange Fruit” and published the composition, he played it for a New York nightclub owner who soon passed

the number to Billie Holiday. She and her pianist, Sonny White, arranged the music for vocals and keyboard. According to NPR Music’s “Take Five: A Jazz Sampler”: “Billie Holiday introduced the song at Greenwich Village’s Cafe Society in 1939; the tiny basement club in Sheridan Square was the scene of unprecedented racial mixing. ‘Strange Fruit’ always came at the very end of Holiday’s set. … The waiters would suspend service so the room was quiet. Holiday was lit with a small pin light on her face, which went dark at the song’s conclusion. There were no curtain calls, no encores.” The song was interpreted by dozens of other artists, eventually finding a place in the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress and being recognized by TIME Magazine as “The Song of the Century” in 1999. The photograph of the lynching that inspired the song was originally taken to be reprinted as a souvenir. Lawrence Beitler was a local studio photographer in Marion who surely saw money in the shot; photos documenting lynchings were turned into postcards meant to inspire fear in the black community while marking the event for the attendees. Beitler reportedly sold thousands upon thousands of copies of the image after the hangings, working day and night for over a week to meet demand for the grisly visage.

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pounding away at the masonry around the prison’s iron door. When the first barricade gave way, the mob found the interior doors unlocked, and began the assault. Shipp and Smith were brutally beaten, then dragged to the tree where their bodies were hung. Shipp was by all accounts already dead from the assault when the rope was placed around his neck. Lawrence Beitler was summoned to take a picture marking the day when the residents of Grant County ensured that there’d be no trial for the accused; no chance they’d ever be set free. The acting head of the NAACP, Walter White, investigated the lynchings, and found the Sheriff and his men either incompetent or criminally negligent. Amid rumors that a group of blacks were planning to march into Marion and seek retribution, Grant County Prosecutor Harley Hardin determined he wouldn’t prosecute, claiming his actions would only incite more violence. None of the members of the mob who lynched Shipp and Smith ever served time, although indictments were brought by Indiana Attorney General James Ogden. Whites in Marion, enraged by the indictments, no doubt swayed the jury in the trial of two of the alleged vigilantes, and after the first acquittals, the remaining indictments were dropped. Mary Ball eventually admitted that she hadn’t been raped. Speculation remains that she may have, at one time, dated Smith or Shipp. Billie Holiday’s 1939 recording of the song “Many people are totally unaware “Strange Fruit” and the of the whole narrative [of] these manner in which she performed it live helped lynchings in Marion.” cement the terrible event in the American — MATTHEW MYER BOULTON, CTS PRESIDENT consciousness; additionally, photographic souvenirs of lynchings did as much to inspire civil rights activists of the members of the state legislature as they did to instill terror. were dues-paying Klansmen. The CTS program that honors the legAs crowds began to gather around acy of Holiday’s song is part of an obserMarion’s town square, Sheriff Campbell vance of the Christian faith’s Holy Week, ordered his men to keep their weapons holstered — the mob included women the days leading up to Easter Sunday. In and kids. The throng grew rapidly as news addition to the film — and an open disof the killing and the rape spread, and cussion about the events that inspired onlookers streamed into Marion from the song and the video — the program surrounding towns. By nightfall, somewill include vocalist Keirsten Hodgens where between 10 and 15,000 Hoosiers (Ball State University); dancer Mariel stood outside the Grant County jail, howl- Greenlee (Dance Kaleidoscope); celing for the blood of the three black teenlist Eric Edberg (DePauw University); agers inside. (Marion’s total population in pianist R. Kent Cook (Illinois Wesleyan 1930 stood at about 23,000.) University); and, oboist Roger Roe Whether Campbell was complicit in the (Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra & murders is unclear, but the crowd that Indiana University). The filmmaker had gathered clearly outnumbered law who worked with Frank Thomas, enforcement officials that night. Using Elizabeth Myer of the Salt Project, will sledgehammers, several men began also be in attendance. n Of the estimated 4,479 lynchings that occurred in the United States between 1882 and 1968 — a count taken by the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama — the Marion mob scene, preserved in a heartbreaking photograph and an equally moving song, may be the most famous example of a vigilante murder. The two men who were killed that August night in1930 in Marion were teenagers: Thomas Shipp was 18 and Abram Smith was 19. James Cameron, then 16, was spared by the mob after someone in the crowd shouted that Cameron was innocent of any crime. The three suspects had been jailed after being accused of the rape of a white woman, Mary Ball, and the shooting death of a white man, Claude Deeter. After Deeter perished from his wounds, Grant County Sheriff Jake Campbell took Deeter’s bloody shirt and hung it in the window of the county courthouse. The town was already on edge: a series of union-busting bombings had gone unsolved, and many Marion residents were familiar with newspaper statistics about the high rate of dismissals in Grant County. Over 60 percent of those tried for crime in and around Marion got off, and the public perceived local cops and detectives as completely inept. Additionally, the entire state had been consumed by the rise of Ku Klux Klan activity, influence and control in the decade prior — in the ‘20s, over half

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ere they are. Our 100 absolute favorite records ever to emerge from the great Hoosier State. We compiled a list that is historically and creatively representative of the best music that Indiana has to offer your ears, a snapshot of our state’s musical identity. Consider this your pre-gaming read for next week’s complete coverage of Record Store Day, the best musical holiday of the year.

The four points Here’s how we determined what we’d include on the list. Albums that made this list are creative products of Indiana. We looked at a few different ways of measuring “Hoosier”-ness and came up with a list of loose criteria. Albums on this list fulfill at least two of the following criteria, if not all four: 1. Were written/performed by an Indiana-born artist 2. Were recorded at an Indiana studio 3. Were released on a Hoosier label 4. Were released when artist was living and working in Indiana for a significant period of time “But where is my beloved Thriller?” we can hear you exclaim. “The unimpeachable Tender Lover?” Hoosier legends like Babyface and The Jacksons appear on this list … but perhaps not with the releases you would expect. We wanted a list of 100 albums that are true local releases. That’s why, for example, The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery doesn’t appear here, but his Fingerpickin’ is one of our first choices. We love John Hiatt’s Bring the Family, but Hiatt moved to Nashville in 1968 — and wasn’t living here by the time his first record was released.

10 COVER STORY // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

We also only chose one album per artist (although some individual musicians have performed on a few of these different records). The vast majority of releases picked are fulllength albums, although we did include a few EPs, splits and collaborations that were too excellent to leave out. This is an unranked list. We’ll be honest: we considered ranking these from 1 to 100 for weeks, but when it comes down to it, Naptown Blues 1929-1934 is a totally different animal than DMA’s Pheel Phree — both excellent, but determining which one is more so? Well, we’ll lend our ear to anyone who can come up with a persuasive argument. It’s also vaguely Central Indianafocused, because, well, we live here. Above all, we wanted to honor albums with lasting historical and cultural impact. Indiana lays claim to some of the best jazz artists to ever pick up instruments. But we wanted to honor the funk gods who lived and worked here, too, and revolutionary studios like New Palestine’s 700 West, plus all that searing punk that radiated out from the Heartland in the ‘70s. But don’t think we abandoned the newbies; there are several 2013 releases on this list (perhaps more than any other year), proving that Hoosier music is just getting consistently more excellent.

The contributors We reached out to a few dozen of Indianapolis’ most dedicated music makers, purveyors and lovers when we started this project. They sent us their short lists of favorite records, which we used when compiling our full list. Our contributors represent a variety of genres, but unsurprisingly, many of their lists included some of the same records. Excellence is excellence, no matter the genre. See the list on page 13.

Action Strasse, American Gas Jive

Amensty, Free Your Mind: The 700 West Sessions

Adam Jay, Mediastinum

Coffinworm, IV.I.VIII

Dave Owen, Nocturnal

DJ Shiva, Consumer Product

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Coach is playing out with a full band now, but this breathy, intimate release showcases what a good record really does: makes you feel like the artist is playing right in the room you’re in.

Action Strasse - American Gas Jive GARAGE POP - 2008 Adam Jay -  Mediastinum ELECTRONIC/TECHNO - 2012

Charles Tyler - Eastern Man Alone JAZZ - 1967

When a debilitating health issue landed Indianapolis techno giant Adam Jay in the hospital, he used the experience as a source of musical inspiration recording the beeps and buzzes of the life-sustaining machines for use as compositional elements in his music production. The project also served as a fundraiser for Adam's outstanding medical debts. Perhaps the most conceptually interesting release in Adam’s large discography of techno classics. Al Hobbs and the Indianapolis Mass Choir - Let Him Have His Way GOSPEL - 1982 Indy has a great gospel music tradition and this live recording from Al Hobbs and the Indianapolis Mass Choir is an excellent example. Check the rocking “Praise Him For Myself.” America Owns the Moon - Tiger EP ROCK – 2003 Amnesty - Free Your Mind: The 700 West Sessions SOUL/FUNK/PSYCH - RECORDED 1973 RELEASED 2007 A major masterpiece of Indiana funk. Sophisticated arrangements, superb playing and soulful vocals bring Amnesty’s politically charged songs to life as the band blurs the lines between jazz, soul, gospel and psychedelic rock. A must-hear Hoosier classic. Anonymous - Inside the Shadow   PSYCH/ROCK - 1970 While the record was released on Indianapolis musician Jim Spencer's Milwaukee-based A Major Label, the band was from Indianapolis and had risen from the ashes of the 1960s garage band Sir Winston & The Commons. The album channels Buffalo Springfield, Jefferson Airplane and The Byrds, while remaining original. Like the other records listed here, the quality of the songwriting is major league excellent. The album has been reissued on LP and CD multiple times and is relatively easy to acquire. - Stan Denski Apache Dropout – Self-Titled ROCK - 2011

DMA, Pheel Phree

PHOTO BY LISA FETT

Caleb McCoach

Coffinworm -  IV.I.VIII METAL - 2014

THE NITTY-GRITTY Dates listed are for original or widest release. Genre specifications can be debated in the comments section online. And 100 is a nice, round number. All blurbs are written by the staff of NUVO or, when noted, Stan Denski. Arson Garden – Self-Titled ROCK/INDIE - 1988 Bloomington’s ethereal art rockers are one of Indiana’s most underappreciated rock bands. Art Adams - Rockin’ My Way Around ROCKABILLY/COUNTRY - 2005 Art Adams recorded a handful of classic rockabilly singles in the genre’s heyday. He still sounds amazing on this 2012 LP.  

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Baron Von Ohlen Quintet with Mary Moss – The Baron JAZZ - 1973 Breezy, soulful Euro-jazz featuring delicious electric piano work from Indy keyboard masters Steve Allee and Claude Sifferlen. Billy Foster & Audio – Self-Titled JAZZ/FUNK - 1983 Billy Wooten And Special Friends - In This World FUNK/JAZZ - 1979 In demand by DJs around the world for the funky Latin Jazz groover “Chicango.” In This World features guitarist Steve Weakley from Indy’s legendary Funk Inc.

One of the few avant-garde jazz albums from the Indianapolis scene. Featuring an ensemble of local players including David Baker on cello,  Charles Tyler’s Eastern Man Alone was recorded in Indy and released on the legendary experimental music label ESP. The album recalls the work of outsider jazz legend Albert Ayler, a musician Tyler had cut several records with prior to this date. Not the stereotypical sound we’ve come to expect from Indianapolis jazz - but a classic nonetheless.

The Blankenship Bros. - Bluegrass & Rockabilly Kings From Indianapolis ROCKABILLY/BLUEGRASS/COUNTRY - 1999 An excellent compilation of raw country and rockabilly music independently released by Indy’s Blankenship Brothers. These seldom heard recordings date from the late ‘50s and early ‘60s.

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Dancing Cigarettes – School of Secret Music/The Gulcher Recordings CD POST-PUNK - 1996 Dave Owen - Nocturnal ELECTRONIC/DRUM AND BASS - 2013 Any of Dave Owen’s jazzy drum and bass creations are guaranteed to be masterfully produced. Owen’s catalog is full of releases that have been championed by the genre’s greatest producers and DJs, but this recent work is particularly striking and soulful.

The Burnt Ones - Black Teeth Gold Tongues PSYCH/ROCK - 2010

David Baker's 21st Century Bebop Band The Harlem Pipes JAZZ - RECORDED 1980S, RELEASED 2003

Cara Jean Wahlers and Grover Parido Goodnight Charlotte FOLK - 2010

A brilliant collection of classic bop from composer, conductor, trombonist, cellist and elder statesman of Indiana jazz, David Baker.

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Goodnight Charlotte is a stunningly beautiful set of quiet-yet-engaging songs anchored by Wahler's inyour-ear vocals and Parido's achingly gorgeous cello. Whether his contribution is part of the background, or a solo that creeps from the background and engulfs the listener, his playing is pointed and pretty, soulful and satisfying. The album is music for your head and heart. Caleb McCoach - Songs From An Empty Shore FOLK - 2013 Ten dreamy, spare, (mostly) crushingly sad tracks from Indianapolis singer-songwriter McCoach, this release features just acoustic guitar and cracking voice, along with some minimal percussion. This excellent album is one of the anchors of new label In Store Recordings and rewards repeat listens. Mc-

Demiricous - Two (Poverty) METAL - 2007 Devil to Pay - Fate Is Your Muse METAL - 2013

Fate Is Your Muse is without a doubt a towering, monumental piece of metal that has the power to transcend labels and genres. Doom? Straight up metal? Stoner rock? Whatever the fuck Metallica called what they were doing after Master of Puppets and before Load? Give FiYM half a chance and it will change you.

SEE, ALBUMS, ON PAGE 12

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // COVER STORY 11

Dorsch, Neapolitan

The Gizmos, 1976/77 The Studio Recordings

Freddie Gibbs, The Miseducation of Freddie Gibbs

Cara Jean Wahlers and Grover Parido, Goodnight Charlotte

Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s, The Dust of Retreat

Marmoset, Record in Red

ALBUMS , FROM PAGE 11

Hotfox - You, Me, and The Monster INDIE ROCK - 2011

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The Impossible Shapes - Tum POP/FOLK - 2006

The DIxon-Rhyne Project - Reinvention JAZZ - 2008 Legendary organist and Wes Montgomery sideman Melvin Rhyne shines on this funky collaboration with Indy sax player Rob Dixon. A soul-jazz masterpiece for the hip-hop era.

In the Face of War - Self-Reliance is Self Destruction HARDCORE - 2002

DJ Shiva - Consumer Product ELECTRONIC/TECHNO - 2011 Claiming nearly 20 years of experience as a DJ, Lisa Smith — better known as DJ Shiva — has been a tireless proponent of techno music in Indy. Shiva has also been active as a producer, amassing a respectable discography since releasing her first 12" in 2005. Consumer Product is an expertly crafted chunk of hardcore minimal-techno. "Insipid Market Fodder" is the standout track here. The introductory passage recalls traditional West African drumming, and just before the hypnotic percussion pattern lulls you into trance, Shiva slaps on a funky, jacking Chicago house beat. Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in contemporary electronic music and absolutely essential listening for techno fans. DMA - Pheel Phree ELECTRONIC/PSYCH - 2013 Full of cryptic lyrics and jarring waves of sound, DMA's stream of consciousness creations flow loose and free. But there's a method to the madness. The most striking elements on Pheel Phree are Adamson's carefully layered and ethereal multi-tracked vocal harmonies. These moments strike in unlikely ways and suddenly shift listeners into a different dimension of sound not unlike the otherworldly choirs in the Philip Glass epic Einstein on the Beach. Dorsh - Neapolitan SOUL/ELECTRONIC - 2012

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The debut release from Rad Summer’s eccentric young soul crooner Dorsh is a remarkably mature and compelling work. Dorsh is a true triple threat, delivering high quality work on Neapolitan as a producer, vocalist and MC. Throughout the LP, Dorsh’s delicate, whispery vocals are tastefully paired with jazzy, ambient electronic beats. Ebony Rhythm Band - Soul Heart Transplant   SOUL/FUNK/PSYCH -  RECORDED 1969 RELEASED 2004 In 1969, Ebony Rhythm Band released a funky 45 titled Soul Heart Transplant on Herb Miller's Indianapolis-based soul label Lamp. This LP is composed

Murder by Death, Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon

The Involuntarys - I’d Rather Be A Faggot Than A Christian PUNK - 2013

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Freddie Gibbs at Jazz Kitchen of unreleased tracks from those sessions. Essential for the inclusion of "Drugs Ain't Cool," a mind-bending psychedelic funk nugget recorded a full year prior to the debut release of George Clinton's Funkadelic. Elephant Micah - Hindu Windmills FOLK - 2006 Everthus The Deadbeats - John Kill and The Microscopic Lullaby GLAM FOLK - 2008

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Everything, Now! - Spatially Severed   ROCK - 2008 Our favorite of the wild, sci-fi-flecked rock inventions from Everything, Now!, helmed by Jon Rogers. Freddie Gibbs - The Miseducation of Freddie Gibbs HIP-HOP – 2009 The Gates of Slumber - Conquerer DOOM METAL - 2008 Gizmos – 1976/77 The Studio Recordings PUNK - RECORDED 1976-77 Best news out of the GIzmos camp this year? The lineup that recorded these songs is reuniting and touring this summer.

12 COVER STORY // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Good Luck – Into Lake Griffy POP-PUNK - 2008 Gently emerging from the soft-spoken Bloomington P.C. punk scene, Good Luck made national waves with their debut record, Into Lake Griffy. Mixing the best parts of progressive indie and punk acts like The Weakerthans, Good Luck’s three incredibly talented members laid down track after track of melodic, thoughtful pop punk with enough noodling to feed an army. Grampall Jookabox - Ropechain PSYCH-FOLK - 2008 Before he morphed into Jookabox or DMA, David “Moose” Adams was know as Grampall Jookabox. More than any of his other releases, Ropechain captures GJ at their weirdest, their wildest, their catchiest. Aside from the tripped-out reggae of obvious single “The Girl Ain’t Preggers,” Ropechain is packed with incredible songs that blur the lines between nonsensical and insightful.

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Hoagy Carmichael - Curtis Hitch and Hoagy Carmichael JAZZ - RECORDED 1920S, RELEASED 1974 This reissue rounds up nearly all the recordings the young Hoosier songwriter Hoagy Carmichael made in Richmond, Indiana’s Gennett Records studio - including the original 1927 recording of Hoagy’s perennial classic “Star Dust.” The album also features selections from the Evansville based jazz group of Curtis Hitch.

Sometimes you just want to get your kicks and let go. That’s where the Involuntarys come in. Underneath their bonehead sensibilities lies an acute sense of satire and commentary. Songs like “Helen Keller Was A Socialist” are sure to have you pondering in the pit. Featuring some of the most lovable party punks in town, The Involuntarys will remind you why 1994 was the best year ever.

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J Brookinz - Gateway 3/Rebel Music HIP-HOP - 2012 The best result of J. Brookinz’ Gateway experiments, this album came out of a 48-hour-lock-in-and-recording-session and features a huge amount of Indy’s hottest hip-hop talent, all grounded by the venerable production talents of Brookinz. The Jackson 5 - The Lost Steeltown Recordings SOUL - RECORDED 1967, RELEASED 1996 In 1968 Gary, Indiana’s Steeltown Records released the debut recording by future pop icons Jackson 5. This LP collects unreleased material from those sessions, providing a snapshot of the group’s sound during a time when the Jackson brothers were regulars at local Gary clubs and talent shows. Jimmy Coe - After Hours Joint JAZZ/JUMP BLUES/R&B - RECORDED 1950S RELEASED 1989 Saxophonist Jimmy Coe spent the majority of his career working the jazz clubs of Indianapolis. This LP collects his best work from the 50s, from Louis Jordan style jump blues to smokey after-hours jazz. John Cougar Mellencamp – Uh-huh HEARTLAND ROCK - 1983

either. The songwriting — the biggest problem with most rock records— is fantastic. Most of the LP can be heard on YouTube. CD and LP reissues do exist, though they are also hard to find today. — Stan Denski

John Terrill – Frowny Frown FOLK/PSYCH - RECORDED 1988-1998 RELEASED 2008 This obscure set of home-recordings by Dancing Cigarettes co-founder John Terrill is a hidden jewel in the Hoosier music archives. Texturally, Frowny Frown recalls the fractured psychedelic folk-pop of Syd Barrett or Skip Spence while the songwriting evokes Loadedera Velvet Underground. A superb and rewarding collection of songs that deserve wider critical recognition.

Memory Map - Holiday Band POP/ROCK – 2011

700 West label head and producer Moe Whittemore released this oddball collection of tunes as a showcase for his studio’s sound. The LP is a real mixed bag featuring everything from folksy country to Moe’s funky psychedelic oboe workouts. But the real highlight is the sweet soul ballad “Check Me Out,” featuring Tony Black of legendary Indy soul group The Revolution Compared to What on vocals.

A wonderful set of 1960s field recordings featuring Howard County fiddle maestro Summers. Indiana Fiddler captures the sound of rural Indiana in its purest form. Jorma Whittaker - Self-titled ROCK - 2003

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The Late Show – Portable Pop POWER POP - 1980 A gleaming, lively, of-the-period piece of work, Portable Pop echoes bands like the Knack and The Romantics, but also the British Invasion sound and Elvis Costello. Released in 1980 on Rave Records, it would be the only official release by The Late Show and outof-print for many years — that is, until its reissue on Trashy Creatures Records in 2012. Leroy Carr & Scrapper Blackwell - Naptown Blues 1929-1934 BLUES - RECORDED 1929-1934 Legendary Indianapolis blues duo Carr and Blackwell changed music with their sophisticated take on the genre. Leroy Carr's smooth, laid-back croon was a million miles removed from the raw-throat hollering of his rural southern counterparts, while Blackwell's jazzy, single-string solos broke the mold for blues guitar while anticipating the work of future performers like Charlie Christian. This Yazoo reissue collects some of the duo’s best recordings.

Marmoset

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Mab Lab - A Mab Lab Reader 99-03 SOUL/ELECTRONIC/ROCK - RECORDED 1999-2003 Bands with turntablists may seem like a cliche today, but when Mab Lab hit the Indy scene with its blend of hip-hop and soulful rock grooves, the result was ultrafresh.  Vocalist Kate Lamont established herself as one of Indiana’s most creative musicians off the strength of her work with the collective. The Madeira - Carpe Noctem SURF ROCK - 2008 Did you know Indiana has a world class surf rock band making world class surf rock albums? We do. Manchild - Power and Love SOUL/FUNK - 1977 Before attaining worldwide stardom as an R&B superproducer, Babyface cut his teeth with Indy's Earth, Wind & Fire-styled soul group Manchild. Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s - The Dust of Retreat ORCHESTRAL POP/INDIE ROCK - 2005 Marmoset - Record in Red POP - 2001 McKay - Into You PSYCH ROCK - 1977 Ray Pierle comes from a family of musicians and in 1977 was the driving force behind the release of the LP Into You, credited to the band McKay. Released in a pressing of 300 copies, the music sounds like a blend of Neil Young and Jerry Garcia while not trying to be

TOMMY JOHNAGIN APR 99-12 12

SPECIAL EVENT KEVIN POLLAK

Mike Adams At His Honest Weight - Oscillate Wisely POP/ROCK - 2011

Kaleidoscope Jukebox - Infinite Reflection ELECTRONIC/DOWNTEMPO - 2013

Kentucky Nightmare - Take Her Favour ROCK - 2007

NEW PARKING GARAGE ACROSS STREET

N. COLLEGE AVE. BROAD RIPPLE 6281 317-255-4211

Mo - First Album   PSYCH/COUNTRY/SOUL - 1976

John W. Summers - Indiana Fiddler FOLK/BLUEGRASS/COUNTRY - RELEASED 1984

A first listen to Bloomington producer Kaleidscope Jukebox’s (a.k.a Clint Carty) Infinite Reflection will evoke comparisons to downtempo champs Thievery Corporation. Rightfully so, as Carty has produced a remix for the group and his LP was released on a subsidiary of their ESL label. Like Thievery, Carty has a penchant for Asian/Eastern inspired melodies and instrumentation. But for our money Thievery Corporation hasn’t created anything as compelling as Carty's transcendent seven-minute title track.

BRINGING COMEDY TO INDY FOR 32 YEARS

MAY 8-10

A treasure, Adams is. We’ll cut the Yoda-speak and tell you why: Adams is the guy behind husband&wife and the Bloomington label Crossroads of America. But it’s his eponymous work that’s really captured our hearts, most of all his excellent 2011 release Oscillate Wisely. We expect his forthcoming album on Joyful Noise to be even better. Mudkids - 4trackmind HIP-HOP - 1998

DOWNTOWN

247 S. MERIDIAN ST. 317-631-3536

REESE WATERS APR 9-12

WEDNESDAY LADIES IN FREE THURSDAY COLLEGE ID NITE $5

The Mudkids were the first Indianapolis hip-hop group to successfully channel the spirit of golden-era, “Native Tongues” hip-hop. Their debut still stands as the most potent dose of the Mudkids musical vision. I had this album on repeat for months after its release and it still sounds great over a decade later. Murder By Death - Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon ROCK/ALT-COUNTRY - 2012 For years now, Bloomington’s Murder By Death have released albums chock full of intriguingly dark rock and songs full of monsters and magic. But it’s their latest release, the crowdfunded 2012 album Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon, which showcases the band at new heights. Cellist Sarah Balliet rips and rolls around Turla’s rich, deep voice (which has been steadily dropping a half-octave or so every album to date). Standouts include “I Came Around,” “Hard World” and “Lost River,” but every track of the set is a winner.  Formerly of Okkervil River, multi-instrumentalist Scott Brackett is a tremendous asset to the group, which rockets through all 13 eminently sing-alongable tracks. They’ve always been a beast of a group to see live, and Bitter Drink, Bitter Moon captures their live power and harnesses it to wax.  

www.historicplainfield.com

It’s time for a visit.

Nomad Yarns 218 E. Main St. • 317-742-7456 Sweetheart Cupcakes 212 E. Main St. • 317-203-5951 The Real Food Shoppe 208 E. Main St. • 317-203-4097 Gear Up Cyclery 124 W. Main St. • 317-203-5045

S E E , A L B U M S , O N P A G E 14

Clark’s Barber Shop 118 S. East St. • 317-839-0311

THE CONTRIBUTORS: Karl Hofstetter (Joyful Noise Recordings), Bob Richert (Gulcher Records), Jim Ector (Karma Records), Sharon Rickson (Girls Rock, various bands), Travis Harvey (Village Green Records), Nick Selm (Drink or Die, NUVO), Ace One (emcee), Jason Nickey (Landlocked Music) Abby Goldsmith (General Public Collective), Todd Robinson (LUNA Music), Rich Barker (Punk Rock Night, various bands), Jon Rogers (Musical Family Tree), Wayne Bertsch (Barfly), Kyle Hodges (Owl Studios, Jazz Fest Foundation, various musical projects),  Rob Peoni (Thoughts on Tracks, MFT, We Listen For You), Slater Hogan (DJ, Keepin It Deep), Annie and Andy Skinner (Indy CD and Vinyl, A-Squared Industries), Nick Saligoe (Deckademics, DJ Metrognome), Eric Salazar (DJ Salazar), Rick Wilkerson (Missing Link Records), Derek Vorndran (In Store Recordings) Stan Denski (IUPUI, Aether/Or Records, Irvington Folk Festival) and the editorial staff of NUVO.

Buzz’s Pizza 10 S. East St. • 317-839-2000 Flowered Occasions 115 W. Main St. • 317-839-7331

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // COVER STORY 13

The Naptown Afro-Jazz Quintet, Naptown Jazz

Songs: Ohia, Didn’t It Rain

The Proforms, Atavism

Sleeping Bag and Rozwell Kid, Dreamboats

Racebannon, Satan’s Kickin’ Yr Dick In

Sir Winston and The Commons, We’re Gonna Love

Slothpop, Self-titled

ALBUMS , FROM PAGE 13

Sirius Blvck - Year of the Snvke HIP-HOP - 2014

MX-80 Sound – Hard Attack PUNK - 1977

Skafish - What’s This? 1976-1979 PUNK/NEW WAVE - RECORDED 1976-1979 RELEASED 2007

One of the most innovative Indiana bands ever, Bloomington’s legendary MX-80 anticipated the guitar noise of no wave and post-punk bands like Sonic Youth.

A collection of early demos recorded by Hammond, Indiana’s androgynous new-wave pioneer.

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Slater Hogan and John Larner - The Hoosier Daddy E.P. ELECTRONIC/JAZZ/HOUSE - 2003

N.A.P. - Straight out the Nappy City HIP-HOP - 1996 The influence of Dr. Dre’s California G-funk sound is a pervasive influence on N.A.P.’s cult rap classic Straight out the Nappy City. Lyrically, N.A.P. chronicle Indianapolis street culture from Post Road to Haughville.

The Indy house production duo of John Larner and Slater Hogan have released a slew of classic titles in their genre.  But for the purposes of our list it made sense to choose the duo’s Hoosier Daddy E.P., a recording that pays tribute to the jazz heritage of Indianapolis. The bubbling funk of ”Jazz Kitchen” features the trumpet of Naptown jazz veteran Clifford Ratliff.

Naptown Afro Jazz Quintet - Naptown Jazz LATIN/AFRICAN/JAZZ - 1980 Vibes player Billy Wooten teamed up with Nigerian percussionist Prince Julius Adeniyi to record this collection of Afro-Latin jazz and hard bop.

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Oreo Jones - Betty   HIP-HOP - 2012

ing to a song about woodpeckers or something else wonderfully stupid.

Oreo Jones’ full-length debut Betty is one the strongest locally produced hip-hop LPs we've ever heard. It finds Jones stepping forward as a remarkably mature writer, weaving thoughtful narratives, full of nuance and poetic turns of speech, all delivered with his booming, charismatic flow. The album is an artistic triumph from start to finish, and it's loaded with so many highlights and potential anthems, it's difficult to spotlight just one or two tracks. But one song that really spoke to me was Jones' touching and enigmatic tribute to '50s teen pop sensation Frankie Lymon.

Primevil - Smokin' Bats at Campton's PSYCH/ROCK 1974

Pessoa – Do You Have Great Strength? EMO - 2010

After the demise of Twilight Sentinels producer/MC Joe Harvey assembled the Proforms, a supergroup of Indy’s underground hip-hop talent featuring dynamic MCs Skittz and Ace One with cuts by DJ Spoolz. Atavism sounds like a classic even on the first spin. That's due in no small part to the Harvey's predilection for the vintage sounds of early '90s "golden era" hip-hop. Atavism is a finely crafted slice of Indiana hip-hop.

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Despite My Chemical Romance and Fall Out Boy’s best attempts to defile the good name of “emo,” Pessoa fearlessly embraced and revived the genre. Originally from Avon, the four-piece became a staple of the anythinggoes house party scene. If you don’t know all the words to “The Coming Up Right,” then you might be fucked. Pravada - Dirty Looks ROCK - 2013 Prizzy Prizzy Please – Self-Titled POP-PUNK - 2008 These Bloomington nerds knew their instruments inside and out and approached rock and roll as one, big, sweaty joke. Relax, get high and find yourself mosh-

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Pessoa

Hard stoner rock in the mold of Mountain or Black Sabbath. On tracks like “High Steppin’ Stomper,” Jay Wilfong’s heavy riffing anticipates the sound of metal that would soon dominate Indianapolis airwaves. Recorded by Moe Whittemore at the mighty 700 West studio. The Proforms - Atavism HIP-HOP - 2011

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Racebannon - Satan's Kickin' Yr Dick In NOISE PUNK - 2002 Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band - Between the Ditches COUNTRY BLUES - 2012

14 COVER STORY // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Rhythm Machine - Rhythm Machine FUNK/SOUL - 1976 The original Indianapolis pressing of Rhythm Machine's impossibly rare  LP regularly sells around the $1,000 mark, making it completely inaccessible to the average music fan. Fortunately Now-Again Records’ recent reissue corrects that problem, while adding previously unreleased tracks and rare photos to the package. The best work here recalls classic Kool and The Gang, while the grooving ballad "Put A Smile On Time" will win the heart of any soul music fan. Rodeo Ruby Love - The Pits POP/ROCK - 2013

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Scott Matelic - Primitive Pessimist    HIP-HOP/ELECTRONIC/PSYCH - 2004 In recent years Scott Matelic has made his name creating uptempo dancefloor bangers. But the delicate downtempo instrumentals on his 2004 debut stand as the producer’s finest work. Matelic’s carefully constructed jazzy hip-hop beats have rightfully earned comparisons to DJ Shadow’s landmark Endtroducing LP.

Sleeping Bag & Rozwell Kid - Dreamboats POP/ROCK - 2013 Not a Sleeping Bag or a Rozwell Kid record, but a collaborative, best-of-both-parties 6-track release created after the Hoosier and Pennsylvanian frontmen exchanged a series of emails after meeting out on tour. Big ups to Gmail (or whatever service provider they were using) because now we can blast these irresistibly catchy songs as loudly as possible. Technically not a full album and technically not entirely from Indiana, but so overwhelmingly excellent it had to find a place on this list. Dreamboats scratches every itch the devoted Pinkerton fan could possibly have. Sloppy Seconds - Destroyed PUNK - 1989 Slothpop - Self-Titled ORCHESTRAL POP - 2011 A large corner of the Indianapolis music scene heaved a heavy sigh in 2012 when self-described freak-folk group Slothpop called it off. Luckily, members have mostly gone on to participate in other excellent projects. But we yearn for the pop beauty of their early 2011 self-titled (and singular) album, showcasing Kristin Newborn’s pure, effervescent voice. “Kokoro” is the beating heart of this album, which was nimbly produced by Andy Fry at Queensize.

Sir Winston and the Commons - We're Gonna Love PSYCH/GARAGE - RECORDED 1966-1967

S.M. Wolf – Self-titled POP - 2013

This EP collects all the recorded work of Indy’s wildest ‘60s garage band. The title track is an indisputable fuzz guitar garage rock classic.

We’d been waiting a long time for a pop record this good to come out of Indianapolis. The brainchild of Amo Joy mastermind Adam Gross, S.M. Wolf is a little

more straight forward than his previous projects. But there is still plenty of room for experimentation. Gross paints splashes of twee, psych and folk throughout his lush pop landscape. Songs: Ohia - Didn’t It Rain    ALT-COUNTRY/FOLK - 2002 Sure, Molina’s originally from Ohio. But the singersongwriter behind Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co (the groups are one and the same, generally and confusingly) was the cornerstone of Bloomington’s Secretly Canadian, and spent quite a bit of time living in Indianapolis — it was, in fact, his home when he passed away last year at the age of 39. Didn’t It Rain is as potent, desperate and howling as Molina gets — not quite as bleak as 2000’s Ghost Tropic, but dark all the same. The additions of Jim Krewson and Jennie Benford (Jim & Jennie & The Pinetops) add close harmonies as Molina breaks and rebuilds songs again and again.

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The Sound Defects - The Iron Horse ELECTRONIC/HIP-HOP/PSYCH - 2008 A stunning set of atmospheric instrumental hip-hop beats with a strong psychedelic slant. There’s a cinematic quality to The Iron Horse that recalls groovy late ‘60s soundtrack work by composers like Ennio Morricone and John Barry. An exceptionally listenable and soulful LP. Turner Bros. - Act 1 FUNK/SOUL 1974 The Turner Bros. recorded a couple R&B sides for Atlantic Records in the 1960s, but returned to Central Indiana to independently record and release this 1974 masterpiece. A legendary LP full of stunning soul music that stands up well against the best acts of the era. Twilight Sentinels - Meanwhile HIP-HOP - 2007

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Uncle Funkenstein - Together Again   JAZZ - 1983 Saxophonist Russell Webster’s ambitious 1983 double album is a sprawling tribute to the glory days of the Indianapolis jazz scene. Uncle Funkenstein features an all-star cast of local players including Clifford Ratliff, Claude Sifferlen, Alonzo "Pookie" Johnson, Melvin Rhyne, Larry Ridley  and James Spaulding. Uncle Funkenstein is probably most known for its outrageous price tag. A copy sold at auction for nearly $4,000, making it the most valuable Indiana LP ever. But musically the album is sought after for the two-part, 29-minute soul-jazz jam "Uncle Funkenstein.”

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Various artists - Dig That Rock & Roll From Indiana ROCKABILLY/ RECORDED 1950S - RELEASED 1980 A fantastic collection of early Indiana rock, from the frantic rockabilly of Ronnie Haig to the doo-wop vocals of the Five Stars.

Various artists - Indianapolis Jump BLUES - 1977 Comprised of field recordings made in Indianapolis by noted ethnomusicologist Art Rosenbaum in the 1960s, Indianapolis Jump collects work by seldom heard Indy blues players like Shirley Griffith, Pete Franklin and J.T. Adams. Various artists - Red Snerts   COMPILATION - 1981 Famed compilation of Indiana new wave and punk. Vulgar Boatmen – You and Your Sister ROCK - 1989

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We Are Hex - Gloom Bloom GOTH/NEW WAVE/DARK ROCK - 2009 Wes Montgomery - Fingerpickin' JAZZ - 1958 Guitar wizard Wes Montgomery's debut solo release captures the sound of Indiana Ave. at its peak. Recorded in Indy with a cast of local legends like "Pookie" Johnson and a 17-year-old Freddie Hubbard. The Wooden Glass - Recorded Live JAZZ/FUNK - 1972 Vibraphonist Billy Wooten is probably best known for his tenure with Blue Note jazz guitarist Grant Green. But for his fans, this collection of funky, blunted-out jazz instrumentals stands as his best work. A remarkable cover of the Dramatics' "In the Rain" is the highlight here. The track has been extensively sampled by Madlib, driving up demand for original copies which routinely fetch over a $1,000. Recorded live at The 19th Whole, a now defunct Indy nightclub.

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Yank Rachell - Yank Rachell BLUES - 1973 Tennessee-born mandolin blues master Yank Rachell moved to Indy in the late 50s. Rachell began his recording career in 1929, but this collection dates from a 1973 session in Indy. You really can’t go wrong with any of Yank’s releases, but this tile catches the blues legend in fine form. The Zero Boys - Vicious Circle PUNK -1982 Zerfas - 700 West PSYCH ROCK - 1973

Mo Whittemore's 700 West record label released many records in the 1970s that are highly prized today, but none more than this 1973 release by the Zerfas brothers, Dave (drums) and Brian (keyboards). Recorded on an 8-track machine, the band used every technique they could to create what is a kind of Sgt. Pepper of their very own. Ambitious, well written and played, this is simply a great record by any measure. Reissues on vinyl exist but the LP has yet to see a CD reissue. ­— Stan Denski

A NOTE TO THE DISGRUNTLED There are way more than 100 excellent albums with origins in Indiana, so we’ve opened a forum for you on NUVO. net where you can submit your favorite. Find it at nuvo.net, along with a playlist of several of these artists. Just itchin’ to dash off some quick hate mail? That can go to music@nuvo.net. (But be creative, please, because we might decide to run a list of 100 best hate mail submissions in the near future.) NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // COVER STORY 15

A&E EVENTS Celebrate BRAZIL! On the eve of the World Cup, being hosted for the first time by Brazil since 1950, comes the launch of a programming initiative of the Indianapolis Public Library celebrating Indy’s sister relationship with Campinas, Brazil. Things kick off April 9 at Central Library with a 6 p.m. reception in the Riley Room featuring music from DJ Kyle Long and Brazilian food, followed at 7 p.m. by welcoming remarks and a Capoeira performance. And the celebration continues April 14 with a 6 p.m. screening of Wrinkles of the City — La Havana, a short film about a street art project that melded large-scale photos of ordinary people with graffiti art, followed by a panel discussion featuring local artists Samuel E Vazquez, Artur Silva (Cultural Cannibals), Dan Thompson (Bridge Collective) and Dave and Holly Combs (You Are Beautiful). All events are free; more info on events through May at indypl.org. Central Library, April 9 & 14, 6 p.m., FREE Butler ArtsFest April 9-13: The Two Maples — A Butler Theatre adaptation of a Russian fairy tale by Evgeny Shvarts appropriate for ages 5-95. April 10, 7 p.m.: The Soldier’s Tale — A world premiere of a new staging of Stravinsky’s musical theatre piece involving the combined forces of Butler Dance, Music and Theatre. April 11, 7:30 p.m.: Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra — The Schrott’s Center professional orchestra in residence offers the world premiere of ICO composer in residence James Aikman’s Triptych: Musical Momentum On, plus Strauss, Mozart and a bassoon concerto performed by virtuoso Martin Kuuskmann. Butler University, butlerartsfest.com Richard Blanco Blanco became the nation’s fifth inaugural poet when he read at Obama’s second inauguration, but he scored a lot of firsts, as the first Latino, immigrant and openly gay writer to earn the honor. Plus, he was the youngest. Born in Madrid to a family of Cuban exiles, raised in Miami, now based in Maine, Blanco has published three books of poetry and is working on a full-length memoir and children’s book. Herron School of Art and Design, April 10, 7:30 p.m., FREE, iupui.edu Ensemble Voltaire: Late Bloomers Sure, child prodigies like Mozart and Liszt went over big in all the fashionable salons. But there is life after 50 — if there was statistically less of it back when Jean-Phillipe Rameau and CPE Bach were enjoying late-career renaissances. Ensemble Voltaire will present music by such “late-blooming” Baroque composers in the final program on its 25th anniversary season. Trinity Episcopal Church, April 11, 7:30 p.m.; and Athenaeum, April 13, 7:30 p.m.; $20, $10 senior/student; indybaroquemusic.org

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WONDER WOMEN AND CONJOINED TWINS FIRST FRIDAY, BY THE NUMBERS Crystal France and Evan Hauser e Crystal France is a skilled painter who works with a variety of materials — oils, encaustic on paper, pencil on Dura-lar — all in service of self-portraiture. And while those cross-media explorations pay off in this exhibition, it was a traditional painting (oil on canvas) that had the biggest impact for me: “Conjoined,” which portrays France and her sister — identical twins — joined at the head. The sculptor Evan Hauser, who also works confidently across a variety of media, focuses more on childhood dreams than France’s adolescent self-perception. The ceramic “Child’s Play” portrays a boy who may be innocently shooting off a slingshot but is, in any case, standing on a missile. It’s a treat to see such fresh and vibrant work by two artists who complement one another so perfectly.

With stops at the Harrison, Gallery 924, New Day Meadery, Primary Gallery and the Athenaeum

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Harrison Center for the Arts through April 25 Cities and the Field: A Sonic Map of 2 Indianapolis by Stuart Hyatt and The National Road by Field Works e Composer and artist Stuart Hyatt walked the entire length of Washington Street (aka The National Road), recording sounds in order to create the first sonic map of Indianapolis. That map is part of this exhibition, along with the accompanying album, The National Road, by Field Works, the band/art collaborative founded by Hyatt. Themes of apocalyptic paranoia abound in the liner notes, which take cues from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities. The show features the fifteen watercolors by Nathaniel Russell which illustrate the liner notes. One watercolor accompanying a section of liner notes entitled “The Mediated World” refers to a device recently purchased by the Indiana State Police to track cell phone data and terrorism. (Keep your eye on the emperor, warn the liner notes.) It depicts transmitters and receivers, akin to what you might see on the top of a typical cell phone tower, against a black background. This painting — like the surrounding exhibition — is an engaging combo of police state paranoia and Dr. Seussian playfulness. Harrison Center for the Arts through April 25 Quicksand: Landscape of the Feminine by Anila Quayyum Agha e If you paid a visit to the TINY II exhibit at Gallery 924 last December, you saw —but hopefully didn’t bump into — Agha’s installation “Unbearable Beauty,” consisting of maybe a dozen hawthorn branches coated in acrylic, sticking out of the wall. There’s nothing tiny about what this installation has grown into — a whole forest of honey locust thorns painted 3

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“Conjoined” by Crystal France

white — sticking out of the wall, entitled “Murmuration.” How willing are you, this installation seems to ask, to indulge your curiosity and engage with such a work of art? But the other work on display isn’t quite so prickly. Her collaged drawings, which blend embroidery and textiles — crafts that are traditionally the province of women — might just inspire contemplation of the place of the feminine in art. Gallery 924 at the Arts Council through April 25 Wonder Women: Wayne Bertsch e Those of a certain age will remember the television series Wonder Woman, starring Linda Carter. Cartoonist, artist, and frequent NUVO contributor Wayne Bertsch (of “Barfly” and “Gadfly” fame) surely enough finds room for Carter in one of his paintings on display. But he also portrays Rosa Parks, Hillary Clinton, and a host of other female heroes — the Virgin Mary among them — who equally deserve the title “Wonder Woman.” Bertsch’s ability to depict the human form in a seemingly endless variety of styles is also pretty damned wonderful. 4

New Day Meadery through April 30

“Imagined City V” by Anila Quayyum Agha Holy Ground: The Works of Lauren Kussro e If you’ve ever seen Kussro at work ­— say, intently cutting with an X-Acto knife — you’ve seen her achieving a certain calm in her precise work that takes cues from the repetitive patterns she finds in the natural world, in the forms of barnacles, flowers and roots. And that feeling of calm is, in part, what she hopes to give to viewers of her art. “Through this exhibition, I offer the gift of a quiet space,” Kussro says in her artist statement. Perhaps the most stunning works in this exhibition were the most functional; for instance, “In Aere Noctiluca,” a hanging lamp that resembles a glowing jellyfish in the depths of the ocean. 5

Primary Gallery; closing reception April 18 Steel Trees by Todd Bracik r Bracik’s 15 “Steel Trees,” on display at the Athenaeum, incorporate a variety of items into their DNA, as it were; their trunks, fashioned from interweaving steel bars, remind me vaguely of the double helix form. You see bicycle frames as well as implements like saws and hammers incorporated into structures that sometimes resemble bird cages, sometimes monkey bars. A plush toy bird sits in one bird cage-esque tree, clueing us into the artist’s sense of whimsy. Maybe, next time around, we’ll see steel birds too? 6

Athenaeum ArtSpace through April 30 — DAN GROSSMAN

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Georgeanna Smith and Matthew Roland in NoExit Performance’s Middletown.

NoExit Performance: Middletown q On one level, this is about a handful of people in a small town. John (Matthew Roland), a long-time resident, is “medically lonely,” while Mary (Georgeanna Smith), a newcomer, hopes her husband will manage to be in town for the birth of their son. John and Mary meet by chance at the public library. Through their sometimes funny, sometimes painful interactions and those of their neighbors, we realize the precious ordinariness of being in the middle of the birth-to-death spectrum. On another level, this is about the “before, after, during” of all of life on Middletown’s patch of Earth, from the rocks and trees and spirits of the long-gone Native people to a contemporary astronaut observing his hometown from his rocket ship, and more. Any of us could be a resident of Middletown, too. And on the meta level, the playwright pokes affectionate fun at wordsmiths and theatre-goers. Director Michael Burke and his team took Will Eno’s exquisitely layered script and illuminated it by adding their own beautiful layers of staging. Every detail is perfectly chosen, from the cop’s subtly sparkling tie to the walls of distressed wood window frames, and from the yearning background music to the dreamy lighting illustrating the clouds that “Middletown is known for.” Each of the eight actors is solidly in control of the rich language and completely believable in his or her role(s), even under the microscope of the very intimate temporary theatre space in the Indy Indie Artist Colony lobby. I laughed, I cried, I was healed. Opening night was sold out and with only six performances total, be sure to buy tickets in advance. — HOPE BAUGH April 10-12 and 18-19 at Indy Indie Artist Colony

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The Mountaintop w David Alan Anderson and Tracey N. Bonner take IRT audiences to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s figurative mountaintop in an intense two-hander. Katori Hall’s script is an unexpected exploration of King’s life and legacy that invites audiences to glimpse an imagined fraction of time lost to history. Set on the eve of his assassination at the Lorraine Motel, King (Anderson) encounters a spirited maid (Bonner) who challenges our notions of the civil rights leader. The duo has a powerful and believable chemistry that carries the story through each twist. The production beautifully unpacks the humanity of a man elevated to sainthood. Director Courtney Sale creates heartbreaking moments of clarity that allow space to interpret King as both sinner and saint. What’s left is a call to action that echoes King’s great orations, which still resonate today. Yet the play about a preacher refrains from being preachy as it reflects on where we have come and where we are going together. — KATELYN COYNE Through April 27 at Indiana Repertory Theatre Hoosier Bard: Arden of Fevershame e Did Shakespeare write part of this play, first printed in 1592 and long attributed to the prolific Anonymous? Maybe. The language makes me think of him. Regardless, the story is edge-of-your-seat interesting, based on a love-and-lust murder that really happened in the 1500s. It’s dark and violent, with great fight choreography, but funny, too, because the murderers are so serious about their narcissism in the name of love. Director Terri Bourus and the large cast — a nice mix of professional actors and students — make it easy to understand what’s happening, with several offering particularly nuanced work. Jaddy Ciucci is formidable as Alice Arden, the privileged yet dissatisfied wife. And it’s intriguing to see Ben Asaykwee — perhaps best known for his bawdy, eye-winking roles — play a weary assassin-for-hire who’s just doing his best to stay menacing and get the job done. The actors don’t ever fully leave the set except at intermission, which allows for breathless pacing and makes the two hours fly by. Why not five stars? A few of the acting choices and one or two of the costumes didn’t work for me. Also I’m still trying to decide if the set is simply a goodenough clutter hampered by venue limitations — or a brilliantly layered homage to the production’s many influences.

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— HOPE BAUGH Continues April 11-12 at Central Library

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EVENTS PLAY BALL! With yet another signal that the Season of the Polar Vortex may actually be behind us, the Indianapolis Indians home opener at Victory Field is slated for April 10 with the first pitch at 7:05. The Tribe takes on Corporal Klinger’s hometown team, the Toledo Mud Hens (yes, that was a reference for the geezers reading this). The first 2,500 fans get a free schedule magnet and everybody gets a fireworks show after the final out. Sun King and IndyCog are teaming up again for Bike to the Ballpark, a ride from the brewery through Downtown to the yard. The Sun King event, complete with beer, food trucks, beer, vendor booths, beer, beer and beer, gets underway at 4. Bring your glove, meat. April 10, 7:05 pm, Victory Field, tickets from $10 - $35 (tickets for kids under 14 start at $9), 269-3452 Indy Eleven v. Carolina RailHawks So, you read last week’s NUVO and you’re completely familiar with Indy’s addition to The Most Popular Sport on the Planet, right? Good. Fresh off a 3-1 preseason victory over the IU men’s squad in front of a crowd ™ of 4,700 in conditions that could only be described as “damn cold,” the Eleven open up their inaugural season at home in the refurbished Carroll Stadium at IUPUI. April 12, 7:30 pm, Michael A. Carroll Stadium, tickets from $10, indyeleven.com Thunder v. Pacers The Pacers go on the road to play the Bucks and the (grrrrrrr) Heat before returning to Bankers Life on Sunday to slug it out with Oklahoma City in a nationally televised matchup (ABC, RTV-6 locally). It’s the last home game for the Blue and Yellow before the playoffs, and the team’s mission is clear: STOP SUCKING.

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any of them came north from Kentucky. One of them came from North Carolina. And some of them were native Hoosiers. But the dozen or so African-American men who came together in Indianapolis in the spring of 1889 — 125 years ago — to form the Hoosier Blackstockings were all so devoted to the still-evolving sport of baseball that they toiled as common laborers and servants during the day. Somehow they still found the time and energy to contribute to a key facet of the history of baseball — and ultimately, black culture. While organized African-American hardball leagues didn’t exist until 1920, by the 1880s the color line had largely been drawn in baseball, forcing black players, managers, owners and fans to establish and support their own segregated teams. The late 1880s were a heyday for the sport in the black community. Hall of Fame player, man-

April 13, 3:30 pm, Kuntz Stadium, tickets from $10 ($7 student), myalleycats.com

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The 125th anniversary of first black baseball team in Indy

Madison Radicals v. Indianapolis AlleyCats Oh, you play Frisbee? That’s cute. Try playing Frisbee like THESE guys. The game’s called “Ultimate,” and your Alleycats open the 2014 campaign against the Madison Radicals at 3:30 on Sunday. Never seen it? Imagine all the running of soccer or lacrosse coupled with the passing game you’d find in football, and you’ve got a game that’s a lotta bang for the buck.

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THE INDIANAPOLIS BLACKSTOCKINGS

April 13, 1 pm, Bankers Life Fieldhouse, some single seats and resale tickets available, pacers.com

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The Freeman covered the national rise of black baseball: Pictured are two members of the African Tigers club of Ark.

ager and scribe Sol White — in his landmark study of early African-American hardball, 1907’s History of Colored Base Ball — wrote that while few professional black teams existed in the late 1880s, it still became big business. “This year [1890] saw the close of a period in colored base ball which may well be called the money period,” the trailblazing White penned. “From 1885 to the close of 1890, colored base ball flourished.” Enter the Hoosier Blackstockings (or, alternatively, the Black Stockings or Black Socks). The team apparently coalesced around April 1889. By May, the squad was garnering attention in the local African-American press — namely, The Freeman newspaper, which triumphantly announced on May 18, 1889:

“Indianapolis can now boast of a firstclass colored nine which though recently organized, is composed of first-class balltossers. It has been named the ‘Hoosier Black Stockings,’ and it herewith challenges any amateur club in the country, black or white. A stock company will soon be formed and the club proposes to cross bats with the colored clubs of St. Louis, Louisville, Chicago, Cincinnati, or any other places holding strong nines.” (The challenge included a dare to the Cuban Giants, one of the few professional “colored” hardball teams in the country. The Cubans apparently didn’t respond.) SEE, BLACKSTOCKINGS, ON PAGE 20

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BLACKSTOCKINGS, FROM PAGE 18 On May 25, 1889, The Freeman reported that “[The] Indianapolis club will return here June 11th” from a tour of the Midwest and that the squad, officially called the “Hoosier Blackstocking B.B.C. [Base Ball Club], was comprised of the following players: William Craven, James Anderson, George Thomas, Jno. Barbour, Elzy Hart, George White, Bud Banks, Bud Cooke, Moses Allen, Wm. Shelton, Noah Moore.” There was a reason for the coverage: The influential publisher of The Freeman, Edward E. Cooper, was a crucial figure in the formation of the Blackstockings and “imagined himself as a baseball magnate ...” according to Northern Illinois professor James E. Brunson in The Early Image of Black Baseball. That personal vision, ironically, directly contradicted the relatively conservative Cooper’s disdain for the freewheeling “Dude” culture — an attitude and carriage of black sporting enthusiasts that today might be called “swagger.” Indeed, the development of the Blackstockings was so intertwined with The Freeman and Cooper that all correspondence for the franchise was directed through the newspaper’s office. Dr. Leslie Heaphy, in her book, The Negro Leagues: 1869-1960, wrote that by using The Freeman newsroom as its home base, the team “saved the expense of hiring a team secretary and paying for an office.” The Indianapolis “base ball” crew was a young bunch, ranging in age from late teens to mid-20s. They were mainly a blue-collar crew — many were day laborers, factory workers, coal diggers, house servants. A good slice of them lived in what was known as “Center Township.” The Blackstockings hosted some of the best amateur black teams in the country, among them the West Ends of St. Louis, probably the preeminent AfricanAmerican Midwestern aggregation, one The Freeman called “A Crack Colored Club,” hoping to hype the West Ends/ Blackstockings matchups in Indy. In order to draw fans, the Hooiser squad needed to look like a genuine challenge for St. Louis. But a late-spring road trip didn’t go as well as hoped by the Blackstockings, and both the team and its followers were, according to The Freeman, relieved when the squad returned home in early June. “[The Stockings] club is still playing in hard luck,” the paper stated. “It has some of the best players in the league” — presumably a local city league — “and a good many attribute their bad luck to other than inability to play ball.” 20 SPORTS // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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A Freeman cover from 1915, above; and KC’s Thomas Stirman, one of the nation’s early greats.

But the Indianapolis crew saved the best for last — a scheduled clash with the New Orleans Pinchbacks, who for two years had crowed about being the best amateur “colored” team in the nation, a boast The Freeman (and, therefore, the Blackstockings) took seriously. The publication claimed that the Pinchbacks “still hold their title as ‘champions’ in New Orleans” and “are champions of the colored clubs [in the] South.” The Pinchbacks, perhaps more than any other baseball team, represented the blossoming of African-American pride They were the nascence of a long, in the late 19th century, an evolution that occurred proud tradition of black baseball in at the same time that was fading Indianapolis that included the great Reconstruction to an end and formalized segregation was spreading ABC teams in the early 1900s. across the South. The implementation From there, the Blackstockings took of “Jim Crow” law was finalized with the on the visiting West Ends — who by that Supreme Court’s landmark 1896 rultime had “lost but one game this seaing in the Plessy v. Ferguson case that son ... A large crowd will no doubt witinfamously declared constitutional the ness the contest between these giants,” existence of “separate but equal” racial according to the paper. legal and educational systems. It’s worth noting that the results of But the Pinchbacks defied that trend games were rarely recorded, even by the by boldly naming themselves after P.B.S. team’s de facto PR arm, The Freeman; no Pinchback, who became the first person scores or outcomes for the Whens or West of color to hold the governorship of a Ends contests could be found in the paper. state when he took the reins of Louisiana The squad immediately set about playing a relatively less-known Center City team, the Whens, on June 5th. The Freeman, in its June 1 edition, did its best to hype the match, perhaps revealing Cooper’s self-interest in promoting the local black hardball scene: “The When club is one of the strongest in the city league and as the Blackstockings are the best colored ball tossers in the State … much interest is centered in the game. Everybody will be there.”

briefly in late 1872 and early 1873. While many mainstream, i.e. “white,” papers — including The New York Times — opined Pinchback’s brief rise as calamitous, African-American publications rejoiced in the development in Louisiana and hailed Pinchback as a hero. That was especially true of Edward Cooper and The Freeman, who held the Louisiana governor as a shining light in the struggle for civil rights. Strangely enough, however, the Pinchbacks ball club was formed, owned and managed by Walter L. Cohen, a nationally known (and somewhat notorious) gambler and shadowy entrepreneur with political and business connections throughout the South and Midwest. The roster was topped by pitcher George Hopkins as the squad embarked on a grand tour of the North that included stops in St. Louis and Chicago. And, allegedly, in Indianapolis to cross bats with the Blackstockings. The clash was scheduled for Sept. 11 at Indianapolis’ Athletic Park. An ad in The Freeman trumped up the contest as a “Colored Championship game” and lauded the Big Easy aggregation as “the strongest colored base ball team in the country [with] several members from the Cuban Giants.” Admission was set at 25 cents and 15 cents, although ladies were free. Unfortunately, the Pinchbacks were apparently delayed by two ill members and failed to turn out for the Sept. 11 game. The clash was rescheduled for a two-game series Sept. 16-17. The result of the match — or even whether it was actually played — was not reported. And that apparently ended the Hoosier Blackstockings’ story — nothing about them was reported in The Freeman for the rest of 1889 or anytime after that, a fate that seemingly reduced the club to little more than an historical blip. But the Blackstockings were much more than that. They were the nascence of a long, proud tradition of black baseball in Indianapolis that included the great ABC teams in the early 1900s; the birthing of Indy native and Hall of Famer Oscar Charleston; the first woman owner of a Negro Leagues franchise, Olivia Taylor; and the Indianapolis Clowns, who served as the first professional gig for a tender Alabama youth named Henry Aaron. Indianapolis thus became one of the traditional centers of African-American baseball during the long, arduous and tragic existence of segregation, both formal and informal. And it started 125 years ago with a bunch of ragtag but noble collection of blue-collar workers named the Blackstockings. n

CIRCUS Champions Pavilion, Indiana State Fairground

APRIL 10 - APRIL 13 Thur. April 10th - 7p Fri. April 11th - 7p Sat. April 12th - 10a, 2p & 7p Sun. April 13th - 11:30a & 3:30p Tickets range from $10 - $24. General Admission & Reserved. www.muratshrinecircus.com 317-635-2433

PROCEEDS BENEFIT MURAT SHRINERS. PAYMENTS ARE NOT DEDUCTIBLE AS CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS

OPENING The Lunchbox e Low-key, engaging dual character studies from first-time director Ritesh Batra. In Mumbai, lunchboxes are delivered to businessmen each day. Curious why her chronically-preoccupied husband doesn’t comment on her new recipes, Ila (Nimrat Kaur) puts a note in his lunchbox. She realizes the lunchbox is being mis-delivered when she receives a note back from a different man, soon-to-retire accountant Saajan (Irfan Khan), and an odd friendship begins. Kaur is very good, while Khan gives a wonderfully nuanced performance as a man going through the motions who is drawn back into life through his contacts with Ila and an eager-to-please trainee (Nawazuddin Siddiqui). PG, Opens Friday at Keystone Art The Raid 2 e Ultra-violent action film. After fighting through a building full of thugs in The Raid: Redemption, police officer Rama (Iko Uwais) goes undercover again, leading to lots more fight scenes in a variety of locations. Gareth Evan’s film is stuffed with dazzling fights combining martial arts with all sorts of other battle styles. The bloody action is mesmerizing, particularly in a huge fight in the gray mud of a prison yard, where the mayhem becomes artful. Bring your droogs and enjoy the well-staged carnage. R, Opens Friday at Keystone Art Ernest and Celestine A French-Belgian animated film about an orphaned mouse who befriends a starving bear, based on a series of Belgian children’s books. First released overseas in Dec. 2012 and nominated for a 2013 Oscar. This is the brand-new English dub (with French subtitles) with voice work by Forest Whitaker, Lauren Bacall and Paul Giamatti. PG, Opens Friday at Keystone Art Oculus A haunted house (more specifically, haunted mirror) flick that’s earned good notices: “what begins as run-of-the-mill backstory vomit is thrillingly repackaged as an almost-Lynchian duet between warring states of consciousness” (Slate). R, Opens Thursday in wide release Rio 2 Macaws Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway leave Rio for the Amazon rainforest. Also returning is will.i.am as Pedro, a rapping Red-crested Cardinal. G, Opens Thursday in wide release and 3D

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A major motion picture about business negotiations and staffing changes could’ve been a lot worse

B Y ED J O H N S O N - O TT EJO H N S O N O T T @ N U V O . N E T

he TV commercial currently running for the sports-related Kevin Costner movie Draft Day includes the following quote: “Every bit as good as Bull Durham and Field of Dreams.” Pete Hammond from Movieline said that. Ed Johnson-Ott from NUVO says this: Pete Hammond is out of his mind. To equate Draft Day to those extraordinary films is ridiculous. Certainly, every person is entitled to his or her opinion. My opinion is that Pete Hammond is a quotewhore or a chump. Or both. That said, let me assure you I don’t intend to trash Draft Day. Despite some missteps, the movie is enjoyable. First and foremost, its creators earn points for their nerve. Imagine the courage it took to try to get funding for a major motion picture about negotiating. Negotiating, for Pete’s sake! Of course, the negotiations take place on the day of the NFL Draft, where the signing of new players becomes a nationally televised three-ring circus. The story centers on Cleveland Browns general manager Sonny Weaver Jr. (Costner), who will be trading for the number one draft pick, or something like that. (I should note that I don’t know much about football or football negotiations. The only reason I know anything about it at all is because my son loves the sport and I love my son.) Sonny spent most of his life living in the shadow of his father. Following the death of his dad a few days earlier, the NFL Draft allows him the opportunity to establish himself as his own man. He must also deal with the agendas of the head coach (Denis Leary, doing the same rat-a-tat anger spewing schtick he always does) and the team owner (Frank Langella, acting entitled and maybe stoned behind expensive sunglasses). The negotiations are entertaining. It’s

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Kevin Costner stars in Draft Day — a major motion picture more-or-less about negotiating. REVIEW

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a pleasure to see Kevin Costner portraying a character similar to those from his glory days, forging ahead whether he is ready or not and occasionally pausing to laugh at his own hubris. The various football players, agents and managers are played big and bold. Chadwick Boseman from 42 appears as one of the athletes and Sean Combs turns up as an agent. A boatload of real-life football guys and media people make cameo appearances. Director Ivan Reitman (I would normally list a few of his films here, but his good ones were made too long ago) opts to present the back-and-forth between the teams by extensive use of split screens that include overlapping images of shoulders and stuff. It makes every-

thing look like a zippy ESPN documentary, which seems appropriate. The parts of Draft Day I just described are fun. But wait, there’s more. Apparently concerned that the negotiations were not enough to hold the attention of a wide audience, the screenplay slaps some relationship issues onto the story. Turns out that the team numbercruncher (Jennifer Garner, who shines when she smiles and looks like she’s smelling something unpleasant when she doesn’t) is also Sonny’s pregnant girlfriend, providing a touch of romantic give and take. And it turns out Sonny’s mother (Ellen Burstyn) has picked Draft Day to scatter her husband’s ashes on the football field, and she wants Sonny to take a break to participate. Zzzzzzzzzzzz. Does any of this reflect reality in any way? Damned if I know. All I can tell you is that Draft Day is most certainly not every bit as good as Bull Durham and Field of Dreams. But as an uneven latter-day Kevin Costner vehicle, it’s not bad at all. n

Visit nuvo.net/film for complete movie listings, reviews and more.

Italian Film Festival IUPUI has the latest from Italy throughout the month, starting with Viva L’Italia, which finds a corrupt senator unable to tell a lie after suffering a stroke (April 12, 2 p.m.); and Balancing Act, about a family fractured after Dad admits to an affair (April 13, 4 p.m.)

• For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes

Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI, in Italian with subtitles, FREE, italianfilmfests.org

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CONTINUING The Grand Budapest Hotel q A creation this engaging, funny, melancholic and agreeably odd deserves to be seen now — and on the big screen. It’s the eighth feature film by writer-director Wes Anderson, whose visual style I’ve compared to pop-up books, dioramas, dollhouses, puppet shows and ornate pastries. Aided immeasurably by Ralph Fiennes’ exceptional performance, the fanciful trappings and shifting spotlights somehow seem more genuine than the real world. Director Wes Anderson doesn’t just take viewers through the looking glass, he shows us the depth within it.

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The Avengers, only to be revived for a spinoff TV series, it’s nigh impossible to take the death of a major character seriously. PG-13, In wide release and 3D Noah y Darren Aronofsky’s take on Noah and the Ark uses the Bible as a jumping-off point for a CGI-filled epic flick with an environmentalist bent. Some Christians are cheesed off by the big liberties Aronofsky takes (Stowaways! Weird Angels!) and the fact that he never uses the word God. Russell Crowe is interesting in the lead role, playing Noah as a warrior. The big action scenes are draggy … hell, the movie is draggy.

R, At Keystone Art

PG-13, In wide release

Captain America: The Winter Soldier r A solid flick that continues Marvel’s streak of winning superhero epics. Captain America (Chris Evans) is a good man, period. He’s uncomplicated and not dark and angsty like most contemporary superheroes. However, I was bothered his crew’s disregard for human life. And speaking of killing, Marvel has a real problem with death credibility. After Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg) was graphically killed in

300: Rise of an Empire y Sorta sequel/prequel to the 2006 battle and abs epic, based on Frank Miller›s graphic novel Xerxes. Okay, but not as entertaining as the original, although the gushing tomato soupy blood is cool. Alas, the novelty of the presentation style has worn off, the time-hopping doesn’t help and the absence of Gerard Butler is notable. Eva Green as Artemisia and Rodrigo Santoro as Xerxes give it the old college try, though. R, In wide release and 3D — ED JOHNSON-OTT

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BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

Upland is unveiling their “new look” at all locations April 9, including the Broad Ripple Tasting Room and Carmel Tap House. “The key for us is to have artwork on the bottles and tap handles that represent Upland’s values and artisanship,” explains owner Doug Dayhoff. “Over 15 years we did it without much of a system. We were all over the board, and it was time to clean it up and give it a more consistent look.” Tomlinson Tap Room now has Quaff On! Bourbon Busted Knuckle on tap. It’s a burly brew with layers of flavors to enhance hearty, full-flavored dishes such as their crockpot Shepherd Pie. Quaff On! is extending from its Nashville base to Bloomington with a Tap Room in the former Cafe Django space at 116 N. Grant St. They’re joining Function Brewing’s newly opened brewpub at 108 E. Sixth St. Events APRIL 9 — Sinking Ship, Bier 7-tap takeover. Bier is now also at Jockamo Upper Crust pizza in Irvington and Dawson’s on Main in Speedway APRIL 15 — Thr3e Wise Men head brewer Keely Thomlinson will walk attendees through making Green Tea Kolsch, 6:30-9 p.m. This Girls Pint Out event is open to all. NUVO stopped in for a pre-taste of this sunny hued, earthy aroma, refreshing citrusy brew teasing us into wanting to work in the garden. APRIL 15 — Ruth’s Chris celebrates its 20th Anniversary with a special limited edition of Bock of Elijah Bourbon Barrel beer at both Indy locations. The superbly balanced Dopple Bock, created in partnership with Thr3e Wise Men Brewing Co., imparts layers of fruitiness mildly embraced by the feel of aging for six months in a 20-year barrel.

CORRECTION: Disregard what we said last week about a recent change at Bier’s tasting room. Here’s what you need to know, straight from Bier: “We will now be serving pints on Friday with customer appreciation from 7-9 p.m. when brewery tours/buses will not be allowed.”

EVENT Prairie Plates with Joseph Decuis Conner Prairie is opening up the Chinese House, Eli Lilly’s summer home furnished with Chinese artifacts, for the first in its Prairie Plates series of dining experiences, this one catered by Joseph Decuis, the renowned Northern Indiana farm-to-fork enterprise. Waygu beef raised on Joseph Decuis’s farm is on the menu, prepared in a variety of ways. Conner Prairie, April 10, 6:30-9 p.m., $150 per person, 21 or older, connerprairie.org

NUVO.NET/FOOD Visit nuvo.net/food for complete restaurant listings, reviews and more. 24 FOOD // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

FOOD

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LOCAL ALONE CAN’T SAVE US

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B Y N EI L CH A RL ES ED I T O R S @ N U V O . N E T

he other day I was chatting with a respected Indianapolis restaurateur, a man who has owned numerous successful establishments over the years. I asked him something I ask most chefs and proprietors these days: Was he sourcing any of his ingredients locally? He replied that he wasn’t, because the kind of produce he needs to make his style of food doesn’t grow in these parts. His comment reminded me that, in spite of the huge strides the local movement has made over the past decade, and in spite of leaps in food quality and diversity across the culinary landscape, we are in all likelihood never going to be independent of essential ingredients grown and raised thousands of miles away and the carbon footprint which unfortunately accompanies them on their journey. Although the diversification of our local food supply is unquestionably for the good, we are still a long way from anything approaching food security, though we live in the middle of one of the largest expanses of GMO corn and soybeans on the planet. While the family farms which supply the bulk of organic and artisan meat and

produce to our restaurants and farmers’ markets work wonders within the confines of our short and occasionally hostile growing season, their output is realistically only available to those sufficiently affluent and mobile enough to obtain it. Long gone are the old days of the unspoken “hundred mile rule,” when most restaurants wouldn’t touch anything that didn’t come from at least a couple of hours away; the further removed and more exotic, the better. For the lucky minority who can now afford to eat locally, the advantages are

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Why local food independence is a long way off

numerous: The food is a hundred percent traceable, it’s healthy, it’s fresh and its purchase supports the local economy. But what do we do in the winter, when the farmers’ markets have closed, or during the rest of the year, when we fancy some responsibly-raised seafood or exotic fruits? It can be a problem. For fish, the Monterrey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch is a good resource if you need to check up on the sustainability of a given species. For produce, it’s hard to really trust the large organic grocery stores, especially when the fruit and veggies are suspiciously big and shiny and uniform, not to mention ferociously expensive. Even the regular grocery stores are getting wise to our preferences, featuring sections offering “local” but entirely unexceptional fruit, co-opting the word but not the spirit or the meaning. Recently I’ve been using an app on my phone called Buycott. It’s very cool but also very depressing. Essentially you enter in all the things you want to avoid, which in my case includes GMOs and Monsanto, then scan the product’s barcode if it has one. Last week I scanned a bottle of “organic” juice I had purchased. The screen lit up like a Christmas tree. Not only was it not organic, but it contained GMOs. For two days it sat in the fridge until my taste for mango got the better of my conscience, and I drank it anyway. Even scarier was the result when I scanned a box of baby formula. It turns out our fourmonth-old is being raised on genetically modified (but probably locally-grown) soy, a realization which should hardly come as a surprise, but it’s a bit of a downer nevertheless. At least by the time he’s old enough to eat solid foods, green beans will be in season. Proper, responsiblygrown beans purchased at the farmer’s market, of course. n

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Steve Allee

JAZZ KITCHEN CELEBRATES 20TH Jazz Kitchen’s 20th anniversary poster graphically illustrates the several hundred people who have appeared from one to multiple times, earning the venue a loyal following and accolades as one of the finest clubs locally and internationally. Steve Allee headlined April 5, 2014 just as he did opening night in 1994. “Jazz is improvisation,” quipped Steve as he changed the playlist to better fit the feel of the moment. We were gifted with nostalgia and fresh approaches with “Little Sunflower” (Freddie Hubbard arr. Steve Allee); “Cariba” (Wes Montgomery, arr. Steve Allee); “Dangerous Curves” (Matt Harris); and Allee’s ballad “Under The Moonlight” along with “Art’s Groove” and “The Whistler” dedicated to Russell Webster. Players included: trumpets Joey Tartell, Jeff Conrad, Mark Buselli, Pat Harbison;  trombones Jim Pugh, Pete Brockman, Tim Coffman, Daniel Coffman;  saxophones Mike Stricklin, Tom Walsh, Chip McNeil, Rob Dixon,  Ned Boyd; drums Steve Houghton; Bass-Nick Tucker; guitar Sandy Williams; and piano Zach Lipidus. “For me, in jazz, nothing is quite as exciting as hearing (or playing with) a large big band, playing their hearts out in a club setting,” commented Allee. “The Jazz Kitchen has provided that opportunity for us for 20 years. David Allee has had and continues to have the musical vision and generosity of spirit to provide an important outlet for artists and a wonderful venue for the community. He has taken no shortcuts, just hard work and tenacity. We extend our most appreciative thanks to David and Lori Allee, Frank Stean and the entire staff of the Jazz Kitchen.” The April 4 program [which this reviewer did not attend] included Bill Lancton’s Santana Tribute and Rob Dixon WTCBB & Pavel & Direct Contact, followed by a Latin Jam presented by Indy Jazz Fest. April 6’s closing event brought out Clifford Ratliff’s Indiana Avenue Tribute to the music of Jimmy Coe, Russell Webster and Pookie Johnson. Melding close harmony with personal spins were Ratliff, trumpet; Matt Pevic, saxophone; Kevin Anker, piano; Fred Withrow, bass; and (newly returned from his twoplus years gigging abroad) Kenny Phelps, drums. Author David Williams provided historical context. “We’re looking at a blend of past and future,” commented Dave Allee. “We need to look forward without stagnating. We’re never so totally satisfied we stop taking risks to bring forward new talent as well as honoring our musical heroes.” — RITA KOHN

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Culture Shock in Dunn Meadow — by Seth Johnson Lanterns Raised for Son Lux — by Katherine Coplen 26 MUSIC // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

PHOTOS BY JOSEPH FOLEY

Jason McCash

IN MEMORIAM: JASON MCCASH Doom metal bassist passes away Saturday

W

BY BRA D S A N D ERS MUSIC@NUVO.NET

hen Indianapolis doom trio The Gates of Slumber broke up last September, I eulogized the band for the metal blog Invisible Oranges. In that piece, I reflected on the Gates’ long reign as Indianapolis’ finest metal export, and I mourned the void their absence would leave in the local scene. I couldn’t have imagined at the time that I’d ever have to write an obituary for a member of the band, but on April 5, bassist Jason McCash passed away at his home in Indy. No cause of death has been publicly confirmed. McCash was 37. McCash’s crushing bass tone was a hallmark of the Gates of Slumber’s sound. Unlike many metal bassists, he was always presented right at the front of the mix, and his work on songs like “God Wills It” and “Conqueror” helped form the blueprint for today’s thriving generation of American traditional doom metal bands. 2008’s masterful Conqueror LP in particular represented a turning point for American doom, and the bass performances throughout that record are spectacular. McCash’s presence was also felt on the live stage, where he and drummer

Bob Fouts formed a rock-solid counterweight to Karl Simon’s more flamboyant guitar playing and singing. “He had a killer tone with a unique style and always came up with new and interesting bass lines and counter melodies,” Fouts said of McCash’s contributions to the band. “For [The Gates of Slumber], he was irreplaceable.” Chris Bruni, whose Profound Lore label released Conqueror, remembers McCash as one of the true good guys of heavy metal. “He was one of the true doom metal enthusiasts and visionaries today who supplied one of the most massive bass tones you’ll ever hear,” Bruni wrote in an email. “Yet with the doom metal grandeur he brought forth, he was such a humble, down to earth person, and one of the nicest and most sincere people I’ve had the pleasure of knowing and working with.” Everyone who met McCash came away with pretty much the same impression as Bruni. Metal critic Kim Kelly called him “one of the kindest, most genuine people on this earth” in her poignant remembrance for the Roadburn Festival’s website. Whenever I ran into him at a metal gig in Indianapolis — which was often — he

was eager to chat about whatever band shirts we happened to be wearing that night. I’ll always remember how often he smiled at Gates shows, as if he could never totally get over how cool it is to be in a room full of people who came to see you play music. When the Gates split up, McCash remained close with his former bandmates. “Jason and I have always had an inseparable bond. We could never stay too mad for too long,” Fouts told me. “[He] was absolutely the best friend I had on this earth.” Simon offered a similar sentiment in a Facebook post he wrote to close the door on the possibility of a reunion. “My best friend died last night ... I’ve lost a brother.” In McCash’s death, Indianapolis has lost a brother too, and so has heavy metal. Both will be poorer for his absence. McCash is survived by his wife, Bridget, and their three children. “He loved his wife and kids more than any male role model in my life that I had ever seen,” Fouts said. n A memorial fund for Jason McCash’s family has been set up online. Find the link on NUVO.net.

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B Y CH RIS MU R R A Y MUSIC@NUVO . N ET

assist Christian McBride has been a versatile force in jazz, R&B and rock music for the past 20 years. McBride’s impressive career includes winning three Grammy Awards, appearing on over 300 albums and performing with legends Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, McCoy Tyner, Wynton Marsalis, Herbie Hancock, James Brown, Sting, The Roots, Bruce Hornsby and dozens of others. McBride and his virtuosic bass lines currently lead four ensembles: an 18-piece big band, an experimental group with two DJs called A Christian McBride Situation, a quintet with vibes and saxophone named Inside Straight and the Christian McBride Trio, featuring pianist Christian Sands and drummer Ulysses Owens. It’s that last one that will venture to the Jazz Kitchen tonight to play two sets. We chatted with McBride before the show while he was on the road. NUVO: What musicians — bass players and non-bass players alike — helped mold and shape your sound and concept of music? CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE: Because of my instrument, the frequency is so low that it is hard to attain clarity, so when you try to play eighth notes — no matter what the tempo — you run the risk of getting lost. So it was always my goal to try to emulate the clarity that Freddie Hubbard had, that Joe Henderson had, that McCoy Tyner had, that Jaco Pastorius had. If I could somehow capture their execution and clarity of tone then I would be satisfied. Ray Brown, Paul Chambers and Oscar Pettiford were probably the only three acoustic bass players that I felt were able to still have a lot of dexterity but still keep their big, fat, full sound. Those are my favorite bass players. NUVO: Growing up, what albums did you keep coming back to? Which albums helped push you to the next level? MCBRIDE: I’ve always been a big fan of Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers — albums like Moanin’, Free for All, Indestructible, Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue, Four and More, My Funny Valentine and Cannonball Adderley’s Mercy, Mercy, Mercy. 28 MUSIC // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

LIVE

CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE TRIO

WHEN: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 7:30 P.M., 10 P.M. WHERE: JAZZ KITCHEN, 5377 N. COLLEGE AVE. TICKETS: PRICES VARY, 21+

NUVO: As you were first getting into the jazz scene, what were some of the biggest performance moments for you? MCBRIDE: I played with Freddie Hubbard for the first time when I was 18. I played with Joe Henderson for the first time maybe two to three months after I joined Freddie’s band, and I played with McCoy Tyner a month after that. Bobby Watson gave me my very first gig ever in New York, so I’m always indebted to him for getting me out there on the scene. People like Mulgrew Miller — rest his soul — and James Williams, they really looked out for me when I first came to New York. The man who’s playing drums with me on Wednesday night, Carl Allen [filling in for Ulysses Owens] was always like a big brother figure to me and was someone I knew I always could lean on for advice. If I ever got out of line or did something wrong, I knew he would sound me on it. Same thing with Lewis Nash, Betty Green and so many other people who were just very helpful to me when I first got to New York.

A quick primer on Virtuoso bassist McBride, at Jazz Kitchen tonight MCBRIDE: Going to see the Isley Brothers when I was seven years old. My uncle was a promotions man at a local radio station, so we were always going to every rhythm and blues or gospel show that came through town, so I saw a lot of people at a young age. I got to see Gladys Knight and the Pips, Wilson Pickett, Smokey Robinson and of course once I saw James Brown my life was ruined in the best possible way! [Laughs] NUVO: What upcoming projects are you excited about?

MCBRIDE: I’m just about to finish my next album, which is called Movement Revisited and features my big band with the Abyssinian Baptist Church Choir, led by J.D. Steele. There are four narrators on the album: Sonia Sanchez reads the words of Rosa Parks, Vondie Curtis Hall reads the words of Malcolm X, Dion Graham reads the words of Muhammad Ali, and Wendell Pierce reads the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. That will be out January of 2015. I can’t wait! n Special thanks to Bethany Robinson for her assistance with this piece.

NUVO: What artists are on your playlist right now? MCBRIDE: Because I have a lot of projects going on, I usually have to do very specific listening, but if I just put my phone on and let it run, you might hear anything from James Brown, to Willy Nelson, to The Meters, to Andrew Hill, to Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic. It could be anybody. NUVO: Do you have any pre-show rituals? MCBRIDE: I usually like dead silence before a performance, but I usually never get it. If I’m playing at a concert hall, then I can sit in my dressing room and completely take my mind off everything and meditate for five minutes. NUVO: What are your earliest musical memories?

Christian McBride Trio

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THE SOUL OF LATIN JAZZ

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO

or nearly 40 years Poncho Sanchez has been keeping the flame of soulful Latin jazz alive. On Sunday, April 13, the master conguero will bring his Latin jazz band to Indy for a performance at the Jazz Kitchen.

WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

NUVO: You're one of the few MexicanAmerican musicians who has been successful in the Latin jazz scene. Was it difficult for you to get your foot in the door of the Afro-Cuban music world? PONCHO SANCHEZ: It was rough. The Cubans and the Puerto Ricans didn't believe that Chicanos could play congas. There was a park in Los Angeles called Griffith Park and I heard that every Sunday a bunch of conga players would get together there. So one day when I was a young guy starting out I went over there and I saw these guys playing rumba. They were rally good, so I tapped a guy on the shoulder that was playing the quinto [the lead drum] and I asked, “Can I sit in and play?" The guy turned and said "Are you Cuban?" I said no. He said, "Are you Puerto Rican?" I said no. So he said "What are you?" I said "I'm a Mexican-American, a Chicano." He said "Chicanos can't play conga" and then he turned his head and kept on playing. A little later he got up from the drum to go get a beer, so I jumped in and started soloing on the quinto. He came back and watched me for five minutes and when I finished he came up and said, “Wow, you sound great. Your mother or father must be from Cuba or Puerto Rico." He couldn't believe it. He said, “Man, I've never heard a Chicano play like that in my life."  That happened again the first time my band went to New York City. We played at the Village Gate and it was completely sold out. Tito Puente, Kako and Patato were there. A lot of my heroes were there. But they weren't there as my friends. They were there to see if these Mexicans from Los Angeles could really play Latin jazz and by the end of the night they were all cool with us. NUVO: I've read that you taught yourself conga by listening to classic Latin jazz records from guys like Mongo Santanaria. I wanted to get your opinion on a quote Mongo gave in an old issue of Downbeat. He said, "You can’t learn to play things like guaguancó in the United States. You have to have been where it came from. You can’t listen to records and get those feelings." SANCHEZ: Mongo Santamaria is my hero. I named my son after Mongo and we were good friends for years. In a sense he's right.

LIVE

PONCHO SANCHEZ

WHEN: SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 6 P.M., 8 P.M. WHERE: JAZZ KITCHEN, 5377 N. COLLEGE AVE. TICKETS: PRICES VARY, 21+

But it's not my thing to play rumba and guaguancó. I got into Latin jazz with the mambo and the funky cha-cha rhythms. I come from a different side of things. In the barrios of Havana I know they play the guaguancó and rumba in many different styles. If you went to Cuba and hung out there for a while you'd pick up all that stuff up. But you can learn to be a great conga drummer without growing up in Cuba and playing guaguancó your whole life. As a matter fact sometimes I see cats that are great rumberos and play all these complex bata rhythms from Cuba and Africa, but when it comes time to sit down and jam with a Latin Jazz band they ain't got no swing.  NUVO: You've been playing Latin music for several decades. What are your thoughts on the current state of Latin music? SANCHEZ: First of all I'm proud and happy that Latin music has grown as much as it has. I joined the Cal Tjader band and became a professional musician in 1975 and I was playing in local bands around Los Angeles seven years before that.  I've been doing this a long time playing different types of Latin music. In the early years I was even in a Tex-Mex band playing polkas and cumbias. So I am proud to see Latin music grow so much and spread all over the world. n

> > Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // MUSIC 29

SOUNDCHECK

WEDNESDAY BRAZIL Cultural Cannibals Celebrate Brazil Party Celebrate the sights, sounds and tastes of Brazil at this free, all-ages event hosted by Cultural Cannibals. Kyle Long (our world music columnist, just flip back a page to read his work) will spin Brazilian music on the stacks; his collaborator Artur Silva will unveil a new installation. Capoeira mestre luri Santos and his North Star Capoeira group will perform; food and other treats will be available. Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St., 6 p.m., FREE, all-ages DANCING

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Retro Rewind The Vogue had jettisoned Retro Rewind in exchange for Glow Wednesdays, a black light party soundtracked with retro jams, but the people want those good all retro jams, and the people don’t want black lights. One could even say … they rewinded back to Retro Rewind. (We’ll pause for laughs here.) Retro Rewind is always full of beautiful young people who will definitely be late to their Thursday morning classes. In the past, the night has consistently

draws some of the biggest weeknight crowds, who are there for the cheap drinks and to find other like-minded grinders. Grab your friends (and possibly a nap after work) and hit the club for fun, sing-along-able music at this always packed event. Sometimes, Retro Rewind even celebrates hump day with seasonal themes featuring special contests, games, and party favors. DJ Steady B is the man on the decks holding it down currently. Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 10 p.m., 21+ SOUL Daley Hailing from majestic Manchester, England, singer/songwriter Daley has built quite the reputation for himself at the young age of 24. Releasing his debut album Days & Nights on Feb. 11, 2014, Daley is redefining the traditional sounds of R&B and soul music. The massive 12-track album has already received praise from fans and media as well as other artists, including Pharrell Williams, who Daley has worked with closely in the past. Daley describes the album as “my life for the past couple of years” and that it’s a mix of his career, love life and everything else.

Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 8 p.m., $15 in advance, $17 at door, all-ages Passafire, The Bishop (Bloomington), 21+ Jay Elliott and Friends, Tin Roof, 21+ Passafire, Lullwater, Bishop (Bloomington), 18+ Set It Off, My Sweet Fall, Chin Up, Kid, Follow Me Forward, Authors, Irving Theater, all-ages Monique Rust, Holly Reinhardt, Birdy’s Bar and Grill, 21+ The California Kid’s Open Mic Blues Night and Jam, Raceway Pub, 21+ Yelawolf, Centerstage Bar and Grill (Kokomo), 21+ The Family Jam, Mousetrap, 21+ Holly Reinhardt, Monique Rust, Birdy’s, 21+

THURSDAY REGGAE Jesse Wagner Wagner of The Aggrolites will hit up the DO317 Lounge alongside Green Room Rockers and Sweet Poison Victim. DO317 Lounge, 1043 Virginia Ave. Suite 215, 8:30 p.m., $8 in advance, $10 at door, 21+

DANCE Altered Thurzdaze As jam and electronica’s musical boundaries continue to dissolve into each other, Altered’s bass-heavy offerings are effortlessly appealing to EDM fans and Mousetrap regulars alike. Originating as a “dubstep and broken beats” event, Altered Thurzdaze has evolved to include drum-and-bass, glitchhop, house, and many other EDM subgenres. Wild laser shows, abundant hoop and poi spinners, cheap craft beer, fog effects and no reservations on the dance floor create an addictive dancing environment you won’t find anywhere else in the city. The Mousetrap was featured as 2013’s Best Place for Hippies in NUVO’s Best of Indy reader competition (and some years before that, too). Get a healthy dose of EDM every Thursday night. Both Mousetrap regulars and electronic music fans will find something to like about this weekly event, especially as genres like dubstep, EDM and house music gain a greater share of pop culture attention. This is a great way to kick the weekend off early, and get a little of practice dancing before you shake your groove thing in nearby Broad Ripple on the weekend. There’s a different lineup of songs every weekend, but one thing remains the same: this is an EDM dream and an allaround blast of a dance party. Mousetrap, 5565 N. Keystone Ave., 9 p.m., FREE, 21+

SOUNDCHECK An Evening of English Country Dance, Garfield Park Arts Center, all-ages The Peacock Effect EP Release Show ft. The Underhills and Jesse Lacy, The Bishop, 18+

FRIDAY LEGENDS Cher, Pat Benetar This diva’s currently on her Dress to Kill tour, and we’re taking it seriously. Like, very seriously. We think Cher could easily kill us, with her clothes or all other manner of ways. Please take mercy on us, Cher. We are your humble servants. Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages EDM Excision Make em’ bounce! Excision does it with robotic sounds and heavy bass. Massive drops can’t hurt his cause either. By encompassing a different style of dubstep, one that sounds like a machine trying to speak its language to you, he’s found himself carving a new path through the electronic music trail. A trail ripe with opportunities to move forward. One that his bouncing fans have followed furiously, anxiously waiting for what’s next. And at the end of the show, he’ll have you volunteering to bounce at his next shows too. Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 9 p.m., prices vary, all-ages LEGENDS Booker T. Jones Remember our interview with Booker from last week? Here’s a lil taste of it again before the show: “I see music as a free art form and I take it as a compliment when someone samples my music. I liked that Jay-Z record and it really stuck me because it was so creative. I would’ve never thought of using those chord progressions like that. I constantly go back and listen to the music of Beethoven, Brahms and Sibelius. That music is public domain now and available free of charge. We live in this world for a short time, we’re just passing through. So I think music and art should be free.” Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 8 p.m., prices vary, 21+ LADIES Wonder Women Indianapolis Music Barfly guy Wayne Bertsch is putting on this show to give a lil love

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Booker T

to the ladies of Indy’s music scene (and to coincide with his April gallery show meditating on the best DC superhero, Wonder Woman). On the lineup are four of Indy’s strongest voices, including Jenn Cristy, Veseria, Mina and The Wondrous Flying Machine and Kaleidostars. If you’ve been paying attention to Barfly at all in the last few years you know Wayne is obsessed with these groups. Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St., 8 p.m., $6, 21+ FESTS Jamtron 2014 We appreciate the collegial vibe that Indy’s hard rock and jam scenes have; we appreciate it even more when they involve local visual artists in their shows. So you can bet we really appreciate Jamtron, a mini-fest going down this Friday at the Trap, where No Pit Cherries, Sugar Moon Rabbit, Dell Zell and Audiodacity will bring seven live painters along to celebrate art, music and community. Mousetrap, 5565 N. Keystone Ave., 10 p.m., $5, 21+ ROCK Buffalo Killers, Clear Plastic Masks Lebanon, Ohio’s Buffalo Killers are still burning bright after eight years and several albums. GIYL (Go If You Like): Neil Young + The Grateful Dead, shows on tiny stages, brothers in bands together. DO317 Lounge, 1043 Virginia Ave #215, 9 p.m., 21+ SINGER-SONGWRITER The Hostel Takeover Series with Lisa Walks Walks is playing out on her debut EP

Ferus Avem, a catchy collection of tunes anchored by her soulful voice. Indy Hostel, 4903 Winthrop Ave, 8 p.m., $5, all-ages Josh Gracin, 8 Seconds Saloon, 21+ Jeremy Vogt, Jon Martin, Books and Brews, 21+ Night Moves with Action Jackson and DJ Megatone, Metro, 21+ Join The Dead, Dead Man’s Grill, Bionic Monks, The Greg Blackman Band, Rock House Cafe, 21+ Cool Hand Lex, Sensu, 21+ Gramatik, DJ George Garcia, Bluebird (Bloomington), 21+ Johnny Dial, Madame Walker Theatre, all-ages Model Stranger, Pravada, Party Lines, Simple Ghost, Melody Inn, 21+ September Sky, The Protest, Decibel, Into the Divine, Hoosier Dome, 21+ Sleeping Bag, S.M. Wolf, Sir Deja Doog, Christian Taylor, address unlisted, all-ages Jazz Nonet from Cracow Poland, Latvian Community Center, all-ages Knight Fusion: A Little Knight Music, Marian University Theatre, all-ages Heywood Banks, Brown County Playhouse, all-ages Rise, 247 Sky Bar, 21+ Ben Lumsdaine Quartet, Chatterbox Jazz Club, 21+

SATURDAY DJS Spring Swing Festival and Food Drive The first of two sweet fests happening this Saturday is Keepin’ It Deep’s spring celebration featuring a massive lineup of tag team sets. We’ll run it down in the order they provided. On the decks NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // MUSIC 31

SOUNDCHECK

RESEARCH STUDY: ADULTS 18 TO 50 WITH GENITAL HERPES FOR AT LEAST 1 YEAR ARE NEEDED FOR A STUDY TO TEST A NEW VACCINE NOT APPROVED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THERE WILL BE 3 DOSES OF VACCINE GIVEN WITH STUDY PARTICIPATION LASTING UP TO 17 MONTHS. RESEARCH IS DONE AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY INFECTIOUS DISEASES RESEARCH AT THE ESKENAZI HEALTH CAMPUS. CALL 278-2945 OR E-MAIL IUIDR@IU.EDU. RISKS ARE DISCLOSED BEFORE ENROLLMENT. PAYMENT IS PROVIDED.

will be Exploratio; Dane Rohl and Samaro; DJ Qik and Rican; Cadillac G and Matt Dash; DJ Orion and Cool Hand Lex; Sinclair Wheeler and AP; Action Jackson and Lemi Vice; Lockstar and Gabby Love; Matt Alee and Iron Lion; The Dub Knight and JodyFree; Jake Massey and Megatone; Indiana Jones and Top Speed; Oh Be One and Cory James. The party goes til 10, and it’s free when you bring a canned food donation. (Bring a couple, why don’t you? You know you’ve got tons in the back of your pantry.) The party is in a tent across the street from Tiki Bob’s. Keepin’ It Deep Tent, 240 S. Meridian St., noon, free with can food donation or $5 without, 21+ FESTS

NUVO.NET/BESTOFINDY

Culture Shock The single best day of music in Bloomington is also free and all-ages – but first a big disclaimer: Music Editor Katherine Coplen used to help put on Culture Shock in years past. She’s since moved on to such illustrious pages as the ones you hold in your very hands, but Culture Shock soldiers on. It’s a day-long fest put on by WIUX, IU’s student radio station. This year’s headliners is weird boy wonder Mac DeMarco; he’ll be joined by Royal Bangs, Tunde Olaniran, Sleeping Bag, Drekka and Litty Timmy McFarland of Flight 19. Previous headliners have included Beach House, Ty Segall, Xiu Xiu and Sunset Rubdown, so don’t sleep on this one.

Memory Map

EDUCATION Discovering Brazil through Hip-Hop Kyle Long of Cultural Cannibals explores the roots of Brazilian hip-hop and examines key figures and social issues in the scene in a workshop designed for teens and adults. This workshop will occur at multiple branches – keep your eyes on our listings. Glendale Branch, 6101 N. Keystone Ave., 11 a.m., all-ages

Rathskeller, 401 E. Michigan St., 8 p.m., $20 in advance, $25 at door, 21+

The Slimtones, Melody Inn, 21+ Chris Shaffer, Tad Robinson, Slippery Noodle Inn, 21+ The Fontaine, Sabbatical, 21+ Juice Album Release, Lost Years, Don’t Call It A Comeback, Runforitstacy, Anthem High, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Jimbo Mathus, Shelby County Sinners, Radio Radio, 21+ Here Come The Mummies, Vogue, 21+ Philadelphia Phil and Friends, Gaslight Inn, 21+ Bailey Williams and The Cherannes, The Rutabega, DO317 Lounge, 21+ The Coathangers, Audacity, The Bishop (Bloomington), 18+ Charlie Hunter, Scott Amendola, Jazz Kitchen, 21+

DANCE

SUNDAY

Dunn Meadow (Bloomington), noon, FREE, all-ages BALLADEER Edwin McCain Who will be Edwin’s crying shoulder tonight? Will it be you? Will it be me?

Real Talk A line stretches out from the White Rabbit every time the A-Squared DJs and DJ Action Jackson roll into Effin’ Square for their second Saturday dance night Real Talk. Get there early – we promise the dance floor will fill up – for the chance to see even the most reluctant dancers boogie on the dance floor. White Rabbit Cabaret, 1116 E. Prospect St., 10 p.m., $1, 21+ 32 MUSIC // 004.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

SUBMITTED PHOTO

OPEN MIC NIGHT Localmotion Organizer Mat Davis makes sure all his events are open to all-ages and he always makes room on the schedule for first-time performers. That can create a few bumpy or awkward moments as novices struggle with nerves and flubbed lines. But Davis’ events have such spectacular high points you quickly forgive these occasional rough spots. Every time I attend one of Davis’ open mic nights, I walk away with

the feeling that I’ve discovered an exciting new voice in my community, or that I’ve been exposed to an interesting new perspective on an important issue and that’s why I give Localmotion my highest recommendation. — KYLE LONG Fletcher Place Art and Books, 642 Virginia Ave., 7 p.m., prices vary all-ages VOICE Blind Boys of Alabama, My Brightest Diamond Throughout the 1940s and ‘50s, The Blind Boys of Alabama recorded a string of electrifying gospel roots classics. If their recording career had stopped at that point, the strength of those influential early recordings would’ve been enough to permanently etch the group’s place in American music history. But the Blind Boys have soldiered on, continually building on their seventy-year artistic legacy. In more recent years the Blind Boys have picked up five Grammy awards and collaborated with a wide range of artists — from Lou Reed to Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. At this show, the Blind Boys will be reunited with one of their recent collaborators as the group splits a bill with Shara Worden and My Brightest Diamond. Worden was a featured vocalist on the Blind Boys 2013 release I’ll Find A Way. Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, 610 W. 46th St., 7 p.m., prices vary, all-ages FOLK ROCK Saintseneca, Memory Foam, Blessed Feathers The Grove Haus will be a perfect spot for Saintseneca’s twisted folk jams, which mash the musical traditions of Appalachia with synths and gang vocals. Grove Haus, 1001 Hosbrook St., 7:30 p.m., $7, all-ages

SOUNDCHECK POP Memory Map, Square Peg Round Hole We haven’t seen Memory Map ‘round these parts In a couple years, but we’ve heard whispers they have a forthcoming album on Joyful Noise to complement their excellent debut release Holiday Band. Memory Map is a Bloomington supergroup including Matthew Tobey, Michael Hart Dixon, Joshua Morrow and Mike Bridavsky. They’re pretty big in Japan (no, really; they sell out festivals there).

The dynamic duo has been making legendary tunes since 1993 and show no signs of slowing down. A jam-packed set offers fans a chance to salute a pioneer of contemporary electronic music.  Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 8 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 The Reign of Kindo, Matthew Santos, I Dream in Evergreen, Audiodacity, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Allvaret, Wounded Knee, Shipwreck Karpathos, Melody Inn, 21+ Discovering Brazil Through HipHop, Franklin Road Branch, all-ages

The Bishop, 123 S. Walnut St., 9 p.m., $6, 18+

TUESDAY

Wildhoney, Kam Kama, Rachael’s Cafe, all-ages Xero Sum Reunion, Eyes on Fire, Ikillya, Scumgrief Reunion, Birdy’s, 21+ Acoustic Bluegrass Open Jam, Mousetrap, 21+ Faster Pussycat, 8 Seconds Saloon, 21+ The Icks, Black Panties, Male Bondage, address unlisted (house), all-ages Cocoanut Grove Lounge, Melody Inn, 21+ Poncho Sanchez, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Russ Bucy, Jake Corn, Slippery Noodle Inn, 21+

DANCE

MONDAY DANCE One More Time Prepare to travel Around The World with Daft Punk as One More Time features a high-energy set of Daft Punk originals, remixes and club bangers.

Beats Antique Tuesday is like Friday in the NUVO office; we go to print at 5 p.m. and then some (or most, or all) of us head out celebrating another paper in the books. This week’s best Tuesday dance bet? Beats Antique at the Vogue, an electronic/world fusion trio that fuses about a million genres into an outrageous live show that will make you think it’s your Friday, too. Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 8 p.m., $18 in advance, $20 at door, 21+ Broke(n) Tuesdays, Melody Inn, 21+ Heather French Henry, Found Drowned, Perfect Teeth, Bishop (Bloomington), 21+ IU Jazz Combo and Latin Jazz Ensemble, Buskirk-Chumley Theatre, all-ages

NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK

BEYOND INDY

CHICAGO

ON

Big Paraid Double Door, Apr. 12 Dan Croll Schubas Tavern, Apr. 12 Denny Laine Reggies Music Joint, Apr. 12 Lotus Riviera Theatre, Apr. 12 Malevolent Creation Cobra Lounge, Apr. 12 The Men Empty Bottle, Apr. 12 Moonrise Nation Subterranean, Apr. 12 The Pines The Hideout, Apr. 12 The Silver Palms Beat Kitchen, Apr. 12 Toadies Metro / Smart Bar, Apr. 12

WITH ER PRODUC REO JONES O

2 HOUR

BLOCK LOCAL MUSIC on x103

LOUISVILLE Here Come The Mummies Wright-Taylor Building, Apr. 11 Mike Simonetti Zanzabar, Apr. 11 Booker T. Jones Mercury Ballroom, Apr. 12 Treasure Fingers Diamond Pub & Billiards, Apr. 12 Whiskey Shivers The New Vintage, Apr. 13 Excision Mercury Ballroom, Apr. 14

Sundays

10p.m.-MIdnight

listen read tweet @ x103.com

@ nuvo.net

@tremendouskat

Central Indiana musicians & bands can submit tracks at www.x103.com

CINCINNATI Buffalo Killers Motr Pub, Apr. 12 Christina Perri Bogart’s, Apr. 12 Diarrhea Planet Baba Budan’s, Apr. 12 Under The Sun Knotty Pine, Apr. 12

BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // MUSIC 33

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SEXDOC THIS WEEK

VOICES

EXCERPTS FROM OUR ONLINE COLUMN “ASK THE SEX DOC” W

e’re back with our resident sex doctor, Dr. Debby Herbenick of Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute. Sorting the inbox and providing color commentary is calendar editor Sarah Murrell, who should never be taken seriously under almost any circumstance. On with the queries!

Bangin’ Aunt Flo A good friend of mine recently called to catch me up on some of the great sex she’s been having with her recent hookup. The other day, they had sex on the last day of her period, and we were laughing at how awkward that sitch ALWAYS is. Do guys care if you’re on your period? Besides being incredibly awkward, are there any health benefits or risks to having sex on your period? — Anonymous, from Tumblr

ACROSS:

DOWN:

5. What album was released October 2012 by the band “Why”?

1. Nominations are now open on nuvo.net for what?

6. Who performed at Clowes Auditorium April 3-5?

2. Who is the 85 year old nun planning to block the entrance of the federal building?

7. Percy’s book “Demon Camp” is about what psychological disorder?

3. What it the last name of the famous Indiana artist that the New York times called, “A sizable addition to the art scene”?

9. What new Indy shop took the place of Tea Pots n Treasures at 7 E Market St.? 10. What is the last name of the person who said “a child that does not know their own value, is comfortable in devaluing himself”?

QUESTION:

4. What is the name of the circus that is in Indy April 10-13? 8. Okkervil River and Will Sheff left what Bloomington based label?

Who earned the NASL 2013 Goal of the Season Award? *Hint Read Left to Right Up then Down CODEWORD:

34 VOICES // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

SARAH: For some guys, the menstruating vagina is as inviting as a sarlacc pit. For others, it’s almost an afterthought. I had a boyfriend who was so nonplussed by the idea of it that it made me realize that it was actually me who was self-conscious about having sex on my period. It makes for a pretty reliable litmus test, though, when determining a man’s maturity. If a guy is genuinely repulsed by the simple idea of his genitals near yours while you’re surfing the crimson tide, his experience with women has probably been a short-lived, one-handed pursuit and you should let that one hang out on the vine a little longer ‘til he’s ready.  The simple fact is, if you’re so grossed out by a little blood that you entirely lose your sex drive, you didn’t want it that bad in the first place. If your guy would rather bang something with less mess and biology, give him a blow-up doll and give yourself the gift of the single life. Cowabunga! DR. D: Most men don’t care - and post-high school/ early twenties, many women stop caring too. Period or no period, you can have enjoyable sex. But if you want a few days or a week off of sex, they’re yours to take period or not. Some people use period time as a time to do something different (sex toy play, finger play, etc). All that said, blood is involved in periods and this can pose a slightly higher risk of STI transmission if a person has an STI to begin with, so that’s something to be conscious of (hopefully you all are out there getting STI tested anyway, though). And as for benefits, if you are comfortable having period sex, it can be enjoyable and maybe even help you relieve period-related cramping or headaches or mood issues. You know your body best.

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DR. DEBBY HERBENICK & SARAH MURRELL Ball Talk How do you handle the testicles? Any fun suggestions? — Anonymous, from Tumblr SARAH: 1. Put a bird on them. 2. Glue on googley eyes so the dick looks like a nose, giggle. 3. Sequins, sequins, sequins 4. Dip them in ink and stamp them in a ball print scrapbook (no two are alike!). 5. Use brown eye shadow and some contouring make it look like cleavage. Or just be nice to them the same way you would if your ovaries hung out on the outside. (That’s how sensitive they are!) If they’re struck or impacted in any major way, most guys get physically nauseated. Don’t be too scared, just be really gentle until you dial in how sensitive your partner’s are. But in general, just translate all the moves you use on the shaft to a more delicate ball version and pay them plenty of attention. Buen provecho. DR. D: With care. And ask, ASK, first. Some men love to have their genitals gently touched or (very rarely) pulled. And some like to have their testicles gently sucked on. Others. Do. Not. For some, the testicles are a no-touch zone and that’s okay because, like women, men get to say what they do and don’t enjoy being done with their body too. A fun thing to try, though, if you are lounging around post-sex on a lazy Sunday: blow warm air, then cool air, and repeat. Watch the testicles shrink up and then expand in response to the changing temperature. You’re welcome.

We need your sex questions, and we know you want to ask! Don’t worry—we won’t ever publish your name or pass your email address off to the NSA (they already have it along with all your sexts). To use our anonymous magical Tumblr, go to nuvosexdoc.tumblr.com/ask, or go the semi-old-fashioned route and email us at askthesexdoc@nuvo.net.

NUVO.NET/BLOGS Visit nuvo.net/blogs/GuestVoices for more Sex Doc or to submit your own question.

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HEALTH CARE Mobile Medicine Company seeking Health Care Professionals for the following positions: - Physician - Nurse Practitioner - Physician Assistant - Medical Assistant - Podiatrist - Psychiatrist Please forward resume/CV to: piercemobilemedicine@ gmail.com or fax:317-288-9386 Now Hiring Caregivers Companion Care Company provides supported living services to individuals with intellectual and/or physical disabilities. Looking for mature caregivers to support person(s) with special needs in the Geist, Noblesville, Fishers, Carmel, and Castleton areas. Requirements: At least 18 yrs old, valid driver’s license, current car insurance and vechile registration, High School diploma or GED, good driving history and criminal record. To apply please visit our website @ www.ccc-in.com/ Call 317-926-3823 with any questions. HHA/PCA NEEDED Home Health Agency hiring for in-home care employee. Males welcome to apply. Apply in person. 5226 Southeast Street. suite A9. Indianapolis, IN 46227. Via fax: 317-405-9045 or apply online at www.attentivehhc.com

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MARKETPLACE Services | Misc. for Sale Musicians B-Board | Pets To advertise in Marketplace, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

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Certified Massage Therapists Yoga | Chiropractors | Counseling To advertise in Body/Mind/Spirit, Call Virgo Marta @ 808-4615 Taurus Gemini Cancer Leo

Advertisers running in the CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY section have graduated from a massage therapy school associated with one of four organizations:

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ADOPTION PREGNANT? ADOPTION CAN BE YOUR FRESH START! Let Amanda, Carol or Brandy meet you for lunch and talk about your options. Their Broad Ripple agency offers free support, living expenses and a friendly voice 24 hrs/day. YOU choose the family from happy, carefully screened couples. Pictures, letters, visits & open adoptions available. Listen to our birth mothers’ stories at www.adoptionsupportcenter. com 317-255-5916 The Adoption Support Center

American Massage Therapy Association (amtamassage.org)

International Massage Association (imagroup.com)

Association of Bodywork and Massage Professionals (abmp.com)

International Myomassethics Federation (888-IMF-4454) Pisces

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Additionally, one can not be a member of these four organizations but instead, take the test AND/OR have passed the National Board of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork exam (ncbtmb.com).

CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPISTS

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EMPEROR MASSAGE Stimulus Rates InCall $38/60min, $60/95min (applys to 1st visit only). Call for details to discover and experience this incredible Japanese massage. Northside, avail. 24/7 317-431-5105 GOT PAIN OR STRESS? Rapid and dramatic results from a highly trained, caring professional with 15 years experience. www.connective-therapy.com:

© 2013 BY ROB BRESZNY Libra

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Freedom is the most

important kind of joy you can seek right now. It’s also the most important subject to study and think about, as well as the most important skill to hone. I advise you to make sure that freedom is flowing through your brain and welling up in your heart and spiraling through your loins. Write synonyms for “freedom” on your arm with a felt-tip pen: liberation, emancipation, independence, leeway, spaciousness, carte blanche, self-determination, dispensation. Here’s one more tip: Connect yourself with people who love and cultivate the same type of freedom you do. Aries

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s Love Your Messes

Week, Taurus. In accordance with the astrological omens, you are authorized to love the hell out of the messes in your life -- from the small, awkward knots of confusion to the big, beautiful heaps of fertile chaos. This is not a time to feel embarrassed or apologize for your messes; not a time to shy away from them or ignore them. On the contrary, you should explore them, celebrate them, and even take advantage of them. Whatever else they are, your messes are untapped sources of energy. Learn to love them for the mysterious lessons they keep teaching you. Love them for the courage and willpower they compel you to summon. Love them for the novelty they bring your way and the interesting stories they add to your personal legend. Taurus

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Are you thinking of linking

your fortunes to a new ally? Or deepening your collaboration with a familiar ally? Have you fantasized about bonding intensely with a source that may be able to give you more of what you want and bring out more of the best in you? These prospects are worth contemplating, Libra. But I suggest you let your connection ripen a bit more before finalizing the shift. I’m not necessarily saying there’s a potential problem. I simply suspect that you need further exploration and additional information before you can make the smartest move possible. Libra

Aries

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Saturn has been in the sign

of Scorpio since October 2012 and will be there until the end of 2014. (It will make another visit from June to September 2015.) What does that mean? I have a view of Saturn that’s different from many astrologers. They regard it as the planet of limitation, struggle, and difficulty. Here’s what I think: While Saturn may push you to be extra tough and work super hard, it also inspires you to cut away extraneous desires and home in on your deepest purpose. It motivates you to build strong structures that free you to express yourself with maximum efficiency and grace. Scorpio

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “A snowball’s chance in hell” is an American idiom that’s equivalent to saying “it probably won’t happen.” After all, a snowball would instantly melt if exposed to the scorching fires that rage in the underworld. But what if there’s an exception to this axiom? Let’s call on another American idiom: “when hell freezes over.” It’s another way to say “it probably won’t happen.” But the truth is that now New Age & Curiosities • Classes & Readings and then a cold front does indeed sweep through the infernal region, icing its flames. When that happens, a Mention for 10% off! snowball’s prospects of surviving there improve dramatcelestialdawning.com ically. And that’s exactly what I predict will happen for Open Saturday 10-8 • & Sunday 10-6 you in the coming week. Virgo

the critical transformations you have. They can’t be expected to converse with you in your butterfly language. Are you willing and able to speak caterpillar?

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 2007, J. K. Rowling fin-

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When I took an inter-

mediate painting class in college, our first assignment was to imitate an old master. My choice was the Flemish painter Pieter Breugel the Elder (1525-1569). I worked on reproducing his painting The Fight Between Carnival and Lent as precisely as I could. It was tedious and liberating. I invoked Breugel’s spirit and prayed for his guidance. I sank my psyche deeply into his. By the end of the four-week process I’d learned a lot about painting. Given the current astrological omens, Sagittarius, I suggest you try something similar. Pick someone who excels at a way of working or a state of being that you would like to master yourself, and copy that person for a while. For best results, have fun with it. Play! Sagittarius

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author J. R.

ished writing the seventh volume of her seven Harry Potter books, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The day it was published it sold 11 million copies. But Rowling had actually written the final chapter of this last book way back in 1990, when she first conceived the story she was to spend the next 17 years working on. She knew the climax right from the beginning. I foresee a similar theme unfolding for you in the coming weeks, ALLI Cancerian. As you plot a project you will be developing for a long time to come, you will have a vision of what it will be when it becomes fully mature.

R. Tolkien spent 14 years working on The Lord of the Rings. In using a typewriter to produce over 1,200 pages, he relied solely on his two index fingers. He never learned the ten-finger typing method. I suppose it didn’t matter in the end. Presumably, his impediment didn’t affect the quality of his work, but only made it harder to accomplish and required him to spend a lot more time. Is there a fixable limitation on your own ability to achieve your dream, Capricorn? Is there some handicap you could, with effort, overcome? If so, now would be an excellent time to begin.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When you see your shadow, it’s

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The truth’s superb surprise,” wrote poet Emily Dickinson, may be “too bright for our infirm delight.” Sometimes we’ve got to be careful about articulating what’s really going on. “The truth must dazzle gradually,” she said. If it hits us too fast and hard, it may be difficult to digest. So did Emily suggest that we should lie and deceive? No. “Tell all the truth,” she declared, “but tell it slant.” This is excellent advice for you in the coming days, Aquarius.

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usually right next to you. It’s there on the ground or floor, a fuzzy black shape that follows you around closely. But today I saw my shadow waving back at me from afar. I was standing on top of a hill, and the sun’s rays created a dusky version of me in the meadow way down below. I think this is a useful metaphor for an opportunity that’s available to you. In the coming days, you will be able to view the shadowy, undeveloped parts of your personality as if from a distance. That means you will have more objectivity about them, and thus greater compassion. You can get a calm, clear sense of how they might be mucking with your happiness and how you could transform them. Leo

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “You cannot use butterfly language to communicate with caterpillars,” said psychologist Timothy Leary. That’s good advice for you to keep in mind in the near future. You might want to find a way to carry on constructive dialogs with people who have a hard time understanding you. It’s not necessarily that they are stupid or resistant to your charms. The problem is that they haven’t experienced some of Virgo

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Here’s my report on your

progress. You are not struggling to embody a delusional state of perfection as it is imagined by other people. Rather, you are becoming an ever-more soulful version of your idiosyncratic self, evolving slowly but surely. You are not dazedly trudging along a narrow track laid down by thousands of sheep. Instead, you are lively and creative as you bushwhack a path for yourself through the wilderness. To celebrate this ongoing success, Pisces, I suggest you get yourself a new power object that symbolizes your inventive devotion. Pisces

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Homework: Write a short essay on “How I Created Something Out of Nothing.” Go to FreeWillAstrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 04.09.14 - 04.16.14 // CLASSIFIEDS 39

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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - April 9, 2014