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HAMMER’S LAST COLUMN VOICES, 10

COVER PAGE 14

After a 23-year association with this newspaper, and 20 years of delivering a weekly column, the time has finally come for me to say goodbye to all of NUVO’s readers and the city of Indianapolis, my beloved hometown. Final story by Steve Hammer

MARCH 20- 27, 2013

Vol. 24 Issue 01 issue #1097

STAFF EDITOR & PUBLISHER KEVIN MCKINNEY // KMCKINNEY@NUVO.NET EDITORIAL // EDITORS@NUVO.NET MANAGING EDITOR/CITYGUIDES EDITOR JIM POYSER // JPOYSER@NUVO.NET NEWS EDITOR REBECCA TOWNSEND // RTOWNSEND@NUVO.NET ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR SCOTT SHOGER // SSHOGER@NUVO.NET MUSIC EDITOR KATHERINE COPLEN // KCOPLEN@NUVO.NET CALENDAR // CALENDAR@NUVO.NET FILM EDITOR ED JOHNSON-OTT COPY EDITOR GEOFF OOLEY CONTRIBUTING EDITORS STEVE HAMMER, DAVID HOPPE CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS WAYNE BERTSCH CONTRIBUTING WRITERS TOM ALDRIDGE, MARC ALLAN, JOSEFA BEYER, WADE COGGESHALL, SUSAN WATT GRADE, ANDY JACOBS JR., SCOTT HALL, RITA KOHN, LORI LOVELY, SUSAN NEVILLE, PAUL F. P. POGUE, ANDREW ROBERTS, CHUCK SHEPHERD, MATTHEW SOCEY, JULIANNA THIBODEAUX EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS JORDAN MARTICH, JENNIFER TROEMNER EDITORIAL INTERNS JOEY MEGAN HARRIS, AUDREY OGLE ART & PRODUCTION // PRODUCTION@NUVO.NET PRODUCTION MANAGER/ART DIRECTOR DAVE WINDISCH // DWINDISCH@NUVO.NET SENIOR DESIGNER ASHA PATEL GRAPHIC DESIGNERS SARAHKATE CHAMNESS, WILL MCCARTY ADVERTISING/MARKETING/PROMOTIONS ADVERTISING@NUVO.NET // NUVO.NET/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR OF SALES & MARKETING MARY MORGAN // MMORGAN@NUVO.NET // 808-4614 MARKETING & EVENTS MANAGER LAUREN GUIDOTTI // LGUIDOTTI@NUVO.NET // 808-4618 EVENTS & PROMOTIONS COORDINATOR KATLIN BRAGG // KBRAGG@NUVO.NET // 808-4608 MEDIA CONSULTANT NATHAN DYNAK // NDYNAK@NUVO.NET // 808-4612 MEDIA CONSULTANT ANGELO SMITH // ASMITH@NUVO.NET // 808-4613 MEDIA CONSULTANT HEATHER LEITCH // HLEITCH@NUVO.NET // 808-4611 ACCOUNTS MANAGER RYAN STROBLE // RSTROBLE@NUVO.NET // 808-4607 ACCOUNTS MANAGER KELLY PARDEKOOPER // KPARDEK@NUVO.NET // 808-4616 ADMINISTRATION // ADMINISTRATION@NUVO.NET BUSINESS MANAGER KATHY FLAHAVIN // KFLAHAVIN@NUVO.NET CONTRACTS SUSIE FORTUNE // SFORTUNE@NUVO.NET IT MANAGER T.J. ZMINA // TJZMINA@NUVO.NET DISTRIBUTION MANAGER KATHY FLAHAVIN // KFLAHAVIN@NUVO.NET COURIER DICK POWELL DISTRIBUTION MEL BAIRD, LAWRENCE CASEY, JR., BOB COVERT, MIKE FLOYD, MIKE FREIJE, STEVE REYES, HAROLD SMITH, BOB SOOTS, RON WHITSIT DISTRIBUTION SUPPORT SUSIE FORTUNE, CHRISTA PHELPS, DICK POWELL HARRISON ULLMANN (1935-2000) EDITOR (1993-2000)

EDITORIAL POLICY: NUVO Newsweekly covers news, public issues, arts and entertainment. We publish views from across the political and social spectra. They do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. MANUSCRIPTS: N UVO welcomes manuscripts. We assume no responsibility for returning manuscripts not accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. DISTRIBUTION: The current issue of NUVO is free. Past issues are at the NUVO office for $3 if you come in, $4.50 mailed. NUVO is available every Wednesday at over 1,000 locations in the metropolitan area. Limit one copy per customer. SUBSCRIPTIONS: NUVO Newsweekly is published weekly by NUVO Inc., 3951 N . Meridian St., suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208. Subscriptions are available at $99.99/year and may be obtained by contacting Kathy Flahavin at kflahavin@nuvo.net. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to NUVO, inc., 3951 N. Meridian St., suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208. Copyright ©2013 by N UVO, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission, by any method whatsoever, is prohibited. ISSN #1086-461X

INDIANA’S VOICE FOR

SUSTAINABLE LIVING INDIANALIVINGGREEN.COM

KO: NEW PROJECT FROM SLOTHPOP VOCALIST Slothpop, Newborn’s critically adored former group, dissolved amicably in March of last year. Now, almost exactly one year later, Newborn prepares to release a new album and set off for a host of shows to impress Indy music fans once again.

WAS HAMMER FOR REAL? VOICES, 11 Was he for real, that Steve Hammer guy? It was always hard to tell. In print, he was “a cipher,” he admits. In person, he could be as gray and affectless as the mugshots that accompanied his prose. Story by Scott Hall

BINGHAM SHEDS BAND, LABEL MUSIC, 32

Story by Katherine Coplen • Cover photo by Mark Lee

There’s not a lot of people that can list “rodeo bull rider” and “Academy Award winner” side-by-side on their resume. Story by Katherine Coplen

NEWS .... 11 ARTS ..... 16 MUSIC .. 25

NUVO.NET N

WHAT’S ONLINE THAT’S NOT IN PRINT?

REVIEW: CLARA-JUMI KANG JOINS THE ICO

INDY’S CRIME & PUNISHMENT, PART. 1

GALLERY: MIDWEST FASHION WEEK

Kang overall did a splendid job with this material, articulating her passages well and maintaining nicely controlled tonal vibrancy (Beethoven does provide lots of challenges for the solo instrument).

According to the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, as of the week ending March 9, the number of murders was at 22. That number was 17 as of last year - a nearly 30 percent increase.

Images from the Friday event at the Artsgarden for the Midwest Fashion Week..

Story by Tom Aldrige

Column by Abdul-Hakim Shabazz

WTF?

Photos by T.J. Foreman

WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY ABOUT WHAT WE HAD TO SAY Letters to the editor should be sent c/o NUVO Mail. They should be typed and not exceed 300 words. Editors reserve the right to edit for length, etc. Please include a daytime phone number for verification. Send email letters to: editors@nuvo.net or leave a comment on nuvo.net, Facebook and Twitter.

EVERYBODY BELT-TIGHTENS David Hoppe’s column (Those cuts at the IMA—The end of an era?” Hoppe, March 13-20, 2013) makes it sound as though the IMA’s recent budget cuts are a threat to civilization. They aren’t. Most organizations must belttighten from time to time and the IMA is no exception-particularly if it is drawing down too much money from its endowment, as its board concluded. It’s also pertinent that the IMA has recently been involved in areas where it arguably shouldn’t have been involved. The most glaring example, from this preservationists’ point of view, is the historic Central Canal upon which the IMA’s contemporary art installation, entitled FLOW: Can you See

the River?, visually intruded at numerous points along our unique scenic waterway (and elsewhere throughout the city). The IMA’s role as a prominent place for contemporary art is not endangered by the recent budget limitations. Perhaps the cuts will cause it to become more creative. Hopefully, the museum will also be more restrained in its desire to encroach on our scenic public commons by placing outdoor art in inappropriate public spaces. Also hopefully, other organizations which seek to advance their brands through conspicuous public art will also exercise greater restraint.

FROM THE PUBLISHER Welcome to our 23rd anniversary issue. We could not have achieved this milestone without your passion for our city and its progress, the confidence of our advertisers and the talent and commitment of our staff and freelancers. Thanks to you all. We redesigned this anniversary issue knowing that picking up NUVO is one of many media options available to you. We set out to make NUVO more readable, enjoyable and ultimately all-you-need — as the original mobile companion device that it is.

Here are some of the highlights. We made it easier for you to navigate to your passions through landing pages. We expanded our coverage of food and film, including film listings on nuvo.net, and doubled the size of our music listings. We improved our coverage of the club scene with a photo page called Nightlife and the addition of a one-page, weekly look at the best of the best of the editor’s picks called Get Out. This is also the 20th anniversary of Steve Hammer’s column and it is with great difficulty that we announce he is penning his last column this week. As Steve moves to San Antonio, we try to put into perspective the era that Steve so brilliantly and humorously chronicled — and so significantly influenced. Thank you, Steve, for your many gifts to our city and to NUVO these past 23 years. You will be missed. His departure also creates opportunity as we bring into rotation, alongside David Hoppe, three new columnists with diverse perspectives in a section called Voices. Watch for them to roll out starting next week. We are debuting within this issue a new concept and design of our longstanding Indianapolis CityGuides. They are now quarterly and provide you with editor’s picks on all that Indy has to offer — with an emphasis on seasonal offerings. We know you enjoy picking up NUVO each week and with our daily, weekly and quarterly perspectives on the best of the cultural landscape, some weeks the paper product may be all you need. But nuvo.net is standing by to meet you on any platform with a different and much more vast and immediate experience if required. And if you should desire to meet other NUVO fans and their friends please join us at our series of custom tailored events that kick off this Friday at the Vogue in celebration of our anniversary. Also, please watch for 2013 updates on the Cultural Vision Awards, Best Of Indy party and the Mass Ave Criterium Festival. Thanks for another great year and for reading!

— KEVIN MCKINNEY

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER

— Clarke Kahlo • Indianapolis NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13-03.27.13 // THIS WEEK 3

GETOUT!

THIS WEEK

GET OUT!

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

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The best of what Indy has to offer this week!

XXXDAY X FRIDAY

HEADLINE RYAN BINGHAM

XXXDAY F X RIDAY

EVENT PG. 25 PAGE NO.

EVENT PAGE NO.

Celebrate asd fasf asdf our 23rd asf sfasdf anniversary asdf asdf partyasdf with asfasdf husky, bourbon-soaked voice. Bingham’s He is a perfect artist to complement our LOCATION / PRICE / ETC. Spring Guide Launch Party. Read our interview with the Crazy Heart soundtrack star on page 25 and head over to the Vogue this Friday to see Bingham live. (P.S. Our Spring Guide is nestled inside these pages!)

The kicksasf off sfasdf a seriesasdf of silent asd IMA fasf asdf asdf films asdf with live musical accompaniment with a asfasdf selection from well into the era of talkies: LOCATION / ETC. a 2011 film by/ PRICE Japanese director Naoki Yoshimoto about a young lady who discovers she’s a vampire. Percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani, making a return visit to the Toby, will accompany the film playing instruments of his own design.

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TODAY

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XXXDAY X TUESDAY XXDAY

THE TOBY AT THE INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART, 4000 MICHIGAN ROAD, 7 P.M. / $5 PUBLIC, $3 MEMBERS

MONTEREY HEADLINE JAZZPAGE FESTIVAL EVENT NO. asd fasf asdf asf sfasdf asdf asdf asdf asfasdf Two things we remember from singer Dee Dee Bridgewater’s last /appearance at the / PRICE ETC. LOCATION Walker: her brilliant, forceful performance — and her raunchy between-song patter directed at two handsome young gentlemen in the front row. She’s part of an allstar band led by bassist Christian McBride stopping by 40 cities in celebration of Monterey’s long-lived festival. MADAME WALKER THEATRE CENTER, 617 INDIANA AVE., 7 P.M. / $30-45

HEADLINE REUSING INTERIOR WHOLE PAGE NO. CITIES

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

Science on Tap @ City Market presents a discussion of the big picture from Brandon Pitcher. The idea of reusing whole cities st arts with reused materials in revitalization projects, then goes Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body co py Body copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body further to look at other aspects of how communities are organized and managed. It forces us to rethink water, energy, food, edu cation, nutrients, and more. copy Body copy Body copy CITY MARKET, 5:30-7:30 P.M., 222 E. MARKET ST. / FREE. BOLDED EVENT INFO

HEADLINE THEINTERIOR WHIPPING PAGE NO. MAN Five remain to catch ManBody , a tense, of Body a young confederate officer his family’s plantation for Passover to f ind it deserted butBody copy Body Bodychances copy Body copy Body The copyWhipping Body copy copyvivid, Bodybittersweet copy Bodytale copy copy Body copy Bodywho copyreturns Body to copy Body copy Body cohome py Body copy Body copy Body copy for twoBody now-freed slavescopy waiting among the ruins. We gave it five stars last week, praising David Alan Anderson for his gentle, formidable turn as the elder of the two freed slaves. copy copy Body BOLDED EVENT INFO THROUGH MARCH 24 AT INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE, TIMES VARY, 140 W. WASHINGTON ST.

THURSDAY FRIDAY

HEADLINE BILL BURR INTERIOR PAGE NO. Bill Burr’s a funny and he’s over thecopy place. Burrcopy doesBody morecopy 300 Body datescopy a year, along stops late copy nightBody T V copy showsBody andcopy with Body morning zooBody crews likeBody Bob and alsoBody copy Body Bodydude copy–Body copyfunny Body all copy Body Body Body copywith Body copyonBody co py copy copyTom. BodyHe copy squeezes in weekly recordings of Thecopy Monday Morning Podcast; he was an early podcast adopter, and has made the rounds of all th e other comedy podcasts of note as an interviewee. copy Body copy Body BOLDED EVENT INFO EGYPTIAN ROOM AT OLD NATIONAL CENTRE, 502 N. NEW JERSEY ST., 8 P.M. / $29.50 PLUS FEES

FRIDAY SATURDAY

HEADLINE RUSTY ATINTERIOR DADDY PAGE REAL’S NO. Pick up Lower, the newest full-length from Indy hip-hop statesman Rustycopy Redenbacher one of ourBody localcopy record stores and head over to copy his album party Daddy Body copy Body copy Body elder copy Body copy Body Body copyatBody copy Body copy Body copy Body Body release copy Body co Saturday py Bodyat copy BodyReal’s. copy Body copy Body copy3855 Body E. copy BodyST. copy BodyON copy DADDY REAL’S THE PLACE, 9 P.M. 96TH / LOG TO NUVO.NET TO READ OUR REVIEW. BOLDED EVENT INFO

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HEADLINE INTERIOR PAGE NO. 5TH ANNUAL HUNGER BANQUET Each year the IUBody School of Medicine’s Globalcopy Health Interest the banquet, which and awareness for the problem of hunger und the the copy Body copy Body BodyStudent copy Body copygroup Bodyhosts copy Body copy Body copyraises Bodymoney copy Body copy Body copy Body copy Body co pyaround Body world. Dr. Robertcopy Einterz this year’s keynote speaker, and copy guests willcopy also Body enjoycopy dinner and cultural dance performances. Bodyis copy Body copy Body copy Body Body IUPUI CAMPUSBOLDED CENTEREVENT ROOMINFO 450, 420 UNIVERSITY BLVD., 5-8 P.M. / $5 FOR STUDENTS, $7 FOR NON-STUDENTS.

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4 GET OUT! // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

VOICES IT’S TIME TO SAY GOODBYE TOC

No apology for standing up for the voiceless

A

fter a 23-year association with this newspaper, and 20 years of delivering a weekly column, the time has finally come for me to say goodbye to all of NUVO’s readers and the city of Indianapolis, my beloved hometown. It feels like I’ve been saying farewell in print for months, because I have been, but I promise it ends this week. I’ll be gone as a weekly presence in print but will contribute the occasional article or blog piece to this newspaper. I’m sitting in our new, sunny living room in the Alamo Heights area of San Antonio, tapping away my last NUVO column on my phone as my wife takes a Saturday afternoon nap. Mozart’s Piano Sonata No. 8 is playing. Back in 1993, when I began writing this column each week, I hoped it would be successful. I wanted certain people to like it, certain people to be apathetic to it and a certain segment of the population to be completely and utterly outraged by it. By those standards, if no other, this column has been a staggering success, exceeding my highest expectations. If I had known in 1993 that the column would run for two decades and terminate due to my moving to Texas after being promoted to a good job with a Fortune 500 company, I’m not sure whether I would have reacted with happiness, terror or disgust. But here I am, working in a six-floor office building in Texas and signing off in print in Indy. It’s been a good run, for which I am profoundly thankful. It ends on a good note on the 23rd anniversary of the newspaper you’re holding in your hands or seeing on a screen. My professional career in journalism and writing goes back even further, to the late 1980s, where I worked for the Indianapolis Recorder and the Noblesville Daily Ledger, two very different places culturally. I covered dozens of metro counties council and zoning meetings for the Indianapolis Star and the sadly deceased Indianapolis News, as well as high school sports for the great Associated Press. It’s been a gas. In my 27-year career as a professional staff and freelance journalist, I have spoken with James Brown, Kurt Vonnegut, Yoko Ono, John Updike, George Clinton, Tony Bennett and Elvis Costello. I’ve breakfasted with Claire Danes and lunched with James Earl Jones and Steve Wilkos. I’ve covered hundreds of speeches featuring notable and historical people: Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, Nelson Mandela (twice), Allen Ginsberg, Dan Quayle, Bill Clinton (5

GET OUT!

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

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STEVE HAMMER SSHAMMER@NUVO.NET A After 23 years of being assocciated with NUVO, Hammer has left Indy for a career in h SSan Antonio.

times), Jimmy Carter, Ted Kennedy, Ralph Nader, Gerald R. Ford, George Bush Sr., Dan Rather, John Waters and hundreds more. I’ve been to at least 700 Pacers home games at the Coliseum, Market Square Arena and the Fieldhouse. I’ve seen the legendary players of the ABA Pacers and have been present when Reggie Miller was draining threes. I covered the 2000 NBA Finals and chatted with Shaquille O’Neal and Jesse Jackson in the Lakers’ locker room. I hung out with Mark Cuban when Dallas came to town. I’ve seen almost every single one of my musical heroes perform in person except John Lennon and Mozart. Prince, James PHOTO BY PHILLIP MEYER Brown, Bob Dylan, Paul McCartney, This NUVO cover image, from Sept. 4-11, 1991, features Hammer playing bingo with his grandmother. Roger Waters and hundreds more. For years I was paid to go to concerts, which ships along the way. I deeply regret that. my final one, taken from one of my last is more fun in theory than reality. But I don’t apologize for standing up days before leaving town: And every week since 1993 I’ve done for the workers, the underprivileged I was walking down Ohio Street in this column. I’ve written it on planes, and the voiceless. I don’t apologize for front of the federal courthouse, mindtrains and buses, in hotel rooms and in promoting a liberal or socialist agenda. ing my own business and listening to the back of cars doing 90 mph on the History has and will continue to prove Mozart. Something hit me hard, simiinterstate. It’s been a constant presence. me right on that. lar to when someone pats you on the Most of the time I’ve enjoyed it, but Two of the people most responsible back especially hard. Except it wasn’t sometimes it’s been a drag. It’s very cool for shaping my attitudes and urging me my back, it was my left leg and my foot to have the privilege to say whatever the towards excellence are no longer with was pinned underneath the wheel of hell you want in print, but when you’re us. Harrison Ullmann, NUVO’s editor a motorized wheelchair driven by a setting the alarm for 5 a.m. Monday to from 1993 to 2000, fought to get me a 60-year-old white lady with an artificial get up and write a piece in less than two weekly space in the paper and helped leg. “Oh my gosh,” she said, “Are you hours, it most certainly feels like work. me craft my prose. My mother also okay?” “Not really,” I Unlike most writers shaped my philosophy of standing up said. My foot felt like I know, I don’t keep for the underdog. She died on Christmas it was on fire and I was any of my old stories or Eve 1999 and Ullmann passed away a afraid she’d caused It’s been a good run, clippings, so it’s hard few months later. I still miss them but serious damage. to review my columns for which I am feel their presence in my life. She apologized proand choose a favorite. So instead of being a controversial fusely and I hobbled profoundly thankful. off. I thought, “Bitch, The ones that stand local columnist and minor local celebout in my mind are the rity in Indiana, I am now a hard-working you may have only one ones where I either union man in Texas. I’m grateful for the leg but you have two told a story of injustice change and the opportunity for a fresh eyes and they both work!” Once I was that needed telling or where I cracked start. It feels good. at my desk, I inspected the damage: A myself up with my comedy. My last words as a print columnist are chunk of flesh the size of a JFK half-dollar Several times I’ve written reviews of these: Thank you for reading, whether had been gouged out the side of my foot. vending-machine food in the style of a you were supportive of me, vehemently I’ve never even heard of that happensnooty restaurant critic. For some reaagainst me or apathetic. I’m humbled ing before. The strangest things always son, that makes me laugh. I also have by the opportunity I’ve had. Thank you happened to me in Indianapolis. enjoyed the book reviews I’ve written Kevin McKinney, thank you Jim Poyser, I’m just about out of room but have that ignore the book’s content but focus- a few last thoughts before signing off. I thank you NUVO. May God continue es on its physical properties: the quality to protect and bless the great city of apologize to anyone in my personal life of its paper, the strength of its binding, Indianapolis, the state of Indiana and in Indy that I’ve mistreated in any way. the readability of its font, etc. everyone who lives there. I’ll never forMy life hasn’t always been as upbeat as I also have enjoyed relating personal get any of you. Goodbye. „ it is now and I’ve burned some friendstories of my life in Indianapolis. Here’s VOICES // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO 5

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VOICES WAS HAMMER FOR REAL? TOC

A meditation on the man, from an ex-colleague

Irreverence wasn’t fashionable then Others offer a more generous assessment. Indianapolis Star columnist Dan Carpenter, a brother in this city’s tiny fraternity of left-leaning commentators, responded kindly when asked about his longtime NUVO counterpart. “He’s given to excess, like myself, and then some. Like myself channeling Hunter Thompson, maybe,” Carpenter wrote of Hammer. “He has also given by excess, to a town that needs a full-throated defender of its underappreciated values and defier of our fashionable complacency and submission to elite rule. … He’s carried on in the nobly cantankerous spirit of his mentor, the late Harrison Ullmann, and I’ll miss them both.” Ullmann, an old-school liberal and gadfly journalist-at-large for decades, was

VOICES

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SCOTT HALL

EEDITORS@NUVO.NET

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evoted Pacers fan. Proud Southsider. Avowed Marxist. Soul music lover. Internet provocateur. Was he for real, that Steve Hammer guy? It was always hard to tell. In print, he was “a cipher,” he admits. In person, he could be as gray and affectless as the mugshots that accompanied his prose. Now, we may never know. Let’s be clear: He’s not dead in the conventional sense. As readers have learned, Hammer is ending his weekly NUVO column after a marathon 20-year run, seldom equaled in the annals of local punditry. That’s about 1,000 columns, if you do the math, not to mention the estimated 3,000 stories he wrote for NUVO in various part- and full-time capacities that included managing editor, music editor, arts and culture editor, arts and media editor, and contributing editor. In that period, he’s been a consistent voice of truth to power, or at least an entertaining annoyance to a series of elected officials, sacred cows and fancy folk of all kinds. He has drawn lessons from his favorite topics — the Kennedys, Watergate, the Beatles — and established his everyman credentials with uncomfortably personal accounts of his struggles with authority, money, objective reality, various substances and various unstable women. But after two decades of apparent selfrevelation, Hammer remains an enigma, even to longtime associates and perhaps even to himself. In the case of this story you’re reading right now, for example, he never quite could decide — over the course of 13 emails and a two-hour telephone conversation — whether to participate. Why waste more space examining a man who wasn’t there? It’s all in the columns, right? “Take a halftone photo of me and enlarge it 400 percent,” Hammer, 48, wrote in one message. “The space between the dots is me. All else is disinformation.”

GET OUT!

S Scott Hall has been a NUVO contribuh ttor since 1990 and very, very briefly preceded Steve Hammer b as managing editor. a

SUBMITTED PHOTO

NUVO’s editor and top columnist in early 1993, when Hammer joined full-time as managing editor. It was the young journalist’s first solid job since volunteering in Little Rock for the Clinton campaign. His weekly column began that summer, when the prolific Ullmann — whom he calls “a monumental figure in my life” — took a vacation. Hammer’s journalism career had begun years earlier. The Southport High School grad studied at Indiana University and worked for its award-winning Indiana Daily Student newspaper before dropping out, short of his degree. He quickly found work, however, writing for the Indy Star and News and the Noblesville Ledger, and even serving a few years as managing editor of the Indianapolis Recorder, one of the nation’s oldest African-American newspapers. During that era, he became acquainted with Will Higgins, editor of a short-lived local alternative paper called the New Times. As a freelance writer, Hammer followed in 1990 when Higgins became the second editor of a new, struggling alt-weekly called NUVO. “Hammer was a strange cat, and bright,” recalls Higgins, now the Star’s senior wiseacre feature writer. “I remember he had a funny way of standing – sort of on one foot, always shifting feet, as if he had to pee. “Irreverence is fashionable now, but in the early ’90s it was hard to find. Hammer oozed it, oozed irreverence. So I gave him work.” Later, as Hammer settled into NUVO fulltime, he became a frumpy king of all Naptown media. He launched the first of his many websites and blogs in 1994, well ahead of many major news outlets. For a full year, he hosted The Steve Hammer Show on WAV-TV. Not everyone was a fan, of course — that’s the mark of a successful columnist. Hammer was a frequent target for disgruntled readers but also felt love from people who recognized him on the street. “I got nothing but feedback, dude,” he recalls.

Friction at work But even among colleagues there was friction. Little warmth remains, for example, between Hammer and another longtime NUVO contributor, Jeff “Flounder” Napier. Napier was the music editor when Hammer became his supervisor, and Hammer became music editor after

A staff photo image from the mid-90s. There’s Steve, far left, a cigarette dangling from his lips.

Napier’s full-time employment ended. Among other issues, Hammer says Napier actively lobbied against him in the local music community. “For enemies, none is more despised than Napier,” he says, not kidding. “Whatever he says will infuriate me endlessly.” Obligingly, Napier says Hammer “singlehandedly tried to kill” the city’s original music scene. “Steve Hammer was the worst music editor ever,” Napier says. “That really made me hate him for a long time. It was so clear that he didn’t really want to do that job.” Hammer agrees he hated that job, though it gave him great memories: meeting James Brown, interviewing Yoko Ono. He also lost control a bit during the early 2000s, he says, both personally and professionally. And he never was much of a team player. “I was notorious for never showing up at NUVO events,” he says. “I was and am generally inaccessible for all kinds of social niceties.” Eventually, Hammer’s supervisors grew weary of the disappointments and terminated him as a full-time employee in 2006. “It was really hard,” says Jim Poyser, NUVO’s managing editor then and now. They allowed him to continue writing his weekly column, however, at a higherthan-usual pay rate. Hammer admits the extra cash was a key motivation to continue writing as he humbly started over on the career ladder, taking an IT gig with a major telecom provider. “Sure, he wanted the money, but it must have been terrible for him, to keep on with us,” Poyser says. “The fact that he stayed engaged as a columnist indicated his love for Indianapolis, his love for his readers, and their love for him.” In retrospect, the fresh start has proven positive for Hammer. Before leaving NUVO, he enjoys pointing out, he met a bright and attractive intern, Katie, whom he now calls his wife. He is currently in Texas, training for a lucrative new position with that telecom company. And his column, which concludes this week, has remained as weird, funny and insightful as ever. Even Napier gives props. “Over the past six or seven years, first thing I do when I pick up the NUVO is look for Steve Hammer’s column,”

More Hammer When Artest threw those blows in Detroit, he was fighting for us, too. He was expressing with his fists the feelings of many Americans, including myself, in those dark days after the rigged election. He is a hero in the sense Che Guevara is a hero, a leader of men and a strong voice for revolution in the face of oppression. — STEVE HAMMER, “ARTEST MUST STAY: OUR SURVIVAL DEPENDS UPON IT,” NUVO, DECEMBER 2005

I think there’s been an essential truth to all of my columns, no matter how shitty they were. — STEVE HAMMER, EMAIL MARCH 2013 Napier says. “When he started doing what he wanted to do, that’s when he became a great writer.” As for Hammer, he’s over it. A new life calls. “Steve Hammer the columnist is dead, and I killed him,” he says. “Steve Hammer the IT specialist is concerned with doing a good job, being a nice husband and doing the right thing. He won’t be attending the funeral of the other Steve Hammer.” „ VOICES // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO 7

Because Ideas MatterRecommended Readings by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Butler University

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Joe Holmes: Here I Am Amongst You By Len Graham Four Courts, 2010 Reviewed by George W. Geib

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Joe Holmes (1906-1978) was one of the great traditional musicians of County Derry, Northern Ireland. As both a singer and a fiddler, he possessed a highly varied repertoire of tunes, ballads, and entertainments that made him a welcome performer throughout the island. Len Graham was a close friend of Holmes who collected much of this work in both recorded and print versions. This delightfully illustrated print collection is an extensively annotated compilation of 80 songs, 53 fiddle and dance tunes, and an introduction to Christmas mumming. Holmes performed with, and frequently influenced, many of the leading artists of the Celtic revival. Thistle and Shamrock listeners will recognize some old favorites, but should be surprised by the amount of new and unexpected material. Holmes learned many of his favorites from his mother, who in turn drew heavily upon 19th century broadside ballads and community dancing. The feel of an earlier Ireland is very real and immediate. Biography, history, and musical archive, this volume is well worth a visit. — George Geib is professor of history at Butler University. Go to www.butler.edu/BookReview for more recommendations by the faculty and staff of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Butler University.

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ur son is engaged. David Hoppe To be married, that is. He called us a has been writing columns for few nights ago. Before telling his mothNUVO since the mid-1990s. er and me the news, he made sure we were both on the line; his mother held her breath in the kitchen (she had a feeling this was coming), while I (clueless) hustled upstairs to pick up the extension. Something like pandemonium erupted married out of need; and need is certainly shortly thereafter. not enough to hold a marriage together in By our reckoning, Graham and Amy have any true or nourishing way. been together for about five years. They met For some of us, it’s a family thing, but it’s a in college, where they traveled in the same community thing, too. Marriage is an opporcircles; then they were friends, who managed tunity to stand before our tribe to acknowlto navigate the various iterations of today’s edge that two of us are crossing a threshold. It courtship rituals, including moving in togethdoesn’t matter how old we are, where we’ve er and moving to another state. Now this. been or what we’ve done, getting married is a All of us know how fraught marriage has way of finally declaring ourselves adults. become. It’s almost as risky a proposition as Laws supposedly intended to “defend” opening a restaurant. Something like half the marriage, by forbidding some of us from tying couples who agree to marry wind up getting the knot, actually do little more than consign divorced. That’s what happened to me the an entire class to a state of perpetual relationfirst time I tried it. I can still remember sitting ship adolescence. As countless Internet dating alone with the judge in his office in the county sites attest, it’s hard enough for two people to courthouse as he signed the no-fault papers. find each other in a way that matters in this It was late in the afternoon on a bone-chilling world. What’s crazy is that, so long as we have day in early spring. When he was finished, the this thing called marriage, we try to prevent judge looked at me in a way I would like to some of us from being part of it. think of as kind. In that moment we were like Marriage, of course, is also a way of believtwo characters in an Edward Hopper painting; ing in the future. But even that has become there was nothing left to say. a loaded proposition these days. There was a Graham’s mother and I will celebrate our time — not that long ago — when the idea of 30th anniversary this June. I am at a loss to progress was a palpable thing. Standards of account for our good fortune. All I can say is living improved from one generation to the that hardly a day goes by I don’t thank my next, as surely as day follows night. lucky stars I had the presence of mind to ask Well, we’re not so sure about that now. It her to marry me. And that she said yes. seems we work more and earn less. Even a Like Graham’s mother and me, Amy’s parcollege degree isn’t what it’s cracked up to be. ents are long married. I am told that when As for the planet, we keep pushing it harder, Amy offered them the news over the phone, making more demands. We know we’re doing Graham could hear the whoop of joy from damage, finding it in the air we breathe, the across the room. I can’t help but think this water we drink, hiding deep inside us. makes some kind of a difference, that if the mothers and fathers in this story were living apart in different towns, The prospect of this impending different states — geographic and otherwise — their feelings, while no less marriage feels tidal, like the loving, would surely be tempered somenatural movement between how by bittersweet experience. As it is, the prospect of this impendand across generations. ing marriage feels tidal, like the natural movement between and across generations. Our family histories make it possible for us to celebrate it as both a distinct As Rick tells his lover Ilsa in the movie moment in time, one to be gathered round Casablanca, the problems of little people and savored for itself, and a continuity, anothlike us don’t amount to a hill of beans in er turning of our mutually familial wheel. this world. Under the circumstances, it A dear friend of ours, twice divorced himcan be easy for marriage to seem like just self, asked why anyone today would feel a another pale gesture. need to marry. I doubt there is a need, as Or its defiant opposite. Because when such. We’ve known couples that have made two people get married, they show us a way long and rich lives together, and never forward. In this, Graham and Amy, bless needed vows. Perhaps it’s the word “need” them, are leading with what is best about itself that’s a culprit here. You shouldn’t get us all, their hearts. „

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STEWARDSHIP FOR THE BIRDS

State’s Audubon society hires first full timer

Let’s all pause and delight in the fact that Indiana University men’s basketball player, Victor Oladipo, was named national player of the year by The Sporting News. Oladipo, was also voted first-team all-Big Ten, along with teammate Cody Zeller, and earned Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year. (JP)

BY JO R D A N MA R T IC H EDITORS@NUVO . N ET

T

o commemorate its 75 years of protecting Indiana’s birds, the Amos W. Butler Audubon Society has hired Don Gorney as the non-profit’s first full-time staff member. Gorney, a volunteer board member since 2008, is now director of bird conservation and education. A grant from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust funds the new position. Stewardship remains the society’s central focus, a testament to its namesake, celebrated naturalist Amos Butler, who authored The Birds of Indiana in 1890. “We want to protect the birds so that not only are they here for us but also for future generations,” Gorney said. Among the society’s many accomplishments since it was formed in 1938, members played crucial roles in the preservation of Indiana’s largest rookery of great blue herons and in the founding of the Burr Oak Bend Nature Preserve, a 120-acre site along the White River in Hamilton County. Gorney got involved with the group when he moved to Indianapolis in 1998. He became so well known in the bird-watching community that he eventually was asked to join the board. Perhaps his former job as a bank examiner for the Federal Deopsit Insurance Corp. gave him the instincts for safeguarding what’s valuable. Nevertheless, it was a perfect fit for Gorney, who’d found relief from work-related stress in bird-watching. “Starting to bird-watch was a way of relaxing,” Gorney said. “It gave me something to do in the evening and provided an outlet from the mundane world of bank examining.” By hosting meetings and presentations, the Amos W. Butler Audubon Society has spread awareness about issues facing birds while inspiring fascination with the many species found around the state. Fifteen Important Bird Areas, which distinguish areas where a species is threatened by loss of habitat, have been created under the organization’s watch. “Over the last 10 years or so I’ve seen 250 species of birds just in Marion County,” Gorney said. “When people see some of these birds that are really just striking in appearance, it really captures their attention.” One of Gorney’s key areas of focus is the Lights Out Indy project, which seeks to eliminate unnecessary lighting from buildings at night. Excessive lighting confuses migrating birds and often causes death by collision with the building — more than 800 deaths since the fall of 2009 by the organization’s count. The message is simple: By

Last Wednesday, we learned that the Indianapolis Airport was Best Airport in North America by the Airports Council International. Based on passenger satisfaction surveys, the award comes on heels of news last month that the airport will soon be home to the largest airport solar farm in the country. Construction on the 75-acre farm, which will be located at the entrance to the airport, is set to begin at the end of March and will cost an estimated $35-$40 million. Fly the eco-friendly skies! (HL, JP)

On top of tracking Butler, IU, Notre Dame and Valpo through March Madness, Indiana’s annual Golden Gloves fights kick off this week and runs each consecutive Thursday Downtown at Tyndall Armory through the championships on April 25. Tickets are $10, $12 for ringside. Also, the Brickyard Battalion, the fan club firing up support Indy’s yet-to-be-named pro soccer team, will “Build the Brick House” with a World Cup qualifier viewing party Friday, March 22, at Union Jack Pub. The U.S. Men’s Team (coming off a loss Honduras) hosts Costa Rica. Kickoff at 8:30 p.m. Hit The Batallion up on Facebook for free membership (members get 20 percent discount on food) and to RSVP for the party. (RT)

PHOTO BY MARK LEE

Don Gorney, a volunteer board member since 2008, is now director of bird conservation and education at the Amos W. Bulter Audubon Society. The society celebrates its 75th anniversary this year and, with Gorney’s hiring, its first fulltime staff member.

LIGHTS OUT, INDY

TAKE A HIKE!

Whole Foods Market selected Amos Butler Audubon’s Lights Out Indy project as the recipient of its April 3 Community Day fundraising efforts. Five percent of sales at both the 86th St. and Carmel locations on April 3 will be donated to Lights Out Indy.

Join the Amos Butler Audubon Society for a spring hike on Sunday, March 24 at the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s 100 Acres lake. The hike begins at 3 p.m. Participants are to meet at the Lake Terrace near Park of the Laments at the southeast corner of the oxbow lake. The event, held in conjunction with IMA’s Spring Equinox event, is suitable for beginning birders and nature-lovers of all ages. Contact Don Gorney at don@amosbutleraudubon.org for more information.

eliminating unneeded lights, companies can save energy and money, and help prevent bird injury and death. Another program Gorney now supervises is Wings Over Indy, a project geared toward urban-dwelling birds such as nighthawks and chimney swifts. More than 30 gravel patches have been created for nighthawks and eight towers have been built for chimney swifts under the program. As one of Indiana’s oldest non-profit organizations, Hoosiers have supported the Amos W. Butler Audubon Society through donations at its spring fundraising event, the Birdathon. In 2012 a record $31,970

was raised for conservation and education projects here and in South America, adding to a total of $530,000 raised since 1987. “I just find that amazing from a group of volunteers,” Gorney said. “We’ve had amazing success.” Connect with the Amos Butler Audubon Society at amosbutleraudubon.org or at http://www.facebook.com/amosbutler. „

On Friday, we received an announcement regarding a fundraising partnership between Primary Colours and Gennesaret Free Clinic for fundraising purposes for Gennesaret. Since 1988, Gennesaret Free Clinics has been bringing medical care to homeless persons. Happy 25th birthday to Gennesaret — and happy 14th birthday to their Art for Beds fundraiser, which involves raising money for the clinic by auctioning artwork donated by some of Indy’s best galleries and artists. Primary Colours issued a Call-for-Artists, to participate in this year’s Art for Beds event, which will be held Downtown at the Conrad, on Sunday, April 28. Artists can vie for cash awards in the process. Go to primarycolours.org, gennesaret.org, and/ or contact Primary Colours BrianShort@ primarycolours. org. Deadline for submissions is April 12. (JP) On Monday, Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry joined a litany of local officials and businesses lobbying to advance plans to modernize Indy’s mass transit system. The plan still needs the General Assembly to approve administrative details before the community can decide whether to support it. The House has approved a bill making the necessary changes; the Senate has yet to advance it. (JP, RT) On Tuesday, newly elected Pope Francis issued a warning in his inaugural mass: “(W)henever we fail to care for creation and for our brothers and sisters, the way is opened to destruction and hearts are hardened.” (JP, RT) NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // NEWS 11

Tuesday, April 9, 6:30 p.m. Refreshments in the cafe at 6 p.m.

Christian Theological Seminary Shelton Auditorium 1000 W. 42nd Street, Indianapolis $10/person | Purchase at cts.edu or at the door

Explore life on the edges with international writer, storyteller, theologian/philosopher, and liturgical artist Peter Rollins; singer-songwriter Liz Janes; and local social entrepreneurs Laura Henderson and Derrick Braziel. Part-talk, part-performance, with “mash-up� style Q & A moderated by CTS President Matthew Myer Boulton. For information call 317.931.4225

www.spiritandplace.org | #SPINDY With support from Grace Unlimited, Community of the Living Spirit, and ...

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CELEBRATING AN EXECUTION LULL

Advocates stoke efforts to end state’s death penalty B Y H A NNA H L E Y V A EDITORS@NU VO . N ET

REUSING WHOLE CITIES

5:30-7:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY CITY MARKET Science on Tap @ City Market presents a discussion of the big picture from Brandon Pitcher. The idea of reusing whole cities starts with reused materials in revitalization projects, then goes further to look at other aspects of how communities are organized and managed. It forces us to rethink water, energy, food, education, nutrients, and more. Free.

“CAIRO TO JERUSALEM” WITH JERRY WILLIAMS 7-8:30 P.M. WEDNESDAY CENTRAL LIBRARY

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ndiana will not join Maryland this year in abolishing the death penalty, leaving advocates to continue efforts to garner greater legislative support while taking heart, at least, in a multi-year lull in local executions. No inmates have been executed in Indiana since 2009, when Matthew Eric Wrinkles received a lethal injection for the 1994 killings of his estranged wife, Debra Wrinkles, her brother, Tony Fulkerson, and his wife, Natalie Fulkerson. Between 2003 and 2009, the state executed 11 people. Fourteen prisoners remain on death row in Indiana. “Thirty states have either no death penalty or haven’t carried any out in over five years,” said Karen Burkhart, Amnesty International’s death penalty abolition coordinator in Indiana. “The large number of states no longer carrying out death sentences shows some sort of consensus.” In remarks at the 14th annual Celebrate Life: Alternatives to the Death Penalty party, held at the Indiana Statehouse on Feb. 27, Burkhart noted that five states have outlawed capital punishment since 2007. Maryland moved toward becoming the sixth when its legislature last Friday passed a bill — requested by Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) — to abolish the death penalty. At the Indiana Statehouse event, sponsored by the local chapter of Amnesty International, about 50 people gathered to celebrate Tom Hinesley, chief deputy of the Public Defender’s Capital Division, as the 2013 Abolitionist of the Year for his efforts to change the sentencing for inmates on Indiana’s death row. “After 25 years of standing in this building, this is the first time I’ve ever faced a friendly audience,” Hinesley, a former parole officer, said in his acceptance speech. Eighteen prisoners have been executed in the state since 1994, and Hinesley has been at every one of them, providing whatever support and help he can. Advocates for alternative sentences cited inhumane and arbitrary elements of the death penalty process as reasons for their opposition. “Punishment is supposed to be reserved for the very worst criminals, but the process for deciding who will be sent to death row is arbitrary and discriminatory,” Burkhart said. “We are simply unable to do it right.” One of the event’s guest speakers had firsthand experience with the process. Randy Steidl was sentenced to death row for the 1986 murders of Dyke and Karen Rhoads in Illinois. After a long journey that included appeals, a new sentencing hearing, and finally a new investigation, he was exonerated in 2004 after 17 years in prison, mostly on death row.

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The Central Indiana Bicycling Association presents an evening of stories featuring Jerry Williams at Clowes Auditorium in the Central Library. Free.

LEGAL ISSUES CONCERNING 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGY 5-7 P.M. THURSDAY IUPUI ROBERT H. MCKINNEY SCHOOL OF LAW The featured speaker will be Michael Weinberg, an attorney with Public Knowledge who is the currently the vice president of their Institute for Emerging Innovation. Price: Free, but registration is required.

PHOTO BY HANNAH LEYVA

Tom Hinesley, chief deputy of the Public Defender’s Capital Division, was named the 2013 Abolitionist of the Year by the local chapter of Amnesty International.

actions across the nation and around the He now works with Witness to world. The Indiana Journey of Hope is set for Innocence, a Philadelphia-based organizaOct. 4-20, including an event to coincide with tion made up of death row exonerees and the Oct. 10 celebration of World Day Against their family members who fight to end the Death Penalty. capital punishment. Abolitionists hope that events like these “If you really want to punish someone, will bring awareness to the issue and evenput them in a cage. At least you don’t run the risk of killing an innocent person,” Steidl said. “You can release “Momentum is changing; an innocent man from prison, but you can’t release him from the momentum is with us” grave.” Another partcipant, Bill Pelke, — DORIS PARLETTE, founder of Journey of Hope… PRESIDENT, from Violence to Healing, advocated abolition from the perspective INDIANA ABOLITION COALITION of someone who found strength through forgiveness. Pelke experitually push lawmakers to do away with enced a spiritual transformation after the murder of his grandmother in Gary in 1985, capital punishment altogether. During the 2013 General Assembly, State and the subsequent trials of the teenage Sen. Lonnie Randolph, D-East Chicago, girls who committed the crime — one of authored a bill to eliminate the death penwhom was initially sentenced to death. alty and commute those sentences to life in His organization travels around the prison without the possibility of parole, but country with murder victim family memit did not receive a hearing. bers who recount their personal experiIndiana Abolition Coalition President ences in healing through reconciliation and promote the concept of restorative jus- Doris Parlette, who called the death penalty “state-sanctioned killing,” said the tice, which “stresses the need for offender support for the movement is there. accountability and the opportunity for “This is happening, the momentum is the offender to make things right with the changing,” Parlette said. “Momentum is victim as much as possible (to) allow for with us.” greater healing in the lives of victims and For the future of Indiana, Hinesley, offenders, and peace in communities, after Parlette’s husband, said he hopes that crimes are committed.” she is right. The group is planning to retrace the origi“We cannot be the society we aspire to nal trail it followed across the state 20 years be as long as this state carries out capital ago — from Michigan City to Evansville, punishment,” he said. „ which has spawned a legacy of affiliated

CAESAR CHAVEZ DAY OF SERVICE ALL DAY, SATURDAY IUPUI CAMPUS CENTER IUPUI students, faculty, staff, and other members of the local community will honor Caesar Chavez, a Mexican American farm worker turned civil rights activist, with a brief morning program at the school’s Campus Center followed by a day of community service. Free, but registration is required.

EARTH HOUR

8:30-9:30 P.M. SATURDAY WHEREVER YOU ARE Every year in March, the entire planet shuts down their electricity for one hour. This year the action is Saturday, 8:30-9:30 p.m. Just say no to fossil fuels! For more, see: http://earthhour.org

5TH ANNUAL HUNGER BANQUET 5-8 P.M., SUNDAY IUPUI CAMPUS CENTER ROOM 450 The event will feature Dr. Robert Einterz as keynote speaker, dinner and cultural dance performances. Proceeds support the Tumaini Children’s Center and the IU-Kenya Orphans Vulnerable Children Fund. Price: $5 for students, $7 for non-students.

THOUGHT BITE A penny saved is a penny earned - tax free. — ANDY JACOBS, JR

N NUVO.NET Medicaid Issues Spark Special Session Talk. Story by Samm Quinn NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // NEWS 13

PHOTO BY MARK LEE

KO 14 COVER STORY // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

New project from Slothpop’s KRISTIN NEWBORN

‘‘I

Todd Heaton and Kristin Newborn are KO.

s to r y b y kath erin e coplen kcoplen@nuvo.net

‘m all over the place,” laughs Kristin Newborn. We’re sharing a table in the back of an Alley Cat with Todd Heaton, discussing the duo’s new band, KO. I’m chomping at the bit to hear Newborn and Heaton’s newest recording project, a debut album slated for a late July release. Slothpop, Newborn’s critically adored former group, dissolved amicably in March of last year. Now, almost exactly one year later, Newborn prepares to release a new album, set off for a host of shows and impress Indy once again. This year has been a diverse one for the duo, whose performance spaces have ranged from basement floors to the Hilbert Circle Theater stage, and just about everywhere in between.

I’m in a tall, cushioned seat at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. After spending too much time chatting in the front over gratis appetizers, I’ve been relegated to a seat in the back; I prefer it there — better to watch the crowd’s reaction to the batch of songs compiled by Steve Hackman, who’s debuting his Brahms “First Symphony” and Radiohead “OK Computer” mash-up. The performance features three singers, including Newborn. After solo songs from the other two performers, Newborn launches into a new piece (arranged by Hanna Benn), accompanied by the orchestra. It’s delicate and lush, and although more than 80 orchestra members join in, Newborn owns the performance. “When I was 3 years old, I would watch these musicals,” says Newborn. “These sing-along, dance-along videos, and then I would go to this electric piano and be able to play back from ear. My mom [saw this and put me] in piano Suzuki [method] lessons that year.” Newborn grew up in Indianapolis; she spent her formative years studying classical music, sneaking into church sanctuaries to play the piano and performing with North Central’s show choir. “Classical music was really important to me; I played a lot of Bach, a lot of Mozart. I loved listening to Debussy,” says Newborn. “Debussy is so beautiful.” After high school graduation, Newborn was set to move to Chicago to attend Columbia College, one of the largest arts

colleges in the country. But something was subconsciously holding her back. “It was so weird — I kept having these really bad dreams that took place in Chicago; I was having weird second thoughts about it,” she says. So, instead, it was off to The Young Americans (after a brief stop in Michigan for auditions) in Los Angeles. TYA is a traveling performance group for young professional musicians, with whom she crisscrossed the world, living for months at a time in places as far-flung as Japan and Germany. “I loved [Young Americans] and I grew up a lot, playing with professional musicians,” says Newborn. “And everyone was super different, but we had one thing in common: our love of music.” After finishing her tours with The Young Americans, Newborn returned to her hometown. Fairly quickly, she settled into a comfortable musical collaboration with Lauren Elson (vocals, violin), Dan Zender (guitar), Bryan Unruh (percussion), Jeff Vyain (cello) and Drew Malott (bass, vocals). That collection of musicians was Slothpop. They released an LP in January of 2011, a magnificently strange collection of 10 strongly written tracks carried by Newborn’s lilting voice. The group performed all over the state and elsewhere, gaining friends and fans steadily. But by March of last year, it was time for

PHOTO BY BRYAN MOORE

Todd Heaton performing live with KO.

something new. So with a brief goodbye (“Dearest loves, Slothpop is officially calling it off.”), KO was born.

I’m in a basement of a stranger’s house in Bloomington. On deck for the night is Floorboard, a gauzy three-piece group led by singer Biz Strother; Philly band Son Step; Steven Layne; Todd Heaton’s Street Spirits; and KO. The basement is far from packed – in fact, a good portion of the people downstairs are band members themselves. It’s a nice space, as college town basements go. I’m posted up on the washing machine, with softly glowing Christmas lights swinging above my head. Newborn floats from person to person – she’s the last act of the night, but she’s there from the beginning, chatting quietly with other musicians. She’s front and center when Heaton starts his set. “I was always a fan of Todd in Our Imaginary Friends,” says Newborn. “Then I heard these home recordings of Street Spirits that he did, and I messaged him right away and said, ‘Todd, Todd, I love you. We should play music.’ ” Street Spirits is a solo writing project that grows to a full band for live performances. Heaton’s EP, released last summer, is a low-fi, dreamy confection with deep, dark undertones; his thunderous drums add gravity to the reverb-soaked vocals. Newborn loved those drums, and Heaton understood KO’s songs. “I didn’t really know where the KO project was going,” says Newborn. “And I didn’t know Todd was going to play drums. I think a lot of people in Indianapolis did not know he played drums as well as he does. I think that was what was cool when we played our first couple of shows; people were like, ‘Whoa, Todd!’ ” Newborn brought five songs to Heaton initially, and they rehearsed only three times before their first live show. “Then, she said, ‘I have two more songs,’ and then, ‘I have two more songs,’” says Heaton. Theirs is a musical partnership that

PHOTO BY STACY KAGIWADA

Kristin Newborn performs with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

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works, and they’re already thinking about future collaborations before this album is even done. “It’d be cool, for the second KO album, for me to help out with songwriting and guitar [playing],” says Heaton. But they’ve still got to finish up this album first. “When I first demo’d these songs, I would be doing the percussion on my guitar with my thumb and it sounded like a djembe,” says Newborn. “When Todd came, we formed this grungy, but still soulful, sound. When we first started playing out, someone said, ‘Hey, you’re afro-grunge.’ I think it fits. I do have a soulful voice, and I’m inspired by a lot of African-style vocals; but Todd brings this hardness to it.” The genre name might be a mouthful, but the songs are really quite simple. “We’re minimalists,” says Newborn. “We’re really into a stripped-down sound. It’s completely the opposite of Slothpop, which I felt like was a very full band, over-the-top and very emotional. KO is more playful.” The recording process was smooth; Heaton’s drum parts fleshed out the tracks naturally. “With the drums, it was easy to come to a conclusion with how the songs should be and how the feeling should be,” says

PHOTO BY BYRAN MOORE

Kristin Newborn performing with KO.

Newborn. “We’ve considered [adding someone else to the band], but for right now, it’s really fun just the two of us.” Heaton hasn’t paused his solo project; in fact, he’s planning on completing a new Street Spirits album by the end of March. But it’s got something in common with KO’s upcoming release: simplicity. “You don’t have to say a whole lot for people to understand,” says Heatonn “In music, there’s a lot of people that have a lot of lyrics trying to get a point across … but in actuality I think there’s a genius in taking complex ideas and breaking them down into a simple platform.”

I’m at the DO317 Lounge. It’s July, and the cozy spot in the Murphy Building is just a few months old. The hallways are buzzing with gallery goers packing the rooms for First Friday, but all is quiet inside our space. After setting up, Heaton and Newborn launch into “I Will Run When It’s Dark” (available for listening on MusicalFamilyTree.net) and I’m entranced. Just a few months after the announcement from Newborn that Slothpop is no more, this completely independently written batch of songs is already sounding years old. “We’ve been having a lot of really neat opportunities [in Indy],” says Newborn. “And it’s hard to consider living in another place. There’s so many good things happening for us. … I think that there are so many talented musicians here.” Spaces like the Murphy Building and promoters likes MOKB Presents have been welcoming to them; in fact, KO just wrapped an opening slot for ‘90s pop dreamboats Sixpence None the Richer. Speaking of throwbacks, we spent time thinking back on those first shows Newborn saw when she moved back to Indianapolis. She remembers being impressed by Christian Taylor and Jorma Whittaker. She’s still impressed by the wealth of what she calls “secret musicians” in Indy — people she didn’t know were talented, prolific artists who pop up at venues regularly.

I’m alone in my apartment, cueing up KO’s newest collection of songs on my computer and sinking into my couch. The mastering process for Goldengal is about 50 percent done – they holed up to record once again at Queensize Studios, where Slothpop was recorded – and Newborn’s let me hear a few of her newest tunes. I cue up “Goldengal,” the title track, which starts with a slow, steady beat from Heaton and easy guitar riffing from Newborn. Thirty seconds in, the guitar spins and layers, leading in a vocal harmony and looping vocal tracks with Newborn’s tranced-out rock scatting, a chorus of da-DATs and dum-dats. It’s gorgeous, and I can’t wait to hear more. “Goldengal is a real person,” says Newborn. “I was trying to reach this person in some way; I think when you’re with someone for so long, you can fall into these habits where you feel like you become further and further away. … I don’t think this person knows the album is named after them, which I think is fine.” A collection of formidable Indy talents guest on the record; this includes Heaton, of course, but also the collective talents of Derek Johnson (Johnsongs) and Leilah Smith (Homeschool). But the songs were written solo. “I started composing songs right after I was done with Slothpop. It was natural – I was getting used to playing by myself and experimenting with pedals and playing more guitar.” Listening to “Goldengal,” I’m struck again by the sheer beauty and resonance of Newborn’s songwriting. Her music seems devoid of place or time, and her voice transcends trappings of genre and venue. From basements to the Hilbert Circle Theatre; spaces large and small are perfectly suited for KO. “That’s the awesome thing about KO. We can play in a basement, she can play at the ISO, we can play in a club — and it just works,” says Heaton. “The magic of KO is that it’s really versatile and unique, but open to everybody.” Like she said, they’re all over the place. „ NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // COVER STORY 15

OPENING DURUFLE’S REQUIEM

Butler University • March 23, 8 p.m., free Retiring professor Henry Leck, who has taught at Butler for 24 years will conduct his final concert this Saturday, leading Butler groups in Maurice Durufle’s 1947 Requiem. The first half of the show will feature a piece by Butler student Mike Henson, Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in D-flat Major and four short Durufle motets.

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Musical Arts Center, Bloomington • March 22 and 23 Three pieces collected under the title “Old World New World,” including Bournonville Suite (choreographed by August Bournonville), and two by Ballachine: The Four Temperaments (with music by Paul Hindemith) and Western Symphony (based on traditional American melodies). ISO: BEETHOVEN’S FIFTH Hilbert Circle Theatre March 22 and 23, 8 p.m.

COMEDIAN BILL BURR Egyptian Room at Old National Centre March 22, 8 p.m. (see pg. 3)

ONGOING DANCE KALEIDOSCOPE: PIAF PLUS Indiana Repertory Theatre Through March 24 w Interweaving pizzazz with introspection, DK dancers zip through ten songs by Jacques Brel and 12 by Edith Piaf, presenting each as a mini-drama. The standout during opening night was Piaf’s “Mon Dieu” [My God], a plea for more time with a dying lover. Jillian Godwin and Zach Young bring pathos and hopefulness to the song, zooming in from the universal to the personal. George Salinas, who left DK last year, had become so linked to the role of Brel’s highjumping, in-your-face “Jackie,” but Zach Young makes the character his own, bringing different insights and a different quality of bravado. With nuanced changes from previous performances, the double bill throughout emphasizes intricate footwork and powerful emotional connection. — Rita Kohn ECLECTICPOND: JULIUS CAESAR Irvington Lodge March 22, 23, 29 and 30 at 7:30 p.m.; March 24 at 5:30 p.m. t EclecticPond discovers original and thought-provoking aspects of Caesar via gender reversed casting, but the play feels constrained by its modern corporate office setting, which isn’t big enough for a Roman empire erupting into war. A dangerously alluring Joanna Winston finds unexpected moments of intensity and levity as Cassius. Still, Caesar offers the highest production values seen to date from EclecticPond. — Katelyn Coyne THE WHIPPING MAN Indiana Repertory Theatre Through March 24 q David Alan Anderson, at turns gentle and formidable as a recently freed slave, anchors the three-man cast of The Whipping Man, a 2006 play about two freed slaves and the son of their former master spending Passover together during the final year of the Civil War. THE LYONS Phoenix Theatre Through March 31 q A portrait of a dysfunctional family featuring vibrant dialogue and lively characters, skillfully directed by William Fisher, Diane Kondrat is marvelous, heartfelt and funny as an aging matriarch and Chales Goad disappears into the role of the terminally ill father and husband determined to torture his family to the bitter end. TWELFTH NIGHT Wheeler Arts Community Center March 21-24

RABBIT HOLE Theatre Non Nobis Through March 29

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A preliminary artist’s rendering of the Fringe on Wheels truck.

TODAY’S SPECIAL? TRAGEDY

Fringe on Wheels could rev up this summer B Y S TA CEY M I CK EL BA RT EDITORS@NUVO.NET

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he IndyFringe Theatre Festival has been a highlight of the city’s annual cultural calendar for the past eight years. But IndyFringe has been on a quest in recent years to become known as a year-round organization — through programming at its theater and soon, if all goes according to plan, via Fringe on Wheels. Described as the love child of a food truck and traveling circus, the Fringe on Wheels will serve as a mobile mini-fringe festival anytime, anywhere, explains IndyFringe Executive Director Pauline Moffat: “What we want is a vehicle that is easy to fit in spaces where other people can’t go. It’s self-contained, a traveling billboard for us, and can accommodate enough performances to make it like a traveling circus.” The truck would serve as a mobile stage for performers of all types, explains Pat McCarney, the organization’s technical director: “We’re planning it so that it will take us a manner of minutes to get a stage and lighting set up. We want to appeal to all types of performers, from

people who do stage work and plays to musicians to magicians and jugglers, circus performers, poets—even visual artists who want to teach classes.” The truck’s easy set up would allow IndyFringe to serve many different communities. It could act as a home base when the organization takes street theatre and buskers downtown to Georgia Street (as it did during the 2012 Super Bowl), entertain crowds outside the Palladium at Carmel’s Center for the Performing Arts, and take the flavor of the fringe to other local festivals around Indiana. Moffat had the idea for the truck after seeing a similar fringe caravan used by the Adelaide Fringe Festival in Australia. After attending a meeting of the Indiana State Festivals Association, she could see there was high demand for artists at festivals throughout the state. She sees Fringe on Wheels as a cost-effective way to bring such performances to other communities. IndyFringe will program artists for the truck, and several local artists have already pledged to develop performances for the Fringe on Wheels. The truck can also serve as a scouting tool, according to McCarney. All Fringe on Wheels performances will be a fee-for-service arrangement, with IndyFringe paying the artists. The truck will also serve as an ambassador for the organization and can be used as a mobile ticket office. IndyFringe is in the midst of a $10,000

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IndyCar engineer Lee Dykstra is helping Indy Fringe to engineer the Fringe on Wheels truck.

fundraising campaign to purchase the truck, and would like to have it in operation by this summer. The current sketches of the truck are conceptual; the organization will sponsor a design competition to determine the final artwork for the outside of the vehicle. IndyFringe has also recruited IndyCar engineer Lee Dykstra as a volunteer to help ensure that the Fringe on Wheels is reliable and functional. Moffat is excited about what Fringe on Wheels could bring to Indianapolis. “The truck is the beginning of what could become a busker’s city,” she says. “Pat coined a wonderful phrase: ‘Every street deserves a festival.’” „

ONGOING KNIFE FIGHT: BROCK FORRER AND ADAM WOLLENBERG w TWO THIRDS GALLERY THROUGH MARCH 29 A spectacular grouping of solo and collaborative art from two of Herron’s most exciting printmakers, soon-to-be graduate Forrer and recent graduate Wollenberg. Both artists have aggressive, distinctive styles. Forrer is known for his bold images of shack-like structures and odd characters. Wollenberg’s ongoing apprenticeship as a tattoo artist is evident; he’s always been fascinated with feathers and arrows, and they combine well with the knives, axes and bones that he introduces with this exhibition. The show has an overwhelming sense of doom and dread, but also an exuberance that renders it ambivalent. — Charles Fox

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SPARK FISHING: JUSTIN COOPER e MONSTER GALLERY THROUGH MARCH 28 (BY APPT ONLY) As thoughtful and realized a show as one has come to expect from Cooper. Cooper employs both large, unstretched canvases and smaller, gold leaf-laden panels. His use of negative space is well considered, and his effective compositions are neither busy nor sparse. The reintroduction of humans into his art is welcome; female figures are prominent within this body of work (with especially stunning impact in “Collector”). Despite depicting the search for energy, the net effect of Spark Fishing is to leave the viewer with a feeling of peace. — Charles Fox LINDA ADELE GOODINE AND KYLE CHANNING SMITH r HARRISON CENTER FOR THE ARTS THROUGH MARCH 29 Herron Prof Goodine and her student Smith combine their talents. Goodine’s large-format photographs explore mythology, history and the concept of emerging womanhood against the backdrop of the near Northside. In “Antoinette,” a young woman — seemingly unafraid of getting her head chopped off — sunbathes on a strip of rococo wallpaper on a snow-covered suburban landscape. The magical and the everyday mingle in her evocative photos. Kyle Channing Smith’s work is more quotidian: Her video “I’d Invite You, But You’d Just Stand Around Looking Awkward” features Smith acting out an endless, looping series of verbal pauses. — Dan Grossman RECYCLE PARTS t STUTZ ART GALLERY THROUGH MARCH 29 Salvaged bike parts become photos, painting and sculpture. Birds are a recurring motif: two bike seats become ears for a whimsical owl in a sculpture by Catherine Cunningham. ECO-LOGIC r SPACECAMP MICROGALLERY THROUGH MARCH 29 Four artists playfully blur the lines between natural and artificial. Notable are Caleb Charland’s impeccably composed photographs showing apples and potatoes powering LED lights. GRAPHITE w INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART THROUGH JUNE 2 The fourth most abundant element in the universe, employed by a range of contemporary artists in innovative ways. Including Robert Longo’s drawings of iconic artworks and Kim Jones’s massive, playful “Untitled (War Drawing).”

PERRY RILEY JR. Dewclaw Gallery through March 23 MATT HUTTON AND CORY ROBINSON Gallery 924 through March 29 MIKE ALLEE: SELECTIONS FROM A HUMAN CIRCUS Indy Indie Art Gallery through March 31

OWEN MUNDY Herron School of Art and Design through April 13 STEELE CONCEALED Indiana State Museum through April 22 THOMAS MUELLER Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center March 25-May 12

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Christina Blanch in two incarnations: as the teacher of a classroom full of superheroes in an illustration by Justin Wasson and in human form alongside comic legend Stan Lee.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO LOIS LANE? BSU offers online course on gender in comics BY ROBERT ANNIS EDITORS@NUVO.NET

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all State professor Christina Blanch spent her formative years spinning in a circle, trying to transform into Wonder Woman. Although she didn’t magically become a crime-fighting Amazonian princess, she did gain a life-long love of comics. This April, Blanch will bring that appreciation to the Internet, teaching a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on gender in comics. The six-week class begins April 2, and so far, more than 5,000 people — a mix of comic fans and academics — have signed up for the class. The reading list will be a grabbag of classic superhero titles like Action Comics and Captain Marvel, and other, lessconventional fare, such as Terry Moore’s Strangers in Paradise and Y: The Last Man. Comic book creators and icons such as Gail Simone, Mark Waid and acclaimed Batman writer Scott Snyder agreed to be interviewed for the class. All the reading materials for the class are available on the Comixology app at a reduced price. Blanch estimates the class will eat about three to five hours a week, culminating in the students creating their own comics. Ball State senior and self-confessed feminist nerd Valerie Sizemore disagrees with some academics who might argue that comic books are too “low-brow” for the classroom. “It’s possible to couple gender theory with comics to create a fruitful and intelligent conversation,” Sizemore said. “Studying

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GENDER THROUGH COMIC BOOKS

A MASSIVE OPEN ONLINE COURSE OFFERED THROUGH BALL STATE UNIVERSITY TAUGHT BY CHRISTINA BLANCH APRIL 2-MAY 11 ON CANVAS.NET

works by writers like Shakespeare, Joyce, or Emerson are important, but with the right professor and the right questions, comics can be just as valuable learning tools. Our class proved this true on a daily basis.” Gender has been a thorny role in comics over the years. Superman was the first superhero in comics, and Lois Lane the first popular female character. When she was created in 1938, Lois was a tough-asnails reporter, fighting Clark Kent for the big stories. But in the 1950s, she turned into “a simpering crybaby,” as society tried to force women back into the home. Instead of coming up with angles for her next Pulitzer Prize-winning article, Lois was dreaming up harebrained schemes to capture the Man of Steel’s affections. Blanch had hoped to use a copy of Superman’s Girlfriend Lois Lane featuring Superman and Batman playing horrible pranks to dissuade Lois, but the issue wasn’t available on Comixology. Sizemore, who took the class last semester for credit, discovered one of her favorite new characters from the assigned reading material. “We had to read Batwoman: Elegy by Greg Rucka, and I immediately latched onto her,” Sizemore said. “Not only is she this tough, intelligent, and strong woman, she’s an LGBTQ character whose existence doesn’t revolve around the fact that she’s a lesbian. Her sexuality has an effect on

her life, of course, but it isn’t her driving characteristic. It’s refreshing because you don’t often get to see queer characters this nuanced, let alone that are women.” Batwoman is in stark contrast with too many oversexed depictions of female superheroes that are all-too common in comics. Adding insult to injury, female heroes, already barely clad in skimpy costumes – Who would really fight crime in essentially a swimsuit and high-heeled boots ? — are drawn in ridiculous, bodycontorting poses that no woman with a spine could accomplish. That’s why fans started the Hawkeye Initiative website, which replaces the superheroine with the Avenging Archer in the same pose. The site is the focus of one of Blanch’s lectures. “I think it’s great, really funny,” Blanch said. “I don’t mind women being sexy – or men, for that matter – but some of the poses just make you go, ‘really?’ It’s opened some eyes. You might not think it’s that bad, but then you stop and really look at it (in a different context).” Blanch praised Marvel Comics recent decision to revamp the Ms. Marvel character, renaming her Captain Marvel and giving her a new, less revealing costume. Blanch spoke with writer Kelly Sue DeConnick, and said the reason for the switch was fairly simple – DeConnick knew she would be writing a funeral scene in the new comic, and “who goes to a funeral with their butt cheeks hanging out?” Blanch said. “Comics are getting better,” Blanch said. “Some things are never going away and that’s fine … but let’s not use women just to advance the men’s stories.”„

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LITERARY BUFFOONERY

ROBERT REBEIN: DRAGGING WYATT EARP BOOKMAMAS • MARCH 22, 6 P.M. Irvington-based author (and IUPUI prof) Rebein’s new book, Dragging Wyatt Earp: A Personal History of Dodge City, called “an affecting memoir of life in small-town Kansas” by Kirkus Reviews and published by Ohio University Press imprint Swallow Books, will launch Friday at Bookmama’s with a reading by the author. A sample quote: “The idea of the artist as renegade and rebel, as someone who marched to the beat of his own drum, a professional in every sense but bound to no man, answerable only to his art and his own internal agenda—the salvage yard was where that intoxicating idea first blossomed into life for me.”

Vouched Books has a good read for you BY JO SEPH F IT Z P A T R IC K EDITORS@NU VO . N ET

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iction in jeans. Poetry drinking a High Life. Christopher Newgent says he “wanted to create a space where people could yell about books,” with the idea of purchasing books from small press publishers — overlooked books not getting the attention they deserve — and marketing them. His aim was simple: “Exposing people to literature that they might not have seen elsewhere, didn’t have the opportunity to see elsewhere — to give people an excuse to hang out, drink beer, talk about literature and books.” More than two years later, his Vouched Books has chiseled its way into the Indy arts and literary scene as both a pop-up store and organizer of events — including readings in its Vouched Presents series, which will present a couple authors, Michael Nye and Andrew Scott, on March 23 at Indy Reads Books. At one event, visitors to the Vouched table got to take home an original poem typed on an old-fashioned typewriter right in front of them. An event Vouched hosted around the time of last year’s election pitted two published authors head-to-head to debate the prevailing literary issues of the day. For Newgent, who considers himself “somewhat of a hooligan” and a fan of “literary buffoonery,” his efforts are about “just having fun with books.” But he isn’t in it just to goof around. In part, it’s about balancing the scales: “In high school and mostly through college too, you have to read a bunch of dead white guys.” He points to the vast overrepresentation of male writers in syllabi and short-story compilations, and says he strives to diversify the selections on his table, to represent women and men equally. Newgent thinks that his attempts to get behind particular books and authors — and make a case for why they really should be read — are part of the reason why people tell Newgent that they’d never read for fun before they bought and read a Vouched offering. That sort of approach might work with young readers: Newgent says teachers have approached him after readings to ask him to visit their classrooms.

VOUCHED RECOMMENDS : According to Vouched founder Christopher Newgent When All Our Days Are Numbered by Sasha Fletcher One of the first books on the table, and a book I’ve not been able to replace in three years. A “novella in verse” that borders on the surreal, as the narrator often can’t distinguish between his dream life and real life.

IF THESE WALLS COULD TELL Indiana Landmarks Center • March 22, 8 p.m.; $10 advance, $15 door An initiative of Storytelling Arts of Indiana and Indiana Landmarks, If These Walls Could Tell charges a Hoosier writer with developing a story about an Indiana landmark of particular historical or cultural resonance (that may or may not be literally haunted, depending on your sympathy for such extra-sensory interpretations). This year’s Walls Could Tell storyteller is Rocky Ripple native and Storytelling Arts co-founder Bob Sanders, who will present a story on the Lerner Theatre in Elkhart.

FAHRENHEIT 3/23: CELEBRATING RAY BRADBURY The nation’s first center for the study of Ray Bradbury has a good deal of programming planned for this weekend, starting at 7 p.m. on March 22 at Indy Reads Books with a talk by center director Jon Eller on Bradbury’s 1950 breakthrough collection, The Martian Chronicles. The celebration decamps March 23 for the Indianapolis Public Library’s Irvington Branch for three events: a 10:30 a.m. talk by on Eller on the center; a 2 p.m. discussion of Fahrenheit 451 moderated by Eller; and a 5:30 p.m. screening of the 1966 film adaption of Fahrenheit 451. All events are free.

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Christopher Newgent

Ayiti by Roxane Gay The Haitian American Roxane Gay stockpiled this collection of short stories about Haiti. Featuring characters that are halves of broken islands clutching to whatever it is that might make them whole again.

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M A R C H 2 3 , 7 P . M . A T I N D Y R EA D S BO O KS FEATURING MICHAEL NYE (AUTHOR OF STRATEGIES AGAINST EXTINCTION, MANAGING EDITOR OF THE MISSOURI REVIEW) AND ANDREW SCOTT (AUTHOR OF NAKED SUMMER, SENIOR EDITOR AT ENGINE BOOKS)

If I Falter at the Gallows by Edward Mullany This is the last book I read through in one full sitting. Mullany’s collection of poems, most no more than 20 or so words long, gathers together life’s absurdity in short bursts of humor or longing or both.

How to Predict the Weather by Aaron Burch You never know what world you might inhabit in any given story by Burch — whether this world, or one where wine stains can become birthmarks, hands can become birds that wish to fly off from the wrist, or overcast days can grow from jars of clouds.

The Chronology of Water by Lidia Yuknavitch A memoir just short of drowning, Yuknavitch pulls us under in this book of screamsong and joy, starting from a life of anger, drugs, and swimming with Ken Kesey, then moving to her now-life as an artist, writer, wife, and mother.

VOUCHED CAN BE FOUND… ...in the most surprising places, whether they’re supposed to be there or not. But here are a few spots you can almost always find the table (in either digital or corporeal form). First Fridays in Fountain Square: The new First Friday home base for Vouched is the Wheeler Arts Community in Fountain Square. And once the weather warms up, there’s a good chance you’ll find them on a sidewalk somewhere after the Wheeler closes for the night. WordLab at Indy Reads Books: The table can be found at Indy Reads on the first Monday of each month (from 7 p.m.) during WordLab, a meet-up and workshop for local writers with an emphasis on experimentation. Vouchedbooks.com: The Vouched website offers a constant stream of book reviews, author interviews and updates on Vouched events and activities. „

BUTLER DIVERSITY SERIES: MAYA ANGELOU Clowes Memorial Hall • March 26, 7:30 p.m. Does my sassiness upset you? / Why are you beset with gloom? / ‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells / Pumping in my living room … You may shoot me with your words / You may cut me with your eyes / You may kill me with your hatefulness / But still, like air, I’ll rise. KRZYSZTOF URBANSKI: THE VISION OF A YOUNG CONDUCTOR Marian University Theatre • March 27, 7 p.m. As far as we can tell, the vision of the ISO’s 30-yearold music director is unaided by corrective lenses — or, for the most part, by the use of a score on the lectern. Urbanski will presumably address more serious concerns of vision and purpose in an installment of Marian’s Global Studies Speakers Series. Free registration suggested at marian.edu. LAURETTE MCCARTHY: THE ARMORY SHOW March 27, 6 p.m. at Herron School of Art and Design Independent scholar and curator Lauren McCarthy will stop by Herron Tuesday to talk about the Armory Show, the 1913 exhibition at New York City’s 69th Regiment Armory that purportedly kicked off visual art’s modern era in the States. McCarthy’s new book, Walter Pach: The Armory Show and the Untold Story of Modern Art in America, focuses on one of the show’s organizers, a polyglottic champion of modern art who was a key translator of European ideas and movements for an American audience (and vice versa).

N NUVO.NET • IF THESE WALLS COULD TELL review by Rita Kohn • REVISIT OUR 2012 PROFILE OF “MIGHTY MAESTRO” KRZYSZTOF URBANSKI NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // ARTS 19

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FLIGHT BEHAVIOR

Kingsolver’s new one begins process of grieving for natural world S H A W N D RA MILLE R E D I T O R S @ N U V O.NET

“Where will they go from here? … Into a whole new earth. Different from the one that has always supported them. In the manner to which we have all grown accustomed.” Barbara Kingsolver’s latest novel, Flight Behavior, is a frightening, hilarious, heartbreaking, compelling read. A scarring read. It’s an elegy to the beauty of the familiar world, the world that is soon to be a thing of the past. Kingsolver invites us to begin the process of grieving, embodying that lost beauty in the form of the monarch butterfly, whose migration traverses the length of North America in waves, each generation taking one turn more in a timeless dance from Canada to Mexico and back again. Except that now, their winter grounds are growing uninhabitable, and Kingsolver sets the entirety of the monarch’s overwintering colonies in the Appalachian woods behind the house of her main character, Dellarobia Turnbow, a 28-year-old mother of two young children. The butterflies can move higher up the mountain as their habitat shrinks, but they can’t move beyond the mountain’s peak to resume their annual migration pattern. “They can’t levitate,” says Ovid Byron, an entomologist studying the situation in Dellarobia’s backyard, in one of many painful scenes. Though the story is fictional — and no monarchs have yet wintered in Appalachia — the biological framework is devastatingly true. Mudslide in Mexico, check. Habitat loss, check. Massive die-off of species, check. Terrifying trajectory, check.

Burning up with fever Dellarobia likens our earth home to a febrile child: She is burning up with fever, and no amount of washcloths applied to her forehead is going to help that now. Reading the opening chapters, you’re smacked in the face with weather wackiness mirroring real life. Kingsolver makes you feel the defeated sogginess of an Appalachian town that’s been socked in by an abnormal amount of rainfall for months. It’s the kind of rain that makes ancient trees pull out of the ground and fall over, giving up the ghost for too much of a good thing. And that’s just the beginning. Read on to absorb the visceral impact of the planet’s heating — moisture pulled into the air 20 // ARTS // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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and dumped down in torrents and “freak” snowstorms, in intensified weather events taking place all over the globe. Absorb the fact that this is not really weather at all, but climate change made manifest. If you’re like me, dread might settle into your belly as you think of the powerlessness you felt watching your garden shrivel two summers running under extreme heat. The futility of praying for rain on the second bone dry month, the third. Remembering the dawning of a truth: This isn’t about inconvenience anymore. It’s about the food we eat, the biosystems we depend on, breaking down. When Dellarobia is first confronted with the fact that, carbonwise, we are now well over the limit of atmospheric parts per million that scientists say allow it to maintain thermal stability, she asks, “Why hasn’t everything blown up?” Ovid responds, in essence, look around. Wildfires. Superstorms. Drought. The canary is dead, he later informs a clueless CNN reporter.

No soul left in it Can we survive without a certain species of butterfly, or the other 30 percent of the world’s animals and plants estimated to be on a path to extinction in this century? Perhaps. Theoretically. But as Ovid says, what is the use of saving a planet that has no soul left in it? And, as Ovid also notes, a few degrees will be enough to take our kind out of the running. I recommend keeping another book at your fingertips to follow Flight Behavior. Take the good medicine of Joanna Macy and Chris Johnstone’s Active Hope: How to Face the Mess We’re in Without Going Crazy. It’s the antidote to defeatism. It embraces full expression of the pain and fear and outrage we feel at the destruction of our beloved home. And then says, let’s get to work. „

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Paul Weitz directs Tina Fey and Paul Rudd in a romantic comedy you could probably write the screenplay for, but no one will listen to you because you are stranded in Indiana. (PG-13)

THE CROODS

Early reviews for this animated film aren’t too bad, especially when you consider Nicolas Cage stars (in disembodied form). Other voices include Emma Stone and Ryan Reynolds. (PG)

INAPPROPRIATE COMEDY

A bizarre cast includes Lindsay Lohan, Rob Schneider and Adrien Brody in this oddly entitled comedy. After all, why go to the theater when you can just download the app? (R)

RECOMMENDED SIDE EFFECTS e Soon to disappear from local screens, Steven Soderbergh’s purported last film is one helluva a twisty yarn, not so much a tirade against big pharm, as it is another example of Soderbergh’s comfort in any genre. Perhaps he can come back from retirement and direct InAPPropriate Comedy 2? Rooney Mara and Jude Law star. (R)

STOKER t Are you in the mood for weird? Stoker, the first Englishlanguage film from Oldboy director Park Chan-wook, works mightily on establishing a weird, creepy atmosphere and making it the main attraction. Mia Wasikowska stars. (R)

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Morgan Freeman’s withering stare wilts hearts and minds in Olympus Has Fallen.

A ROLLERCOASTER OF CLICHES

Morgan Freeman exceeds term limit in Olympus Has Fallen B Y ED JO H NSO N- O T T

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lympus Has Fallen is Die Hard in the White House. Minus the personality. And the wit. And the perfect casting. Have I lowered your expectations sufficiently? The action flick from Training Day director Antoine Fuqua is structured like a shoot-‘em-up video game, with extra dollops of torture. How sophisticated is Olympus Has Fallen? The hero is named Mike Banning and the villain is called Kang. Mike Banning versus Kang — maybe I should have described the film as Jonny Quest in the White House. Here’s the thing, though. The damned movie is entertaining. Watching an impressive cast riding a rollercoaster of dumb-ass clichés is not the worst way to spend a couple of hours. God knows there are plenty of high-quality action flicks available for home viewing, but if you’re in the mood to go to the theater and not think, Olympus Has Fallen just might be for you. If you’re reading this

review three months from now, however, and considered watching this on home video, don’t. With so many good action movies at your disposal, you shouldn’t waste your time on a glorified video game with a happening cast. The story: When a traffic accident leaves the White House limo dangling off a bridge, Secret Service agent Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) manages to save President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart), but First Lady Margaret (Ashley Judd) plunges to her death in the river below. Cut to months later, when Banning has a new job away from the White House and out of the president’s sight. Thus concludes the character development of hero Mike Banning. The character development for President Asher is even simpler, by the way. He mourns his wife and loves his son Connor (Finley Jacobsen). And he’s square-jawed. That’s it. Enter a delegation from South Korea, at the White House to discuss the ongoing threat from North Korea. But wait, turns out the delegation has been infiltrated by terrorists led by Kang (Rick Yune). All hell breaks loose as the president and his staff (including valiant Melissa Leo) gets kidnapped and the military assault on the White House begins. Luckily, the window of Mike

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(R) y W I D E R ELEA S E

Banning’s office looks out on the invasion site, giving Banning the chance to use his mutant powers - er, make thatSecret Service training - to rescue the president and stop the invading forces. Meanwhile, Secretary of State Trumbull (Morgan Freeman) is now Acting President (but really, isn’t Freeman always Acting President?). His expert team includes Secret Service Director and voice-of-reason Lynn Jacobs (Angela Bassett) and General Edward Klegg (Robert Forster), the designated asshole for the good guys. Banning soon contacts them by phone and the “Die Hard” rip-off motif is complete. The quick-cut action is peppered with one-liners, but the lack of personality keeps the film from transcending its genre. Questions abound: Why focus so much on the missing son without suitably following up? Why cast Morgan Freeman as Acting President while allowing Aaron Eckhart to be so bland as the real one? Of course, Olympus Has Fallen is not a movie for questions, just quips and explosions. „

e Riveting documentary about the horrific murder of three little boys in small-town Arkansas and the terrible aftermath. Three teenagers were convicted of the crime – one of them confessed – but over the years the confession was recanted as coerced and the guilty verdicts contested. I can’t tell you how it all ends, but justice has never been more insane than it is here. At Landmark Keystone through March 21. (R)

FILM EVENTS SANGUIVOROUS The Toby • March 22, 7 p.m. The IMA kicks off a series of silent films with live musical accompaniment with a selection from well into the era of talkies: a 2011 film by Japanese director Naoki Yoshimoto about a young lady who discovers she’s a vampire. Percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani, making a return visit to the Toby, will accompany the film playing instruments of his own design. 7 p.m., $5 public, $3 members VINTAGE MOVIE NIGHT: HOUSE OF DANGER Garfield Park Arts Center • March 23, 7 p.m. Onslow Stevens stars in the kind of B thriller that he was pretty well known for back in the ‘30s. Tickets $4, refreshments $1 each. SUSHI: THE GLOBAL CATCH WITH FORTYFIVE DEGREES IndyFringe Basile Theatre • March 27, 6:30 p.m. Indy Film Fest is hooking up a movie and a restaurant for its Spring Film Series at IndyFringe Theatre, where a $20 ticket will get you a film screening, dinner and an adult beverage (all screenings are 21-and-over events). Sushi: The Global Catch tells of how sushi evolved from a simple, elegant street food sold almost exclusively in Japan to a world-wide favorite of stock brokers and poor reporters alike. FortyFive Degrees will offer sushi and sake.

N NUVO.NET Complete movie listings and times available at NUVO.NET NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // ARTS 21

BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

Beer Buzz’s St. Patrick’s Day included a stop at MacNivens after the ISO Pops ABBA concert featuring the outstanding RAJATON vocal ensemble. MacNivens’s growing lineup of taps is impressive. With an order of the tasty fries we sampled Sun King’s Foxy Jam Pants Pale Ale, Daredevil’s Lift Off IPA — and with a nod to the Irish — Three Floyd’s double IPA Brian Boru. Each is distinctive in its balance between malt and hops and each satisfying the taste treat you want. Admitting to my NY City roots, it was fun to close out with Brooklyn Brewery’s Dry Irish Stout — and watch basketball down to the wire. Belgian beer enthusiasts tasted, talked about and tried to influence each other’s votes for their favorites among 32 contenders during Kahn’s March 7-9 Battle of Belgium. Unibroue Don De Dieu was named champion, Rochefort 10 gained the runner-up berth, Rochefort 8 took third place and Chimay Blue fourth. These brews, along with 2012 BOB champ Leffe Brune and 2011 champ St. Bernardus Abt 12, are on special at Kahn’s Fine Wines and Liquors until March 20. Check out the keg refill opportunities at Bier Brewery — for more contact corbin@bierbrewery.com. Bier beer is now served at 17 restaurants and taverns in greater Indy, and the brewery’s expansion is almost complete. Upland Schwarz Black Lager received an award of excellence at the 2013 United States Beer Tasting Championship in ‘Best of the Midwest Dark Lager.’ Aurora, Ind.’s Great Crescent new canning line introduces Blond Ale in blue cans, IPA in green, Aurora Lager in yellow, Coconut Porter in tan and Dark Lager in deep red. Black cans feature special releases and seasonals.

EVENTS AMERICAN IDIOT TAPPING March 21, 6-9 p.m. at Flatwater Restaurant Sun King will tap its American Idiot IPA Thursday as a prelude to Broadway in Indianapolis’s presentation of the Green Day rawk-musical American Idiot at Clowes April 2-7. The specialty beer is described by brewers Dave Colt and Clay Robinson as “an intriguing journey of three American hops and their quest to satisfy your thirst.” Sun King and Broadway in Indy previously partnered on a lovely Vienna-style lager, the Million Dollar Brewski, in December 2011.

STREET FOOD SATURDAY March 23, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at Big Car Service Center The Indianapolis Vegetarian Society celebrates the annual Great American Meat-Out with a mini-food truck fest featuring meatless (some vegan) offerings from Nacho Mama, Scout’s and Taco Lassi. With door prizes and indoor seating.

N NUVO.NET • NUVO’S RESTAURANT DATABASE searchable by neighborhood and type and featuring a veritable smorgasboard of reviews, is always online at nuvo.net. 22 // ARTS // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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WHISKEY AND TACOS WITH MERLE Cincy’s Bakersfield Tacos expands to Mass Ave BY K A TY CA RTER EDITORS@NUVO.NET

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hen Cincinnati restaurateurs John and Joe Lanni opened the first Bakersfield Tacos, Tequila & Whiskey Bar in their city’s Over the Rhine neighborhood last year, they weren’t counting on the kind of success it’s had straight off the bat, both in business and culinary terms (it’s now rated the 2 Zagat restaurant in Cincinnati). But their concept — one that combines Mexican street food with the barrel liquors and country-pop of Bakersfield — has attracted an audience equally tempted by tacos and outlaws. Indy diners will have a chance to test the hype with the opening of a second installment of the restaurant on the south end of Mass Ave, in a location that housed Bazbeaux until that pizzeria moved across the street. The Lanni brothers aren’t new to the business. They own a small national chain (16 units) of “fast-casual” burrito restaurants called Currito (one franchise is located in Circle Centre), as well as the stand-alone Sohi Grilled Sandwiches in Oxford, Ohio. “Bakersfield is a passion project for us. We wanted to create a fun, upbeat bar and restaurant where people could let loose a little, have a good time, listen to really great tunes,” he told NUVO during an opening night party in early March. When he talks about “great tunes,” John refers to artists of the Bakersfield Sound era — Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Buck Owens, etc. — and more contemporary artists who have been influenced by them. “These guys were the first real rebels of their time — rock stars with a hillbilly country attitude,” he said. “They all sort of nested in Bakersfield, an agricultural town in southern California where Mexican food is indigenous.” While the connection between Mexican food and tequila might be obvious, whiskey is something of a unique addition to the equation. “Tequila bars have been done,” John said. “We wanted to incorporate bourbon and whiskey into the mix because of the regional importance of those liquors, with bourbon originating in Kentucky. It’s also what the Bakersfield Sound musicians were drinking, back in the day.” If guests waver on a decision between the more than 50 varieties each of bourbon and tequila available, a large poster of Johnny Cash holding a glass of whiskey might push them away from the tequila menu. Also served each night are rotating $3 shots of both liquors, along with $2 glass boots of PBR. A full bar is available for those who prefer other liquors, and rotating drafts will offer selections of local and national craft beers.

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Pollo verde, fish and pastor tacos at Bakersfield Tacos.

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The menu is described as street Mexican with a chef-driven flair. “We use premium ingredients, but are very affordable so people can eat here frequently,” John said, pointing out that every food item on the menu is priced under $10 and the menu was intentionally kept small. The lineup typically consists of eight tacos — including the fan favorite fish (crispy Mahi) and Pastor (marinated pork and picked red onions) — two tortas, two salads and chips with dips, including vegetarian options. Bakersfield’s guac — hand-cut with chunks of avocado, lime-forward and punchy — won a “Best Guacamole in Cincinnati” award from three publications last year. As for the choice of downtown Indianapolis for their second location, John said it just seemed like a wide-open mar-

ket: “Mass Ave didn’t have any Mexican on the street — we thought we’d be a good complement to all the other really great restaurants around the city.” The restaurant seats 110 people, with a room downstairs available for private parties, and is considered family-friendly until a rowdier late-night crowd arrives. He notes that the location was a huge selling point as well — they were attracted to the historic building, the look of exposed brick and the flexibility of the space after knocking down a few walls. “We are one part restaurant, one part bar and we opened up the space to blend the two,” he said. „

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MARCH MADNESS RESTAURANTS With the NCAA’s yearly men’s basketball extravaganza upon us, we wanted to point you in the direction of a few of Indy’s best places to catch the tournament’s games, grab some grub and a tasty brew. Alley Cat A hole-in-the-wall to beat all holein-the-walls, you can’t even get here without threading through Broad Ripple’s back alleys. Cheap drinks, good music and lots of pool playing, the Cat is the best place in the city to be at last call for a variety of reasons — not the least of which is you don’t have to go home alone. 6267 Carrollton Ave., 257-4036. Barley Island Restaurant & Brewhouse Taking its name from the 17th century room in an alehouse in which beer was consumed, Barley Island produces some of the state’s best beer and serves it in several convenient locations. Up north there’s the Old World pub house where we first fell in love with the brew. Barley Island has an emphasis on freshness – the beer is made from scratch as well as many of the food items. 639 Conner St., Noblesville, 770-5280. Broad Ripple Brewpub Not only does Broad Ripple Brewpub serve great beer, the food matches the quality, making for a great experience. Try the traditional, English-style cask ales for the real pub experience. Or maybe the Lawn Mower Pale Ale, a draft that is sure to quench your thirst during the hot summer months. Its great location by the Monon Trail means you can while away the time people-watching as they bicycle, roller-blade, saunter and walk their dogs up and down the trail. 840 E. 65th St., 253-2739. Brothers Bar & Grill This regional chain seems to have established itself as a popular destination for food, drinks and sports since opening up in Broad Ripple. Expect to find the usual bar food appetizers and Bud and Coors products on tap, with a few surprises, such as blackened salmon and tilapia, along with Bell’s and Peroni. 910 Broad Ripple Ave., 252-5530. Chatham Tap A great hangout for the Downtown crowd, and an ideal spot for a beer or a scotch and a snack after theater or before the dance clubs, Chatham Tap offers great drinks and nightly specials, as well as taps dedicated to local brews. The outdoor patio, adjacent to the Cultural Trail, can feel like the center of the universe. 719 Mass Ave., 917-8425.

MacNiven’s This addition to the Mass. Ave. pub scene offers some of the best pub food around, including great fish and chips, authentic neeps and tatties (turnips and potatoes), mince (well-braised beef) and one of the best burgers in the city – a huge, crisp disc you have to fold over to get on the bun. With an impressive selection of imported beers, including over 15 Scottish beers (many of them on tap), MacNiven’s atmospheric sound of clinking mugs raised in toasts sets the mood in this loud, raucous, and fun place to watch the game – even if it’s not soccer. 339 Mass Ave., 632-7268.

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The Alley Cat, rarely seen by daylight.

Dorman Street Saloon Located on the near east side of Indy’s downtown, all roads and trails lead to Dorman, one of the city’s oldest and hippest destinations. From the jukebox that always plays what you want to hear, to the mesmerizing trains that roll nearby while you’re sipping your PBR out back on the deck, Dorman’s got a magic feel to it. A pool table and a paucity of TVs round out the destinations attractions. 901 N. Dorman St., 237-9008. Flashbacks A destination for great food and special times, Flashbacks Family Bar & Grille boasts a traditional bar atmosphere, plenty of TV screens, and tables of all sizes to play host to your gathering. 6835 E. Southport Road, 215-4109. Kilroy’s Bar & Grill Enjoy the game by watching a wall full of TVs over one of their several drafts of domestic, import and craft beers. Have a bite out of one of their renowned stuffed breadsticks and savor any one of the daily drink specials while cheering on your favorite team. 201 South Meridian St., 638-9464.

BEST INDIAN CUISINE NOW OPEN DOWNTOWN For more information or to view our menu visit

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www.indiagardenindy.com To show our appreciation we offer the following coupons: (Broad Ripple location also accepts competitor’s coupons)

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The Tap Beer is what they do best at The Tap in Bloomington. You’ll find 50 beers on draft each day, rotated out routinely. The Tap’s many flat screens are always showing what’s happening in the world of sports. And even though there’s no kitchen at The Tap, they’re partnered with some of Bloomington’s finest eateries to bring the good stuff straight to your table. 101 N. College Ave., Bloomington, 812-287-8579. Thr3e Wise Men Brewery This venture by Scott Wise, of Scotty’s Brewhouse and Scotty’s Lakehouse fame is a terrific place to relax in front of the game for many Broad Ripple-ites. The feature at this location is a micro-brewery with seasonal brew made on-site. Growlers are available, as well as a menu of appetizing bar foods. 1021 Broad Ripple Ave., 255-5151. Twenty Tap This is another joint that takes some patience if you want a table, especially near the TVs in the bar section. Occupying the old Northside News space at 54th and College, this locally owned establishment perfectly fits its So-Bro neighborhood setting. Everything about this place, in fact, feels neighborhood-y, from its emphasis on locally brewed beer and locally sourced food. Beer can be purchased in pints, half-pints or flights. Sip and watch patrons play darts, as basketball plays on the TVs above the bar. 5406 N. College Ave., 602-8840.

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RYAN BINGHAM SHEDS BAND, LABEL Striking out alone into Tomorrowland BY K A TH ER INE C O P L E N KCOPL EN@NU VO . N ET

T

here aren’t a lot of people who can list “rodeo bull rider” and “Academy Award winner” side-by-side on their resume. But Ryan Bingham’s not an ordinary guy. He’s a folk rock road warrior who’s not road-weary. And he’s an award-winning songwriter who penned “The Weary Kind” after reading the script for 2009 country music movie Crazy Heart and realizing the characters from the movie’s plot didn’t stray too far from the characters in his own life. “Reading about “Bad” Blake, I thought that my father was very much like him,” says Bingham during an early March phone call. “A lot of his friends were like that [too], so I kind of grew up with those characters in my life from a very early age. … And I wrote the song not even really thinking about the film –– there wasn’t much expectations for me yet, because it was so early on.” The songwriting was less a pressurefilled experience than a career oddity that had Bingham in disbelief all the way up to his climb to the Academy Awards podium in 2010. “It was very surreal for somebody like me to get thrown into that world all of a sudden, to be a part of it,” says Bingham. “I was just having fun with it while it lasted; I didn’t feel all this sudden pressure of living up to anything. I’ve always thought that all I can be is myself. After years on the road and three full albums, Bingham parted ways with his long-time band and long-time label for the release of Tomorrowland. Nothing acrimonious with the band, just time for them to go their separate ways. “I’d been on the road with the band for almost ten years, and they dedicated a lot of time going on the road with me and playing these songs,” says Bingham. “None of us had much of a home life or any kind of normal life other than being on the road constantly and playing shows. We were tired and wanted a break. (One member) was getting married; another one (was opening a music venue).” The label was the same kind of story. Lost Highway Records was absorbed and broken down by Universal, and the employees Bingham had spent time with had been let go. It was time to go their separate ways. “The [people laid off] were the ones that mentioned to us, ‘You know, you guys could probably do this on your own.” It was a natural thing to do instead of finding another label.” So Axster Bingham Records was born, and the first release was Tomorrowland, a collection of solo songs. Tomorrowland

CALEB MCCOACH SONGS FROM AN EMPTY SHORE INSTORE RECORDINGS

e This month’s release of Songs From An Empty Shore from Indiana’s Caleb McCoach is an acoustic delight. When his honest, unpolished folk vocals mesh with the simplicity of the guitar, piano or soft snare drum accompaniment, the music begins to define itself in simple, repetitive melodies. Instead of heavy distortion and fuzz, his often stiff voice carries over soft instrumentation and delicate rhythms. Songs like “Some Men” showcase McCoach’s intimately experience-based songwriting. His songs are wrapped up in a struggle with identity and humanity, with an original sound that rests between anti-folk and pop. The most comprehensive example of the beautiful simplicity of McCoach’s writing is found in “Seaside Store,” where a simple slant on a childhood tonguetwister is transformed into a song about living in the present. A bohemian-hymnal quality surrounds each song on this album, and a listen all the way through is a journey through loneliness, loss and a resurfacing of hope. This ability to transform the mundane observations into passionate perceptions is where McCoach hits his stride as a songwriter, and where listeners should pay attention. –– JORDAN MARTICH

IN MEMORIUM: JASON MOLINA

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Ryan Bingham

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THE VOGUE, FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 6259 N. COLLEGE AVE., 8 P.M., $22 ADVANCE, $25 AT DOOR 21+ BULLEIT BOURBOR TASTING, BEGINS AT ALLEY CAT, 6267 CARROLLTON AVE., 6 P.M., $30 ADVANCE, $40 AT DOOR, 21+, FOUR DRINKS, CUSTOM FLASK, APPETIZERS

doesn’t stray too far from his Southwestern grit roots, and neither does Bingham. Although Bingham spent some time soaking up the glitz and glamour that comes with being an Academy Award winner, he looks back most fondly on his time as a young musician striking out in Texas. Growing up in New Mexico and West Texas, Bingham listened to a lot of Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark. He moved near Austin in the early 2000s, and found it a welcoming place for a musician trying to find his voice. “It’s such a melting pot for music,” says Bingham. “It’s really diverse; you have all the blues and zydeco; jazz comes up from Louisiana and the South; you have the mariachi and tehano stuff from Mexico and the Western swing and folk, songwriter, Woody

Guthrie stuff from Oklahoma.” And it’s a town that supports burgeoning talent by taking care of their beloved local musicians –– transplants or not. “There’s tons of programs that help musicians get health care; there’s all kinds of stuff,” says Bingham. “I don’t think I could have done it anywhere else. If I would have moved somewhere else at that age and tried to play music I don’t think I would have found that kind of support structure.” In the meantime, there’s more Oscarwinning music to listen to –– while discussing current musical tastes, Bingham tells me he’s been regularly listening to another Academy Award-winning musical release. “I’ve been listening to this Rodriguez record from the [2013 Oscar winning documentary] Searching for Sugarman,” he says. „ Bingham will join HoneyHoney for a show at the Vogue Friday to celebrate NUVO’s Spring Guide launch. Join us for a Bulleit Bourbon tasting at 6 p.m. at the Alley Cat before we move to three more bars. The tasting includes drinks at each location, a custom flask and appetizers.

The Indianapolis and Bloomington music communities –– and the rest of the world –– were saddened to learn of the untimely passing of longtime local musician Jason Molina, 39, who died in his home in Indianapolis Saturday, March 16. The force behind Songs: Ohia and later, Magnolia Electric Company, Molina was signed to Bloomington label Secretly Canadian and released the majority of his work on that imprint. “Jason is the cornerstone of Secretly Canadian,” said a statement released by the label. “Without him, there would be no us –– plain and simple.” Molina experienced a variety of health problems in recent years, including a years-long struggle with alcoholism that led his family to ask fans for financial support to his rehab. Memorial contributions are still being accepted. “I have not given up because you, my friends, have not given up on me. … Keep the lamps trimmed and burning,” Molina wrote in a note on the band’s site in May 2012. LOG ON TO NUVO.NET TO LISTEN TO A PLAYLIST OF TRACKS BY MOLINA.

NUVO.NET N ONLINE FEATURE: Kat talks SXSW 2013 Pink Floyd cover band challenge

SLIDESHOW: St. Paddy’s Day Revelry by Mark Lee KO performance shots by Bryan Moore NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // MUSIC 25

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BABA SALAH ON MUSICAL HEALING

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ven leaders and people who are at the center of conflicts can be touched by the message brought by music,” Baba Salah tells me. I was inquiring about whether he believed that musicians could play a role in bringing peace to the tense political situation unfolding in his native Mali in West Africa. Last year a group of Islamic militants took control of three major cities in the country’s north region, establishing strict enforcement of Islamic law and issuing a ban on all non-Islamic music –– a huge blow for a nation where music is a major international export. “I really felt for the musicians who were in the North at that time,” Salah says. “For a musician in Mali, music is the only way they have to earn a living and take care of their families. Many of them had to come south and of course we had to help them and share in their suffering. It is not easy now in the South either. As a result of the coup d’état and the war, business and investment has slowed, but we do what we can to support them because they have nowhere else to turn.” Salah says the situation is improving, though, “with the intervention of the French, our African neighbor, and the international community, many of the Islamists have scattered.” But he tells me there’s still work to do. “We need

a national reconciliation. The problem started with a particular group of Tuareg that created an alliance with the Jihadists. The population needs to understand that it was not all the Tuareg that revolted. The authorities need to educate the population so they do not confuse the rebels with the larger Tuareg and Arab communities.” This all happened at a time when Salah was preparing for his first major international release. But he isn’t letting the crisis slow him down –– his new LP, Dangay was released in January. For Salah, making music isn’t a choice. “There are things that we don’t consciously decide to do. Music is my passion. It’s something that comes from inside of me. It’s stronger than me,” he says. It’s a call Salah felt early in his life. “No one in my family was a musician; it was a gift. As a child I made my first drum set with cans and old hubcaps,” he remembers. “Later, I became very interested in the guitar. A big influence for me on the guitar was Douma Albarka Maiga. I saw him play and was very impressed. It was then that I decided to play guitar. But I could not approach him because he was grand, and I was just a child. I made my own guitar with wood, and used brake cables for strings and nails as tuning pegs.”

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

Salah would eventually master the instrument. In fact, last year Vanity Fair magazine dubbed Salah “the Jimi Hendrix of Africa.” It’s an apt comparison considering Malian music’s close relationship with American blues. I asked Salah about that connection. “The similarity is natural because we sing about our problems,” he says. “Our country is dry and there isn’t much rain. It’s a difficult environment, and we sing a lot about our pain and troubles. In a situation and environment like this you can’t just sing about partying and fun. In this kind of environment our songs are deep and melancholic. The enslaved Africans in the United States, because of their situation, had to express their suffering, too. This is the blues.” But Salah isn’t just singing the blues. “I’m aware of what music can contribute to humanity,” he tells me. “My greatest goal is to bring to the attention of Africans that we have a lot to do. I want to bring a consciousness to my brothers and sisters in Africa about the things that concern us. But not just Africa, what’s happening in Syria

for example, and what happened in Iraq, it’s hard to fathom. I just can’t believe that every day we have all these tragic deaths just because of power and greed.” That’s a tall order, but Salah says he’s confident in the role his music can play in reshaping society. “The music gets people’s attention. When Malians listen to music, they are relaxed, and they are concentrated on the message. In Mali, music is probably the best way for this message to be transmitted.” „

>> Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net

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MATTHEW HOUCK’S DARK GLOW Phosphorescent releases stunning new LP

B Y K A TH ER INE C O P L E N KCOPL EN@NU VO . N ET

I phoned up Matthew Houck –– the man behind Phosphorescent –– in late February at his place in Brooklyn, where he’s lived for six or seven years (he can’t remember). Houck was gearing up to begin a spring tour for the new album Muchacho, a hauntingly beautiful new collection of songs he wrote, mastered and produced completely solo. That’s not new for Houck, whose experimental indie folk is created largely solo. What is new is the parade of musicians that accompanied the recording –– more than 20 in all, who came in one by one to layer their instruments and voices over Muchacho’s 10 songs, which were conceptualized largely during a solo trip to Tulum, Mexico, a town along the Caribbean coast. You can hear that locale in Muchacho; I imagine crashing waves, the bright white sun, swaying palms in every track. This is an album that rewards multiple listens, and standout tracks “Muchacho’s Tune,” “Song for Zula” and “A Charm/A Blade” are addictive, with looping synths, horn choruses and muted, haunting guitar. Houck will return to Bloomington for the third time in five years for a show at The Bishop with Strand of Oaks on Thursday, March 28. NUVO: I’ve seen you twice –– both in Bloomington, where you’ll play again in a few weeks, once at the Waldron and once at Russian Recording. MATTHEW HOUCK: I remember that recording studio place; that was great. I don’t know if I have any pearls of wisdom to drop about Bloomington, but I have spent time there because of Secretly Canadian. I used to live in this town, Athens, Ga., and it seems like a similar kind of vibe. A nice little artistic enclave in sort of a other-type of state. NUVO: A dot of blue in a sea of red. So, let’s talk Muchacho. I love this album. I’ve been playing it over and over, making the people in my house a little crazy. It’s … so sad. HOUCK: It’s a bummer, I know. It’s a rough record. NUVO: It’s so beautiful and so sad. The first question I actually wrote down when I found out I was going to interview you was, “Are you OK?” HOUCK: [laughs] You know what, with a little bit of distance from the record, I’ve asked myself that same question. Yeah, I think I’m OK. But it’s a rough record and I’m kind of –– I listened to it maybe a few weeks ago. I hadn’t listened to it since I had finished it and I kind of got a little distance.

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little bit uninhabitable. I just got out, I wanted to get out of it and just write these songs. They had been starting organically, but I wasn’t able to work on them. So, I figured, [the trip] would be a dual purpose: getting out of town, getting away from my own life, trying to focus and do some writing and finish up these songs that were brewing.

HOUCK: It’s weird. In the past, I’ve always allowed the live band to be a separate thing from the recordings. To just let the songs be what they are for that given night, for whoever’s playing them. But for this record, I do think we’re going to be able to recreate the album. We played one show to test the waters a bit. It was at the old CBGB’s space. It’s going to be flexible; some of the dates are going to have a few more members than others. But I think we’re going to be able to recreate this record live. Minus the horns; I’m not bringing any horns out. The songs are sounding really full and rich. This is the first time I’m trying to be true to the versions on the records and bring them to the stage. And so far, it’s working! It’s sounding really, really good.

NUVO: I’ve actually been lucky enough to go [to Tulum] –– HOUCK: Oh, you know this place? NUVO: Yes, it’s so beautiful. I feel like I’m transported back every time I cue up this record. I feel the airiness and the physical beauty of that place. And a lot of your lyrics feel like you’re bringing the outside inside. How did the physical beauty of the space you were creating in affect your songwriting? HOUCK: I understand what you mean, because it’s a thing that I don’t know if you’re really conscious of what you’re doing while you’re doing it. You know, I can say for sure that being there while writing was definitely influencing the lyrics, but that stuff kind of happens subconsciously. I can say for sure that it wouldn’t have been written like that if I had been in my apartment –– well, I can’t say for certain, I guess. But that stuff happens –– it’s an ephemeral thing that happens behind the scenes in your mind. Hopefully, if you do your job right, you can sort of capture it. So I’m glad to hear it did that for you. It’s really good to hear. NUVO: You open and close the album with a sun invocation. Why did you choose to do that? HOUCK: That was something that was a conscious choice. It was a conscious decision to end it and start it that way rather than starting with a sunrise and ending with a sunset, which may have been the logical way. It seemed important to me to start it with an ascension and then end it with another ascension. It’s rising –– I call it a cone. It felt very much like that. Part of it is because the record is so bleak, so it’s [to say] it’s not all bleak. Maybe saying to myself or maybe to the listener, it was a conscious decision to focus on the light instead of the dark.

NUVO: I think “Muchacho’s Tune” is my favorite track on the record, I think. You told Spin you made this “in the middle of a freakout.” Can you tell me more about how the songs came together in that hut in Mexico?

NUVO: You tracked and mastered this yourself, and, I assume, wrote it all yourself. I know you’ve produced entire albums solo before –– I think Pride was like that. But on this one, you called on 20 different musicians to add parts. Tell me about the production and recording process.

HOUCK: The genesis [of the tracks] came together a little bit before that. I actually went down to Mexico to get away from my own life a little bit. My own life had become a

HOUCK: It was a bunch of folks! I had an idea to get a big, live thing together, but it didn’t work that way at all. Because of schedules and everyone being so busy, I ended up tracking this stuff

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SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Matthew Houck

“My own life had become a little bit uninhabitable.” — MATTHEW HOUCK by myself, when I came back to New York and set up the studio again. And then, I ended up bringing in each musician one at a time. There was a never a point when we were all playing together. The process was like a sculpture or painting or something. Everyone on the record, I had them basically for one day, which speaks to how good they all are. I am lucky to have found such an amazing crew of people. They all came in and were able to record everything in one day one at a time. Then I would take those tracks and work with them and spent a long time carving spaces for each instrument and, yes, building up the songs from various places. NUVO: That’s interesting that you refer to it as a sculpture –– I just heard this quote again the other day. Supposedly Michelangelo said something to the effect of, “David was always inside of the marble, and I knew he was, I just had to carve him out of it.” Thinking about the intricate pieces and layering that went into this record –– I’m thinking of the chorus on “A Charm/A Blade,” those horns and building that one by one. It doesn’t feel like something that was put together piece by piece, it feels like a full live group. That brings me to my next question –– how are you going to do this live?

NUVO: Spin described your words as exhibiting “lyrical nudity.” What do you think when you read things like that? HOUCK: I’m OK with most of it. Even from the very initial stages of doing this, I called this thing Phosphorescent as opposed to calling it Matthew Houck, you know? There’s an intrinsic layer of protection there. I know there’s a healthy mix of truth and fiction in this stuff. A lot of times, I’ll be really concerned about a line or a part of the song, and oddly enough, no one will ever mention it. But then people will be really affected or concerned about me personally [laughs] based on a lyric or something. And the funny thing is that [lyric] may be a toss-off line for me. I think there’s a healthy distance between the work and myself. I don’t sweat it too much, even though there’s a tendency with musicians and songwriters specifically, to put everything out like it’s your diary or something. And to some degree, it is, because you can’t escape your own thing. But I feel OK about that –– people can project whatever they want. I am a little bit jealous about filmmakers and authors of books –– I don’t think that people assume that it’s such a direct line to your personal life. I don’t think people watch a David Lynch movie –– Mulholland Drive or something –– and assume he’s a lesbian with amnesia. They’re not concerned about David Lynch. NUVO: I do worry a bit about David Lynch sometimes. HOUCK: Yeah, you might be right, maybe. You might be right. „

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WEDNESDAY ROCK The Ataris Anderson’s The Ataris have had more members than some pro hockey teams (19 at last count), but their 2003 gold album So Long, Astoria and its Don Henley cover hit “Boys of Summer” solidified the lineup on our minds. Guitarist and singer Kris Roe has spent parts of the last few years on an acoustic solo tour, but he’s back with the boys and coming to the Melody Inn. They’ll be accompanied by Indy punks of Up! Scumbag and Dan Vapid and the Cheats. Melody Inn, 3826 N.Illinois St. 9 p.m., $10, 21+ Clifford Ratliff Big Band Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Kopecky Family Band, Highland Reunion & Yearbook Committee Verve Nightclub, 21+ Wayne Hancock, Special Guests Radio Radio, 21+ Chevelle Egyptian Room, Old National Centre, all ages

THURSDAY ROCK Milo Greene, Kopecky Family Band, Plaid Dragon Milo Greene is a cinematic-pop quintet billed as “the next big thing,” behind the success of such groups. Cinematic is fitting –– the group released a short film called MODDISON in late 2012, filmed over five days in a cabin in California. Who is Milo Greene? He’s a fictitious booking agent the group created to seem more established in early gigging days. Radio Radio, 1119 Prospect St. 9 p.m., $12, 21+

The Abrams Brothers East Noble High School, all ages Kentucky Nightmare, Secondary Modern, Hank & Cupcakes, Sweet Poison Victim Melody Inn, 21+ Paul van Dyk The Vogue, 21+ Chris Cohen, Idiot Glee The Bishop, Qur’an Qur’an (Bloomington), 21+ DA sings Frank and Tony at Chef Joseph’s Connoisseur’s Room, 21+ Goldhouse, It’s All Happening Hoosier Dome, all ages

FRIDAY ROOTS Ryan Bingham, Honeyhoney The next show on your roots-rock radar should be Ryan Bingham. Bonus –– NUVO’s official Spring Guide launch is at this show, and we’re sponsoring a Bulleit bourbon tasting in Broad Ripple before starting at 6 p.m. at the Alley Cat and moving to three more locations. Log on to nuvo. net/streetteam for more info and turn to page 25 for our interview with Bingham, who plays bourbon-soaked, rough-voiced Americana. You may recognize him from the 2009 film Crazy Horse, for which he penned and performed the Academy Awardwinning song “The Weary Kind.” The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave , 8 p.m., $22 advance; $25 at door, 21+ Bulleit Bourbon Tasting Begins at Alley Cat, 6267 Carrollton Ave. 6 p.m., $30 advance, $40 at door, 21+ , Four drinks, custom flask, appetizers

COMEDY Bill Burr Bill Burr’s a funny dude –– and he’s funny all over the place. Burr tours for more than 300 dates a year, along with stops on late night shows and radio shows like The Bob and Tom Show. He also squeezes in weekly recordings of The Monday Morning Podcast; as an early podcast adopter, he’s often asked to guest by other comedians with podcasts. Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St. 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages ROCK Ash These Northern Ireland rock and roll legends just celebrated their 20th year together as a band –– can you believe that? Pick up A-Z, the definitive collection of the group’s newest release series: a single for every letter of the alphabet, all recorded in 2010. Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St. 9 p.m., 21+ The Abrams Brothers Kokomo High School, all ages Don Williams The Palladium, all ages Singlemothers with Male Bondage and Green Gold Hoosier Dome, all ages Gospel Jazz Experience hosted by Kenny Phelps Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Songwriter’s Circle Irving Theatre, all ages Greg Bates 8 Seconds Saloon., 21+ Lo Cor de la Plana Buskirk-Chumley Theater, Bloomington, all ages Galaxy Express, The Gitmos, Webcam Teenz Melody Inn, 21+ Simplified Rathskeller, 21+

SATURDAY ROCK Houndmouth This year has been good to Houndmouth thus far. They’re a Hoosier band with Louisville musical roots (since they hail from just across

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the river in New Albany). After being picked up by Rough Trade and setting off on their first headlining tour –– in fact, as I write this, they’re on their way back from their stop at SXSW –– and a few dates with the Alabama Shakes and Michael Kiwankua, it looks like 2013 will be the year the group breaks through. They deserve it; they’re rowdy and tight live, with shimmering keyboards and a trio of voices. MOKB was an early adopter and brings them back to Indy regularly. Don’t miss your chance to see them before they stop coming back to us so often. Radio Radio, 1119 Prospect St. 9 p.m., $10 advance, 21+

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HIP-HOP Rusty Redenbacher Album Release Indy hip-hop elder statesman Redenbacher releases his latest solo effort this Saturday at Daddy Real’s The Place, which happens to be the physical venue location of the label Rusty’s signed to currently. He’ll perform with The Native Sun, Echomaker, MC Sparkplug and DJ Ganzarell. Read our review online at NUVO.net Daddy Real’s The Place, 3855 E. 96th St., 8 p.m., all-ages

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SUNDAY The Secret State Beale St Live, 1+ Your 33 Black Angels Indy’s Jukebox, 21+ Richard Smith Clinic and Concert Arthur’s Music Store, all-ages Mr. Clit & The Pink Cigarettes, Ultrasphinx, Green Gold Melody Inn, 21+

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ROCK Scott Weiland, The Saw Doctors As I write this, the Stone Temple Pilots and former frontman Scott Weiland are fighting about whether Weiland is in or out of the band. (The Stone Temple Pilots issued a statement saying they “officially terminated Scott Weiland” and he responded that he could not be fired from a band he co-founded – conclusion: no one knows what’s going on.) Regardless, you can see Weiland flying Pilot-less and performing alongside The Saw Doctors. Egyptian Room, Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages Gentlemen, I Dream in Evergreen, Black Beacon, Black Cat Rebellion, Clayton Lewis Irving Theatre, all ages Bob Marley Tribute Party Madame Walker Theatre, 18+ Barbara Cook The Palladium, all ages Darwin Deez, Caged Animals Russian Recording, all-ages Ralphie May Wabash College, all ages Mosh Pit Madness Ep. lll: Revenge of the Pit The Emerson Theater, all-ages Wolff & Clark Expedition, Jeff Berlin Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Judson Clairborne, Caleb McCoach, The Dead Frets, Jascha White Rabbit Cabaret, 21+ Macklemore, Ryan Lewis Purdue University, Lafayette, all-ages

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MONDAY METAL Author & Punisher, Coffinworm, Black Goat of the Woods The author and punisher in this band name is one and the same: industrial doom and drone artist Tristan Shone. This one man machine experience utilizes plenty of controllers and speakers, called “a symphony of hellish steel presses.” This Dickensian steampunk noise sound appealling? Check him out at the Mel where he’ll perform with Indy locals Coffinworm and Black Goat of the Woods. Melody Inn, 3826 North Illinois St. 8 p.m., $8, 21+

Pre-Werk Early Show Melody Inn, 21+ Werk Melody Inn, 21+ Serenade Jazz Orchestra Jazz Kitchen, 21+

MARCH 23 Saw Doctors, Veseria These Irish rockers are favorites of Maryland gov’na Martin O’Malley and are occasionally described as the “Irish Springsteen.” They’ll perform with locals Veseria. Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 8 p.m., $23.50 advance, $25 at door, all-ages Gentlemen, I Dream in Evergreen, Black Beacon, Black Cat Rebellion, Clayton Lewis Irving Theatre, all ages

MARCH 26 Kentucky Nightmare, The Sands, Legs Bluebird, Bloomington, 21+

MARCH 27 TUESDAY JAZZ Monterey Jazz Festival There’s just one stop on the Monterey Jazz Festival in Indianapolis, and it’s at the historic Madame Walker Theatre. The 55th Anniversary Celebration features vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater, bassist Christian McBride, pianist Benny Green, drummer Lewis Nash, saxophonist Chris Potter and trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire. Bridgewater’s been in Indy before, for Indy Jazz Fest 2011. Tickets range from $30 to $45. Madame Walker Theatre Center, 617 Indiana Ave., 7:30 p.m., prices vary, all-ages Kid Rock, Buckcherry, Hellbound Glory Memorial Coliseum, all ages Your 33 Black Angels Be Here Now, 21+

HIP-HOP Afroman Afroman was an early adopter of independent, online-only music releases, allowing the public to buy his 2004 album Afroholic straight from his online store. That double album featured a variety of parody songs and diss tracks. (Sidenote: Did you know “Because I Got High” was nominated for a Grammy?) Indy’s Jukebox, 306 E. Prospect St. 8 p.m., $10, 21+ R&B Ish Husband-wife duos have a special kind of chemistry –– the kind that can only come from living and working with just the two of you year after year. Ish, a Chicago R&B duo with roots in Indianapolis, is no exception. In fact, they particularly focus on love, marriage and positivity. The Jazz Kitchen, 5377 N. College Ave., 8 p.m., $10, 21+

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DJ/DANCE Topher Jones, Digital Departure Topher Jones regularly stops in town –– but he doesn’t regularly play free shows. This Keepin’ It Deep event is a rescheduled party after a February ice storm cancellation. Blu Lounge, 240 S. Meridian St., 10 p.m., free, 21+

03.21 Don Stuck Open Jam 03.22 Bosco France

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MARCH 29 HIP-HOP Bone Thugs-N-Harmony Bone Thugs-N-Harmony return to Indianapolis more times than you would think for a hip-hop group that’s over 20 years old. Then again, they are from Cleveland, so it’s not too far. The third album of their Art of War series is scheduled for a May 21 release, so expect brand new material from the Thugs. The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave. 9 p.m., 21+ ROCK Final Friday at the IMA The last Friday of every month, NUVO columnist Kyle Long throws a party at the IMA. This free, all-ages event has featured the Jefferson St. Parade Band, a looseygoosey marching collective from Bloomington. This month’s iteration takes a more spacey turn –– Fountain Square favorites and Rad Summer acolytes Party Lines will take over the space. Catch a screening of the film Sparrows in the Toby and explore the galleries – it’s all open until 11 p.m. Indianapolis Museum of Art,4000 Michigan Road, 6:30 p.m., free, all-ages Holly Williams DO317 Lounge, all-ages Family of the Year, The Mowgli’s Radio Radio, 21+

MARCH 30 ROCK Gentleman Caller, Everything, Now! It’s serendipitous that Everything, Now!’s first show in over a year is with Gentleman Caller. After all, Everything, Now! is Jon Rogers, and whoever is playing with him at the time; Rogers is also the main force these days behind Musical Family Tree, which earlier this year released a tribute album to Kenny Childers, the

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main force behind Gentleman Caller. Radio Radio, 1119 Prospect St., 8 p.m., $8 advance, $10 at door, all-ages GREEN Indiana Living Green Celebration You’d be crazy not to attend this celebration for our sister publication, Indiana Living Green. From top to bottom (literal bottom: you can tour the catacombs), City Market is being taken over by ILG and other greenthinking Indy orgs. Featuring music from Kelly Pardekooper (a NUVO dude); Sweet Poison Victim; and DJ Kyle Long, you’ll be bouncing to tunes and taking in crazy fashion exhibits, horiticultural art installations and classes from Trade School Indy and so much more. Market vendors and Tomlinson Tap will be open and ready for business, too. City Market, 7 p.m., free, all-ages Brenda Williams Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Pigeons Playing Ping Pong, Brings Da Funk! Mousetrap, 21+ One in the Same Cheeseburger in Paradise, Fishers, all-ages

MARCH 31 CC Murder Dogs, Side FX, Hunted Down Hoosier Dome, all-ages

APRIL 1 Smith, Weakley and Clark Trio Jazz Kitchen, 21+

APRIL 2 Kyle Eastwood Band Jazz Kitchen, 21+ R5 Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages

Adam Craig Band, Carly Pearce Tin Roof, 21+ A Day to Remember, Of Mice and Men, Chunk! No, Captain Chunk! You, Me and Apollo DO317 Lounge, all-ages Werk Melody Inn, 21+

Friday Night Blues

03.22 Dicky James & the Blue Flames @9PM 03.29 Carson Diersing

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APRIL 3 ROCK Christian Taylor Showcase This show kicks off with Golden Bloom, The Saturday Giant. Christian Taylor is an Indianapolis musical hero for a reason. Go see him. Melody Inn, 3826 N. Illinois St. 9 p.m., $5, 21+

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APRIL 5 ROOTS The Whipstitch Sallies, James and the Drifters, Stampede String Band The Whipstitch Sallies are allfemale bluegrass rockers with panache. Three bucks for a night of local roots rock is a First Friday win. The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave. 9 p.m., $3, 21+ Conquerers Album Release Hoosier Dome, all-ages Earthgirl, jmtta, Kirchenkampf Irving Theater, all-ages The Joy of Painting, Veseria, Train Company, Verdant Vera Beale St., 21+ The Protomen at Deluxe Old National Centre, all-ages Rock-a-billy Night Radio Radio, 21+ Hotfox, The Mitchells, Vaudevileins Melody Inn, 21+ Stepdad, Party Lines White Rabbit Cabaret, all-ages

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APRIL 10 ROOTS An Evening of Blue Grass Punch Brothers member Noam Pikelny said to me last May, “People who don’t know much about bluegrass music call us a bluegrass band and people who really are steeped in bluegrass music refuse to call us a bluegrass band. Some people who are extreme preservationists are offended when others label us a bluegrass band.” Bluegrass, it seems, is a loaded term. But the very title of this evening proves you’ll truly experience a night of bluegrass with Pikelny, Ryan McCoury (Travelin’ McCourys), Bryan Sutton (Dixie Chicks, Jerry Douglas), Barry Bales (Alison Krauss) and Luke Bulla (Lyle Lovett). Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., $ prices vary, 7:30 p.m., all-ages

APRIL 11 ROCK Neon Trees Provo rockers Neon Trees ruled the airwaves this winter with their insistant jingle “Everybody Talks.” They’ve joined up with radio kings Maroon Five for a spring tour that will take them across the US. But first,

they’ll stop at Richmond High School. Richmond High School, Richmond $15 students, $20 general, advance; $20 students, $30 general at door

APRIL 12 PUNK Green Jelly Punk Rock Puppet Show Green Jelly (pronounced Green Jello – changed after legal pressure from the powers that be at Jell-O) claims to have had more than 400 members since their inception in 1981. They shut it down in 1995, after a cluster of albums and a Grammy nomination, but restarted in 2008 and made several new songs available before setting off on a set of tours. Yeah, we’re not really sure what a punk rock puppet show is either, but we’re excited to find out. Indy’s Jukebox, 8 p.m., $10 advance, $15 at door, 21+

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Emmylou Harris, Symphony Center, March 20 Aaron Carter, River Rockhouse, Mach 22 Darwin Deez, Schuba’s, March 22 Rihanna, A$AP Rocky, United Center, March 22 Alejandro Escovedo, Old Town School of Music, March 23 Frightened Rabbit, The Twilight Sad, Riviera Theater, March 23 Stars, Milo Greene, Metro, March 23 Sister Hazel, Viper Alley, March 23 Martha Wainwright, City Winery, March 24 Alt-J, Metro, March 28 Erykah Badu, House of Blues, March 28 Scotty McCreery, Paramount Theatre, March 28

LOUISVILLE Kendrick Lamar, The Palace Theater, March 21 Joshua James, Headliners, March 25 The Moth, Headliners, March 26 Leonard Cohen, The Palace Theater, March 30 Grizzly Bear, W.L. Lyons Brown Theatre, April 1 Styx, Horseshoe Southern Indiana, April 6 Fleetwood Mac, KFC Yum! Center, April 11

CINCINNATI Pierce the Veil, Memphis May Fire, Bogart’s, March 28 Divine Fits, Taft Theatre, April 2 Lupe Fiasco, Fifth Third Arena, April 6 Akron/Family, Motr Pub, April 17L Beach House, Bogart’s, April 24 Limp Bizkit, Bogart’s, May 5 The Lumineers, Riverbend Music Center, June 4

NIGHTLIFE Pubs and bars in Indy celebrated an extended St. Paddy’s Day all weekend, with traditional music and lots and lots and lots of green beer. Meanwhile, in Fountain Square, burlesque troup Hasenpfeffer celebrated their third anniversary in their home club, the White Rabbit Cabaret. Plus: bonus NUVO editor shot!

Pat Flynn’s The lovely ladies of Hasenpfeffer at White Rabbit Cabaret PHOTO BY BRYAN MOORE

PHOTO BY MARK LEE

White Rabbit Cab

aret

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MOORE

NUVO Managing Editor Jim Poyser and Big Bob, St Patrick’s Day Parade at Woodruff

Eastside was filled Pat Flynn’s on the e Rogue Players with music fromTh PHOTO BY MARK

LEE

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD

DOPING ON ICE Plus, Japan still loves faxing!

Leaders of the ice-fishing community, aiming for official Olympics recognition as a sport, have begun the process by asking the World Anti-Doping Agency to randomly test its “athletes” for performance-enhancing drugs, according to a February New York Times report. However, said the chairman of the U.S. Freshwater Fishing Association, “We do not test for beer,” because, he added, “Everyone would fail.” Ice-fishing is a lonely, frigid endeavor rarely employing strength but mostly requiring guile and strategy, as competitors who discover advantageous spots in the lake must surreptitiously upload the hauls lest competitors rush over to drill their own holes. Urine tests have also been run in recent years on competitors in darts, miniature golf, chess and tug-of-war, and in 2011, one chess player, two minigolfers and one tugger tested positive.

Cultural Diversity • A frequent sight on Soweto, South Africa, streets recently is crowds of 12-to-15-year-old boys known as “izikhotane” (“boasters”) who hang out in their designer jeans, “shimmering silk shirts, bright pink and blue shoes, and whitestraw, narrow-brimmed fedoras,” according to a February BBC News dispatch. Flashing wads of cash begged from beleaguered parents, hundreds may amass, playing loud music and sometimes even trashing their fancy clothes as if to feign an indifference to wealth. Since many izikhotanes’ families are working-class survivors of apartheid, they are mostly ashamed of their kids’ behavior. “This isn’t what we struggled for,” lamented one parent. But, protested a peer-pressured boaster, “(Y)ou must dress like this, even if you live in a shack.” • India’s annual “Rural Olympics” might be the cultural equivalent of several Southern U.S. “Redneck Olympics” but taken somewhat more seriously, in that this year, corporate sponsorships (Nokia and Suzuki) helped fund

the equivalent of about $66,000 in prize money for such events as competitive pulling using only one’s ears or teeth. “We do this for money, trophies, fame and respect,” one ear-puller told The Wall Street Journal in February. This year, in the four-day event in Punjab state, the 50,000 spectators could watch a teeth-lifter pull a 110-pound sack upward for about eight seconds and an ear-puller ease a car about 15 feet. • Weird Japan: (1) A generous local businessman recently graced the city of Okuizumo with funding for replicas of two Renaissance statues (“Venus de Milo” and Michelangelo’s “David”) for a public park. Agence France-Presse reported in February that many residents, receiving little advance warning, expressed shock at the unveiling of “David” and demanded that he at least be given underpants. (2) Fax machines, almost obsolete in the U.S., are still central to many tech-savvy Japanese families and companies (who bought 1.7 million units last year alone), reported The New York Times in February. Families prefer faxes’ superiority to e-mail for warmly expressing Japan’s complex written language, and bureaucrats favor faxes’ preserving the imperative of paper flow.

Latest Religious Messages • The 14 guests at a jewelry party in Lake City, Fla., were initially incredulous that home-invader Derek Lee, 24, meant to rob them, but when they saw that he was serious (by putting his gun to the head of one woman), the hostess went into action. “In the name of Jesus,” she shouted, “get out of my house now!” Then the guests chanted in unison, “Jesus! Jesus! Jesus!” over and over. Lee, frightened or bewildered, sprinted out the door empty-handed and was later arrested. • The president of the National Black Church Initiative told the Associated Press in January that its pastors are generally free to ordain new pastors as they wish, and that consequently Bishop Wayne Jackson of Detroit did nothing wrong in his ordination ceremony (which was surreptitiously video-recorded and uploaded to YouTube), even though it consisted of Jackson in robes, praying while lying on top of the new bishops, who were also praying. (The AP noted that Bishop Jackson had been the target of that’s-sogay YouTube comments.) • Yet Another Fatwa: Saudi cleric Sheikh Abdullah Daoud, in an interview

in February on al-Majd TV, decreed that female babies should wear full-face veils (burkas) to help shield them from sexual advances. (According to a former judge at the Saudi Board of Grievances, Saudi authorities have issued standards for fatwas, thus urging people to ignore “unregulated” ones such as Skeikh Daoud’s.) • In January, Lhokseumawe City, Indonesia, drafted new ordinances, including one that prohibits women from riding motorcycles with their legs straddling male drivers, since that would tend to “provoke” them. A proponent said the ban “honor(ed)” women “because they are delicate creatures.” Immediately, some authorities denounced the legislation, pointing out that riding “side saddle” is much more dangerous in cases of sudden swerves and collisions. As of press time, the mayor had not decided whether to implement the ordinance.

Questionable Judgments • In February, an off-duty Tampa police officer and an off-duty sheriff’s detective from nearby Hernando County were awarded the sheriff’s office’s highest honor, the Medal of Valor, for exemplary bravery in an October incident in which a 42-yearold naked woman was shot to death by the officers. The woman was holding a gun and had made threats, and a 5-year-old boy was inside a truck that she wanted to steal. However, even though a neighbor had simply wrestled the woman down earlier, the officers still thought their only move was to shoot to kill. Said the woman’s brother, “They shot a mentally disturbed, naked woman. Is that valor?” • In 2011, Julian Pellegrino pleaded guilty to DUI involving serious bodily injury to Mark Costa in Chicopee, Mass., and was sentenced to serve 18 months in jail, but that did not deter Pellegrino from filing a lawsuit in December, demanding $1.1 million for Costa’s somehow “caus(ing)” his car to collide with Pellegrino’s. Pellegrino (with a broken neck) was actually more seriously injured than Costa, who sued back, asking nearly $200,000. (In 2010, while Pellegrino was awaiting disposition of the case with Costa, he pleaded guilty to another DUI.)

Fetishes on Parade • Paul Jamrozik, 63, was arrested in Upper Darby, Pa., in January and charged as the man who lured a 12-year-old boy into his home and, under the guise of pretend-podia-

try, spritzed his feet with athlete’s-foot spray and tickled them before performing an exam of his ears and nose with medical equipment. When the kid asked to leave, according to the police report, Jamrozik withheld his shoes until he promised to bring his friends by the next day to be examined.

Least Competent Criminals • Lee Wildman, 35, and Adrian Stanton, 32, pleaded guilty in connection with a burglary at Durham (England) University’s Oriental Museum, in which they heisted artwork worth the equivalent of about $2.7 million and hid it in a field in April 2012. However, they have been unable to help authorities locate the bounty (even with the reward of sentence-reduction) -- because they have forgotten exactly where they stashed it. Eventually, hikers unconnected with the case discovered it and notified police. Said Judge Christopher Prince, “This is not an offense that can be described as sophisticated.”

Readers’ Choice • (1) Two brothers, celebrating a winning lottery ticket in Wichita, Kan., in February, bought a stash of marijuana, but then, attempting to light a bong using butane lighter fluid, one accidentally blew up the family home. That brother was hospitalized with second-degree burns, and the other was arrested for marijuana possession. (2) Megan Thode, 27, went to trial in February in Easton, Pa., suing Lehigh University, accusing a professor of illegally discriminating against her with a C-plus grade in a class in 2009 in the school’s graduate counseling program, in which a B was the minimum required to continue. Thode demanded $1.3 million for future damage to her career (but not a tuition refund -- as she had matriculated for free because her father is a Lehigh professor). Four days after the trial began, the judge ruled against her. Thanks This Week to Richard Schneider, Harold Gaines, Don Ball, Joan Rohrbach, and Peter Smagorinsky, and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

©2012 CHUCK SHEPHERD DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE Send your Weird News to Chuck Shepherd, P.O. Box 18737, Tampa FL 33679 or WeirdNews@earthlink.net or go to www.NewsoftheWeird.com.

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EMPLOYMENT Restaurant | Healthcare Salon/Spa | General To advertise in Employment, Call Kelly @ 808-4616 LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-7772091 (AAN CAN)

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY © 2013 BY ROB BRESZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings,” says poet Muriel Rukeyser in her poem “Elegy in Joy.” “Not all things are blest,” she continues, “but the seeds of all things are blest. The blessing is in the seed.” I urge you to adopt this perspective in the coming weeks, Aries. Be extra sweet and tender and reverent toward anything that is just sprouting, toward anything that is awakening, toward anything that invokes the sacredness of right now. “This moment,” sings Rukeyser, “this seed, this wave of the sea, this look, this instant of love.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As you seek more insight on your current situation, consider the possibility that the bad guys may not be as bad as they seem. They might simply be so deeply under the spell of their own pain that they can’t see straight. And as for the good guys: I wonder if they are as purely good as they would like you to imagine. It might be the case that they are at least partially serving their own self-interest, while pretending to be utterly altruistic. If there’s any truth to these speculations, Taurus, you’d be wise to stay uncommitted and undecided for now. Don’t get emotionally riled up, don’t get embroiled in conflict, and don’t burn any bridges. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s your mantra: “I get fresher under pressure.” Say it ten times right now, and then repeat it in 10-repetition bursts whenever you need a tune-up. What it means is that you stay cool when the contradictions mount and the ambiguities multiply. And more than that: You actually thrive on the commotion. You get smarter amidst the agitation. You become more perceptive and more creative as the shifts swirl faster and harder. Tattoo these words of power on your imagination: “I get fresher under pressure.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Stories happen to those who tell them,” said the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Modern radio journalist Ira Glass goes even further. “Great stories happen to those who can tell them,” he has said. Let’s make this strategy a centerpiece of your life plan in the weeks ahead, Cancerian. I have a suspicion that you will need first-hand experience of novel, interesting stories. They will provide the precise nourishment necessary to inspire the blooming of your most soulful ambitions. One way to help ensure that the best stories will flow your way is to regale receptive people with transformative tales from your past. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob: I’m spreading the word about Beer Week in your town, and I’d love to see you and your beer-loving readers at some of the events. Any chance you can include some coverage of Beer Week celebrations in your upcoming column? Cheers, Patricia.” Dear Patricia: I don’t do product placement or other forms of secret advertising in my horoscopes. To allow it would violate the sacred trust I have with my readers, who rely on me to translate the meaning of the cosmic signs without injecting any hidden agendas. It is true that Leos might be prone to imbibing great quantities of beer in the coming week, simply because they’d benefit from lowering their inhibitions, getting in touch with their buried feelings, and expanding their consciousness. But to be frank, I’d rather see them do that without the aid of drugs and alcohol. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Hoping to stir up some fun trouble, I posted the following message on my Facebook page: “Don’t judge someone just because they sin differently than you.” A torrent of readers left comments in response. My favorite was from Sue Sims, who said, “Yeah, they might be better at your kind of sin and you might learn something!” That advice is just the kind of healing mischief you need right now, Virgo. It’s a bit ironic, true, but still: Take it and run with it. Study the people who have mad skills at pulling off the rousing adventures and daring pleasures and interesting “sins” that you’d like to call your own.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The French verb renverser can be translated as “to turn upside-down” or “to reverse the flow.” The adjectival form is renversant, which means “stunning” or “astonishing.” I think you may soon have experiences that could be described by those words. There’s a good chance that a dry, impoverished part of your life will get a juicy, fertile infusion. A deficiency you have worried about might get at least half-filled. An inadequacy that makes you feel sad may be bolstered by reinforcements. Alas, there could also be a slight reversal that’s not so gratifying. One of your assets may temporarily become irrelevant. But the trade-off is worth it, Libra. Your gains will outstrip your loss. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Professor Martyn Poliakoff creates short Youtube videos to help teach the public about chemistry. In one video, he explains why an explanation he gave in a previous video was completely mistaken. “It’s always good for a scientist to be proved wrong,” he confesses cheerfully. Then he moves on to speculate about what the right answer might be. I love humility like that! It’s admirable. It’s also the best way to find out the truth about reality. I hope you will summon a similar attitude in the coming weeks, Scorpio: a generous curiosity that makes you eager to learn something new about stuff you thought you had all figured out. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On the one hand, menopausal women are no longer able to bear children. On the other hand, they often overflow with fresh possibilities and creative ideas. More time is available to them because their children have moved out of the house or don’t require as much care. They can begin new careers, focus on their own development, and devote more attention to their personal needs. So in one way their fertility dries up; in another way it may awaken and expand. I suspect that whether or not you are menopausal, you are on the cusp of a comparable shift in your fecundity: one door closing, another door swinging open. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The TV reality show Freaky Eaters profiled a woman named Kelly who had eaten nothing but cheesy potatoes for 30 years. Her average intake: eight pounds of potatoes and four cups of cheese per day. “I love cheesy potatoes,” she testified. “They’re stewy, gooey, and just yum-yum-yummy. They’re like crack to me.” I’m a bit concerned that you’re flirting with behavior comparable to hers. Not in regards to cheesy potatoes, of course, but to some other fetish. I will ask you to make sure that you’re not starting to over-specialize. It would be wise to avoid obsessing on a single type of anything. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the 17th century, polite people referred to mountains as “warts” and “boils on the earth’s complexion.” So says Robert Macfarlane in his book Mountains of the Mind. Annie Dillard describes the peculiar behavior of educated European tourists in the 18th century. When they visited the Alps, she writes in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, “they deliberately blindfolded their eyes to shield themselves from the evidence of the earth’s horrid irregularity.” Don’t be anything like those dumb sophisticates, Aquarius. When you spy irregularities in the coming weeks, consider the possibility that they are natural and healthy. This will allow you to perceive their useful beauty. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are not for sale. Remember? Your scruples and ideals and talents cannot be bought off for any amount of money. You will not be cheated out of your birthright and you will not allow your dreams to be stolen. Although it’s true that you may have to temporarily rent your soul from time to time, you will never auction it off for good. I’m sure you know these things, Pisces, but I suspect it’s time to renew your fiery commitment to them.

HOMEWORK: Describe what you’d be like if you were the opposite of yourself. Write Freewillastrology.com. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.20.13 - 03.27.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 39

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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - March 20, 2013