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October 2013, Issue 21

NORFOLK STATE UNIVERSITY

®

MAKING

WAVES

A Newsletter for Faculty, Staff, Alumni and Friends of Norfolk State University Achieving Excellence. Success Beyond Measure.

New Greenhouse, New Possibilities By Keisha N. Reynolds Communications and Marketing Intern

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orfolk State University’s biology program is undergoing the reconstruction of its greenhouse, set to open in December 2013. Due to leaks, accessibility and safety concerns, NSU’s new greenhouse will replace the previous version that was housed on the roof of the Woods Science Building. The new greenhouse will be located between the Woods Science Building and Dick Price Stadium, allowing students to create a controlled environment where durable plants will be able to grow and water, electricity, and heat will no longer be a concern. Danielle Gray, a senior biology student, is excited about all the possibilities this will bring for her program. “I’m looking forward to increasing the amount Continued on next page

Legacy Media Institute to Present First International Film Festival in Norfolk

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im Reid’s Legacy Media Institute, in partnership with Norfolk State University and the City of Norfolk, will present the first annual International Film Festival November 8–10, 2013. In celebration of the art of filmmaking, the international film festival will present an international showcase of culturally diverse films, while providing local, national and international filmmakers a forum for their work to be viewed, appreciated and discussed. The festival will serve as a vehicle to initiate open dialogue on issues and ideas that build cultural awareness and appreciation. The three-day international film festival will feature a diverse array of film and panel discussions, workshops, product and equipment presentations at a variety of venues in the city of Norfolk and on the campus of Norfolk State University. Screenings will include a dazzling complement of 30 short and feature-length films from a select group of directors and producers from more than 10 countries. An opening night “Red Carpet” VIP celebration, Saturday night gala and closing night awards ceremony and celebration are also highlights of the festival. Tickets for the festival may be purchased through the website. As the first such collaborative effort for the Legacy Media Institute, Norfolk State University and the City of Norfolk, the film festival is poised to provide direct cultural impacts. “I am excited by the opportunity to promote our mutual mission of promoting excellence and appreciation for filmmakers and the stories that they tell,” said founder, filmmaker and actor Tim Reid. The Legacy Media International Film Festival is for filmmakers and film lovers alike. Attendees will be entertained, informed and inspired by the passions and unique visions of the filmmakers that represent a perspective of interconnectedness of cultures. For more information, visit www.lmi-iff.org.

Online Organizations Recognize NSU for Degree Programs

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orfolk State University recently has been recognized for its ability to deliver excellent programs as well as for graduates receiving a return on their investment in a degree from the University. Affordable CollegesOnline.org (AC Online) ranked Norfolk State University as a top college in Virginia for return on investment. The recently launched ranking identified the 28 Virginia colleges where degrees pay off the most. Students who graduate from these colleges earn more over their lifetimes, on average, than graduates from other Virginia institutions. NSU ranked 24th. AC Online analyzed 173 fully accredited, four-year, not-for-profit Virginia colleges using tuition and fees (provided by IPEDS/NCES), graduates’ average starting salaries and return on investment (ROI) calculation (provided by PayScale) to reach its findings. NSU is fully and unconditionally accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and all programs eligible for national accreditation are nationally accredited.

The University’s distance education programs have received the Quality Standards Certification from the United States Distance Learning Association. In addition, BestOnlineColleges.org has recognized NSU’s special education degree program as one of the best in the nation for the 2013-2014 academic year. A leading resource for online education, BestOnlineColleges.org released its lists, which were compiled from data and surveys about programs across the nation. The data and surveys were gathered and analyzed over the course of the 2012-2013 academic year. Both organizations said in their online statements that their goal is to educate potential students and their parents about their options when selecting an institution of higher education.

New Greenhouse Continued

provide funding for special repairs and updates. “This project totaled to $454,720,” said Anton Kashiri, associate vice president for facilities management. In an effort to promote research, learning and service, each plant will focus on the research projects taking place within the classroom. Some of those projects will focus on areas the United States Department of Agriculture and the Farm Services Agency find significant, such as food sources. Botany and plant physiology courses will have representative plants, as well. “We will focus on crop plants, such as cucumbers, peas, carrots, collards, maize, corn, kidney beans, and cloning African Violets,” said Dr. Camellia Okpodu, biology professor, who is a key player in this project. Students will be allowed to create a controlled environment where durable plants will be able to grow. Dr. Okpodu is hoping that the plants can be used to beautify the campus and sell to the community. “Even in the most favorable climate, soil quality, unusual weather conditions, bugs and infestation can still pose a threat to well-tended plants. These issues can be lessened when water, heat, light and air can be regulated,” said Dr. Okpodu. With this well-researched location, water, electricity, and heat will not be a problem.

for information I already know and putting it towards more opportunities of research and plant observations,” said Gray. This project is funded by Maintenance Reserves, which

MAKING

WAVES

Making Waves is published by the Office of Communications and Marketing. (757) 823-8373 Eddie N. Moore, Jr. Interim President and CEO Deborah C. Fontaine Interim Vice President for University Advancement Cheryl Bates-Lee AVP of University Relations Stevalynn Adams Regina Lightfoot Christopher Setzer

marketing@nsu.edu

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Making Waves

Campus Community Meets Interim President

By Keisha N. Reynolds Communications and Marketing Intern

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nterim President and CEO Eddie N. Moore Jr. took two days out of his first week on campus to meet students, faculty and staff. On Tuesday, Sept. 24, students who were eating lunch in Scott-Dozier Dining Hall had the chance to meet and talk with Moore. “I’m excited because change can be good,” said Matthew Carey, a sophomore biology student. “He seems like a respectable guy, and it’s great to see him interact with students.” This dining experience began with a brief introduction of Moore, who noted on Sept. 22, the day before his term began, that he dined at the student dining hall with his wife. “I want to be highly engaged with student life and my goal today was to meet with students before I met with any other large group of campus affiliates,” said Moore.

Shandré Earl, student government association president, was delighted to see this event take place. “This was a great idea and a great way for students to meet the new president in a less formal fashion, and within their comfort zone,” said Earl. Moore continued his campus introduction by meeting with faculty and staff on Thursday, Sept. 26, in a packed room in the Student Center. He looked relaxed as he emphasized to those in attendance that he is at Norfolk State to make improvements and restore the public’s trust. Dr. Chinedu Okala, professor of fine art, was impressed. “There’s clear, compelling evidence of higher education administrative experience,” said Okala, who added, “I wish him the best.”

Nursing and Allied Health Interim Chair Named

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SU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Sandra J. DeLoatch has appointed Dr. Jessica M. Parrot as interim chair to the Department of Nursing and Allied Health, effective August 26. Dr. Parrot holds the bachelor of science in nursing, the master of science in nursing-pediatric nurse practitioner, doctorate of nursing practice and the postgraduate nurse educator Dr. Jessica M. Parrott certificate from Old Dominion University. Since 2010, Dr. Parrott has served as the BSN coordinator in NSU’s nursing program. A national search will be conducted to identify the permanent nursing and allied health department chair.

NSU Chess Club Back in Full Swing

By Eboni S. Veney Communications and Marketing Intern

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ountless student clubs and organizations at Norfolk State University have rich histories. Unbeknownst to most, the NSU Chess Club has been around since the early 1960s. Will Ferrell, a Norfolk State University psychology major, serves as the president of the club and is determined to ensure it flourishes to its full potential. Over the years the club has experienced its ups and downs with student participation; however, in 2008 the club began to regrow its presence on the campus. To date there are approximately 312 members meeting on an average of three times a month. “Not only are we remaining active on-campus but in the community as well. We teach the sport of chess at several local high schools and libraries throughout the Norfolk area,” said Making Waves

Ferrell. “The club, which is an affiliate of the United States Chess Federation, is capable of hosting U.S.C.F. tournaments on and off campus.” Dr. Arthur Bowman, the club’s advisor, noted that the order and structure of chess helps students solve complex problems. “When students sit down with chess, they are able to focus and critically think,” said Dr. Bowman. He believes there is a noticeable transformation in student self-image once they learn to play the game of chess. The club is open to all NSU students and is continuously seeking growth. For more information on the NSU Chess Club, contact the organization’s advisor Dr. Arthur Bowman at awbowman@nsu.edu or visit Room 101A in the Woods Science Building. 3

CAMPUS Briefs Glenn King, a Center for Materials Research graduate student, was honored at NASA Langley Research Center’s Inventors Award Ceremony. A NASA Langley employee, King was recognized for his technical achievements including eight patents issued in 2012. Dr. Chung-Chu (George) Hsieh, professor of computer science and graduate program coordinator, along with former and current graduate students, had three Dr. Chung-Chu Hsieh refereed papers published by three constituent conferences of the 2013 World Congress in Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Applied Computing: G. Hsieh and E. Nwafor, “A Self-Protecting Security Framework for CDA Documents,” in Proc. 2013, International Conference on Security and Management, July 2013. E. Nwafor presented the paper; G. Hsieh, D. Paruchuri, C. Steward, E. Nwafor and D. Gadam, “Lessons Learned: Porting Java Applications to Android,” in Proc. 2013 International Conference on Software Engineering Research and Practice, July 2013; and R. Mullapudi and G. Hsieh, “A Monitored Student Testing Application Using Cloud Computing,” In Proc. 2013 International Conference on Frontiers in Education: Computer Science and Computer Engineering, July 2013. Angela K. Hayes, coordinator for NSU’s Center for Innovative Nursing Education in the Department of Nursing and Allied Health, who also serves as a Angela K. Hayes simulation nurse educator and regional director of the Virginia State Simulation Alliance, is among the first cohort of simulation healthcare educators nationally to receive a certificate in simulation after completing an

Gerald Hunter, NSU’s vice president for finance and administration, began work on Sept. 1. In this role, he is responsible for managing NSU's annual operating budget, establishing current financial policies and procedures as well as overseeing capital and infrastructure improvements for all units, divisions and departments of the University. Additionally, he will provide leadership and oversight for key financial and business areas including auxiliary services, bursar, human resources, controller, planning and budget, facilities management, payroll, procurement

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immersion course at Drexel University. In addition, she has recently passed the national certification examination for healthcare simulation. Dr. Amelia Ross-Hammond, professor of music and NSU director of Service Learning and Civic Engagement, has been appointed by Gov. Bob McDonnell to the Board for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services. Michael Carpenter has been named university registrar. With more than 18 years of higher education experience, he brings to the position a working knowledge of NSU, the Registrar’s Office, information systems and campus needs. In addition, to the Registrar’s Office, he has worked in the offices of Academic Affairs, Financial Aid and Enrollment Management and at Old Dominion University. Catherine Coyle, administrative assistant for the Early Childhood, Elementary and Special Education Department, and Velma Jones, administrative/program support specialist at the Lyman Beecher Brooks Library, were recognized by the National Association of Educational Office Professionals at its 79th Annual Conference and Institute. They were honored at the Professional Standards Program (PSP) Banquet for their professional and personal accomplishments. Coyle received her PSP at the master’s degree, option II level and the certified educational office employee distinction, while Jones received the PSP at the advanced 1, option 1 level. Both are members of the Norfolk State University Association of Educational Office Professionals (NSUAEOP). Additionally, during a meeting of the Mid-Atlantic region, two NSUAEOP members were elected to national committees—Cleopatra Riddick, scholarship manager in the Financial Aid Office, will sit on the student scholarships committee and April Allbritton, office manager in the President’s Office, will serve on long range planning.

services, risk management and campus police. Prior to NSU, Hunter served as the vice chancellor for finance and administration and chief financial officer at Winston Salem State University (WSSU) in North Carolina where he provided oversight of an annual operating budget of $170 million and ensured the overall operational effectiveness and integrity of WSSU’s financial systems. He also was Gerald Hunter responsible for developing WSSU’s financial vision, working collaboratively with administration, faculty and staff in budget development and management. Prior to serving at WSSU, Hunter served as the chief financial officer at Antioch University, special assistant to the president for institutional effectiveness at Kentucky State University, vice president for enrollment and financial planning and the assistant vice president for administration at Northern Kentucky University, and as the university budget officer and budget analyst at Murray State University.

Making Waves

New Hires NSU Welcomes its new employees from January 2013 through August 10, 2013.

Delisa Roberts-Jenkins Accounts Payable Shenelle Rogers Accounts Payable

Eugene Anderson Procurement Services

Angela Garcia Facilities Management

Eddie Antoine III Human Resources

Brandi Gardner Student Affairs

Jonathan Skuza College of Science, Engineering and Technology

Kelvin Arthur University Advancement

Krystina Hall Student Affairs

Felisa Smith Nursing

Choni Ashley Band

Barbara Harrison Nursing

Renee Stewart Financial Services

Cheryl Askew Human Resources

Dia Hayes Facilities Management

Tiffani Dawn Sykes Enrollment Management

Shannon Bailey Facilities Management

Melody Iannone Career Services

Angela Taylor Student Affairs

Vick Beckett Athletics

Crystal Jenkins University Advancement

Jonathan Walker Student Affairs

Wenter Blount Spartan Success Center

Linda Jett-Pappas Nursing

Sylvester Watkins Human Resources

Denee Bottoms Student Affairs

Tracci Johnson Student Affairs

Malcolm Watts Athletics

Nathaniel Brown Lyman Beecher Brooks Library

Karma JohnsonFreeman Bursar's Office

MC Wesley Facilities Management

Damien Cameron Office Of Information Technology

Roberta Jones Facilities Management

Kevin Cheney Facilities Management Lionel Dailey Facilities Management

Lucanne Kachmarik Nursing Bryan Kazmierski Athletics

Kent Daniels Facilities Management

Xuemei Li School of Extended Learning

Marcus Davis Student Affairs

Timothy Lowder Facilities Management

Kevin DeVantier Athletics

Willie Marsh Facilities Management

Shannon Foxworth Facilities Management

Darrwin Parker Facilities Management

Atiya Frazer Auxiliary

Patricia Perkins-Smith Facilities Management

Jasmine Frazier Athletics

Sangram Pradhan College of Science, Engineering and Technology

Twanda Gainer Nursing

Making Waves

Roberson White Athletics Jerry Whitley Facilities Management Clarence Williams Facilities Management Karin Williams Women's Economic Development Center Kenneth Willie Facilities Management Levon Wilson Facilities Management Qiguang Yang College of Science, Engineering and Technology Floyd Young Facilities Management

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Making Waves

7

Students Become Immersed in Puerto Rican Culture

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orfolk State student Jenci D. Chavez wanted to study abroad, but didn’t want to go too far from the U.S. When Chavez, a computer science major who is fluent in Spanish, heard about the opportunity to participate in a summer study program in Puerto Rico, she signed on. She and two other NSU students, Andrea Haynes and Bethany Moore, spent four weeks in Puerto Rico as part of a partnership between NSU’s Office of International Studies and Service-Learning and the Global Institute for Romance Studies (Instituto Global de Estudios Romances–IGER). The summer study program was the first collaboration between the two entities and was coordinated by Phyllis Cooper, NSU assistant professor of Spanish. “I just wanted to test the waters before I decide to go very far,” said Chavez. The island lends itself nicely to first-time travelers who want to learn about another culture in an environment that is also familiar. It is a territory of the United States, but its land and people have strong affinities with Latin American culture and heritage. The course explored Puerto Rico’s African roots and taught the students Spanish. Dr. José Hernández, IGER president, said that IGER’s program has been conceived and tailored to fulfill the linguistic and cultural needs of AfricanAmerican students. "Norfolk State needs a robust world languages program, and Spanish will soon be spoken by a majority of Americans,” said Dr. Geoffroy deLaforcade, director of International Studies. “The Office of International Studies is determined to send growing numbers of students to the IGER program each year." Dr. Hernández said that the partnership went well due in part because of IGER’s participation in NSU’s International Week activities during the 2012–13 academic year. “NSU allowed us to reach the population that we aim to impact,” said Dr. Hernández. He was thrilled with the NSU students who participated in the program. “It was evident they were very well trained at NSU,” said Dr. Hernández. “All of them worked hard and participated enthusiastically in all academic and cultural activities.” Although Chavez is fluent in Spanish, she chose to take the class with nonnative speakers, who were learning the language. As a class, they hiked the El Yunque Rainforest, took dance lessons in the town of Loiza, and visited La Cueva Ventana (the window cave) as well as museums, cathedrals, cemeteries and historic landmarks. Outside class, Chavez and the others explored the country and the culture. “We went back to Loiza on our own because we fell in love with the town so much,” Chavez said. They also participated in the “Noche de San Juan” celebration on June 24. “It is believed that when the clock strikes midnight on the 24th,” she said, “you are to jump backwards into the ocean and catch three waves for a fresh start and good luck.” For Chavez, the experience has allowed her to be even more adventurous in her travels. “I would tell other students that it can be a once in a lifetime experience.” Would she do it again? “Yes,” said Chavez, “absolutely.”

8

Making Waves

Classroom Building Construction Reaches Milestone

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onstruction of the Nursing and Allied Health Building hit a milestone. On Friday, Oct. 4, crews put the last piece of structural steel in place during a “topping-out” ceremony. The topping-out ceremony signifies the completion of the overall structure, size, shape and form of the building and celebrates the mid-point of the building’s construction, according to NSU Facilities Management project architect Kevin Cheney. Full completion of the four-story, 140,676 square-foot building is expected by October 2014. This state-of-the-art facility is the first classroom building to be built on campus since 1975 when the Robinson Technology Center was built. Plans for the new building call for 49 classrooms and labs, a café, computer labs and faculty lounges. It will also have teleconferencing capabilities in several rooms. The building will be environmentally efficient and is expected to achieve LEED Gold certification. Located near the Lyman Beecher Brooks Library, the new building will form the southern edge of the quad along Presidential Parkway. Other construction around campus includes a four-month, $4 million renovation to the L. Douglas Wilder Performing Arts Center. Funds for the renovation came from a Virginia College Building Authority bond. As part of its duties, the authority provides financing for certain capital projects and educational equipment for state higher education institutions. Much of the renovation involved elements within the 56,247 square-foot building’s structure. Improvements included correcting a safety problem related to a tripping hazard with the auditorium floor. Additional renovations included upgrading the heating ventilation and air conditioning systems, communication, lighting, theater lighting, stage rigging, audio-visual technology and improving handicap accessibility throughout the building.

Making Waves

9


Norfolk State University Making Waves October 2013