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THE MAGAZINE OF NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE

EYE ON THE

EAGLES Strengthening character and faith through athletics

FALL/WINTER 2010

ARTICLES ALSO AVAILABLE ONLINE AT NWC.EDU/PILOT

COVER SHOT BY JOSH STOKES Front row: Alex Kitson ’12, Rebekah Carrizales ’12, Marie Peters ’13; Back: Ashley Olson ’11, Kabakas Clark ’13, Jenna Powers ’14.

3003 Snelling Avenue North St. Paul, MN 55113-1598 651-631-5100 nwc.edu

Letters and comments can be sent to: marcomm@nwc.edu

JOSH STOKES

PILOT IS PUBLISHED BY THE NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE OFFICE OF MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

President Alan Cureton and Vice President for Student Life & Athletics Matt Hill at Homecoming 2010.

PIL O T S TA F F MANAGING EDITOR Marita Meinerts, M.A. EDITORS Jenny Collins ’05; Nancy Zugschwert GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jessie Henderson CONTRIBUTING GRAPHIC DESIGNER Shelley Andersen PRODUCTION MANAGERS Colleen Bemis F’05; Tammy Worrell F’04 PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jamie Hanson; Joan Ayotte ONLINE EDITOR Brad Dykstra ’86 STUDENT ASSISTANTS Janelle Hamre’11; Michael Forrest ’12

C O N T R I B UT I N G W R IT E R S Tyler Anderson ’07 Shelly Barsuhn Aaron Hagstrom ’11 Christine Henne ’11

Matt Hill ’89 Greg Johnson ’05, M’09 Elissa Sandstrom ’10 Gary Zilary ’13

Playing the Game, Keeping the Faith I love sports. Having played football in high school and college for a total of eight years, I enjoyed the camaraderie that came from being part of an athletic team. The closeness one has with teammates is priceless. I still miss the feeling of walking together onto the field (or the court) of competition just before the start of a game. As a receiver, I cannot describe the feeling that came in those precious few seconds after a successful catch, as our team celebrated the accomplishment of scoring a touchdown. It’s exhilarating.

NO R T HW E S T E R N C OLLE G E A DM I N I ST R AT I ON PRESIDENT Alan S. Cureton, Ph.D. SR. V.P. FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Janet B. Sommers, Ph.D. SR. V.P. FOR MEDIA Paul H. Virts, Ph.D. V.P. FOR INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT Amy Bragg Carey, M.A. V.P. FOR STUDENT LIFE & ATHLETICS Matt Hill ’89, Ed.D. V.P. FOR GRADUATE & CONTINUING EDUCATION Don F. Johnson, Ph.D. V.P. FOR CAMPUS TECHNOLOGIES/CIO Raymond C. Kuntz, M.S. V.P. FOR GLOBAL INITIATIVES Alford H. Ottley, Ph.D. V.P. FOR BUSINESS/CFO Douglas R. Schroeder, CPA DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES Timothy A. Rich, PHR

NO R T HW E S T E R N M E DI A FM 98.5/AM 900 KTIS Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN

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I also appreciated the opportunities to learn and improve my individual skills within a group of people striving to accomplish a singular goal. In athletics, if a team has a goal, a strategy to accomplish that goal, and gifted and talented people committed to work hard to accomplish it, the team can achieve mighty things. The strength of many is more powerful than the strength of one. There are many parallels between playing a sport and living the Christian life. Our “performance” requires cheerful observance to higher rules, because our Authority is higher than any referee, umpire or judge. And when we meet Him, how wonderful to be deemed worthy of emulating a great athlete, the Apostle Paul, who covered more miles than any modern marathoner as he shared the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I am constantly encouraged by Paul’s report at the end of his run: “I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith” (2 Timothy 4:7 NIV). Let’s continue cheering each other on. Go Eagles!

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Northwestern College does not discriminate with regard to national origin, race, color, age, sex or disability.

Alan Cureton, Ph.D. President, Northwestern College and Northwestern Media

EYE ON THE

EAGLES

BEGINS ON P. 14

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Putting Principles Ahead of Results — Special from the Star Tribune

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Crossing the Invisible Line — Tim Sawyer and Kirk Talley

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Chub Reynolds Legacy Continues

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Mud Lessons

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Sports & Faith: Allies or Adversaries?

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From the Bleachers: Football Moms’ Perspective

Follow the Eagles online! NWCEAGLES.COM

JOSH STOKES

The Northwestern Eagles—325 student-athletes and their coaches—integrate faith, academics and sport to the glory of God.

Northwestern News

14 Alumni News

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Northwestern Named a Star Tribune Top Workplace

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New Roles for Jim Johnson and Jim Bender

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Through the Years

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Fast Forward — Tim Cave ’97

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Fulbright Rachel Grammer Teaches in Turkey

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Daystar University Students Visit NWC

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Fast Forward — Lois (Link F’00) Solberg

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Dean Paulson Accepts Pastorate, Leaves NWC After 19 Years

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Women’s Basketball Bids Farewell to Linda Schuck

T O BE AD D E D T O O R R E M O V E D F R O M THE PI L OT M AI L I NG L I S T, PL EAS E E- M AI L M AR C OM M@NW C.EDU .

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FACULTY HIGHLIGHTS

Jonathan Den Hartog, Ph.D. (History) was featured in a Christianity Today article titled “Islam, Immigration, and Catholics.” He also participated in the Religion and the American Revolution Seminar sponsored by the Witherspoon Institute in Princeton, N.J., July 25–31 and his article “Religion and Colonial American Politics” was published in the Encyclopedia of Religion in America (Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010). John Easterling, Ph.D. (Christian Ministries) took six NWC soccer players to South Africa for four weeks for ministry outreach during the World Cup, May 29–June 23. David Fenrick, Ph.D. (Christian Ministries) was re-elected Secretary-Treasurer of the Association of Professors of Mission. He was also appointed to the American Society of Missiology’s Renewal and Strategic Planning Task Force.

iSTOCK

Robin Bell, Ph.D. (Christian Ministries) is a contributing author for Coming Together in the 21st Century: The Bible’s Message in an Age of Diversity, Judson Press 2010. Bell wrote the community action study guide for each chapter.

Northwestern Named a Star Tribune Top Workplace

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n June, Northwestern College was named a Star Tribune Top Workplace for 2010. Of 100 companies selected for this honor, Northwestern ranked seventh in the private/nonprofit large organizations category (500+ employees) and 10th overall (large organizations category). In this same category, Northwestern ranked second for working conditions/culture, and third for managers (employee confidence in competence and direction). The Star Tribune, with help from Workplace Dynamics, conducted a comprehensive analysis of organizations in Minnesota, surveying employees to measure qualities such as company leadership, career opportunities, workplace flexibility, compensation and benefits. More than 33,000 employees in Minnesota shared their views for the survey. Seventy-four percent of NWC employees participated in the confidential workplace survey in February 2010; NWC had one of the highest response rates among the participating organizations. “All Northwestern employees are an integral part of the NWC community and continually provide enthusiasm in their work and service to the organization,” said Tim Rich, director of Human Resources. “Their dedication to serving each student is the foundation for creating the Christ-centered community that makes Northwestern College stand out among other schools.” Results were reported publicly in the June 20 issue of the Star Tribune, and the full list of results and rankings is available online at StarTribune.com/topworkplaces.

It’s been just over one year since last fall’s groundbreaking for the new Billy Graham Community Life Commons (BGCLC), and the progress on the building and campus green is right on track, according to Brian Humphries, associate vice president for facilities operation and planning. Humphries noted that “the prayer effort surrounding the project has truly allowed this building to stand its ground,” and said that the project has progressed for more than 280 days without a work-related injury. A prayer team of staff, faculty and students continues to meet together regularly to pray for the building and construction project. The BGCLC is scheduled to officially open next fall.

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JOSH STOKES

Update: Billy Graham Community Life Commons

Fulbright Recipient Rachel Grammer Teaches in Turkey

Mary Kay Geston, D.M.A. (Music) was selected for two new conducting positions: Voices of Experience, a new and artistically ambitious chorus for ages 55 and older, and the Great River Chorale, a 50-voice chamber choir in St. Cloud, Minn.

BY JAMIE HANSON

JAMIE HANSON

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ast spring, Rachel Grammer ’10, of McHenry, Ill., was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) Grant that gives her the opportunity to teach English in Turkey for nine months. Grammer is Northwestern’s seventh Fulbright winner in the past seven years. While at Northwestern, Grammer spent a summer studying in Israel, propelling her interest in applying for the Fulbright Grant. “My experience in Israel was the primary reason I chose to apply for the ETA in Turkey,” said Grammer. “It gave me a different perspective on the Middle East; it gave me a heart for the people in that area of the world.” The Fulbright ETA program places students in schools or universities in a designated country to teach English through a variety of activities. During their experience, Fulbright recipients are integrated into the host community, giving them a greater perspective and knowledge of the country and increasing their language skills. Her degree in English helped prepare her for this experience, Grammer noted. “A lot of my [Northwestern] classes will serve me well as I teach English—the language/linguistics courses will be beneficial.” Grammer departed for Turkey in September and sees this opportunity as one that will stretch her in her abilities and character—and hopefully provide a few answers to guide her future. “I’ve considered going back to school to get my master’s degree in TESOL [Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages] or linguistics,” she said. “I hope that this experience will clarify some of my future as far as teaching and whether or not I want to work abroad, perhaps in missions or international communication.” The Fulbright Grant program is a part of the U.S. Institute of International Education and selects participants with strong academic merit and leadership potential.

Kent Kaiser, Ph.D. (Communication) presented a paper, “From Social Control to PostFeminism: A Longitudinal Analysis of Reporting on Title IX by Journalist Gender,” at the annual conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication in Denver, Colo., in August. Joanna Klein, Ph.D. (Biology) presented a workshop, “Investigation of Escherichia coli in freshwater sources using membrane filtration and Rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting,” at the 2010 annual meeting of the Association of Biology Laboratory Educators, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, June 21–26. The summer portion of the Science Research Institute was held at NWC, July 6–Aug. 6. Participants included 18 high school students, two high school teachers and six NWC and Concordia University students. Joel Light, M.A. (Biology) and Teresa Gonske, Ph.D. (Mathematics) taught in the institute while Joanna Klein, Ph.D. serves as co-director of the program. Matt Miller, Ph.D. (History) had his research recognized in an essay by Robert Bird on the state of the field of Russian intellectual history as one of the “most distinctive contributions” to the field since 2002. Miller also traveled to Russia for two months during the summer to serve as an advisor for SPAN, an interdisciplinary research program for Minnesota students.

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Dean Paulson Accepts Pastorate, Leaves NWC After 19 Years

Garry Morgan, D. Miss. (Christian Ministries) was interviewed in the September 2010 issue of the Minnesota Christian Chronicle for an article titled “The changing landscape of the mission field.”

James Raymo, D.Min. (Biblical & Theological Studies) received his Doctor of Ministry in Global and Contextual Leadership from Bethel Seminary in June. Boyd Seevers, Ph.D. (Biblical & Theological Studies) served as visiting professor at Jerusalem University College in Israel during the spring 2010 semester, where he taught a class, continued researching and writing a book on warfare in the Old Testament, and traveled twice to Jordan. Kenneth Young, D. Min., Ph.D. (Christian Ministries, Biblical & Theological Studies) was awarded his second doctorate, a Ph.D. in Theology, from Luther Seminary. His dissertation topic was titled “John Perkins in Conversation with Other Black Theologians: Towards a Model for Deconstructing ‘Racialization’ and Dismantling Racism in the Evangelical Church.”

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NWC PHOTOJOURNALISM WORKSHOP

Louis Porter II, M.A. (Communication, Multicultural Affairs) received a McKnight Foundation Fellowship to attend an international symposium on the increasing diversity of voices being taught, published and critiqued. The symposium was held in September at the Salzburg Global Seminar headquarters, Schloss Leopoldskron, Austria. This was the second McKnight Foundation Fellowship Porter has received.

fter 19 years of serving Northwestern College, Dean Paulson, director of Campus Ministries, said his final “welcome to chapel” in Maranatha Hall. In his farewell chapel message on Tuesday, Sept. 7, Paulson shared how he hoped to be remembered. “Remember that I glorified God by exalting Christ,” he said. “It hasn’t been about exalting Dean Paulson for 19 years.” Paulson announced in June that he had accepted the senior pastor position at Kost Evangelical Church in North Branch, Minn., after serving as interim pastor there since October 2009. Paulson felt God calling him to be a pastor because of his love for the work and the joy he finds in it. “The church, the local gathering of believers, by God’s design is His agent to reach the world for Christ,” he said. “I am looking forward to being back on the front lines. But,” he added, “I do miss the students.” Janae Stynsberg ’13 said of Paulson’s role, “It’s a huge spot to fill because he did so much for our chapels, for the students and as a professor.” Students described Paulson as “caring,” “passionate,” “honest” and “dedicated.” A common theme among those reflecting on Paulson’s time at Northwestern is his engagement with students. “He went out of his way to reach out to students,” said Ryan Christiansen ’11. Students also remember Paulson for his sense of humor. In his last chapel, Paulson joked, “When students ask me who they should marry, I tell them, but no one ever listens.” Christiansen recalled that Paulson “always had a big smile on his face, and it was contagious when he started laughing.” Paulson’s career at Northwestern included a number of positions. He became a discipleship coordinator in 1991 and an adjunct professor in the Department of Biblical & Theological Studies in 1996 and later took on the role of director of Campus Ministries, which included coordinating and overseeing daily chapel. One of Paulson’s proudest achievements is starting praise chapel. Paulson’s desire was to be an integral part in students’ lives, and hopes his legacy is “that students left Northwestern reflecting more of the image of Christ in their lives than when they started and that I got to be a little part of the process.”

“I am looking forward to being back on the front lines. But, I do miss the students.”

AARON HAGSTROM ’11, NWC COLUMN NEWS EDITOR, CONTRIBUTED TO THIS ARTICLE.

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GUY MAGNO JOSH STOKES

Ministering to NWC Constituents and Students

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ith a background in ministry, Jim Johnson ’94 admits it was an interesting twist to his journey when God directed his return to NWC in 2006 to take on the role of director of Alumni Relations. For the past four years Johnson has served NWC alumni, parents and churches. ���The best part of my job has been the opportunity to interact with our constituents as they share their stories,” he said. “It is incredible how God has directed each of our paths first to Himself and then to, through and beyond this place we love called Northwestern College.” As Johnson transitions into a new role as Senior Director for Constituent Relations and Campus Ministries, he will use his interpersonal strengths and background to minister to and with students, as well as continue to create partnerships with our alumni, parent and church constituent groups. In this new hybrid role, Johnson will focus on setting the vision for both offices and working with directors and their teams to help serve students, alumni, parents and churches in the best way possible as NWC moves forward to what he calls a “new tomorrow.” Johnson will continue to meet with alumni, parents and church leaders personally to foster stronger relationships. He will also continue to speak at conferences, camps and churches on behalf of Northwestern. On the Campus Ministries side, he coordinates daily chapel guests, speaks regularly to the student body and disciples students in their formative faith journeys. “I am excited each day to be involved in what God is doing across our campus and beyond,” said Johnson. “I love to share from God’s Word, mentor through discipleship and to create environments that lead to further spiritual growth, and [now] I truly feel blessed to be able to do all three; I have fallen into my dream job.”

Jim Bender Leads Alumni & Parent Relations

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n September, Jim Bender F’00 became Northwestern’s new director of Alumni & Parent Relations. Bender attended Northwestern in the early 1980s, then returned after several years in law enforcement and graduated in 2000 through the FOCUS program. He has also served as president of the Alumni Council. We had the opportunity to catch up with him to talk about his new role.

What are you most excited about in your new role? I am most excited about interacting with our alums, parents and friends. The opportunity to serve those associated with Northwestern is hard to consider a job—it is like visiting with family!

What are your initial goals? To connect with as many alumni as possible. I want to assist alumni in their current vocational callings and provide leadership development opportunities. I also want to engage more with our current student body so they know us as their friends/family prior to graduation. I want to work with the Parent Council to use their unique viewpoint to provide valuable input regarding their students’ experience.

What book are you reading right now? I just finished Bill Hybels’ latest book The Power of a Whisper—one of the most amazing books I have ever read! I am in the middle of Sacred Marriage by Gary Thomas—a book we send to alums who notify us that they are getting married.

When you’re not hanging out with alumni and parents, what do you enjoy doing most? I like bike riding around the lakes, traveling to visit our married children, attending Minnesota Twins games and college sporting events. I also like to golf although it is my most frustrating hobby—through which I have not learned patience but rather gardening, due to the divots I dig with my clubs!

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Sacred Bridges: Choir Tour Connects Continents Through Music

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The choir’s complete tour blog and archives are available online at nwc.edu/music under Ensembles. A limited number of CDs featuring the music from the Sacred Bridges tour are available for sale. Contact the Department of Music at 888-878-5514 for details.

n May 18, the 79-voice Northwestern College Choir, under the direction of Timothy Sawyer, embarked on a two-week concert, ministry and cross-cultural tour of the Baltic countries of Latvia, Estonia and Finland. The international tour brought with it the usual mishaps—lost boxes of choir robes, jet lag and rain—but also facilitated joy amidst the choir and inspired the faith of listeners. The choir’s program, “Sacred Bridges,” represented a musical “American choral music is very seldom heard response to the 1990s Soviet in Finland, and the Northwestern College freedom movement (often called “The Singing Revolution”) in the Choir proved to be a brilliant ambassador of Baltic States. Through the tour and sacred American choral repertoire.” the music, the choir focused on the ultimate Sacred Bridge: The — Markus Yli-Jokipii, conductor, Cross of Christ, the bridge between Turku Conservatory Chamber Choir God and all people of the world. Through one piece, O Crux, the choir lifted their voices to deliver their message about the Cross. It was composed by John Orfe especially for the choir and trombonist Jeremy Kolwinska, chair of the Department of Music. Tour performance stops included Riga, Latvia, at the Riga Dome Cathedral, the Estonian cities of Tartu, Narva and Talinn—at the Oleviste Church—and finally the Finnish cities of Turku and Helsinki.

Offering ‘everything we had to give’ The final concert and a worship service were held in the famous Tempeliaukio (Rock Church) in Helsinki, Finland. Soprano Anna Osborne ’11 said in the choir’s blog, “The [Temppeliaukio] church is actually carved into the rock, and the roof compels you to look up into the light…. As we offered Him everything that we had to give—…our exhaustion…as well as our exuberance, joy and love—He… transformed us, using us to make His name great and greatly known.” The tour was full of joy but had times of grief as well. The day before the choir left Minnesota, Sawyer’s father suffered a massive stroke. Sawyer joined the tour a day late and his father died while the group was still overseas. Reflecting on this turn of events, Sawyer wrote: “Surrounded by my choir ‘family’ during each day, with their amazing singing to keep us focused on the task at hand, there was nowhere else in the world I could have been. I know my dad wanted me to go, and my wife, children and an army of friends loved, supported and prayed us through a difficult two weeks. I am once again humbled and uplifted by God’s faithfulness….”

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MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC CONTRIBUTED TO THIS ARTICLE.

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Time at Northwestern: A New Perspective for Daystar University Students Kenyan students study business & economics in Minnesota

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BY JANELLE HAMRE ’11

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ake up. Shower. Get dressed. Keys, phone, wallet. Caribou. Work. Lunch. Work. Home. Dinner. Family. Sleep. Repeat daily for average life in America. In August, students from Daystar University in Kenya visited Northwestern College and the Twin Cities and found themselves swept quickly into the current of activity that propels the American culture. Daystar University is a sister school of Northwestern College, located in east Africa with campuses in both Nairobi and Mombasa, Kenya. It offers studies ranging from Economics to unique areas of study such as Peace and Conflict Transformation. Biannually, students from the Daystar commerce (business) department take an international tour to study business in another culture. After discussion with Northwestern College President Alan Cureton, Ph.D. and Vice President for Global Initiatives Al Ottley, Ph.D., Daystar selected the Twin Cities as the destination for their 2010 tour. During their two-week visit, Daystar students enjoyed a rich Northwestern experience, living intermingled with summer residents in Arden Hall and even seeing the Rock along the campus road artfully stenciled with the Kenyan flag (by Northwestern student Rachel Moretto). More central to their trip, however, was their study of business, which included presentations and discussions with CEOs and leaders of major companies including General Mills, Medtronic, Best Buy and KPMG.

Reflecting on their experience, Daystar students commented on the business men and women (many Northwestern alumni) that they had met: “Passion. They have a passion for excellence.” Another student said, “What interests me… is the culture of togetherness working in the same spirit as a team. This would make us a society where we are able to bring up the poor.” After visiting companies in Minnesota, Daystar students began to develop ideas to bring home to Africa. Their ideas even included application of American time-management skills. Students were surprised by how relentlessly efficient their schedules were constructed to be, even for a two-week stint studying business in the Twin Cities. Between events, there’s about enough time for a sneeze. In the U.S., children, college students and adults alike always seem to be wishing they had more unscheduled time. But students from Daystar University saw advantages to the scheduled lifestyles that most Americans live. They suggested that their communities in Africa might be more likely to advance if they worked with a similar (though perhaps not as extreme) efficiency.

International exchange The Northwestern/Daystar exchange program is the beginning of other similar opportunities as Northwestern focuses on outreach and partnerships with colleges, universities and organizations across the globe. “We want to see other countries grow and develop,” Ottley said. “We encourage students to work in their country—to better their country. We would love to see the students go back home and provide the resources and talent to build their country. “We are reaching out, to provide not only exchange opportunities but also sending opportunities,” said Ottley. “We want our students to go out into the world as much as we want other students to come here, to Northwestern. It has to be a two-way street.” The Daystar visit created opportunities for fresh perspectives and cultural exchange. With collaboration from the Northwestern Department of Business, Event Services, and the Global Initiatives Task Force, students from Kenya were able to experience U.S. business culture in a way that was, according to Ottley, “beyond outstanding.”

“We are reaching out, to provide not only exchange opportunities but also sending opportunities.”

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JOSH STOKES

TICE PHOTOGRAPHY

Meet the Board

Sara Robertson ’54 Connection to NWC As an Illinois native, Sara Robertson ’54, Ed.D. narrowed her college choices to Wheaton (close to home) or Northwestern College in Minnesota. She sent away for a catalog from both schools and within a week received response from Northwestern. When she didn’t receive a Wheaton catalog she took this as a sign she was meant to attend Northwestern.

Education and career Her experience at NWC had great impact on her future, specifically stemming from Robertson’s involvement in the speech program/debate team. While at NWC, Mark Lee, then chair of the speech department, became Robertson’s mentor and she stays in touch with him to this day.

“I am impressed at the incredible quality of thinking that has gone into the development of the curriculum and the various programs at Northwestern.” After graduation, she went on to teach high school speech. It was there that she met individuals involved in Pioneer Clubs, leading her to a career in curriculum development, fundraising and her eventual position as the vice president for development for Pioneer Clubs.

Vision for NWC As Northwestern not only provides education, but also media ministry,

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Robertson strongly believes there is great opportunity to influence many generations through both the college programs and on-air. “I am impressed at the incredible quality of thinking that has gone into the development of the curriculum and the various programs at Northwestern,” said Robertson. She also sees the personal interest that faculty take in their teaching and their students as an extremely important part of the institution.

Interests Now retired, Robertson is an avid reader and manages to read four or five books at once: fiction, nonfiction, religious, and something related to her passions in gender issues or ecology. She also enjoys traveling, sailing, camping, playing games and visiting her cottage in Michigan.

Values to live by While traveling during college, Robertson heard a sermon from which she drew three principles that guide her life: schedule, proportion, and remaining spiritually minded. “Being spiritually minded is incumbent on us as Christians to grow,” said Robertson. “Each day I try to be very aware of how I’m living, making sure that it’s according to the fruit of the Spirit. It’s important to continue growing in the Lord—even for someone who graduated 56 years ago.”

KTIS, Morgan Wood Recognized for Community Service by Industry Peers The Christian Music Broadcasters (CMB) honored KTIS’ efforts and contributions to serve the Twin Cities, and also recognized the station’s innovative promotions, through two awards presented in September at the CMB Echo Awards ceremony in Orlando. 98.5 KTIS accepted the Rob Gregory Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions made to the community through the medium of radio. Jason Sharp, KTIS station manager, invited the entire KTIS contingent present at the ceremony to join him on the stage as he accepted the award and acknowledgements of media peers on behalf of the station. Morgan Wood, director of listener and community engagement at KTIS, was also recognized as Promotions Director of the Year. Wood is widely recognized for the creation and implementation of PrayerWorks, an online, interactive program that connects listeners who have prayer concerns with others willing to pray. At the conference, KTIS staff also participated in educational sessions and meetings, swapping ideas with colleagues from other stations and meeting with reps from various record labels. The Christian Music Broadcasters organization exists to further the excellence of Christian radio across the nation and to create venues for continued exchange of information and ideas. It facilitates community among Christian radio stations, which enables growth and ministry.

Sounding Sharp

New KTIS station manager looks to the future BY JENNY COLLINS ’05

How will you and your team shape KTIS for this next decade? Our mission guides everything we do and that is “to bring people to Christ and nurture believers in their spiritual growth through Christ-centered media.” We have a vision to “engage and mobilize the KTIS family to connect with and love our community through Christ.” We believe that if we can accomplish our vision then we will indeed accomplish our mission. We promote initiatives like PrayerWorks, I Can Help–Twin Cities, and the Drive-Thru Difference because they help accomplish what we believe God is calling us to do.

You receive testimonies from listeners each day. Which one has inspired you most?

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n June 30, Jason Sharp took the helm as station manager for 98.5 KTIS FM (Minneapolis/St. Paul), after three years on the job as the station’s director of programming. His 21-year journey in Christian radio—both on the air and in leadership—has led him through Delaware, Virginia, Tennessee, Louisiana and Minnesota. With KTIS’ 61-year history to build upon, Sharp looks to the future of the station and shares his enthusiasm about what lies ahead.

What challenges does 98.5 KTIS face today? Meeting people “where they are” spiritually is constantly a challenge. We are blessed to have 475,000 people listening each week and all are in a different place. So meeting their needs can be a difficult task! Just like it says in First Corinthians, some need milk and some need solid food. And then, others haven’t even come to the table yet! Between our music-based format and our sister station Faith 900 KTIS AM’s in-depth biblical teaching, our prayer is that we will reach people at the right time in the right way.

What needs does Christian radio serve in an era of satellite radio and the Internet? For us, it is all about serving our local community. We believe God put KTIS on the air in 1949 for a reason and we want to be good stewards of that responsibility. It pleases my heart when I hear ministries like Minnesota Teen Challenge, Union Gospel Mission or Tree House on KTIS. That we can use the tool we have to tell our audience about ministries in this community­—and even encourage community members to serve one another—is a tremendous opportunity.

Nicole e-mailed me to tell me that God found her through a cup of coffee and Starbucks! It’s an amazing testimony. A KTIS listener did the Drive-Thru Difference and paid for Nicole’s coffee. Nicole read the flyer that was handed to her and started listening to KTIS. She had never listened before and felt convicted to start going to church where weeks later, she accepted Christ and was baptized. All because of a cup of coffee! I can’t imagine the joy that the “giver” will feel one day when Jesus introduces him or her to Nicole. That story inspires me because the vision (engaging, mobilizing, connecting, loving) helped accomplish our mission— bring people to Christ!

Who selects the songs in KTIS’ playlist rotations? How do you manage the broad range of opinions on this? The KTIS director of programming selects the music. Prior to being named station manager, that was my responsibility, but it now belongs to Keith Stevens. It is not easy to achieve the “perfect music mix” for all of our listeners. That’s why we created the KTIS Music Team. I encourage people to join this team by going to our website at ktis.fm. That truly is the best way for you to pick the songs that you would like to hear each day…and even the songs that you do not want to hear.

When you’re not listening to KTIS, what are you listening to on your iPod? Oh my. Is this where everyone thinks I am either crazy or really cool? OK...as I look through my iPod, I see Neil Diamond, Milli Vanilli, The Statler Brothers, Bee Gees, Bruce Hornsby, and the Eagles, to name a few.

Tell us about your family. They are truly a gift from God. Julie and I celebrated our 14th wedding anniversary and we have two children: Haley, our 11-yearold daughter, enjoys piano, clarinet and is a budding artist. Carson, our 8-year-old son, is into everything that includes a ball or a puck. Julie works in admissions at the kids’ school in Andover.

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JOSH STOKES

Meet the Board

George Kenworthy As senior pastor at Wayzata (Minn.) Evangelical Free Church for more than 13 years, George Kenworthy, D.Min., got to know many students who attended Northwestern. Members of his congregation also introduced him to the college and over the years he developed connections with various members of the faculty, staff and administration.

Education and career Compelled by the command in Matthew 6:33 to seek the Kingdom of God first, Kenworthy felt called to the ministry field. He studied at Concordia College and Trinity University (B.A.), Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) (Th.M.) and Denver Seminary (D.Min.). He started his ministry career in 1972 at a church in Illinois and has since served as pastor at churches in Iowa, Colorado, Indiana and Minnesota. Kenworthy is founder and president of Reconciliation Associates Inc., a group of Christian professionals who counsel

“The greatest distinctive at Northwestern is its unabashed commitment to teaching students how to live out a biblical worldview.” individuals and couples in order to save, restore and improve marriages. He has written two books, Marriage Makeover and Before the Last Resort: 3 Simple Questions to Rescue Your Marriage. Kenworthy’s role on the academic committee on the Board of Trustees is

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informed by the fact that since 1974 he has been an adjunct professor of Old Testament and preaching at various seminaries including TEDS, Denver Seminary and for the last 18 years at Bethel Seminary in St. Paul.

Vision for NWC “The greatest distinctive at Northwestern is its unabashed commitment to teaching students how to live out a biblical worldview,” said Kenworthy. He believes Northwestern can continue to serve as a light for years to come as the college continues to believe “with God anything is possible” and stay focused on the major themes proclaimed in the Bible.

Family and interests Kenworthy’s family literally spans the globe as two of his three children are missionaries. He and his wife, Joan—a former second grade teacher—stay busy with seven grandchildren. Joan also travels with him around the world as he speaks at military bases and in various mission settings. When not working, Kenworthy enjoys golf, bike riding, hiking, working on cars, fixing whatever is broken, and reading— his favorite book is the Bible. He also enjoys learning from the Bible’s original languages, Greek and Hebrew.

Values to live by Kenworthy firmly believes that his sole purpose is to influence others for Jesus and hopes to impact as many people as he can for Christ in as short a time as possible.

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Connection to NWC

No More Excuses: 24/7 Fitness Center Opens in Student Center Over the summer, Northwestern installed a new 24-hour fitness center in the Robertson Student Center, in the space previously occupied by a swimming pool. The fitness center features high-quality treadmills, elliptical machines and other weight and exercise equipment. At the official opening on September 22, President Alan Cureton, Vice President for Student Life & Athletics Matt Hill and Trustee Michael Meloch dedicated the fitness center to the physical and spiritual health of students, with an official ribbon-cutting and prayer of blessing. Funding for the fitness center was provided by Meloch and his wife Karin, who served as the NWC Eagles women’s soccer coach from 1996 to 2005.

Long Range Strategic Plan Approved by Trustees

AL SCHUCK

I Women’s Basketball Bids Farewell to Schuck

L

ast spring marked the end of an era as women’s basketball head coach Linda (Burkart ’90) Schuck retired from 13 years of coaching the Eagles. Schuck, who decided to spend more time with her family, left as the program’s winningest coach, having amassed 216 career victories. Schuck is the first NWC women’s basketball coach to surpass the 200-win mark. She is the owner of three Upper Midwest Athletic Conference (UMAC) Coach of the Year awards. After wearing an Eagles uniform from 1988–1990, Schuck almost immediately took her place as assistant coach under Sherri Holm. Schuck began as head coach in 1997. During her tenure, more than 100 academic All-American, academic all-conference or scholar-athlete awards have been distributed to individuals on the Northwestern women’s basketball team. “The success of Linda’s teams has gone far beyond the basketball court,” said Matt Hill ’89, Ed.D., vice president for Student Life & Athletics. “I have had the privilege to watch our student-athletes grow under her direction in their personal faith journeys, in the classroom and in the game of basketball.”

n June, the Northwestern College Board of Trustees approved Northwestern’s 2010–2015 Long Range Strategic Plan (LRSP), which was established from a cross-section of the Northwestern College and Northwestern Media communities and affirms our mission and vision. “The new LRSP comes at a perfect moment in our 108year history,” said President Alan Cureton. “Our unique focus on Christ-centered higher education and media continues to attract excellent students, faculty and listeners from around the nation. The exciting and timely initiatives contained in this plan will help us build on that legacy as we promote and strengthen our shared mission.”

Priority Goals for Northwestern College: • • • •

Build a Christ-centered learning community Pursue academic excellence Cultivate leadership development Ensure sufficient resources and their efficient, effective use

Priority Goals for Northwestern Media: • • • • •

Build Christ-centered, engaging and nurturing communities Pursue media excellence Develop God-honoring leaders Acquire/Ensure efficient use of resources Implement new delivery systems

You may view a summary of the 2010–2015 Long Range Strategic Plan at nwc.edu/lrsp.

New head coach Taking the reins from Schuck is Aaron Kahl, who this year became the sixth women’s basketball head coach in Northwestern history. Kahl joins the Eagles athletic staff after a three-year head coaching stint at Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell, S.D. He began his coaching career at Gustavus Adolphus College, his alma mater, in 2001. GREG JOHNSON ’05 CONTRIBUTED TO THIS ARTICLE.

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ALEX KITSON ’12

GOLF | SAVAGE, MN | MARKETING MY TEAMMATES CALL ME: Rife PRE-GAME RITUAL: Marking my golf ball FAVORITE SPORTS FILM: Invictus

N ’11 ASHLBAEYLLOL| SO BAXTER, MN SOFT

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JOSH STOKES

ME: AO MY TEAMMATES CALL ach Club FOOD: Jimmy John’s Be FAVORITE POST-GAME ES ME: My grandfather ATHLETE WHO INSPIR

EYE ON THE

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They’re dedicated competitors known for teamwork, intensity and championship wins. The Northwestern Eagles—325 studentathletes and their coaches—integrate faith, academics and sport to the glory of God.

IZALES ’12 REBEKAHMNCARR | PSYCHOLOGY

SOCCER | ANOKA,

er the Titans FAVORITE SPORTS FILM: Rememb Ping-Pong RT: FAVORITE OBSCURE OLYMPIC SPO ter United ches TEAM I ROOT FOR: Man

ERS ’13 MARIE&PET FIELD | MINOQUA, WI TRACK

| ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

e vault and picture perfect techniqu picture myself going through the tally men To AL: RITU ME -GA PRE RT: Biathlon FAVORITE OBSCURE OLYMPIC SPO TEAM I ROOT FOR: Packers

KABAKAS CLARK ’13

FOOTBALL

| BARTOW, FL | PHYSICAL EDUCATION

MY TEAMMATES CALL ME: Coco Be ar ATHLETE WHO IN SPIRES ME: Ray Le wis (NFL Baltimor TEAM I ROOT FO e Ravens) R: Buccaneers

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N R E T S E W H T R O N S ’ E L L I S T ROSEV L U S E R F O D A E H A S E L P I C N I R P PUTS O

BE R E O N SE PT EM A R TR IB U N ST E TH IN PU BL IS H ED R IG IN A LLY

7, 20 10 .

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BY RACHEL BL

ular live by a partic le to say they op fully pe r to fo lt sy cu t’s ea more diffi can be much It eth . es ilm lu W h va et of set why it took B is ch hi w , begin commit to them yball team to uade her volle rs pe to ar ye a about calls.” making “honor estern College eville’s Northw os R at h to ac co The d her players and she wante , ity gr te er in line judges H es t. stress if officials or on the cour t ne es e pl ci th in at pr s r ei en if touche an demonstrate th these plays ev ing officials of ocker touches ers self-report CALLS: Inform ay n an Eagles bl e pl R m he l O W ga al N d O n: yb H an tio lle — es vo sugg t of bounds . Northwestern r team. ot that goes ou do not see them ded to the othe should ar es aw gl is opponent’s sh Ea t e in th po ns the see the touch— int. That the result mea officials don’t st them the po co ld ou w . ch whi college self-report it, at a Christian ugh sell, even to a e asked be Sh to e. ed prov persistenc es ch ea pr so al last fall, But Wilmeth ed online pray about it ents were post ink, talk and th to s le with er tib ay pa pl llowing comm Tribune website. m fo co her e in Th ed em the Star t that once se and sign by readers on and a concep come symbol be s ha t iri sp ’s e ould be about, thwestern the competitiv What sports sh st month, Nor ... La tly . ac m ra Ex og pr ’ urch conduct our 2009–10 for the Eagles we should all I don’t go to ch earned it the w ly lls al ho ca d on r rs an no Pe ho ! to WOW t, Christian or ard for ed with commitment or off the cour pocrisy involv tsmanship Aw or hy on e , Sp th es e et of liv hl e At us tbeca ed by josiah88 meone NCAA Studen tian alike. post ory this is, so ris st t Ch ea ngr no a t . ha es it, w rough ace female athlet at 11:38 AM ly following th too—still grim on Sep. 7, 10 team!) actual ly and Wilmeth, al le iti s— ho by in er (w ed at ay st pl th po e ea ! Th But an id es and beliefs ender a point. with their valu enabled the s ha when they surr ls 10 at 10:13 AM ia fic of e24 on Sep. 7, nents and ol po bc op ol ro ho ed sc er r ild ei bew print on th e a unique im ality that Eagles to mak ing the spiritu en ep de le hi w t, and their spor . em th es id gu

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READER RESPONSES

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guide them—tenacity, integrity, love, release from the pressure to win, and forming authentic relationships—and floated the idea of honor calls as part of living those ideals. Even after her players accepted it, it took others a while to do so. Before the first games of the 2009 season, Wilmeth told the officials what her team planned to do, then figured word would get around. It didn’t, and neither referees nor opponents could grasp the idea of a team willingly giving up a point. “In our first tournament, at Augsburg, the officials met and decided what we were doing wasn’t fair,” she said. “So they started ignoring our calls, and it was really funny to watch the team’s reaction. They had finally decided to do it, and the ref wouldn’t take it. It was so different that it surprised people at first.” UMAC officials determined there was no rule prohibiting honor calls. When they checked with the NCAA, they were told it was definitely OK—and that NCAA representatives admired and encouraged it. Honor calls have not yet cost Northwestern a match, but they did take 30 points away from the Eagles last season. In return, they have strengthened the players’ dedication to the high standards their faith calls them to follow, which has had a ripple effect. Other teams have begun asking about the concept. Some have simply emulated it, which might be the greatest honor of all. “Last year, in a game against Wisconsin-Eau Claire, one of our girls made an honor call,” Sandstrom said. “On the next point, one of their girls made one. I felt like that’s how volleyball is supposed to be played. It was really nice.”

JOSH STOKES

“It was a hard thing to get used to,” senior setter Leah Kostek said. “I’m so competitive that the first few times it happened on crucial points, I had to tell myself, ‘This is a good thing! This is a good thing!’ “I was really frustrated, but deep down, I knew it was the right thing to do. I’m proud of my teammates, and I’m proud to be an Eagle.” Middle blocker Elissa Sandstrom has had to make several honor calls on herself, and her initial opposition has morphed into unexpected joy. “Now I love doing it,” she said. “It still stinks giving up a point, but it feels right. Other teams have said, ‘Thank you for being honest.’ And if you want to be a person of integrity, you have to have it in all areas.” Wilmeth became intrigued with the honor-calls concept in 2008. After the NCAA Division III Eagles set a school record for victories with a 30-7 record—and went 14-0 in the Upper Midwest Athletic Conference to win their second title in a row—she wanted to set a new standard for achievement, one that wasn’t centered on numbers. One of the Eagles’ opponents that season, Ohio’s Cedarville University, made honor calls. Wilmeth decided to challenge her players to be a “legacy team,” one that left a lasting impression for the athletes who would follow. She set five core principles to

Coach Wilmeth on NCAA Panel Head Volleyball Coach Beth Wilmeth ’02 joined an elite “team” on September 22 in Indianapolis, Ind., invited as a panelist in a discussion about civility, sportsmanship and competition in athletics. The event took place at a private luncheon sponsored by the Indiana Humanities Council and several Indiana sports organizations, and was part of the American Civility Tour with Former U.S. Representative Jim Leach (Iowa), chair of the National Endowment for Humanities. Panel members discussed going beyond competition, and cultivating and maintaining a team that has a reputation of aspiring to higher ideals. In addition to Leach and Wilmeth, the panel included: • • •

Bill Polian, president of the Indianapolis Colts Bernard Franklin, executive vice president for the NCAA Clark Kellogg, vice president of player relations for the Indiana Pacers (moderator)

A September 28 blog entry on the Indiana Humanities Council’s website (indianahumanities.org) included this comment in the post about the panel discussion: “Dr. Franklin then discussed his idea of the ‘classroom beyond,’ the notion that high school and particularly collegiate sports systems have a responsibility to help their players develop emotional, as well as athletic, skills and values. Civility, he argued, is an expression of one’s values: sportsmanship and respect for the other, whatever the field, are the core values that drive civil life.” Wilmeth noted during the discussion that integrity and character are appropriately higher goals than winning, and shared how the NWC volleyball team’s honor call commitment has led to team members pursuing greater integrity in their academic and personal lives as well.

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JOSH STOKES

Sweat and Spirit BY ELISSA SANDSTROM ’10

Adapted from a speech given to new student-athletes at athletic orientation in August.

Serving the Greater Mission The Eagles regularly use sports to share the love of Christ around the world. • For spring break 2010, the volleyball team ministered in El Salvador and Guatemala at orphanages and homeless shelters, and shared their testimonies after matches.

before a game. There is the actual scoreboard that counts points • The men’s basketball team hen I first came to Northwestern I had no idea of the and determines the has collaborated with plans that God had for me here. I thought I would just outcome of the game; missionaries/churches to come in and do the whole college thing: play volleyball, however, there is another share the Gospel through get an education, and be on my merry way afterwards. scoreboard that weighs basketball games and I soon realized that God had brought me to Northwestern for a eternal significance, and clinics in Argentina (2010), bigger purpose than I could ever imagine. And now I can’t imagine when the game is over, Ecuador (2007), England leaving everything behind when I graduate in December. I had no we should care more (2004), and the Czech idea that Northwestern would become a home filled with friends about that scoreboard Republic (2001). and mentors that will truly last a lifetime. than the other. • Members of the men’s When I came to Northwestern I wasn’t sure what the difference Between classes and soccer team traveled to was between Christian and non-Christian teams. In the back of my friends, my favorite South Africa for missions mind, I thought volleyball was going to be something that we did, thing at Northwestern is and evangelism during the but didn’t really try at or care about. That is, it wasn’t our main athletics. It is so much 2010 World Cup. priority because we were not getting athletic scholarships to play fun getting a bunch of and it didn’t really matter if we won or lost. friends together before However, on my first day of tryouts I was awakened to find out a big football game that effort did matter! Right away the returning players were going and having a tailgate party, or going to a men’s basketball game all out, and I kind of took a step back and thought, “Hey, this is when all the fans are standing and the score is tied 71-71 with just like before!” The difference was that the team cared more three seconds left in the second half. But Eagle athletics are truly about my character as a person and making God look good, than unique in the fact that your coaches and teammates are more the outcome on the scoreboard. concerned about you than the outcome of the game. We have all Our theme two years ago was “Fixed on the Eternal” and one been in the place where we have still won the game when our of our captains put our purpose wonderfully during devotions heart wasn’t there, or we put our blood and sweat on the line just to wind up losing. It is easy to get caught up in winning, but being an Eagle has taught me that it is not about winning or personal satisfaction, Elissa Sandstrom but rather playing to honor Christ. Hometown: Awards & Records: Regardless of the score, we play 100 Cloquet, Minn. 3-year Letter Winner percent in order to show Christ to the NCCAA Scholar-Athlete (2009) other teams. So remember this fall, as you Major: NCCAA First Team All-Regional (2009) go through everything for the first time, your Business 3rd in UMAC in Blocks (2009) purpose is to bring Him glory!

W

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A WINNING FORMULA MATH

BY COLLEEN BEMIS F’05

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ootball schemes in a playbook may look like complicated math formulas, but that’s not the connection between sports and mathematics for Jonathon Peterson ’03, Ph.D. It is the lessons of faith and community he learned from teammates, coaches and teachers at Northwestern College that influenced Peterson as he worked to become the highly successful mathematician he is today. After earning his master’s degree and doctorate from the University of Minnesota, Peterson is currently a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow and H.C. Wang Assistant Professor at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. At Northwestern, Peterson played football and ran on the track team from 2000 to 2003. The teams practiced hard and played to win, but it was the “off-the-field” friendships among the players that meant the most to Peterson. “It wasn’t through playing sports itself,” admitted Peterson, “it was through the relationships that made such an impact. Most of my friends were on the football team and we had a Bible study and discussed hard questions and complex theological issues. We were completely free to disagree and discuss doubts. I don’t think that would have been the case if we didn’t have the camaraderie of playing together. I think that was a really unique experience.”

PERFECT SCORE OPENED DOOR It was not the score of a football game, but a perfect score on a math test that changed the trajectory of Peterson’s career. During his sophomore year, Peterson “accidentally” took a graduate-level test written by Don Corliss,

SUBMITTED

FOOTBALL

recently retired mathematics instructor and institutional “IT WASN’T THROUGH researcher, when another instructor PLAYING SPORTS ITSELF, administered the exam to an IT WAS THROUGH THE Abstract Algebra class by mistake. Peterson’s performance was RELATIONSHIPS THAT anything but a mistake, however, MADE SUCH AN IMPACT.” and Corliss was so impressed that he wrote Peterson a note advising him to change his degree focus from education to mathematics. Corliss believed Peterson could make a significant contribution in mathematics research and encouraged him to complete his Ph.D. Peterson took the words of that four-sentence note to heart—so much so, that in 2008 when he defended his doctoral dissertation in probability theory, he invited Corliss to attend the presentation. Corliss remembers that day as one of the best in his teaching career. “He [Peterson] led off by acknowledging God’s enablement throughout his five years of graduate study. Then he acknowledged the support of his wife, Jana (Berglund ’03), and then my role in encouraging him to pursue graduate study in mathematics.” Corliss added, “I didn’t mind being third to God and Jon’s wife.” (The Petersons met on the track team and are parents of 4-yearold Anja.) Whether in sports or academics, Northwestern’s Christ-centered approach is a winning formula for Peterson. “I really liked that there were Christian coaches and teachers I could go to. It’s one of the things I’ve thought a lot about. When I started teaching, I wanted to be a positive influence on my students like the NWC professors were for me.” Some of those same professors now have another Peterson in class. Peterson’s brother, Joe Peterson ’12, is a current NWC math/engineering major.

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JOSH STOKES

BY SHELLY BARSUHN

E H TE G N I N I L S E S L O B I R C VIS IN

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t sounds like a sitcom plot. A college football coach and choir director develop an unlikely friendship. Hilarity ensues as they tread on each other’s academic turf and the disparate worlds of athletics and the arts collide. But this is really more of a reality show, the true story of the friendship between Associate Professor of Music and Director of Choral Activities Tim Sawyer and Head Football Coach Kirk Talley. Before meeting, neither was a big fan of the other’s area of expertise. Passionate about music, Sawyer remained indifferent to football. Lifelong athlete Talley said his experience with choir in middle school was “neutral.” He was corralled into participating in choir even though “it wasn’t the macho thing to do.” So what did these two accomplished men have in common besides ID cards from Northwestern? In a typical college setting their paths may rarely have crossed.

CROSSING CULTURES The story begins almost 10 years ago when Talley, as the new head coach, sent an e-mail inviting fellow male faculty to be a “coach for a day” at an upcoming football game. Sawyer showed up. Acknowledging the “huge divide between music and athletics” at the

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time, Sawyer came to practice that day. “I remember walking down the hallway and running the gauntlet with all these football players,” he recalled. “There was a smell. Of something. It was powerful.” The team was having a pre-game meeting on the bleachers. “One guy got up to do devotions. Then they started to sing. I thought, ‘Ah. Now I know why I’m here.’” A true novice, Sawyer, who grew up in South America where fútbol was soccer, watched his first Eagle football game with interest. He was struck by the effort Talley put into coaching each player, as well as his “incredible servant leadership.” That particular game was “brutal,” but Sawyer noted how team members would pray together over an injured player, and how, despite the loss, they affirmed one another during the team’s now-famous “Fifth Quarter.” Sawyer joked,“That was my ‘football conversion’ experience.” Sawyer reciprocated and invited Talley to a choir concert. Although Talley admits he has always preferred classic rock to classical music, he enjoyed the event. He remembers scrawling notes on his concert program—questions he wanted to ask Sawyer about how he organized and led his “team.” Sawyer continued coming to the games and hanging out with the players and picked up the honorary title “Coach Sawyer.” (Mingling with the players in his Eagle football jacket on the sidelines of a game, he was asked by a visitor, “What do you coach?” Without hesitation, Sawyer responded, “Voice. I’m the voice coach for the football team.”) Because he had no real authority during the games, Sawyer could focus on encouraging the players. From Talley and the other coaches he learned “how to motivate and coach rather than just direct students.” He also picked up the rules of the game. Football began to infiltrate his thinking and language—to the point where he imagined his choir students rolling their eyes during rehearsal and thinking, “Oh boy, here we go, another football analogy.” Sawyer then invited Talley to accompany

the college choir on tour. In this environment, away from football, Talley was able to mentor and build relationships with students in a world much different from his own. At first, the choir members seemed confused. “What’s Coach Talley doing here?” Before long, however, they appreciated his quiet presence. It was a powerful and affirming experience for them just to have the head football coach there, wanting to spend time with them. “There wouldn’t be a whole lot of reasons for a choir member to interact with the football coach,” said Betty Kraus ’07, M’09, a former choir member, “but [they] are intentional about that. It’s a great example for the students.” Josh Sawyer (no relation), former football player and choir member, learned that music and athletics cooperated rather than competed for students. “I’d looked at other schools where athletics had nothing to do with music. At NWC there were three or four of us who did both.” Paul Bradley, dean of student development, is a close friend of Sawyer’s and Talley’s. He looks at their friendship as representative of a broader objective. “We have a fundamental conviction about the whole-person development of our students. It is part of the culture, mindset and paradigm. Each area of the campus is important and needs to be integrated.” Nowadays the camaraderie between the two men is well known, and the connection between music and football seems natural.

PART OF THE FAMILY What has “Coach” Sawyer learned from their association? “Sometimes I get too intense. Musicians—like athletes—tend to be perfectionists. Kirk’s gentleness balances me. He’s not fixated on winning. What you learn from the loss is more important than celebrating the win. In choir now, we have a prayer huddle after the concert. We incorporate that ‘Fifth Quarter’ [model] into the huddle.” And Coach Talley? “The biggest thing I’ve learned—and God is constantly reminding me—is that these guys are

people first, not just football players. Even though I tend to be more introverted than Tim, I can develop a relationship with each. You can’t force it to happen. It has to happen by God’s grace.” Talley and Sawyer are still working on building that bridge. “We are not trying to merge the departments,” Sawyer assured, “but we’re tearing down the impenetrable wall between them.” So when Eagle football players sing together before and after a game, they now have a foundation of musical instruction from Sawyer. “See, Coach Sawyer?” one player pointed out. “We’re supporting our voices when we sing.” And choir students are supported by friendship with Coach Talley (and his wife, Terri, who teaches in Christian Ministries). “I know these kids and their voices—and their hearts as well,” affirmed Talley. Every Friday the men meet for prayer, and their friendship has helped them get through the most challenging parts of life, including losing a parent. More than colleagues, they have become part of one another’s families. Talley still listens to Rush and REO Speedwagon instead of Bach, but Sawyer is hooked on football. “I watched football all weekend,” he announced. “Six games.” Talley laughed. “That’s more than I watched.” “What has happened to me?!” exclaimed Sawyer. Bradley noted, “This friendship is the genuine article. It’s true and it runs deep, through thick and thin. It is Christcentered. It models for students our love and care and respect for one another. It is what we need in this culture—the permanence of relationship.” Talley and Sawyer see parallels to the Christian life—inviting others in, allowing God to break down our barriers so we can build community and learn from each other. “Isn’t that what we all want?” asked Sawyer. “I don’t deserve to be in this family, and yet I’m welcome. That’s really cool.”

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Coaching for Lasting Results

JOSH STOKES

Chub Reynolds’ legacy continues in hearts and on the field BY NANCY CAWLEY ZUGSCHWERT

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situation was so difficult; from that I learned that you praise God even when things are tough. There’s no guarantee it will be easy.”

Three generations of Eagles The Reynolds family was on hand for the reunion as well: Chub’s wife Barb and sons Russ and Rich ’96 and their families, including Rich’s son Rob, a junior defensive lineman for the Eagles this year. Rob was just a baby when his grandfather passed away, but he is well aware of what it means to bear the name of the man for whom the field he plays on is named. “We get a picture taken by the field every year,” said Rob. “I like the sign that says, ‘Never say die.’” Himself wired for competition, Rob openly admires how his grandfather managed the tension of the Christian life and the desire to be competitive. “I think a lot of times, especially in a Christian environment, [people think] you can’t be a Christian and be super tough,” Rob said. “My dad has told me stories, and I think he [Chub] was the toughest guy I’ve ever heard about. It’s mental toughness. Because of that he’s built a lot of kids into grown men, just through character growth.”

Chub Reynolds was inducted into the NWC Athletics Hall of Recognition in 1997. On the display honoring recognized athletes, Reynolds is remembered with these words: “Grit, determination and a never-give-up attitude were the benchmarks of a man who shaped the lives of hundreds. He hated to lose and loved to win. However, more importantly is that he cared about young men. His behavior, intensity for the game, and demeanor were directed toward building boys into men. He demonstrated confidence in his athletes that brought lasting results in their lives. Christ was the focal point of Chub’s life, and he relayed that to his athletes on and off the field.”

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hristian. Competitive. Courageous. Committed. Those who knew Charles “Chub” Reynolds say these words characterized the man who left an indelible imprint on Northwestern, not only in how he lived his life, but also in the way he faced his death. Reynolds, on the NWC coaching staff from 1980 to 1990, served as head baseball coach and assistant football coach before being given the job he wanted most: head football coach—a role he held for less than two full Chub Reynolds coaching history seasons. Many ➔ Head Football Coach 1989–90 still hold vivid memories of ➔ Assistant Football Coach 1980–88 Coach Reynolds ➔ Head Baseball Coach 1981–89 on the sidelines for what was to be his last game on October 6, 1990: in the electric cart required because he could no longer walk, weary but present, talking to and encouraging his players. He passed away just two days later after a lengthy battle with cancer. Dave Halstensgard ’78, director of special projects for athletics, recounted, “Chub was a man of hard work. He put everything he had into it. He worked personally with players. He was about the person and about the team and the team winning, but at the end of the day it was the person who mattered to Chub.” Reynolds was remembered at Homecoming 2010 at an athletics reunion honoring the “Chub Reynolds Legacy.” Athletes who played under this esteemed coach gathered on campus, renewing friendships and recalling what it was like to play for Reynolds—in good times and in bad. Kirby Scull ’92, who was inducted this year into Northwestern’s Athletics Hall of Recognition, played football during Reynolds’ two seasons as head coach. “He was definitely a unique individual with a lot of character and a lot of charisma,” Scull remembered. “One of the things that sticks out to me was his courage. His

BY ALAN S. CURETON, Ph.D.

President Alan Cureton played football during his four years as an STERLING COLLEGE

undergraduate at Sterling College (Kan.). This is one particular practice he’ll never forget.

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ne day, during the middle of the football season, a lengthy and strong rainstorm saturated the practice field. The rain continued to fall as we began practice. As you can imagine, the practice field was a pool of mud. The protocol of every practice required our team to be out, dressed and ready before the coaches would emerge from the locker room, thereby signaling the start of practice. As the rain fell and picked up in intensity, our practice gear was drenched. The players huddled close together to try to stay warm even though we were shivering, wet and discouraged. Some players were already complaining that we had to practice in this terrible weather. Tempers escalated as team members tried to encourage each other to make the most of the situation. Yet, amidst all the words of positivity, we were convinced this practice would be drudgery and useless.

While we were voicing our objections, we heard the loud blast of an air horn coming from the locker room. Sprinting out of the locker room was our head coach. Right behind him were all the assistant coaches, in a perfect line, in a dead sprint. The head coach ran toward us at full speed veering off at the last second and performed a perfect belly flop into a pool of water and mud. Right behind him, one by one, the assistant coaches followed his lead. As each assistant coach hit the mud, the head coach cheered, applauded and affirmed each assistant. We were stunned. I remember thinking, “These guys are nuts!” After the last assistant coach emerged from the mud, the head coach looked at us and said, “Dive in. What are you waiting for?” Not thinking twice, our entire team sprinted toward the mud and dove in, doing our own version of a belly flop. We laughed and rolled and cheered. Within 20 seconds we were covered in mud, soaked to the bone. Then the coach said, “OK, that’s enough. It’s time to practice. Line up.” Wouldn’t you know, we had the best practice of the season. I learned a valuable lesson that day. In this fallen world, we will have days of rain, mud and uncomfortable surroundings. It’s inevitable. And if we permit our surroundings to dominate our thinking, we will be miserable. Or, we can choose to embrace the challenge of the moment and celebrate the opportunity to turn mud into fun and clouds into joy.

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BY MATT HILL ’89, Ed.D.

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here once was a little boy who badly wanted to be a professional basketball player. In the extreme heat and humidity of an Iowa summer, he would shoot baskets, practice moves and dream of the game-winning shot, all while roasting on the hot, cracked and uneven blacktop of his driveway. The hoop was not official regulation in its height and the backboard was peeling and worn, but this was his “home court.”

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As the seasons changed and winter set in, he would put on a parka and gloves, shovel the driveway, turn on the outdoor floodlight, and shoot baskets until his mom made him come back inside for some hot chocolate. His desire to be in the NBA, along with his enjoyment of the game, drove him to practice, try new moves and learn the meaning of dedication.

Because of this decision, our women’s volleyball team gave back 30 points that they did not earn. But they earned much more than “points” with the opposing teams, fans and the athletic community. We received many calls about what these Northwestern athletes were doing, saying it was “refreshing” to hear that a team would actually do this. This one example shows that it is not sport that is an ally or adversary to our faith, but rather it is the people who participate in sport who determine its role. People are the ones who choose to determine the path sport will take, the experience it will be, and how it can be used. One of the most popular passages in the Bible references an athletic event: a race. Philippians 3:14 (NLT) says, “I press on to reach the end of the race and receive the heavenly prize for which God, through Christ Jesus, is calling us.” Paul references life here as a race, focused on the goal, the heavenly prize. With the right perspective, the right focus, the right mindset, sports can be an ally— a conduit to growing, practicing and living out your faith, staying focused on the heavenly prize. Along with the presentation of our lives as a living sacrifice to God (Rom. 12:1) and committing everything we do for God’s glory (Col. 3:23), sport can be used to grow one’s faith and further God’s Kingdom. That is what I appreciate about the athletic program mission at Northwestern College: “to utilize sports as the conduit for spiritual, educational, social and athletic growth of our student-athletes, encouraging them to maximize all their gifts.” Using sport as an “ally” along their faith journey is how our student-athletes, as individuals on a team, grow in all areas of their lives.

MATT HILL ’89, Ed.D., IS VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT LIFE & ATHLETICS AT NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE. HE HAS SERVED AT THE COLLEGE FOR 13 YEARS. HE AND HIS WIFE, MIRIAM, RESIDE IN NEW BRIGHTON

JOSH STOKES

Unfortunately, he ended up being “vertically challenged” and his competitive basketball playing days ended upon high school graduation. As you probably guessed, that little boy was me. While my dream of playing in the NBA faded with the realization that the growth chart couldn’t be bribed, what I learned from participation in sports was far more valuable. I have played, coached and supervised sports teams from Little League to NCAA varsity programs. And while I believe there are aspects of sports in today’s society that are not in line with what we, as Christians, should value and expect, I do believe sports can still be an integral part of the spiritual growth of an athlete. Sport in itself is neither good nor bad; it doesn’t have the ability to determine an outcome. I believe that the people who participate in the sports determine sports’ usefulness and application. Coaches and players who decide that sport is the medium to learn, teach and practice life lessons are the ones using it for the betterment of the individuals, all the while learning how to function together in a team setting with team goals. On the flip side, selfishness, pride and personal gain can also be the result of participation in sports, all determined by the spirit of the individual(s) involved. In his blog, Roger Lipe, Southern Illinois Fellowship of Christian Athletes representative, parallels the participation in sports with worship. He writes, “We, who identify ourselves as coaches and athletes, have rich opportunities for holy, pleasing and spiritual worship as we train and compete. Our daily activities in sport are perfectly pleasing to our Lord as we dedicate ourselves to Him in loving service.”1 Referring to Romans 12:1, Lipe adds that “all of life is our spiritual act of worship, holy and acceptable to God as we offer our bodies as living sacrifices thereby practicing the presence of our Living Lord through our lives in sport.” All that we do can be a form of worship, sport included. Recently the volleyball team at Northwestern College decided to practice a virtue that they were studying: integrity as it relates to worship. In all aspects of their lives they wanted to practice integrity, including on the court of competition. The result of this undertaking was to make “honor calls” (see story, page 16). Most of America would say they are crazy—it is the official’s job to make the call. Or some might even tell you to sell it the other way, to try and influence the official into giving you the point, even if you didn’t earn it.

WITH THEIR THREE CHILDREN, RYAN, AARON AND LAUREN. 1

http://sportchaplainsportmentor.blogspot.com/2008/09/sport-as-worship.html

EAGLE ATHLETICS MISSION STATEMENT Athletics at Northwestern exists to utilize sports as the conduit for spiritual, educational, social and athletic growth of our student-athletes, encouraging them to maximize all their gifts.

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JOSH STOKES • PHOTOGRAPHED AT COUNTRYSIDE RESTAURANT

Working ‘Family Style’ BY GREG JOHNSON ’05, M’09

Pictured: Matt Hill (Student Life & Athletics), Aaron Kahl (Women’s Basketball), Tom Brooks (Advancement), Bill Eppright (Mathematics) and Bruce Melander (Education).

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The Quarterback Club includes faculty, staff and coaches, and bonds together by traveling to one Eagle football road game each season. Named for the restaurant where they first gathered, the group kicked off in 2001 with four men and expands each year. “It’s a great time to socialize, eat out, watch the game, and it’s fun to tour the different campuses,” said Tim Grosz, head men’s basketball coach and a founding member. “It’s a neat tradition.”

HEAD COACH ROSTER BASEBALL: Dave Hieb Head Coach since 1996

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ne of my favorite restaurants serves food “family style,” which usually entails everyone in the party sharing dishes and pitching in for the cost. The staff and coaches at Northwestern—who make the athletics department function and teach our student-athletes—are a family. We approach our respective sports with pieces from our department’s nucleus, and yet we all contribute to the growth of our team at the same time. It’s not a coincidence that on any given week, several members of our staff could be making meals together at Let’s Dish! or watching a Vikings game in someone’s home. Many of our coaches or their spouses participate in a book club one night a month. We laugh together, we cry together, we grow together. While it doesn’t hurt that the 18 people who comprise our full-time staff and head coaches have contributed a total of 184 years to Eagle Athletics, we’re not about creating dynasties. Our unwavering commitment to our mission binds us together. In fact, winning games is not our first priority at Northwestern. We’re competitive, but achieving victories on the court or field of competition is not our first goal. It’s not our second goal, either. We want to see Christ glorified through our teams; our purpose is to bring glory to God by shaping and molding our student-athletes to live Christ-centered lives. If you’re in the Ericksen Center early enough on Wednesday morning, you’ll see a group of female student-athletes from multiple sports teams, along with women’s athletic trainer Sara Mortensen ’00 and athletics office manager Sharon Kleven meeting together for a Bible study. “Our goal is to provide an opportunity for the women from all of our teams to support one another and to do life together,” said Mortensen, who started the voluntary group in the fall of 2009. She enjoys that it’s a way for them to reach out and be a part of one team in the morning before they branch out and join their respective sports teams in the afternoon. This is the spirit of Northwestern athletics. Living out our mission goes well beyond daily team devotions, although that is a staple for all of our 18 squads. We are anything but “me” driven. When our staff went through the Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment from the Gallup organization together, we weren’t surprised that our most common Strengths themes were Responsibility, Harmony, Belief and Positivity. None of us had Competition, Command or Significance as one of our top five. Too often, people define life through their work. At Northwestern, family is more important to us than our work itself, so it’s no wonder we approach our job family style.

BASKETBALL (Men’s): Tim Grosz ’92 Head Coach since 2000

BASKETBALL (Women’s): Aaron Kahl Head Coach since 2010

CROSS COUNTRY AND TRACK & FIELD (indoor & outdoor): Steve Thiessen ’91 Head Coach since 1992

FOOTBALL: Kirk Talley Head Coach since 2001

GOLF: Billy Aune ’89 Head Coach since 1995

SOCCER (Men’s): Greg Wheaton Head Coach since 2000

SOCCER (Women’s): Josh Pettit ’98 Head Coach since 2006

SOFTBALL: Alicia du’Monceaux ’04 Head Coach since 2009

TENNIS: John Sanny ’78 Head Coach since 2004

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS FOR SUBMITTED

SPORTS INFORMATION AT NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE SINCE 2007.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

GREG JOHNSON ’05, M’09 HAS BEEN VOLLEYBALL: Beth Wilmeth ’02 Head Coach since 2004

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FROM THE

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CH ALLEN G ED , EN CO U R AG ED , MEN TORED

Home or away, win or lose, this song of praise and victory (Above All Else) is sung at the end of Fifth Quarter after all NWC football games. Fifth Quarter has always been about praise, encouragement and spiritual lessons learned—not just about Saturday’s final scores. Our family was introduced to Fifth Quarter in 1998 when our oldest son, Eric Wilmeth ’01, was a freshman playing on the offensive line under Coach Jimmy Miller. At NWC, Eric met Beth Lambright ’02, a varsity volleyball player, and they married in 2002. Both are now on staff at NWC. Beth is head volleyball coach and senior women’s administrator and Eric wears multiple hats, including assistant football coach. As parents, we are so thankful for the godly influence and challenges they have received through the NWC athletic program and pray they “pay it forward” in the years to come.

Mike Owczarek, aka “Big O,” has played Eagle football since fall 2007. Each season has taught him different lessons: being challenged to a higher calling than just the sport itself, dealing with a season-long injury, learning and growing both on the field and through Bible study with team members. This past summer he spent in India with Campus Outreach— in large part due to the influence and example of older football players and mentors. Through this experience, he sensed a call to international ministry. Now in his fourth season with the Eagles, he finds himself to be one of the “older guys” and is involved in befriending and mentoring younger players. The coaches’ godly influence on the players led to the players’ godly influence on our son—and shaped his vision for future ministry. Northwestern football has been a great place for our son to be challenged, encouraged and mentored.

Jan Wilmeth Whitehall, Wis.

Cheryl Owczarek Watertown, Minn.

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WATC HI NG A LEA DE R G RO W

Golfer Wins Scholar-Athlete Leadership Award

SUBMITTED

Our son Jason Schumann ’11 is currently in his senior and final year of playing football at NWC. It has been amazing to watch Jason grow athletically and in his faith, and to watch his character become defined and refined as he is becoming a godly young man under the mentorship of Coach Talley and his coaching staff. I love the Fifth Quarter where coaches and players express their appreciation and encouragement to each other and discuss the “adversity” they faced during the game. Many times I have left the Fifth Quarter with just the right word of encouragement to deal with something I was facing. I would have never guessed that I would have been challenged to grow and change as a result of my son being an Eagle athlete! Carol Schumann Taylors Falls, Minn.

WORT H E VE RY PE N N Y We are in our 10th straight year having a son play football at Northwestern. Our four sons (twins Nick ’05 and Ben ’05, Clint ’07, Bobby ’11) have had wonderful times with many godly people. The coaches not only teach, encourage and love the players, but they also have taught our boys what it means to be a Christian and a coach. Some people concentrate on the cost of a private school. I honestly can say that I thank God every time I write a check to Northwestern, that there is a school where my boys came to know and love Jesus more! I cannot say enough positive about the athletic staff and program at Northwestern. Is it too early to register my grandkids at NWC?

Nick Olson ’10 received the 2010 Upper Midwest Athletic Conference (UMAC) ScholarAthlete Leadership Award. The award recognizes two graduating seniors (male and female) who achieve excellence in academics, leadership and community service while participating in intercollegiate athletics. The league’s faculty athletic representatives nominate and vote on this honor. Olson, a Chanhassen, Minn., native who graduated with a degree in accounting, was a member and two-season captain of the men’s golf team. Off the golf course, Olson won UMAC Academic All-Conference honors in each of the three years he was eligible while being named to the dean’s list with highest honors in 2008 and 2009. He earned UMAC All-Conference accolades in each of his four years of competition. He finished as one of the top five golfers at the conference tournament. Olson won medalist honors at the 2010 UMAC finale. His resume is filled with volunteer experiences, including over 50 hours spent with Urban Homeworks, Feed My Starving Children, and Impact Lives. He is now working as an audit associate at KPMG in Minneapolis.

The Athletics Advantage

SUBMITTED

Adie Wolcyn Cambridge, Minn.

“Athletics definitely enhances the overall dynamics of a college campus. There have been studies done that show a direct relationship between a strong athletic program and the strength of that institution’s student body.”

SUBMITTED

Scott Groeneweg ’96, Director of Athletic Recruitment

“All of our athletic teams are conducted in an environment of Christ-centered education and that has a strong, strong pull. So we have students who have Division I full ride scholarships who turn that down to be here. That makes a big statement.” Ken Faffler ’82, Sr. Director of Admissions

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A REFLECTION ON INDIVIDUAL COMPETITIVE SPORTS

WHEN COMPETITION IS PERSONAL BY TYLER ANDERSON ’07, FORMER MEN’S TENNIS TEAM CAPTAIN

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ndividual sports at Northwestern, including tennis, golf, cross country and track and field, provide different opportunities to interact with the competition. While teamwork is essential in volleyball, football, baseball, softball and basketball, the key in individual sports is personal accountability. There isn’t a teammate to make up for the mistakes of a runner who runs a slower sprint or a golfer who finds the bunker. Individual competition also means much more individual interaction with opponents, and Northwestern athletes take advantage of the one-on-one time with the so-called “enemy” to befriend them and show them the Northwestern difference. Walking a golf course for 18 holes with three opponents, squaring off with a player in a singles match or waiting for the next race can take hours each, providing ample time to get to know your opponent on a personal level. “Tennis is ‘in your face’ competition,” said John Sanny, NWC tennis coach. “Players have to constantly talk to their opponents with scores, line calls, and sometimes objections and challenges. To teach players to be intense and competitive in this game, while treating their opponents with honor, is sometimes very difficult. The culture of tennis even includes the handshake after a match.” Tennis player Josh Fread ’11 said there is satisfaction in playing tennis even though the community support for his sport

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is different. “It’s not about having tons and tons of fans. “TO TEACH PLAYERS It’s playing with your team. It’s about community and TO BE INTENSE AND leadership.” COMPETITIVE IN THIS These “individual” Eagles take the challenge GAME, WHILE TREATING seriously though, and while the difference is difficult to THEIR OPPONENTS WITH measure, it would be hard to deny it exists. Sanny said it HONOR, IS SOMETIMES isn’t unlikely for a coach or a VERY DIFFICULT.” team to mention how they’ve enjoyed playing the Eagles. “University of Hawaii-Hilo actually invites us back to play them as often as we can, simply because their players have had such a fun, pleasant experience playing our teams,” he said. Fread even acknowledged that one of his goals as a player is “making sure the other team has a good time while playing.” With or without fans or accolades, Eagle athletes in individual sports strive to reflect their spirit of sportsmanship—whether in a match across town or on an island in the Pacific.

GREAT MOMENTS IN EAGLE ATHLETIC HISTORY 2010

2010 Women’s Volleyball awarded the NCAA Student-Athlete Sportsmanship Award for female athletes, in part for making “honor calls” (see p. 16).

2008

2005

Men’s Basketball Team won the NCCAA Division I Championship. NWC, an NCAA Division III school, was dubbed the National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) basketball tournament’s “Cinderella squad” after their quarterfinal win, finished the 2009–10 campaign with a 22-7 overall record, winning 18 of its final 19 games of the season. No victory was sweeter than the final game, as the Eagles defeated King College (Tenn.), an NCAA Division II team that had beaten Appalachian State, a team who had just missed a berth in the NCAA Division I tournament.

Northwestern joined the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III. Northwestern became an active member prior to the 2008–09 academic year after a four-year provisional membership. Prior to joining the NCAA, the college was a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA).

Football Doubleheader, Double Win! Coach Kirk Talley and the Eagles football team made college sports history by playing—and winning—two games in one day! The Eagles played Trinity Bible College in the morning and Macalester College in the afternoon. The event was covered by ESPN and other local and national media.

PHOTOGRAPHY FROM NWC COLLECTION

1996 The Ericksen Center was completed, giving NWC an intercollegiatelevel sports and physical education facility.

1976–86 Between 1976–1986, the Eagles cross country team and others ran 24-hour relays, raising funds for student scholarships. The relays generated enough funds for two $500 scholarships per year for about 15 years.

1976

After a college-wide ban, the NCAA reinstated dunking in basketball. Brian Budish ’79 had the honor of Northwestern’s first dunk. (Budish was the athletic director at Meadow Creek Christian School in Andover, Minn., for 26 years until his death in 2007. As a triple-sport star, he was inducted in the NWC Athletic Hall of Fame in 1997.)

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Scrolling Through Eagles History Throughout 83 official volumes of the Scroll, Northwestern’s yearbooks testify to the growth and progression of Eagle athletics—both recreational

PHOTOGRAPHY FROM NWC ARCHIVES UNLESS NOTED

and intercollegiate—through the decades. The 1940 Scroll shows two sports: “Boys’ Basketball” and “Girls’ Basketball.” Baseball joined in 1946, and each decade following brought new sports to the lineup. Northwestern began competing in intramural and church leagues and eventually graduated to intercollegiate contests in the late 1940s. Today’s Eagles compete in 18 intercollegiate sports, but throughout 65+ years of athletics, the Eagles have been consistent in one area: They love to win, but they ultimately play for the love of the game and the glory of the Lord.

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The Lost Sports A wandering through NWC yearbooks shows a progression of different sports played by students over the years. A few were apparently “lost” to time…and interest. Whatever happened to… • • • •

Badminton Cheerleading Gymnastics Posture and Calisthenics

• Table Tennis • Swimming • Wrestling

GUY MAGNO

The N Club

Pep Club Pep Club members, including Forrest Williams ’50 (left), supported Northwestern athletics and added “vim, vigor, and vitality” at all sporting events. They also met weekly to pray for the teams.

In the 1950s and ’60s, any men on campus who were letterwinners in a sport at Northwestern were eligible to join the elite N Club. The goal of this club was to further athletics at Northwestern, be useful for witnessing and testimony, and provide a way for others to learn coordination and cooperation. The N Club organized all-campus activities, including a “playday” at Minnehaha Park, a “Winter Carnival” held each February, and pizza parties after games. The N Club also raised money for new uniforms.

Same Goal, 51 Years Later Basketball

Baseball

The 1958 men’s basketball team shared the same team goal—Colossians 3:23— as the recent 2009–10 team:

By the early 1950s, basketball games at Moyer Gym (former Minneapolis campus) were broadcast over KTIS, and players were coming from Oregon, New York, and Arkansas to play basketball for Northwestern.

“Baseball is an up and coming thing at Northwestern that is another means of keeping our bodies in shape and our minds alert.” (1960 Scroll)

1958 “And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the Lord, and not unto men.” 2009–10 “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord, not for men.”

JOSH STOKES

How the Eagles became the Eagles In the 1940s, a group of Northwestern men wanted to start a basketball team and asked instructor Marvin Burgess ’39 to suggest a name. His choice was Eagles, “and Eagles they remain to this day.” From A Cloud of Witnesses, NWC’s 100th anniversary commemorative book

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Through the Years Greg and Mary (Boyd ’80) Pearson have been working with Wycliffe Bible Translators for the past 24 years. They are excited to announce that as of January 2010 the Lote people of Papua New Guinea have the Bible translated in their heart language.

Elwood ’94 and Brenda (Brown ’96) Nelson have been working at Rift Valley Academy in Kenya since 2001. Their five children have been busy with extracurricular activities and look forward to a family vacation on the coast.

George and Kathryn (Rowlee ’66) Ellison served with Wycliffe Bible Translators in Peru, Kenya and Ethiopia for 25 years. They retired from Wycliffe and returned to George’s home in Iowa.

Tim Arfsten ’83 and his family are missionaries in the Philippines. They are making prayer videos to minister to unreached people groups.

Rebecca (Potratz ’95) Irwin is currently residing in California and has been working in the field of marketing with creative professionals for over 10 years.

Gordon Moritz ’66 and his wife, Ruth, have been serving with American Missionary Fellowship. They just finished the Bible Club after-school program and pray for continued participation, staffing and spread of the Gospel.

Robert Samuelsen ’89 is living near Baghdad as he completes his second tour in Iraq—this time with a light infantry brigade. Last year, he earned his master of law degree and was published in The Army Lawyer. Meanwhile, his wife, Julia, is raising their three children: Elizabeth, Peter and Mark.

Jay Stafford ’97 and his family moved to Wadena, MN. Jay is currently the youth pastor at Wadena Evangelical Church. He asks you to pray that his ministry there will be able to help the families that went through the tornado damage both physically and spiritually.

David St. Martin ’89 is the athletic director at Liberty Classical Academy in Maplewood, MN, where he teaches math and coaches several sports. His wife, Kim (Atkins ’89), is the office manager for a local landscape design company. Their son, Stephen, is in first grade.

Corey Mitchell ’01 is now the senior pastor at Winfield Baptist Church in Winfield, PA.

1950s &1960s Grace (Zyp ’53) Reid continues to serve the Lord through the I.C.O.C Mission where she has been blessed to lead some residents to the Lord and hopes to share Christ with more.

1970s & 1980s Larry and Lori (Lehner ’79) Mollan have lived in Menomonie, WI for the past eight years. Lori is a substitute teacher for grades K–12 and a home style consultant/homestager. Larry is a manufacturing engineer for a company in Winona, MN. Thomas ’80 and Paula (Abraham ’79) Houvenagle will be celebrating 29 years of marriage. All of their children are out of the house and enjoying the life that God has given them.

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Julie Anderson ’94 runs an income-generating project for women in Africa and has adopted a Swazi girl.

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1990s Chereyle (Ware ’90) Wenzel has relocated to Texas to pursue a master’s degree in biblical counseling at Dallas Theological Seminary.

2000s

Stephanie (Fowler ’03) Saia completed her master’s degree in counseling from DePaul University in June. She currently resides in the Chicago area with her husband, Michael.

Jenny Collins ’05 started graduate school for holistic health studies at St. Catherine University’s School of Health in Minneapolis. Shar Carlson ’06 will be teaching middle and high school language arts at the Evangelical Christian Academy outside Madrid, Spain for the next two school years, starting this fall. Danya (Hoefs ’07) Dahlin teaches second grade at Heart of the Lakes Elementary in Perham, MN. Cynthia Lindsay ’09 is pursuing a master’s degree from Concordia University in St. Paul in criminal justice leadership. Caitlin (Johnson ’10) Willard is married to Tom Willard ’08. Tom is a Marine, based at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. They welcomed their son Josiah Thomas Willard on September 2, 2010.

Got News? Your story may encourage other NWC alumni! Send your life and

Alicia Parsley ’04 has graduated with an MBA from the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota.

job updates, wedding notices or family additions to alumni@nwc.edu.

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FAST FORWARD

Additions

If you would like to reconnect with other fellow alumni, you may

1990s Nicholas James to Brian and Lisa (Wilson ’90) Ertel on April 13, 2010. He joins Zachary, Callie and Sophie. Grady Andrew to Gary ’93 and Shauna (Kremer ’93) Moody on January 25, 2010. He joins Grant, Bailey, Brooklyn and Bryndal.

find them on Facebook or contact Alumni Relations at alumni@nwc.edu.

Weddings 1990s Cari Corbett and Dwaine Dailey ’99 on December 18, 2004.

Gabriella Marianna to Pieter and Christina (Allen ’97) Koedijk on May 4, 2010. Stella Grace to Jason and Megan (West ’98) Yates on January 6, 2010. Grant to Cari and Dwaine Dailey ’99 on January 5, 2010. Layla Grace to Jon ’99 and Alissa (Peckosh ’99) Gustafson on February 3, 2010. She joins Grant.

2000s Sheena Miller ’06 and Dustin Sayre ’07 on August 13, 2010. Sarah Chinn ’07 and Roger Braun on September 5, 2009. Lina Krych ’07 and Gregory Sminisvek on May 22, 2010.

Phoebe Grace to Tim and Amy (Ulferts ’99) Nelson on February 23, 2010. She joins Sophia and Noah. Justin Nathanael to Nathanael and Amy (Gelling ’99) Opperud on January 21, 2010. 2000s

Natalia Krych ’08 and Jacob Seidal on December 19, 2009. Lizzie Davis ’09 and Micah Stelter ’09 on October 23, 2009.

MAJOR: Communication HOME: Lino Lakes, MN FAMILY: Wife, Lisa (Mollet ’95); Children, Janelle (10), Anna (8), Becca (5) and Mariah (3)

Aaron Richard to Megan and Trevor Rasmussen ’00 on June 29, 2010.

SUBMITTED

Submit your updates and check out additional alumni and class news online at nwc.edu/alumni.

Tim Cave ’97: Standing In the (Travel) Gap Tim Cave ’97 graduated from Northwestern with the intention of using his education to land a role in the technology field. Instead he found himself in the travel industry, affirming his sense that God does have a sense of humor. “Having God place me in the travel industry is quite funny,” Tim said. “I hadn’t even been on an airplane until my honeymoon!” His bride and business partner is Lisa (Mollet ’95), and together they run two travel businesses serving unique markets: one focused on arranging travel for mission trips and one providing educational tours for homeschool families. “I am wired a connector,” Tim said. “I love the thrill of seeing a need and then knowing someone that might be able to fill it. In fact that is why we call ourselves ITG Travel. ITG stands for ‘In the Gap.’ We want to be a bridge between where you are now and where God is calling you.” As a business owner, Tim enjoys the opportunity to bring his faith to the marketplace and to work with those in ministry on a daily basis. “I get to see God’s provision daily,” Cave noted. “You realize that at the end of the day, you can’t control every aspect of it. This has taught me to give God my hopes, dreams and fears and lay them at his feet.” Tim, whose NWC involvement (“besides dating my wife”) included being an R.A., WVOE and intramural basketball, likes to look back on his time at Northwestern. “I was able to get a better sense of who I am and how I am wired,” he reflected. He also discovered who he was not, noting, “I realized after two weeks in a youth ministries class that I shouldn’t pursue that path!”

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MAJOR: Ministries (FOCUS) CAREER: Administrative support HOME: Soldotna, Alaska FAMILY: Husband, Dale Solberg

Lois Link Solberg: Better Late(r) Than Never Lois (Link F’00) Solberg says she has often done things about 25 to 30 years later than the average person. She was 49 when she graduated through the FOCUS program with a degree in ministries—and a goal to teach in an academic setting. “I loved NWC!” Lois said. As a Northwestern employee she loved working with staff and faculty who cared about young people and really wanted the best for them. As a student she loved learning from Bible professors because they were passionate for Jesus and the truths God conveys in the Bible. Another thing that Lois did “late” was marry. She and former NWC Director of Library Services Dale Solberg married when Lois was in her fifties. God called Dale to ministry at Alaska Christian College, a two-year Bible college that ministers to the needs of Native Alaskan youth. There, Dale is the director of learning resources and Lois serves part time as the assistant to the academic dean. Lois also serves part time with Love In the Name of Christ (Love INC), a national outreach organization. She enjoys this opportunity and said, “What can be more rewarding than to help those who are without hope?” Of life in Alaska, Lois said it can be difficult to be so far away from all that is familiar, especially as family and friends age. But her life is rich in many unconventional ways—from filleting her own salmon on the beach under the midnight sun to gathering wildflower blossoms and berries for jelly, there’s always adventure! Lois still aspires to a teaching career and is currently enrolled in online seminary through The King’s Seminary (Calif.). She expects to receive her master’s degree in 2012. Her greatest lesson learned is that it’s still never too late!

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SUBMITTED

FAST FORWARD

Henry Scott to Kim and Ken Schmidt ’00 on February 17, 2010. He joins Calvin John and Teddy Dean.

Ashley Lorraine to Ronny and Anna (Willford ’02) Simmons on January 27, 2010. She joins Alexis.

Liam John to Kristine and Cameron Weiss ’00 on July 6, 2010. He joins Emalyn.

Landon Andrew to Kathryn and Luke White ’02 on May 7, 2010.

Caiden Jeffrey to Jeffrey and Luziane (Betzel ’01) Heinrichs on February 3, 2009. He joins Breanna and Jocelyn.

Collin Gabriel to Michael ’03 and Rochelle (Jacobson ’03) Ness on September 7, 2009.

Meg Alice to Corey ’01 and Heather (Thompson ’01) Mitchell on March 10, 2010. Jael Kennedy to Matthew and Alicia (Osborne ’01) Murphy on September 21, 2009. Emma to Andy and Christina (John ’01) Svec on March 31, 2010. Mackenzie Rose to Eric and Gretchen (McEvoy ’01) Ulferts on February 27, 2010. She joins Titus. Sadie Grace to Matt ’03 and Kari (Stevenson ’02) Ellis on December 3, 2009. She joins Amelia. Eli Benjamin to Paul ’02 and Amanda (Spurgeon ’02) Peterson on April 10, 2010. He joins Eric. Anna Katherine to Kelly and Rebecca (Price ’02) Pruss on August 2, 2010. She joins Alex and Matthew.

Addison Rose to Ben ’05 and Katie (Ginn ’03) Paxson on March 17, 2010. Elliott to Rebecca and Peter Carlson ’04 on November 25, 2010. Lydia Ruth to Andrew and Jamie (Heller ’05) Engelhardt on June 22, 2010. Matteo Antonio to Marco and Abigail (Norris ’05) Montermini on June 23, 2010. Gideon Richard to Ben and Becky (Clark ’06) Herges on January 7, 2010. Dassah Rebecca to Ben and Danya (Hoefs ’07) Dahlin on April 10, 2010. Anna Grace to Jonathan and Amanda (Jensen ’07) Philgreen on April 11, 2010. She joins Abigail Joy.

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In Memory Northwestern College offers condolences to the families of the following Northwestern alumni and friends who have passed away. 1930s

1950s

John Siemers ’35 on May 8, 2010.

Walden Askren ’53 on January 19, 2010.

1940s

Paul F. Smith ’54 on September 4, 2009.

Julius Hoseth ’44 on December 7, 2009. Delbert Golike ’45 on December 29, 2009. Richard Person ’45 on December 15, 2009.

A charitable gift annuity allows you to support Northwestern while providing lifetime income for yourself or loved ones. Contact the Office of Planned Giving to learn how a Northwestern Gift Annuity can be a part of your charitable giving plan.

Staff, Faculty & Friends Nelle (Vandenberg) Elvee Beacham, wife of Northwestern’s third president, Dr. Richard A. Elvee, on September 7, 2010. L. John Buyse, Trustee Emeritus, on October 13, 2010.

Office of Planned Giving

800-692-4020 plannedgiving@nwc.edu nwc.edu/plannedgiving

Our students seek to serve God with passion and purpose. Your gift to the Northwestern Fund helps them do that.

Do you have a college-bound son or daughter? Children of NWC alumni are eligible for a $1,500 tuition discount! The Legacy Discount can be combined with other scholarships and grants at NWC.

➤ nwc.edu/admissions

Make your most significant investment today.

nwc.edu/give 800-692-4020 651-631-5295

FAL L/W IN TER 2 0 10 PILO T

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSH STOKES

And the Eagles Flew Home pus October 1–3 Eagles of all ages returned to cam brations included for Homecoming 2010. Special cele e campuses, evill several reunions: downtown and Ros atics, and hem mat & athletics, psychology and science of the Class ion reun ear class reunions, including the 50-y of 1960. ned on the A beautiful day of fall sunshine reig d and a pie-eating ban g parade—complete with a marchin victory over ball foot contest on wheels—and a 37-34 MacMurray College (Ind.). on Plan to celebrate with us next year the and ing October 7–8, 2011 for Homecom am grand opening of the Billy Grah Community Life Commons!

Homecoming Recap 10 Highlights

20 Homecoming

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Congratulations to Our 2010 Alumni Honorees Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Forrest Williams ’50 (Bible School) and ’57 (B.S.) The Distinguished Alumnus Award recognizes an alumnus of Northwestern College who has demonstrated God-honoring leadership in the home, church, community, and in his or her profession.

NEW FOR 2011

Graduate Studies offered on site and online Master of Organizational Leadership Master of Arts in Theological Studies

Buckles-Hannah Service Award Dan Stoltz ’83 The Buckles-Hannah Service Award recognizes and honors an alumnus who was or is currently a member of the Northwestern College community (faculty, staff, administration and volunteers) who has given outstanding service to Northwestern and its mission.

Athletic Hall of Fame The Athletic Hall of Fame recognizes former athletes or coaches for their NWC athletic achievements and evidence of a continuing commitment to the claims of Christ in their lives. Kirby Scull ’92 Football 1988–1990 Sarah (Ostercamp ’02) Lenz Women’s Cross Country 1998–2001

Adult education you can have faith in.

VISIT NWC.EDU/ALUMNI FOR DETAILS ABOUT OUR 2010 HONOREES.

6 5 1 -6 3 1 -5 2 0 0 | 8 8 8 -3 6 2 - 8 7 1 5 n w c .e d u / g ra d stu d ie s

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CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED NWC.EDU

Will you practice

Tzedakah

this season?

To inspire others to give, an anonymous donor generously gave a $250,000 challenge gift to establish the Tzedakah Scholarship endowment for NWC students. Will you join the challenge of generosity?

Any size gift welcome! Your gift—whether $5, $50 or $5,000—has the power to multiply and bless generations of NWC students, to encourage them, in turn, to develop lives of generosity toward others.

Give today, or learn more at nwc.edu/scholarships.

The Hebrew word tzedakah is an act of righteousness that comes from our duty to help others in need—it essentially means “doing the right thing,” demonstrating justice and fairness.


Fall 2010 Pilot