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NICK ROBERTS | MArch (prof ) + B.AS | PORTFOLIO architect for UNStudio Selection of : professional work for Athfield Architects Ltd competition entries, exhibition projects and writing academic work at VUW and CED: UC Berkeley

CONTACT DETAILS ph: + 31 6 15370339 email: nickroberts16@gmail.com web: cargocollective.com/nickroberts

The Lodge on the Lake

Clyde Quay Wharf | for Athfield Architects Ltd.

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Awaroa Lighthouse

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MUW + VUW Masterplanning | for Athfield Architects Ltd.

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Familial Clouds | Venice Biennale 2012

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Arapai House | private residence + cellar door

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Fans of Grim ’70s Architecture | for Architecture NZ

A Projective Site | MArch (prof ) thesis

House of Fairytales

inhabitation model | 01

Toxic Asset Horror Cabinet

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Selected VUW + CED - UC Berkeley studio work

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| entry to guest house

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| water detention area through edge of PM living

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THE LODGE ON THE LAKE A New Residence for the Prime Minister of Australia ____________________

A | establish courtyard form

with Henry Stephens and Jack Davies + First place

| The Lodge on the Lake design ideas competition. | published: MARK magazine, CONCEPT, Architecure Australia, and Architecture NZ | online: Archdaily, Dezeen and Archinect.

library + study volume private PM wing ceremonial entry

Jury Citation

public function / gallery

This design stood out as one that most successfully integrates the built forms with the subtle landscape of Attunga Point: it responsibly owns the landscape, it is beautifully sited and it celebrates the lake edge location. Casual, yet imposing, it reflects the informal nature of contemporary Australian lifestyles and architecture, while providing attractive larger spaces for public gatherings. Its materials - concrete, Australian timber and recycled metal - were chosen to weather and harmonise with the colours and textures of the bushland setting. Environmental considerations included extensive water detention. ____________________

A | split courtyard form - establish core loop of program PM + service access

visitor vehicle exit visitor vehicle access foot access

Patterns of occupation Australia’s earliest settlers encountered a landscape they perceived to be harsh and expansive - ‘they did not see the landscape of infinite space as sublime’ (Malouf, 2010). Elizabeth Farrelly suggests this has led to a selfperpetuating condition in the national psyche - one where the immediate move towards occupation of this landscape is through an endless proliferation outward, along the ground plane. This notion paradoxically suggests both an adventurous exploration of the frontier, and a conservative lack of willingness to make a place within the landscape – to dig in. Walter Burley Griffin’s 1912 masterplan for Canberra was predicated on the notion that modernist tropes in urban planning could be reconciled with the particularities of topography, suggesting an occupation of the Australian landscape rarely aspired to. This proposal returns to these issues bound up in Australian identity and issues of modernity. The lodge is both a development and a critique of the Australian relationship of landscape and dwelling, through an intersection of public assembly, intimate domesticity, and ground plane. continued over page...

B | entry sequence + ancillary program

green rooves, walls and manicured landscape

water detention / garden locations.

C | water detention + program at edges of site

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| isometric series

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Built Form and Land Form Formally, the lodge is anchored by a split courtyard form, the frontal half sunk down into the earth forming a thickened, occupiable plinth on which the private volumes rest, while ancillary programs radiate out across the site. The notion of form augmented as a response to ground rewards a secondary reading; the constantly changing spatial conditions across the site resists the architecture being reduced to an idealised object. Externally, the building both enfolds the landscape and is subsumed by it. Retaining walls draw visitors into a choreographed entry sequence, pulling them through the earth in a series of intermediary spaces - compressing the archaic nature of the subterranean with shifting weather conditions above.

| site plan 1:500 at A1

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| aerial 7

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| model 01

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| model 02

Environmentally, the intersection of fluid topography and linear definition is equally considered; water collection aligns with human circulation patterns. These culminate in a series of carefully placed water detention areas, dedicated to purifying water, irrigation, and the prevention of flooding and erosion, depending on their location across the site. Materially, the building suggests an acceptance of the Australian landscape’s inherent hostility, utilising a palette of concrete, local timber and recycled metal sheeting that will endure and record the cyclical patterns of sun, rain, and fire. This attempted reclamation by nature is welcomed, only serving to consolidate its place within the landscape. continued over page...

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| longitudinal section 1:200 at A1

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| private PM stair

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continued over page... Internally, manipulation of the courtyard form allows a programmatic organisation attuned to both intimate spaces of repose and a monumental depth suitable for public assembly. Coupled with an awareness of the topography outside, these ever-changing patterns occurring internally, encourage inhabitants to find their way through the site – a gesture toward the nomadic Aboriginal mode of dwelling where built-form is occupied like land-form. From the composed house atop a plinth, to the slippages and interpolations that unravel down toward the lake, the lodge on the lake is a democratic marriage of terroir and architectural typology, introspective private dwelling, and public assembly. 08

| floor plans 1:200 at A1

__________________________ References Malouf, D, and Farrelly, E. Landscape and Dwelling, broadcast for Radio National, 7 November 2010.

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| view from the boathouse

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| the lighthouse viewed from behind the sandbar

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| telemetric rods record the shifting landforms of the Awaroa inlet.

facade

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AWAROA LIGHTHOUSE ____________________

structure

with Henry Stephens and Jansen Aui + First Place | AAA Cavalier Bremworth New Zealand Unbuilt Architecture Awards, 2012. | to be published: BRACKET: [at extremes], NYC. | published: CLOG: Rendering, Architecture NZ. Jury Citation

circulation

Exciting and beautiful, taking the mythology of the lighthouse to create a luminous interior world and an engaging object in the landscape. ____________________ Located within New Zealand’s Abel Tasman National Park, the Awaroa Lighthouse operates at extremes by revealing the tensions hidden within an image of stability. Addressing the lighthouse for both its architectural typology and its imagistic quality, this work situates architecture in the volatile mid-point between the otherworldly beauty of the New Zealand landscape, and an anxiety of destroying it latent within its national psyche. Recording both immaterial data flow from a worldwide network, and material seismic data from a local network of telemetric rods at its base, this work questions the extremity of human influence for the sake of preservation. ____________________

living & workspaces

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Historical citation for the project belongs to the lighthouse, which is addressed as both an architectural typology for inquiry, and for its imagistic quality. Historically pictured amidst precipitous coastline and shrouded by violent waters, its solidity, stability and reassuredness within its siting becomes the idyllic reference point for the vertical structure romanticised on shaky ground. This work operates across boundaries of destruction, preservation and renewal – ensuring a dramatic integration between building and landscape.

telemetric needle

continued...

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| isometric series

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| site plan

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Functionally, the historical processes of the lighthouse as a navigational, directive, and organisational structure are re-imagined here as a symbol of foresight in the event of an earthquake or related natural disaster. The tip of the tower embraces the immaterial data flow of recent technological advances – an above earth recording of satellite photography from a global network of similarly earthquake-prone sites. Materially, a network of telemetric rods radiating across the site, alongside a primary drill at the base of the tower record beneath earth: tectonic and soil movement, seismic noise and electromagnetic waves. In-between, a single residence for a nominated ‘lighthouse keeper’ is provided, where the streams of data from both sources can be consolidated into an anticipatory forecast. At this extreme, the architectural system shifts from its passive, ‘recording’ state to its active, ‘protective’ state: a dormant system within the telemetric rods distributes sand on site into a network of huge, staggered ‘sand walls’ between the outermost rods, defending and preserving the landscape within.

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Formally, the geometric composition of the tower enfolds its functional concepts in exposing a play of opposites. It generates a tension between an image of stability, in a phenomenal sense, versus the reality of fragility, in a literal and tactile sense. Thus, extremities recur within the perceived formal shifts in the building – it is at once austere, monolithic, even muscular when confronted in one elevation, however a shift in viewline reveals the mass as potentially fragile, susceptible to decay and weather. In the distance, no sign of occupation can be read but for the giving way of one surface expression to another. Within, traditionalist concepts of structure are inverted or emphasised in a play of anchors and cantilevers, interrupted and dislodged views, and disproportionate scale that is never easily absolved. These are purposeful absurdities, given our interest in anxiety as a headspace and more importantly, an activator for a designed architectural experience. Operating at the precipice of destruction and renewal, this project asks at what point an alien influence in the benevolent order threatens to figuratively destroy what it is designed to functionally preserve. continued ...

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| view toward the Awaroa estuary

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| the lighthouse set within the idyllic NZ landscape

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| the lighthouse keepers’ quarters

| deep voids between ‘functional’ spaces

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| telemetric rods shifting from recording to protecting the landscape

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| the workspace receives site data locally and globally from other earthquake-prone sites

+90m: research area & workstation

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| entry to the lighthouse at high tide

facade

+90m: Research area and workstation

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structure

circulation

+40m: lighthouse keeper’s living quarters

+40m: Lighthouse Keeper’s living quarters

living & working spaces

telemetric needle

+6m: entry from Awaroa estuary (high tide)

isometric series

plan series

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| plans

+6m: Entry from Awaroa Estuary [high tide only]

longitudinal section

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| longitudinal section

As day passes into night, the tower within the landscape fluctuates between functional and symbolic states. Illuminated from within as the darkest hours emerge, the structural exoskeleton is given an imagistic emphasis and weight. After Vidler [1992: 168], here we are referencing concepts of light as arcane as they are socioculturally embedded in our nature. Engaged in both its physical and metaphysical contexts - the lighthouse remains a beacon in the always-recurrent dark, as it always was, and with it all our internalised understandings of its symbolism: of foresight, and of knowledge, even where the endgame is most unwritten. Awaroa Lighthouse is a project interested in collective memory and prevailing emotional undercurrents; in parallel narratives, over time, space and scale, teetering between the softness of a gesture, and the hardness of a fact. _________________________ References Vidler, A. The Architectural Uncanny: Essays in the Modern Unhomely, 1992.

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| the lighthouse at night

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| gallery B with HCA bust

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| night aerial

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Hans Christian Andersen

HOUSE OF FAIRYTALES

infrastructural passage splits site into urban and garden areas

ideas competition ____________________ with Henry Stephens, Hannes Frykholm and Mats Håkansson + Confidential project - currently under jury. Competition results announced March 2014. ____________________ “Everything you look at can become a fairy tale and you can get a story from everything you touch.”

Hans Christian Andersen

One of the most beguiling aspects of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairytales is their taking place in a world not unlike our own. Andersen’s writing allows us to imagine the possibility of extraordinary happenings within our daily routine. That the narratives of Andersen’s work find their origin in Odense, becomes the point of departure for this proposal to create a new House of Fairytales – to celebrate the life, and to explore the most enduring themes present in Andersen’s writing. This proposal engages these ideas through the creation of a public attraction for the city of Odense, that finds its raison d’etre in celebrating the very personal, and often introspective, nature of human imagination. The House of Fairytales achieves this by challenging the conventions of contemporary museum architecture, which often relies on a singular and spectacular form to announce and separate itself from the city. Conversely, this is a House of Fairytales that is not one moment, but many. It is a public park, punctuated by moments of playful invitation that lead into an immersive interior loop. The scale of the new buildings on Lotzes Have follow the cadence of the existing street-scape, before slipping into an enveloping interior world. Themes running through Andersen’s oeuvre and the birthplace itself, are taken as design drivers that condition the experience, typified by a constant upending of spatial expectations, creating a malleable relationship between the museum’s inward contents and its outward context of Odense. Because notions of iconicity are never the burdened on any one view or moment, the House of Fairytales is able to act as an important link along the changing face of Odense’s public infrastructure, a surreal and educational departure into the world of Hans Christian Andersen, and a generous space of public gathering. continued...

pavilions frame the green surface

submerging the musueum keeps the garden open

building shape fits with program and context

intricate visual connections between underground and garden

lifting up the northern edge of the garden

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| diagram series

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light emitting grass

cafĂŠ

gift-shop and mini-auditorium

camera obsura sphere

underground parking entrance

24 foyer

arch follies

entrance pavilion

entrance ramps

emphasized topography

infill surrounding birthplace

sunken lightwell

urban periscope

educational gallery level -1

educational gallery level -2 25

lightwell

exhibition gallery level -1

exhibition gallery level -2

exhibition gallery level -3

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| site plan

The Interior World

To search it out and momentarily disappear through the entry, requires a pause for reorientation where the context of Odense is cast in a light that oscillates between the surreal and the familiar. The scale of the new structures on Lotzes Have, which follow the cadence of the existing street-scape, slip into an enveloping interior world where themes running through Hans Cristian Anderson’s oeuvre and birthplace itself are taken as design drivers that condition the spatial experience. The ticketed journey through the House of Fairytales is conceived as a loop – through a well-defined entry on the southern border of the site, into gallery and educational spaces that gain their inspiration from Hans Christian Anderson’s birthplace itself. The layered views through intimately scaled rooms of his former home at once turn the perception of a universal icon into an individual encounter – while windows to Ramsherred and Bangs Boder create a playful relationship between casual passers-by and ticketed patrons of the museum. The condition of seeing and being seen is coupled with an awareness of one’s physical awareness is then extrapolated across the site. Interestingly, this contextual reading of the site, marries with three of the most relevant themes present in Andersen’s fairytales – which have profound architectural equivalencies for the sequence of gallery spaces:

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| light-rail crossing

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| gallery A

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| North-South Section

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| gallery B entry point

The position of the distinct ‘other’ | The other is defined in relation to the group, majority or even world, as a means to emphasize the subjectivity of the outcast in many of Andersen’s narratives. The fragile and ephemeral quality of things | A phenomena that appears on many levels in Andersen’s work: paper houses, porcelain castles, and idiosyncratic human sensitivities. Transformation and change | People, places and objects turn out to be much different beyond first impression, and the scale of things often reveals worlds within worlds. Upon returning to the park, it is our hope that visitors while not only command a refined knowledge of Andersen’s work, but will be inspired toward their own creation, through an encounter with a House of Fairytales that rewards exploration and provokes imagination. The strategies proposed here for a new House of Fairytales, celebrate a national icon through the reclamation of public space in the creation of a new type of museum – one that is deeply contextual, while commanding its own undeniable presence.

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| gallery B - stairs below wishing well

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| gallery B - view from ramp to Lotzes Have

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| aerial from west

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| East-West Section

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CLYDE QUAY WHARF ____________________

for Athfield Architects Ltd. Completed mid 2014, This project comprises high end apartments, retail and public space. It is located on the historic Clyde Quay Jetty in Wellington, New Zealand; a site formally occupied by the overseas passenger terminal. The scale and complexity of the project has produced a building whose formal language references the site’s marine heritage, has upgraded the public plane of the wharf level while providing luxury apartments above set against a harsh, coastal environment. As is typical with projects of this scale, it offers many episodes for invention - projects within the project. This has allowed me to develop skills in several roles within the team, including construction documentaion of the external envelope and lobbies, penthouse design, and concept work for bespoke architectural elements - such as lobby stairs. Additionally, the design and documentation of this bulding has required the handling of a complex Revit BIM model - operating across three large linked files and co-ordinated with a range of other consultant’s models. Examples of construction documentation I have been been involved with and produced. More pages and information are available on request.

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| proposed stair for no1 lobby

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MASSEY UNIVERSTY MASTERPLANNING ____________________

for Athfield Architects Ltd. Masterplan for the rejuvination of the Massey University Wellington campus. The work describes a staged framework for the expansion of several of the faculties, with a focus on improving the Campus’ collective spaces and relationship to its neighbouring Mt Cook suburb. The steep topography at the edges of the university campus coupled with low quality building stock has resulted in a missed opportunity to engage with both the neighbouring high school, and the mix of urban and suburban conditions which exist along its boundaries. Additionally, natural spaces for public gathering within the heart of the campus are currently given over to carparking. The resultant masterplan responds to these current problems, proposing a mix of buildings both at the campus edges, and at its core. The buildings merge with a landscape strategy that creates legible gateways that connect to well defined public space within the heart of the campus.

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VICTORIA UNIVERSTY MASTERPLANNING ____________________

for Athfield Architects Ltd. Part of a broader Kelburn campus masterplan, my involvement focussed on the development around Kelburn parade. The universities’ desire to consodilate a campus that has spread across Wellington city created an opportunity to establish a stronger ‘gateway’ of buildings to define the primary entry point into the Kelburn campus. This particular exercise examined the potential of locating new buildings along the less developed western edge of the parade creating a dialogue with both the campus entry and the surrounding suburban context. The inclusion of these structures was then framed as an oppportunity to improve circulation and gathering spaces along the entry corridor to the campus.

Other projects for Athfield Architects: + Cuba-Dixon Mixed use development (feasibility study) + Wynyard Quarter + Housing New Zealand Newtown Social Housing + Scarborough House + Pukehuia Development

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| Familial Clouds at Palazzo Bembo

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| perspectival paper models

| Familial Clouds installation in progress

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FAMILIAL CLOUDS - VENICE BIENNALE ____________________

exhibited at the Palazzo Bembo for the 13th International Venice Architecture Biennale 2012 + My role involved being part of a team creating the ‘clouds’ of architectural process on the walls. The clouds represent the production of Simon Twose’s White House and Concrete House projects, while the composition on the table by Andrew Barrie presents a family tree of New Zealand architecture. ____________________ all photos by Henry Stephens. excerpts from text by Sarah Treadwell: This exhibition, Familial Clouds is the work of two architects, Simon Twose and Andrew Barrie. Across the walls of the exhibition are two houses by Simon Twose, not organised as projects but rather as houses dispersed into clouds of process; productive lines, dead ends and frustrations, the usual stuff of family life. Now partial and oblique, 290 A1 drawings that composed the white house have been reduced to business card size (a million tiny objects that resist collection). Small mirrors, bracketed off the wall reflect and refract the drawings; the displacement of the images is matched by the rotating and twisting bodies that stare into the pre-positioned mirrors to find architecture. The mirrors offer a dislocated view that demonstrates the fleeting and difficult nature of the process of architectural practices and the transient nature of its products. The viewing body, shifted from the usual neutral mode of gallery contemplation, is momentarily comical and active.

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This swarm of analogue practice records negotiations between architect and client as much as architectural form and the insubstantial families of paper cluster to form architectures of conversation, persuasion and decision. The movements inherent in such conversations, and the papery, hand drawn method, were intended to reflect soft tensions in the suburban city context of Auckland. On the gallery walls, all this weight is dispersed into small particles of architecture; models transformed into digital views on the screen in a cropped engagement with medium. These fraught objects are split to reveal the internal fractures of daily life, the reflection of which is displaced through the small technically probing mirrors. Delicately balanced, in loose affiliation, Twose’s architectural clouds and Barrie’s precise diminutive world read as miniaturized explorations of the limits of two-dimensional form and family connections. Writer Susan Stewart has pointed out that; ”The miniature always tends to tableau rather than toward narrative, toward silence and spatial boundaries rather than expository closure. Whereas speech unfolds in time, the miniature unfolds in space”. 04

| White House models

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| section model interior

| data field as perceptual field

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A PROJECTIVE SITE ____________________

Master of ArchitectureThesis (prof ) + Finalist | NZIA Graphisoft Student Design Awards, selected as one of the top 4 Victoria University of Wellington thesis projects, 2010.

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| the real site - Shipwright building, Shelley Bay NZ

+ Finalist | Dowse Art Gallery student crafts awards, 2011 | published: The South African Journal of Art History, vol 27, no. 3, 2012. | online: The Draftery. ____________________ This is an architectural project in reverse - from building, back to drawing. In doing so, the work explores the idea of an architectural space that exists between a physical building and its representation in drawing and modelling. The often unforeseen social, environmental, and economic complexities a building is exposed to over time can be taken backwards into the architects’ most fundamental tools, and in doing so - a different form of site analysis is proposed.

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The project explores the idea of ‘site’ through a design enquiry that attempts to distil a complex way to occupy architecture - that both real space and the space of representation can be occupied simultaneously. I have called this between space A Projective Site: it exists between real and representational space; coupling the sensory, embodied complexities of inhabitation (of the former), with the abstract, instrumental characteristics (of the latter). continued over page...

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| photogram model

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| isometric study C

The intention is to challenge the idea of architecture as a purely autonomous discipline - that which attempts to derive all meaning from its own internalised logic, and impose control on external reality. In this sense, its legitimacy is determined independent of context; however such conceptual purity is never maintained in reality. Our direct experience of space is seen as something that disrupts this conceptual purity. Therefore I attempted to explore the reciprocity between the abstract, instrumental space of representation and the symbolic nature of embodied space. By hovering between these states, a Projective Site suggests that the instability of the translations that occur between them is a creative strength, rather than a weakness. continued over page...

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| section model

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| over page: cumulative section study

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| section model b

The project explores the gaps between how we design and represent architecture, and how we experience it as built space. Rather than see these conditions as opposites, I was interested in exploring the complex relationships and overlaps that occur between the conceptual space of representation and the more direct nature of embodied perceptual space. Instead of separating instrumental and sensory interpretations of reality, this project argues that they are bound in a reciprocal relationship where one gives structure and meaning to the other. In practice, this work attempts to provoke a rethinking of the gaps between architecture’s interiority of representation and the exteriority of its contextedness. It does so by arguing that the inhabitation of architecture is more complex than what is conventionally assumed. This re-reading of inhabitation occurs in the tools that the architect works with directly - the tools of representation. The experiential readings of an abandoned shipwright building, that now exists in a state well beyond authorial intention provided fertile ground for loading the abstract and instrumental qualities of architectural representation with unanticipated social, cultural and economic forces the building has been exposed to over time and has contributed to its current state. It is my hope that by conditioning the space of representation with the depth, complexity and experiential characteristics of real sites and situations that the instrumental and the symbolic meanings of architecture can be seen to be bound in a reciprocal relationship, actively operating through one another’s implied boundaries.

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| top - inhabitation model

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| bottom - section model images

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| inhabitation model b

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| NZIA presentation

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| private entry

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| public entry

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| kitchen + wine tasting

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| courtyard

| elevations

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ARAPAI HOUSE

____________________

Family residence + Cellar Door + Second Place | AAA Cavalier Bremworth New Zealand Unbuilt Architecture Awards, 2013. ____________________ Arapai house is both family home and cellar door - for the marketing and selling of wine. Located on a site that occupies the suburban/rural fringe of Martinborough, New Zealand, the point of departure is a simultaneous critique of both contemporary wine culture, the changing nature of wine production itself, and typical suburban housing in New Zealand. These critiques are realised architecturally in a series of simple gestures, creating a building that is a unique intersection of commercial and domestic programme. While wine culture has been absorbed into visual culture and aspects of globalisation generally, it is unique amongst global goods which often reinforce qualities of placelessness. Fast food for example, intentionally creates distance between the final good, and the where and how it is made. Wine differs as its position in the global market is strengthened by reinforcing the appellation of the vine-

yard and the qualities of its terroir. The final scheme engages these notions by departing from the conventions of its suburban context comprised of large houses on small sites, toward a house that uses private functions to frame public ones. The traditional front and back of house distinctions of its commercial neighbours nearby are also done away with. From a densely planted street facade, visitors are drawn into the heart of the site, and social spaces such as the kitchen also function as wine tasting and selling areas. The interior atmosphere that is gradually revealed is one where the house is visually and physically connected on the north-south axis; while only controlled views are permitted along its east-west length. Arapai house is an exercise in creating a subtle oscillation between the house as workplace and house as home.

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| public living

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THE TOXIC ASSET HORROR CABINET ____________________

with Henry Stephens and Hannes Frykholm The Toxic Asset Horror Cabinet speculates on a future for New York, driven by the city’s historical tendency to re-script its idea of entertainment - a condition where authenticity becomes a tool to be manipulated for commercial gain. During the late 20th century, previously ‘anti-social’ forms of entertainment such as the strip-clubs and brothels that occupied 42nd St and Times Square were replaced by sanitised, carefully designed experiences that are now familiar parts of New York’s identity. New York has long capitalised on a self-awareness of its own image, a state where authenticity becomes reproducible as entertainment, an ultimately mediated urban experience, or ‘vicarious encounter’ with the real New York (Chaplin, Holding (2002). This observation of New York’s past behaviour has resulted in a proposal for a new form of disaster-tourism: one based on the recent and stilllived history of 2008’s Global Financial Crisis. This proposal differs from conventional disaster tourism in that the disaster is both unnatural and largely intangible - our future New York specifically engages the absence of any physical trace left in the very location the disaster purportedly stemmed from. continued over page... 49

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| Manhattan tourist sites

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| toxic asset taxonomy

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| manhattan section

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| offshore sites

This proposal addresses the physical manifestation of toxic assets if the physical effects of the global financial crisis were dispersed far from Wall St, this project reintroduces the physical form that these assets were derived from: foreclosed homes from across America (FIG 04). As Phillip Johnson’s AT&T tower would come to symbolise corporate America infiltrating the domestic (Jacobs, 2012) - here the domestic literally re-enters the corporate – this time as entertainment. Our proposal takes the form of foreclosed homes planted strategically along popular tourist routes (FIG 01). The home becomes the monument, and then the museum - a mobile tourism infrastructure to commemorate an immaterial crisis. Operated by previously out-of-work bankers, these homes are flown in and marked, not by the weight of the grid, but instead by the lightness of balloons - reclaiming the vertical space of Manhattan for the many unknown victims of the disaster, and in turn establishing a presence equal to that of its iconic skyscrapers (FIG 02, 03, 04). As the effects of the global financial crisis continues to be a lived and painful reality for so many, this project re-introduces the notion that despite the immaterial mediums through which America’s financial institutions operate, their physical manifestations are equally real. The Toxic Asset Horror Cabinet removes this physical distance between cause and effect, and the ideal image of New York is forced to contend with its true self, masked in the form of entertainment - just as it has always done.

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References Chaplin, S. and Holding, E. (2002). Addressing the Post-Urban - Los Angeles, Las Vegas and New York in Leach, N (ed.), The Hieroglyphics of Space - reading and experiencing the modern metropolis. New York: Routledge. Jacob, S. (2012). On Sketches for Regency Living, http://strangeharvest.com/on-sketches-for-regency-living. Retrieved 10/06/12

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| high line park

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| prototype of flexible roof system a

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| prototype of flexible roof system b

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| entry

Entry

North Elevation

Site Perspective

East Elevation

SUB TERRA / SUB MILLIMETER ARRAY ____________________ CED: UC Berkeley upper level graduate design studio

10a

Entry

+ Exhibited | Generative Components Student Symposium, at Wurster Hall, CED: University of California Berkeley, September, 2010. North Elevation ____________________ This two part studio involved the design of an environmental control system and its implementation into the harsh environment of the Chajnantor Plain of San Pedro de Atacama. Located in northern Chile, the Atacama is the driest desert in the world and has an extremely thin atmosphere. The thin atmosphere creates an ideal location for astronomical research and therefore phase two was directed toward an implementation of the environmental control system into an ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter / Sub Millimeter Array) complex, for the study of spectral energy distribution between submillimeter and far infra-red wavelengths. The environmental control system is conceived as a reciprocal relationship between a flexible roof system and clusters of hydronodes. The roof deforms relative to solar radiation, exposing heat to the hydronodes which allows the nodes to evaporate stored moisture into the internal atmosphere during the hottest and driest times of the day. The roof and hydronodes work at their optimum on alternating timelines in order to maintain a homeostatic internal environment, relative to the ever-changing external climate.

Site Perspective

Eas

Entry

Site P

North Elevation

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| A specific channel on the Cero Negro mountain, was chosen for its high radiation and moisture content occuring within extremely close proximity.

The final research center creates a synthetic landscape, merging from and mediating the natural environment. The ALMA complex is a shift from the ephemeral science-experiment building, privileging permanence as a way of finding meaning within the vast landscape.

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| wireframe

| 24 hour cycle illustrating relationship between roof-system and hydronodes.

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| wine bottle display unit and floor structure integration 1:20 at A1

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| construction process - aluminium rectangular box for wine bottle display. 1:5 at A1

truction Drawings]

MOUTERE HILLS WINERY ____________________ VUW construction studio

10b

The Moutere Hills Winery was conceived as a two part construction project. Phase one involved the design of the overall layout and envelope and phase two was concerned with the detailing of one interior space within the overall building. The final outcome is an exercise in articulating the temporal (visitors) and permanent (production of wine) cycles of a winery. This was achieved through a series of material and formal shifts, further explored through a carefully managed sequence of fluctuations between visual and physical connections between the different volumes. The sequence of spaces splits at the entrance to the winery - heavy concrete forms accommodating the production of gravity-fed wine follow a consistent gradient down and through the hillside. The public spaces, while initially appearing as a series of isolated, translucent volumes that hover above, permeate through into the production spaces at opportune moments, allowing a physical relationship between the marketing and production of wine. The detailing of the winery was a translation of this logic, where each moment was analysed as to how shifts between separation and conflation could be emphasized relative to the relationship of the spaces in question.

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| section perspective of tasting room, lab and fermentation room

A full set of construction drawings are available on request.

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| exterior perspective

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Ghuznee St Perspective

| Ghuznee st perspective

| study drawings exploring shifts and delays between image and object

Underground Entry Space

Underground Entry Space | underground entry

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Image to Object Transition

Image to Object Transition | image to object transition

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MAISON MARTIN MARGEILA ____________________ VUW design studio

This project is a flagship store for Belgian fashion designer Martin Margiela. The design appropriates Margiela’s reactionary ethos to the transitory, fleeting nature of mainstream fashion culture and instead tends toward permanence while satisfying the industry’s need for the new, through re-cycling and re-appropriation. The building actively defers the satisfaction of the user, challenging the conventions of the fashion store. To achieve this, the strategy of the building is understood through a shift from image to object - a concomitant relationship between the garments and the architecture. The external facade presents an unclear ‘image’ of the building, indicating that it requires inhabitation in order to be understood. An underground entrance reinforces the departure from the distracted gaze of looking through a glass shop facade. Here, the image (synonymous with speed and immediate satisfaction) is ironically employed as a delay mechanism, drawing attention to the details of the garments which are physically located deeper within the building. The store is composed of physically isolated, yet visually connected volumes - so as one moves through the building, a simultaneous understanding of the architecture and the garments emerge. The steel structure is guiding and constant, but does not necessarily define spatial boundaries, while the skin of the building, made of printed ETFE (a translucent plastic film), blurs the depth and definition of spaces and is continually recycled to display new lines as they are brought into the store. A symbiotic relationship emerges between the Display Area fashion, architecture and the inhabitant.

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| east elevation East Elevation | Scale 1:100

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Display Area | display area

Space -looking looking back toward Display Areadisplay area | purchasePurchase space, toward

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APPENDIX

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FANS OF GRIM ’70s ARCHITECTURE ____________________

+ Published | Architecture NZ, Auckland, May/June issue, 2013. ____________________ During December 2012 and January 2013, I travelled through Bangladesh and India. This article chronicles my visit to the Louis Kahn designed Jatiyo Sangsad Bhaban, or the National Assembly of Bangladsh, situating the analysis within the context of present day Dhaka. The photos on this page are scenes from across the capital; the shipbuilding yards, garment factories, the South-Dhaka slums and Sadarghat boat terminal. A full set of images can be found at http:// cargocollective.com/nickroberts.

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nick roberts | architecture portfolio 2008-2014