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Archery Magazine 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID RAVENNA MI PERMIT NO. 320

&ARTICLES

FEATURES June/July 2007 WORLD ARCHERY FESTIVAL STANISLAWSKI OPEN $1,000,000 Safe for Another Year by Paul Davison .........................................5 FROM THE PRESIDENTS DESK by Bruce Cull ...........................................12 NFAA CALENDAR OF EVENTS ...............20 NFAA HEADQUARTERS REPORT ...........16 SHOOTING UNDER PRESSURE by Bernie Pellerite ...................................21 SECTIONAL NEWS ..................................25

ON OUR COVER:

INDOOR NATIONALS Recap and results ....................................38 REMINISCING COMPOUND BOWS, THE EARLY DAYS by Robert Ragsdale .................................41

Vol. 27 • No. 3 © 2007 NFAA®

“ASAP” After School Archery Program and club application form ......................................55 TOURNAMENT REGISTRATION FORMS

AND MUCH MORE!

WHAT IS GOOD FORM? by Terry Wunderle ...................................48 MILK RIVER MADNESS by John Dudley .......................................50 NOSTALGIA CORNER Happy 30th Birthday...Bowhunter Freestyle by Paul Davison .......................................54

New caption needed — photos by Greg Nielsen.

EDITORIAL POLICIES Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published bi-monthly. Editorial deadlines are as follows: ISSUE Feb/March April/May June/July

DEADLINE December 15 February 15 April 15

All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on diskette and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. DO NOT include digital photos in your word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors. The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which are published. All material will be published at the discretion of the editorial board. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under

ISSUE Aug/Sep Oct/Nov Dec/Jan

DEADLINE June 15 August 15 October 15

the rules of fair chase will be considered. Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to: Marihelen Rogers, Editor, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 • (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com NFAA Section and State Association News should be directed to: Paul Davison, Section and State News Editor 2787 Winston Way, Duluth, GA 30096 Fax (770) 476-7488 E-mail (preferred): stringwalker@att.net

Archery is published bimonthly by the National Field Archery Association, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373, 909/794-2133. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with self-addressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. 2 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 3

ADVERTISERS INDEX Angus Brown Safaris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Archery Focus Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 BCY Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Brite Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Eastman / Carbon Express. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Electronic Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Gold Tip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Kwikee Kwiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Limbsaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Maple Leaf Press . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Mathews, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mental Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 New Archery Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Ragsdale & Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Shot Doctor, the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48, 59 Specialty Archery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

The voice of field archery, the NFAA®, Ted Nugent United Sportsmen, the IFAA and bowhunting.

Visit our Web site www.fieldarchery.com or call us toll-free at 1-800-811-2331 EDITORIAL BOARD: Bruce Cull, Brian Sheffler, Paul Davison, Douglas Joyce EDITOR: Marihelen Rogers, NFAA Executive Secretary PUBLISHER: Rogers Printing Inc., 3350 Main St. PO Box 215, Ravenna MI 49451-0215 LAYOUT: Patricia A. Rogers SALES MANAGER: Jim Stewart DISTRIBUTION MANAGER: Scott Robbins

Stanislawski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . outside back cover

ADVERTISING SALES

Stringwalker/Paul Davison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Martin J. Rogers NFAA Headquarters 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com

Sure-Loc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 TrueFlight Feathers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 US & International Archer Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Walkers Game Ear. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

by Paul Davison

$1,000,000 Jackpot Safe for Another Year

T

4 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

he third leg of the World Archery Festival’s 3-Star Tour, the Stanislawski Open, is where the big bucks can made. Anyone, regardless of skill-level, gender, age or style, who has competed in the first two legs, the Vegas Shoot in February, and the NFAA Indoor Nationals in March, is eligible to win a Mustang and/ or an ATV at Pittsburgh. The chance to win the $1,000,000 jackpot, however, is open only to those who shoot a perfect 900 at Las Vegas, and a perfect 600 with 120 X’s at the NFAA Indoor Nationals. The hard part, however, is that in order

to win the $1,000,000, those eligible must shoot a perfect 1200 at the Stanislawski Open. Remember, the Vegas Shoot and the Indoor Nationals are shot at “standard” indoor distances, 18 meters and 20 yards, respectively; while the adult shooting distances in the Stanislawski Open are 40, 50 and 60 yards. No 20-yard wimp is going win this tournament or the $1,000,000. This was the first year that three NFAA Pros; namely, Chance Beaubouef, Bob Eyler and Jesse Broadwater, were eligible to win the $1,000,000. In 2006, it was Jesse Broadwater

and Lee Ford. In 2005, it was Chance Beaubouef and Mike Anderson, and in 2004, it was Chance Beaubouef and Nathan Brooks. Bob Eyler was the 2006 Compound Unlimited Male Stanislawski Open champion, while Chance Beaubouef was the champion in both 2005 and 2004. Jesse is a former Mustang winner (2004) as well as 2006 NFAA National Outdoor champion. Chance, Bob and Jesse seem to thrive on distances greater than 20 yards. There were three shooting lines on Saturday: 7:30 am, 11:30 am, and 3:30 pm. As Archery Magazine June/July 2007 5

PREVIOUS PAGE WAF President Bruce Cull presents Hoyt Pro Josh Schaff with keys to the Mustang. LEFT Left side of the 11:30 am shooting line. RIGHT Right side of the 11:30 am shooting line. BOTTOM Vermont’s “Pelkey’s Road Team” — always here in force.

TOP LEFT

These Cubs had no adult help in scorekeeping. TOP RIGHT

A look down the crowded 11:30 target line. RIGHT

expected, very few shooters picked 7:30 am for their first round, but more than onehalf of the competitors opted for the more “comfortable” 11:30 line, thereby using nearly all the more than 100 target butts. Normally, “on-the-clock” practice is allowed during the entire day on a space-available basis, but the full 11:30 line negated all practice for about three hours. Saturday’s first round proceeded without a hitch. All eyes were on the three “future millionaires.” Bob Eyler and Jesse Broadwater, shooting 11:30 line, dropped their first arrows in the first and second ends at 50 yards, respectively.

6 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Chance Beaubouef, shooting the 3:30 line, cleaned 40 and 50 yards, but dropped his first arrow during the second end at 60 yards. This is believed to be the farthest anyone has gone in the pursuit of the $1,000,000 Jackpot. Chance had a good day otherwise, however. He, along with Dave Cousins and Perry Harpring, led the Championship Freestyle Male Division with 598’s, just two points off perfect. Jeff Hopkins was close behind with a 597, followed by Reo Wilde, Kevin Polish and Kale Henton with 596’s. In the Championship Freestyle Female Division, Holly Pagel and Erika Anschutz led after the first round with

589’s, closely followed by Tiffany Reeves (588), Kelly Ward (587), Connie Calloway (586) and Jamie Van Natta (585). Similar scores were shot in the Championship Senior Freestyle Division; namely, 589 by Dan Renner, 588 by Dennis Neeley, Phil McCoy and Dee Wilde, and 587 by Ed Horn. Rick Hunsinger led the Championship Freestyle Limited Division with a fine 580. Rick was followed by Jeff Fabry (577), Michael Cole (571) and Randy Brabec (570). Saturday evening was capped off with the 2007 3-Star Tour shoot-off for the Ford Mustang. To be eligible for the shoot-off, one had to attend all three 2007 WAF tournaments: (1) Vegas

Pro Dave Barnsdale makes emergency repairs in BCY’s booth. Shoot, (2) Indoor Nationals, and (3) Stanislawski Open. Using the special “Mustang” target face, 213 shooters started the shoot-off at 10 yards. In 5-yard increments, only those who scored a “5” advanced to the next longer distance. Eightysix survived to 25 yards, 37 to 35 yards, 18 to 40 yards, nine to 45 yards, and just two to 50 yards: Josh Schaff and Keith Trail. Fifty yards seems to be the magic maximum distance, for that’s what it’s been for the past three years. Josh shot first, and he scored a solid “4.” Keith needed a 5 to win the Mustang

or an “easy” 4 to move on, but just like last year, the poor soul who shoots last seems to be snake-bit. Keith flinched his shot nearly off the target face. Josh Schaff, who looks barely old enough to drive, was the 2007 Mustang shoot-off winner. In the past, the 3-D shooters had a similar shoot-off for an ATV; but because of the rather poor turnout for the 3-D shoot at Pittsburgh, there was no third leg of the 2007 3-Star Indoor Marked 3-D championship.

Instead, the 3-D was replaced by a unique and better attended Novelty Shoot. Those participating in the Las Vegas and Louisville 3-D events, as well as the Pittsburgh Novelty Shoot, were now eligible to shoot-off for the ATV. The ATV shoot-off rules are essentially the same as the Mustang shoot-off rules — the principal difference being that a Vegas Shoot target face is used instead of the Mustang face. Eighteen survived to 35 yards, just six to 40 yards, and four to

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 7

LEFT—Synchronized elbows. RIGHT—Jeff Hopkins, Josh Schaff and Jesse Broadwater take home the BIG checks.

LEFT—Josh Schaff wins the Mustang Shoot-off at 50 yards. RIGHT—Darrin Christenberry wins the ATV for the second year in a row.

45 yards. Only one survived 45 yards: Darrin Christenberry. The difference between a Vegas target and a 3-D animal target makes no difference to Darrin — he’s won the ATV in both 2006 and 2007! There were just two lines on Sunday. All kids and the Freestyle Flights shot at 7:30 am. All others were assigned to the 11:30 am line. Once again, we apologize that there’s insufficient room in this issue to describe all the head-to-head competition. We’re concentrated on the Championship divisions. All scores from the 2007 Stanislawski Open are listed in this issue and on NFAA’s website, www. fieldarchery.com. The rally caps are on! In the Championship Freestyle Male Division, the three leaders on Saturday were passed by three others on Sunday. There were three 599’s, plus one 598, shot

8 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

on Sunday. The seven 598’s and 599’s shot over the two days were scored by seven different shooters. Now that’s parity. Jeff Hopkins’ 599 gave him a 1196 total (and $5,000), just four points off perfect. Josh Schaff, this year’s Mustang winner, also shot a 599 for a 1194 total and $2,000. Jesse Broadwater finish third with a 1193 and $1,000, bettering Perry Harpring’s 1193 and $700, based on X-count. A similar rally occurred in the Championship Freestyle Female Division. Jamie Van Natta, resting in sixth after the first round, shot an outstanding 591 on Sunday, and finished in second place (1176 and $800), just two points behind Erika Anschutz’s backto-back 589’s ($1,500). Tiffany Reeves finished third (1174 and $525), while first round coleader, Holly Pagel, dropped to fourth with a 1170 total (and $375). There were more

flip-flops in the Championship Senior Freestyle Division. The top five after Saturday remained the top five after Sunday, but the order changed a bit. Phil McCoy emerged as champion with back-to-back 588’s (1176 and $1,350). One point behind Phil was Dennis Neeley ($750) and Dan Renner ($500), with Dennis claiming second place based on X-count. Similarly, Ed Horn (1173, 44 X’s and $380) bettered Dee Wilde (1173 40 X’s and $320) for fourth place. Rick Hunsinger (1156, 38 X-s and $1,000) hung on to better Jeff Fabry (1156, 31 X’s and $600) for the Freestyle Limited Championship based on Xcount. Randy Brabec (1148 and $400) finished third, while Michael McCoy (1147 and $200) finished fourth. As you may see from the accompanying photos, the WAF prize money is substantially

augmented by the sponsors’ contingency money. For example, Jeff Hopkins pocketed at least $18,500 in addition to the $5,000 “official” prize money. While the final scores were being tallied, and just prior to the awards presentation, the inaugural Stanislawski Open Novelty Round shoot-down was conducted. Those in the shoot-down were ranked from 1 through 32, based on the Novelty Round scores shot Friday or Saturday (Vegas target faces at 30 yards). Number 1 was matched against number 32, number 2 against number 31, etc. The entire shoot-down results may be seen on www. fieldarchery.com. In summary, the quarter-finalists were Tony Clem, Braden Gellenthein, Perry Harping and Logan Wilde. Braden Gellenthein ($1,500) won the shoot-down over Perry

Harpring ($900). Logan Wilde ($750) bettered Tony Clem ($500) for third place. Tipton Cook, Jim Butts, Jeff Hopkins and Levi Morgan each earned $250 for fifth through eighth place. A special Certificate of Appreciation and Honorary NFAA Life Membership were presented to BCY’s Bob Deston

for representing the NFAA at the IFAA Committee meeting in conjunction with the 2006 World Field Archery Championship in Australia. There’s a possibility that there may be a new venue for 2008 Stanislawski Open. Wherever it’s located, make sure you put it on your calendar. It’s one great shoot!

Freestyle Female Championship medalists Erika Anschutz, Jamie Van Natta and Tiffany Reeves.

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 9

R

ESULTS

FLIGHT

STATE

TOTAL

AWARD

BAREBOW FLIGHTS 1 ALAN PAUL CT 999 $100.00 RONALD THOMPSON MD 789 $0.00 RICHARD LUCANGIOLI CO 768 $0.00 BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE FLIGHTS 1 CHRIS BERRY MO 1167 $375.00 RON DESIMONI NJ 1167 $210.00 BILL HAKL MN 1167 $165.00 JEFF HUMAN NY 1165 $120.00 WILLIAM GRIESEMER PA 1162 $105.00 MARK HERRING OH 1159 $85.00 BOB SHIPMAN IA 1159 $70.00 DUGIE DENTON MT 1158 $65.00 ED RADDER NY 1154 $55.00 GABE BATDORF PA 1146 $50.00 CHAMPIONSHIP FREESTYLE FEMALE 1 ERIKA ANSCHUTZ NE 1178 $1,500.00 JAMIE VAN NATTA OH 1176 $800.00 TIFFANY REEVES MT 1174 $525.00 HOLLY PAGEL MN 1170 $375.00 CONNIE CALLOWAY IN 1169 $300.00 CHAMPIONSHIP FREESTYLE LTD COMP 1 RICK HUNSINGER PA 1156 $1,000.00 JEFF FABRY CA 1156 $600.00 RANDY BRABEC CO 1148 $400.00 MICHAEL COLE NY 1147 $200.00 CHAMPIONSHIP FREESTYLE LTD. RECURVE FEMALE 1 LYNN WALTER CO 875 $200.00 CHAMPIONSHIP FREESTYLE MALE 1 JEFF HOPKINS 1196 $5,000.00 JOSH SCHAFF MT 1194 $2,000.00 JESSE BROADWATER PA 1193 $1,000.00 PERRY HARPRING IN 1193 $700.00 CHANCE BEAUBOUEF TN 1192 $550.00 DAVE COUSIINS ME 1192 $510.00 BRADEN GELLENTHIEN MA 1192 $475.00 KEVIN POLISH PA 1191 $440.00 LOGAN WILDE ID 1190 $400.00 TIM GILLINGHAM UT 1189 $360.00 JIMMY BUTTS NY 1189 $330.00 BOB EYLER MI 1189 $300.00 REO WILDE ID 1188 $280.00 RODGER WILLETT JR VA 1188 $265.00

PLACE 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

FLIGHT

STATE

TOTAL

AWARD

DARRYLL DIEHL VA 1188 $250.00 DUANE PRICE WI 1188 $245.00 DAN MCCARTHY WI 1187 $235.00 KEITH TRAIL NC 1187 $225.00 LEVI MORGAN NC 1187 $210.00 MICHAEL ANDERSON IA 1187 $200.00 KALE HENTON IA 1186 $200.00 KEVIN WILKEY UT 1186 $200.00 KEN KANE VT 1185 $200.00 DARREN CHRISTENBERRY IN 1185 $200.00 WAYNE RISNER OH 1185 $200.00 CHAMPIONSHIP SENIOR FREESTYLE 1 PHIL MCCOY IN 1176 $1,350.00 DENNIS NEELEY CA 1175 $750.00 DAN RENNER SC 1175 $500.00 ED HORN IA 1173 $380.00 DEE WILDE ID 1173 $320.00 THOMAS CROWE OR 1172 $270.00 CHRIS BELING NJ 1172 $230.00 TOM COBLENTZ MD 1171 $200.00 CROSSBOW FEMALE 1 PATRICIA COPLEY WV 1116 $100.00 JEANETTE PRICE MD 1038 $0.00 CROSSBOW MALE 1 STAN PENNYPACKER PA 1106 $150.00 TERRY BUTLER PA 1097 $0.00 RONALD KRESHESKY PA 1083 $0.00 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 KELSEY JOHNSON PA 1090 $0.00 CUB MALE FREESTYLE 1 ANDREW BARNHART NY 1190 $0.00 VINCENT INZONE NY 1176 $0.00 ANDY DAYTON MI 1149 $0.00 CUB MALE RECURVE 1 DUGAN DENTON MI 943 $0.00 FREESTYLE FLIGHTS 1 TODD LAMBRIGHT PA 1186 $1,000.00 MICHAEL PESTILLI CT 1181 $535.00 ANDREW CALLAWAY WI 1179 $400.00 JOHN FUTHEY OH 1175 $290.00 BOB MARCINEK PA 1175 $250.00 TOM PRUITT MO 1175 $200.00 RANDY HINKELMAN MD 1175 $175.00

PLACE 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Senior Freestyle Championship medalists Dan Renner (3rd), Phil McCoy (1st) and Dennis Neeley (2nd).

10 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

R

ESULTS

FLIGHT

STATE

DAN JACKSON 2 CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON TJ KRETZLER SEAN YETZ SONNY FOOTE TIM LILE GREGORY HORNER BILL JENKINS NICHOLAS JONES 3 TODD HOFFMAN JOEY MCNISH MARK WAGNER TIM ANDERSON MARK SALSGIVER RICK CARDARELLI DAN WHITEHOUSE TOBY MEDLEY 4 CHARLIE MONGER MICHAEL GRAHAM GREG BOKASH ADAM MITCHELL ANDY TURNQUIST SEAN NANCE NORMAN MILLER LOREN PAGEL 5 DOUG GRADE JOHN DAVIDSON RICHARD SCOTT CURT PETERSON STEPHEN HELLAND GARY SMITH RICHARD LEWIS MICHEAEL STEFANINI 6 ED DOAN HEIDI SNYDER JOHN MAITREJEAN CHERYL SMITH MICHAEL MICALIZZI JUNIE O’BRIEN GREG KULP GARY MUNSON 7 LORA SMITH SYLVAN GLICK

PA MD PA IL NJ OH PA PA WV WI MO IA OH MI NY VT OH PA PA NJ OH WY MD OH MN WI PA PA PA MN OH PA OH VA NY WI OH CT KY PA WV MI PA

TOTAL

AWARD

PLACE

1174 1174 1162 1162 1162 1161 1161 1160 1159 1159 1155 1154 1150 1148 1148 1147 1147 1158 1150 1148 1147 1147 1145 1144 1144 1141 1140 1140 1137 1137 1136 1136 1135 1133 1129 1125 1124 1123 1123 1119 1119 1113 1113

$150.00 $525.00 $300.00 $215.00 $150.00 $130.00 $110.00 $90.00 $80.00 $400.00 $215.00 $160.00 $115.00 $100.00 $80.00 $70.00 $60.00 $285.00 $160.00 $120.00 $85.00 $70.00 $60.00 $50.00 $45.00 $250.00 $135.00 $100.00 $75.00 $65.00 $50.00 $40.00 $35.00 $200.00 $110.00 $80.00 $55.00 $50.00 $40.00 $35.00 $30.00 $175.00 $95.00

8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2

FLIGHT

STATE

PAUL ZIEMS NY FRANK LORENCE OH GWEN MC MURRAY MD JOHN LETO NJ DIANE JOHNSTON OH MARC COOPER NY 8 LISA BROADWATER PA DON STARK NY SHANNA GAY PA STELLA DEVORE PA ERICK HALL CA JAY PRICE VT RONALD MULDERIG NY BURNELL HUMBERT PA FREESTYLE LIMITED FLIGHTS 1 LONNIE TRIPLETT OH JEFFREY WYLER IL KEVIN KOLAK PA MICHAEL MARINI NY KEN MOORE MA FREESTYLE LTD. RECURVE FLIGHTS 1 CHRIS OLSEN AL STEVE ROBINSON OH MATTHEW SIMMONS OH YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 SAMANTHA NEAL NY JESSICA HEEG WI KRYSTA WIEGERS MI YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE 1 JOSEPH NEWTON KY DEVON WIEGERS MI ADAM GALLANT ME YOUNG ADULT MALE RECURVE 1 JORDAN GROSS VT BEJANMIN LACHMAN UT YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 HUNTER JACKSON MI KAILEY JOHNSTON GA SARAH LANCE MI YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE 1 JOSH BYERLY OH WILLIE THOMPSON KY KRIS SCHAFF MT

TOTAL

AWARD

PLACE

1113 1111 1110 1107 1104 1101 1095 1094 1086 1080 1077 1073 1072 1060

$70.00 $50.00 $45.00 $35.00 $30.00 $25.00 $150.00 $85.00 $60.00 $45.00 $35.00 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00

3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1075 1070 1059 1007 895

$250.00 $140.00 $90.00 $65.00 $55.00

1 2 3 4 5

1062 1014 1003

$200.00 $120.00 $80.00

1 2 3

1153 1136 1135

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

1 2 3

1159 1158 1157

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

1 2 3

871 703

$0.00 $0.00

1 2

1162 1149 1146

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

1 2 3

1182 1174 1171

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00

1 2 3

BCY’s Bob Deston receives a Certificate of Appreciation and Honorary NFAA Life Membership.

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 11

NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 archery@iw.net

GREAT LAKES Judy McCutcheon Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/652-5836 jlynnmac@royell.org

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbs@indy.net NFAA® Office 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373 909/794-2133 800/811-2331 NFAArchery@aol.com

Greetings fellow archers: New article here

Great Lakes Robert McCutcheon 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/965-5290 prairie1@royell.net Mid-Atlantic Mike LePera 34 Kentwood Road Succasunna, NJ 07876 973/584-0637 brtesite@optonline.net Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 IowaArchery@hotmail.com New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore15@comcast.net Northwest Bill Tiddy 3355 Pinecrest Drive Helena, MT 5960-2 tiddyw@aol.com 406/475-3569 Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 Flarchery@earthlink.net 352/332-1969 Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 lee@dlprint.com 512/863-8296 Southwest Jerry Miller 10029 Avoncroft Street Whittier, CA 90601 562/692-6105 swcman1@verizon.net

Rocky Kline Director - IN 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 rlkline@insightbb.com 765/457-7086 Bill Jones Director - MI 2049 Lake St. National City, MI 48748 989/469-3939

Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) tebelius@gra.midco.net

Dave Thewlis Director - OH 16423 Chamberlain Rd Grafton, OH 44044 440/926-2464 DThew69613@aol.com

Ron Lewon Director - SD 11 Front St. Bronson, IA 51007 lewon@netins.net

Joe Barbieur Director - WI 5238 Valley View Dr. Janesville, WI 53546 608/756-1473 caal@charter.net

NEW ENGLAND Volker Pense Director - AAE Carl-Ulrich-Strasse 2B 64297 Darmstadt, Germany 0615-653085 nfaadirector@aae-archery.org

MID ATLANTIC Ron West Director - MD 802 Painter Pl. Capitol Hts., MD 20743 WestArrowsWest@aol.com 202/584-8015

Gary Marrier Director - VT 1525 Gibou Rd. Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471 802/326-4797 bowdoctor@pivot.net

John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com Dave Hryn Director - NY PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224 716/481-4699 Archery1@localnet.com Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@vfaa.org Steve Cox Director - WV WV Archery Assn. P.O. Box 142 Waverly, WV 26184 304/464-5646 MIDWEST Rodney “Zeke” Ogden Director - IA 718 N. 8th St. Osage, IA 50461 641/732-5797 ogdpeep@osage.net John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 wehjkh@frontier.net 651/462-1916

12 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Earl Foster Director - MO 8709 Booth Kansas City, MO 64138 816/763-2699

Tom Schaub Director - CT 35 Benson Rd. Ridgegfield, CT 06877 203/748-3771 Dave Cousins Director - ME 354 River Rd. Standish, ME 04084 207/642-4530 Alvie Carpenter Director - MA 7 Central Peterborough, NH 03458 603/924-3941 alviec@earthlink.net Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/876-4249 barebownh@aol.com Bruce Mulneix, Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401-885-5684 NORTHWEST Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 hmsarchery@email.com 208/476-5377 Doug Tate Director - MT 3499 Blacktail Loop Rd. Butte, MT 5970d1 406/494-4393 DOUG.TATE@northwestern.com

LeRoy Dukes Director - OR P.O. Box 422 Fairview, OR 97024 503/201-4961 T.C. Parker Director - WA P.O. Box 613 Hoquiam, WA 98550 360/533-4698 wa_nfaa@olynet.com Dan Kolb Director - WY 3571 Teton St. Casper, WY 82609 307/265-4418 bhfsldlk@hotmail.com SOUTHEAST Howard Beeson Director - AL 111 Eagle Circle Enterprise, AL 30824 334/347-4990 Oliver Austin Director - FL 1620 Yearling Trail Tallahassee, FL 32317 850/309-1918 oaustin@admin.fsu.edu Earl Watts Director - GA 3672 Larkin Road SE Dearing, GA 30808 706/556-6145 earlwatts1@aol.com Jerry Barr Director - KY 919 Manor Dr. Henderson, KY 42420 270/827-4570 barebow@henderson.net Mike Hindmarsh Director - NC 1687 Kildee Church Rd. Ramseur, NC 27316 bowtie01@centernet.net 919/742-5017 S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com Gordon Oland Director - TN 8851 Highland View Lane Knoxville, TN 37938 865/925-0138 goland@staffingtech.com SOUTHERN Wayne King Director - MS 107 Dana St. Brandon, MS 39042 601/825-9278 Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 479/855-6066 andr-ds@cox.net Scott Bradford Director - LA 40340 Old Hickory Ave. Gonzales, LA 70737-6756 225/622-0838 NFAALADirector@aol.com Robert Wood Director - OK 75377 S. 280 Rd Wagoner, OK 74467 robertw@osaa.us 918/485-6552 Monty Heishmann Director - TX 10149 Heritage Pkwy. West, TX 76691 254-826-5788 barebow@att.net

SOUTHWEST Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 frank@frankpearson.com Tom Daley Director - CA 11271 Lakeshore South Auburn, CA 95602 650/722-2713 nfaadir@cbhsaa@org Kenneth Buck Director - CO 1923 Shoshone Dr. Canon City, CO 81212 719/382-8919 KandSBuck@earthlink.net George Kong, Jr. Director - HI 1255 14th Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816-3838 808/734-5402

Committee Chairmen Pro Chairman Michael Braden 520A Oxford St. Houston, TX 77007 817/319-6638 cell prorookie1@aol.com Bowhunting and Conservation Administrative Chairman Tim Atwood 3175 Racine Riverside, CA 92503 909/354-9968 Atwoodhome@aol.com Celebrity Chairman Ted Nugent Promotion Chairman Fred Eichler

THE NFAA® HAS 50

Robert Borges Director - NM 5332 River Ridge Ave NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 505/890-4665 Archermn@netscape.com

CHARTERED STATE

Jim Marshall Director - NV 195 Ridge Crossing Henderson, NV 89015 702/566-0819 marshalls01@earthlink.net

AFFILIATED CLUBS IN

Judd Wathen Director - UT 309 E. 100 N Ephraim, UT 84627 435/283-3129 Wathen_1@msn.com

SPORT OF ARCHERY

ASSOCIATIONS AND OVER 1,000

THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. THE

IS A HEALTHY AND EXCITING SPORT PROVIDING AN

Professional Representatives

ACTIVITY IN WHICH

Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 (608) 839-5137

THE ENTIRE FAMILY

Midwest Sharon Henneman 9 Aspen Belton, MO 64012 (816) 679-3250 Midatlantic Doug Williams 31 Gaylord St. Apt. A Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 258-9269 dwilliams @copperjohn.com Northwest Carolyn Elder 2319 Pe Ell McDonald Rd. Chehalis, WA 98532 (360) 245-3261 Southern Troy Wesley 2306 57th St. Lubbock, TX 79412 (806) 797-0546 Southeast Jim Pruitte 6717 Green Plantation Rd. Harlem, GA 30814 (706) 556-0738 JPruitte@mcg.edu Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 (801) 323-3704

CAN PARTICIPATE.

WRITE US ON HOW TO OBTAIN INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS PROGRAMS OFFERED BY NFAA®. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENTS, SECTIONAL/STATE TOURNAMENTS, INDOOR/OUTDOOR LEAGUES, JUNIOR BOWHUNTER PROGRAMS, WHICH INCLUDE THE ART YOUNG SMALL / BIG GAME AWARDS, AND THE BOWFISHER PROGRAM.

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 13

The European Professional Archery Series (or the chicken and egg story)

by Steve Kendrick (Vice President of the IFAA) and Tony Goodwin (MD of Alternative Sporting Services)

W

e have been evolving the basic concept of a professional series for perhaps fifteen or more years now. Very simply, we don’t have any professional tournaments in Europe at all because there are no professional archers and we don’t have any professional archers because there are no tournaments for them to go to—a real “chicken and egg” situation. We had to break the circle! Hence, the creation of the Professional Archery Series (www. pro-archery.com) We have deliberately made the format of the series very simple but due to pre-conceived ideas and some misrepresentation many people are still confused. The format is almost a carbon copy of the PGA Golf series. They have 140 players split into groups of 4 around an eighteen hole course. As we are using the IFAA Field and Hunter rounds we 14 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

will have 112 archers shooting in groups of 4 around a course of 28 targets. As with the PGA format, there will be just one class. We will use the IFAA’s Professional Division for compound release shooters. Most tournaments want a thousand or more entries, largely because they need the money from the entries to pay for a big percentage of the prize fund. We will only have a maximum of 112 archers and the prize fund will be raised through advertising and sponsorship deals - just like the PGA. For this to work we have to create a platform for companies to advertise their products and services. More and more people are starting to watch non-mainstream sporting events on the internet, either live or streaming on-demand coverage. For this we have created Alternative2tv (www.alternative2tv.com) which is a dedicated video web site.

Since it was launched in late January, many thousands of archers have watched the various videos on this website and as each programme is preceded by an advertising video this has generated massive interest. We strongly believe that this sort of advertising really works and reaches the targeted audience better than any other form of advertising. The video coverage of Pro Archery events will be very different to anything seen elsewhere in the sport as they will be produced as TV-style programmes - not just a pretty picture of archers shooting arrows. If you have watched coverage of the PGA Tour you will understand the sort of programmes that we intend to produce. We have already produced examples. If you visit Alternative2tv and watch either the EFAA Nationals or the European 5 Nations - Esch - 2006 Report, you will start to see where we are going. These examples have been

produced during an eighteen month learning curve. By the first Pro Archery event we will be ready. So we come to our first event. This will be the 2007 Cartel Classic, to be held at Mullenborn, Germany on June 23rd and 24th. We have a 12,000 EURO prize fund (around $15,000 U.S.) with a first place prize guaranteed at 3,000 EURO. It’s not huge, but it’s pretty good for the first event. In 2008 we will have two tournaments and in 2009 we are planning for three, and continuing on each year until we have a full series. So far we have Cartel Archery sponsoring the prize fund for the first event and we have Alternative Services bank rolling the huge initial setup costs for the project. We have received many very positive reactions and as expected, a small number of negative ones too, but we have no doubt that if we succeed the prize to the sport and the industry as a whole will be huge. On the back of a real professional layer within the sport, membership of the IFAA could quadruple in a few years, lots more competitive archers and lots more customers for the archery shops and manufacturers. For the 2007 Cartel Classic

we are planning extensive freeto-view video coverage over the two days of the event. The coverage will be produced as a live on-demand presentation and will be made into 15 minute segments (just like real TV) with advertising breaks. Each segment will be set onto a timeline so the viewer can break in and out of the coverage at any time. There will also be a separate live updating scoreboard running alongside the video, so you will be able to track how each archer is doing in real time. In addition to video and scoring, the Pro Archery web site also features a rapidly expanding database of professional archers displaying their profiles and their personal sponsors. If you are a competing archer, we are expecting around twenty to thirty thousand viewers during the Cartel Classic so you can get real exposure for yourself and your sponsors. We have prepared the stage. There is still a huge amount left to do, Advertisers are the lifeblood for this venture and we need their support for this year and future years. We have an ever growing entry list for the Cartel Classic. If you are interested in being involved at the start of the Professional Archery Series, make sure you get your entry in as soon as possible. Archery Magazine June/July 2007 15

NFAA now offers Bowhunter’s Liability Insurance as a Benefit of Membership All NFAA members are eligible to use the benefits of the Bowhunters Liability Insurance Program. Every member of the NFAA is covered while hunting on property not owned by NFAA or by members of NFAA. Notable exclusions are any and all property damage arising out of the use of any All Terrain Vehicle, Mobile Equipment or Automobile. When requesting permission to hunt on private property, NFAA members can get easier access to hunt by presenting land owners the following protections: Property Damage Coverage Limits: • $5,000 per occurrence • $50,000 general aggregate NFAA member bowhunters can offer the landowner the following NFAA Bowhunters Code of Ethics: • I will respect the Landowner’s property as if it were my own. • I will do everything in my power to leave no trace on the land on which I am hunting.

• I am dedicated to the conservation and preservation of game and its natural habitat. • I will obey the rules of safe hunting and will only take clear and unimpeded shots to insure a clean kill and safety. • I will not letter and will carry away letter left by others. • I will hunt only on land designated by the Landowner. NFAA member bowhunters will not hold the Landowner responsible for any accidents that occur while on the Landowner’s property. NFAA member bowhunters must present their currently valid NFAA membership card with the NFAA Bowhunters Property Damage Liability Insurance card as evidence of financial responsibility in the event of a covered property damage claim. More complete information and documentation to provide to the landowner is available at www.fieldarchery.com or www.sadlersports.com/ nfaa.

Tournament Pro to Lead Specialty Archery, LLC

Specialty Archery, LLC, of Spencer, Iowa, is pleased to announce the addition of Michael Anderson as General Manager. Anderson is a former archery retailer who has been competing in the Men’s Open Pro Class at 3-D and target events since 1992. Anderson has been shooting a bow since 1985. Some of his past accomplishments include several top 10 and top 5 finishes at IBO, NFAA and ASA events. Anderson has been attending 1215 competitive events annually and plans to continue that in his new role with Specialty Archery, LLC. “I have a lot of friends that are professional shooters and I look forward to getting feedback from them and the other people I meet at tournaments to help Specialty Archery, LLC do an even better job for its retailers and customers,” Anderson said. Anderson is a long-time fan of products from the Spencer, Iowa manufacturer. He has been using the Super Ball Peep from Specialty Archery, LLC in all his bows. For target shooting he has a 1 5/8 inch Super Scope on his tournament sight, while the company’s big Super D scope is on his 3-D bow. Anderson looks forward to helping to introduce the new Super 7 Bright Sight to both 3-D and target competitors. That new sight uses an LED control module so it can offer an aim point in any of seven colors to provide great contrast against any background. In addition to competing, Anderson also bowhunts for deer, turkey, pronghorn antelope and elk. Michael has been living in the Des Moines area and relocated to Spencer, Iowa to take advantage of the opportunity offered by Specialty Archery.

“I am extremely excited to have the opportunity to join Specialty Archery, LLC. I have been heavily involved in archery for the past 22 years. I am really looking forward to working in the archery industry and for this top-quality manufacturer,” stated Anderson.

Specialty Archery is a leading manufacturer of competition scopes, hunting and target stabilizers, peep sights, and other archery accessories. The contact number is 712-580-5762 or you can view the web site www.specialtyarch.com. Hours are 7AM4PM Central Standard Time M-F. The offices are located at 1211 38th Ave West, Spencer, IA 51301. Mail can be directed to P.O. Box 877. 16 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 17

18 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

������� Silver Bowls for Champions and Medals for flights according to NFAA Awards Rules ����������� All Archers must check in at the Registration Desk prior to competition, and present a current NFAA or NAA membership card. Payment of membership fees will be required if current membership cannot be verified. Professional Archers must present a current NFAA Pro Membership Card. ������ ���� ������ Will be held on Wednesday afternoon. Sign up at the Tournament Registration desk. All pros participating will receive 25 Pro Points. Awards to be cash for all winning competitors. Pre-Registration Fee Before July 2, 2007 $200.00 75.00 60.00 225.00

Late Registration Fee After July 2, 2007 $225.00 100.00 75.00 300.00

NAME

DATE

ADDRESS

PHONE

Barebow – Freestyle – Freestyle Limited

Master Senior division (65 and over) Styles available – Please circle one:

Cub (under 12)

Styles Available Barebow Freestyle Freestyle Ltd. Freestyle Ltd Recurve/Longbow

Young Adult (15-17)

Freestyle Ltd. Recurve Longbow

Traditional Trad

ZIP

Bowhunter Freestyle Limited BFHSL

Bowhunter Freestyle BHFS

Bowhunter BH

Barebow BB

Freestyle Limited FSL

Freestyle FS

Names

STATE

Senior Division (55 and over)

CITY

Youth (12-14)

Pro/Pro Senior Adult/Senior/Master Senior Yg. Adult/Youth/Cub Family

Adult Division

tion – five days, five different courses, ALL count toward determining the high score winners – receiving Silver Bowl champion awards and medals for second and third place in all Divisions and Styles. The event includes 28-target Field rounds on Monday and Wednesday, 28 Hunter targets on Tuesday and Thursday, and the faster-shooting 28 Animal round on Friday. Please pre-register to shoot the event – registration form is printed in NFAA Archery Magazine and is also posted on the NFAA Website www.fieldarchery.com. In the days preceding the competition, Darrington Archers will welcome you to get settled in and acclimated. The camping area will be set up for you to move into, and at least one of the ranges (in addition to the practice flat) will be available to fine-tune your equipment and keep in shooting form. These early days are a great time to get in some family activities and experience the Northwest. See the Darrington Archers’ website: www.familyofarchers.com for some suggestions, including tours, shopping, gambling, hiking, rafting, and fishing. How to get here: From SeaTac Airport (or if driving from almost anywhere else) go north on I5 or I-405 (which by-passes Seattle and rejoins I-5 north of the city) to Arlington (I-5, Exit 208). Follow State Highway 530 to the town of Darrington, then turn right on Sauk Avenue, which ends at the range. Along the way, you will notice some of the various attractions. The Tulalip Casino and Seattle Premium Outlets are just north of Marysville on I5 (Exit 202). Whitehorse Meadows Farm and The Outback are along Highway 530 between Arling-

���� ���������������������������

Professional (membership required)

DARRINGTONArchers: NFAAOutdoorNational

���� ���� ������� �������� ������������

Female

ton and Darrington, and offer family activities. The Stillaguamish River follows the highway for much of its route, inviting rafting and fishing action. You will pass beautiful Whitehorse Mountain, which lends its name and image to many of the local businesses. Approaching Darrington, you pass the Bluegrass Festival grounds. This year’s festival is July 20-22, the weekend immediately preceding the tournament, so fans can plan to take in some music and fun (see the festival website www.Glacierview.net/bluegrass for full information). Darrington’s one hotel is fully booked early, so the community makes your trip special by offering rentals of rooms or houses in town. The broker for local housing reservations is Kathy, Phone 360-436-1746 or email onelife@all2easy.net. Ample camping available at the school grounds adjacent to the range – no hookups – showers will be available at the school. For those without their own rig, Kathy will help to match you up with a local camp trailer rental too. There are also a couple Bed and Breakfast nearby, and an assortment of Hotels and Motels in Arlington, Marysville, and Mount Vernon about 30-45 miles from the range. These are listed on the Darrington Archers’ website, or through travel services such as Expedia. Breakfast will be available 6:30-9:00 AM each day of the Tournament, at the Community Center – co-located with the school grounds and range. Dinners will be served at the Senior Center in Darrington on Monday the 23rd (a meatloaf dinner with side dishes, an assortment of salads and dessert) and also a chicken dinner on Wednesday the 25th. Dinner hours are 5:30 to 7:00 PM. Prices are a bargain at $8.00, and $3.50 for the youngsters six years and under. We are still (as this is written in April) working on plans for a Tuesday night dinner, and Thursday is the Barebow Fraternity picnic. To serve you best, RSVP for the meals is appreciated. Contact David & Mary Nations Email Address nations13@verizon.net or call (360) 436-1379. Darrington Archers, the Darrington community, the archers, Clubs, and Shops of Washington State, and the National Field Archery Association hope to see you at Darrington for a week of challenge, excitement, relaxation, and FUN!

Male

T

he 2007 NFAA Outdoor National Championship will be held at Darrington Archers’ range in Darrington, Washington. Dates of the event are Monday through Friday, July 23-27, with opening ceremonies on Sunday July 22 and presentation of awards on Friday, after completion of that day’s round. This is a full week of competi-

Fee

Make checks payable to: "NFAA" mail with your entry to NFAA, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373. Register by phone or fax with credit card (909) 794-2133 fax (909) 794-8512. Visa MasterCard American Express. Credit Card # ______________________________________________ Exp Date _____________ Signature ____________________________ Phone __________________ Amount $__________ Register on line at www.fieldarchery.com

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 19

2007 NFAA® CALENDAR OF EVENTS by Bernie Pellerite ©2007

Shooting Under Pressure

TOURNAMENT ...................................DATES .......................... VENUE Southern 3-D Sectional ....................................... June 2-3 ................................ Irving, TX Big Sky Open ....................................................... June 8-10 ..................Grand Junction, CO Southern Outdoor Sectional ................................. June 9-10 ............................Longview, TX Great Lakes Outdoor Sectional ............................. June 9-10 ..............................Chatham, IL Mid-Atlantic Outdoor Sectional ........................... June 16-17 ........................ Jacobstown, NJ Southeastern Outdoor Sectional.......................... June 16-17 ........................ Morrisville, NC Northwestern Outdoor Sectional ........................ June 16-17 .........................Grangeville, ID Midwestern Outdoor Sectional ........................... June 23-24 ....................Coon Rapids, MN New England Outdoor Sectional ......................... June 23-24 ....................... Lunenburg, MA Southwestern Outdoor Sectional....................... June 30-July 1 ............................. Provo, UT NFAA Unmarked 3-D Championship .................July 14-15 ........................... Yankton, SD NFAA National Outdoor .....................................July 23-27 ..................... Darrington, WA Southeastern 3-D Sectional ................................. August 4-5 ......................Fort Gordon, GA Big Sky Open ................................................... November 2-4 ....................... Mesquite, NV Everglades Open ...............................................December 8-9 ..................... Homestead, FL

20 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Illustration by John Rios

O

Unless you are one of the very few archers that have mastered it, shooting well under tournament pressure has always been a major problem for all of us. When the “moment of truth” arrives on the tournament circuit, most of us are ill-prepared to perform the way we should. The ability to properly execute the shot while nervous, anxious, afraid or excited is not a natural situation for any of us. We must practice it! Think about it...how can you expect to do something in a tournament that you have never practiced? Most of us think that simply shooting arrows until we get fairly consistent at hitting the center of the target IS practice. It would be, if all you wanted from your practice was recreation. We

must remember our individual reasons for practicing in the first place. If it is to be competitive in tournaments, most of us are doing it wrong. To get used to nervousness in high pressure situations, we must understand how it works and how to deal with it. When we practice (if we are doing it the same all of the time), we eventually develop a shot sequence .We nock an arrow, then we grip the bow handle, hook on to the string with fingers or release, etc. If done correctly, with a lot of repetition, we eventually start doing these steps to the shot without having to think about it. We should now be able to concentrate totally on aiming. The body is operating the equipment subconsciously, while the conscious mind is immersed in aiming ... remember, this is the key to “predictable accuracy.” Even beginners have experienced a few shots that “sort of just went off by themselves.” This happens on more of a regular basis as we progress into the

intermediate and advanced levels of archery. Eventually, when we can perform at this automatic level consistently, we are ready for the “big time” (or so we think)! But we soon find out that, to some extent, the winners are usually determined by who can control their nerves and handle the pressure, on that particular day. However, if you think about it, being nervous at an important event is perfectly normal. It is part of the human equation, and happens to all of us. It is how we handle it that separates the winners from the rest of the field. WHY BEING NERVOUS IS A PROBLEM Understanding what pressure or nervousness causes us to do is the key to the solution. When we are nervous, we tend to not execute subconsciously anymore because we don’t trust our “letgo” system. We interrupt mental aiming and start trying to control the shot sequence with our conscious minds and aim, si-

Are you ready for the big time? Archery Magazine June/July 2007 21

multaneously. We become more deliberate and cautious so as to not make “mistakes!” Not understanding that we’ve become more careful and that it violates the offensive second half of our sequence and our “comfort zone,” is a huge mistake! We erroneously calculate that we have a better chance at executing a perfect shot (and we’ll settle for nothing less!) if we bring all of our senses to bear while we’re under pressure. Because we think about parts of our shot sequence and shot timing, and are no longer immersed in aiming at the moment of execution, we have little chance to succeed. Keeping our conscious mind OUT of the shot and on aiming was the key in practice and it’s STILL the key under pressure. How can we execute a “surprise” or subconscious release when our total concentration is consumed by thoughts like: “It’s almost in the middle...get more pressure on the trigger... not too much! Oops! it’s going back out...ease off the trigger...force it back in. Hurry! My elbow is starting to shake!...Should I let down? Nah, I can hold a few more seconds...Get ready, it’s coming back...Where is the trigger? It’s ready now...where is the trigger? Why hasn’t it gone off? Hurry up! It’s going to drop out! Shoot it now...Punch it! Punch it! Now!...... Darn, I missed! I knew I should have let down!” Sound familiar? I hope not, but if it does, you are in the same boat as a lot of others that forget how to shoot when the “heat” is on. The key here is to recognize our weaknesses and prepare for them. HOW TO PERFORM UNDER PRESSURE AND STOP “CHOKING” If you think you are probably 22 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

going to screw up and “choke” under pressure, you will! It’s OK... everybody does it! However, to overcome it, there are a few key things you must understand. First key: admit it! It’s okay! It’s perfectly natural! Denial is the worst thing you can do in this situation. Second key: the pressure or nerves you feel and the thing that is moving your sight around is really just a higher adrenaline level. Third key: if you expose yourself to pressure often enough, eventually you will get used to it! Unfortunately, most of us practice practicing so much that we eventually become really good in practice ... and hopeless in tournaments. Instead, set up your practice sessions so you can raise your adrenaline level to simulate those high pressure situations as closely as possible. For instance, shoot against your buddies and, if necessary, give them a handicap. Make it tough to beat them. Bet dinner on the outcome ... or the loser has to wash the other guy’s truck. Make yourself shoot while you are excited or nervous and in front of as many people as you can. Have the “hyperactive neighbor kid” bang a drum, or have your buddy scream at you while you shoot. Play bad music at really loud levels, especially music you find distracting. Another good pressure practice, if you shoot at home, is to have your wife keep score. Bet her that if you don’t shoot your average (let’s say it’s 295 out of 300), then you’ll clean up the garage (or mow the lawn, etc.) ... tonight! Now that’s pressure! Do whatever you can to create distractions and pressure, so you can practice running your shot program subconsciously while really focusing on the tar-

get ... in the face of pressure and distractions. Fourth key: if you’re thinking about aiming until conclusion, that’s all your mind can handle at one time! Pay close attention to two things: 1) What do I think about under pressure? and 2) Do I have a pattern under pressure? First, you’ll probably realize you don’t really concentrate on the target ... from the “aiming moment” through conclusion. Your mind is probably wandering back and forth, trying to control the physical parts of the shot that you have already mastered in practice (to the subconscious level). But now you won’t let them function, because you don’t trust them ... because this shot is really important (as I said six or seven times before)! You MUST learn to trust that once you commit and start your motor, it will continue to work on “automatic” until the shot goes off (without thinking about it). Again, the conscious mind needs to be constantly occupied during this period (the aiming moment through conclusion). If it’s left to its own devices, the conscious mind will interrupt aiming and the “choke thought” can then replace it. Be sure you understand this fully and the battle is nearly over. Most top shooters talk themselves through it ... “Aim, aim, continue to aim ...” and so on. Some challenge themselves, “Aim ... aim ... I can aim better than this ... aim ... aim ...” Whatever works for you, use it. The next time you are under pressure, try it. You’ll eventually understand the Fifth key: nervousness or anxiety is simply a thought process ... a state of mind that releases extra adrenaline which causes you to shake. You’ll eventually find the final Sixth key: you can’t think

about choking or being nervous or losing if your mind is focusing 100% on aiming. The reason is, of course, because you can only think of one thing at a time! ... and that’s the “thing” you’ll probably get accomplished! Another technique used to succeed under pressure is recognizing your behavior patterns. Instead of going to tournament after tournament and just taking your lumps; learn something from your mistakes. Keep a “shot log” of your performance under pressure. Buy a small spiral notebook (see photo) to keep in your quiver. Don’t just write down your score; make notes of where your arrows went, and in what order, after you shoot. After numerous tournaments, you’ll have a lot of information. There is probably a visible pattern of either low, high, left or right arrows that are shot under pressure. If you record all of your hits and misses, you can recognize your weaknesses and correct them. Remember, you can’t expect your mind to perform well under stress, if it never practices under stress! I’m confident that if you apply these principles to your own situation, you will find shooting competitive archery a lot easier (and more fun!) in the future.

National Archery In the Schools Program (NASP) receives

$150,000 BOOK DONATION from Robinhood Videos

Bernie and Jan Pellerite of Robinhood Videos own their own mobile Shooter’s School and Instructor Certification course. They have donated a copy of Bernie’s best-selling book “Idiot Proof Archery” to every school library in the nation enrolled in the NASP program. This is approximately $150,000 worth of books that will go to 3,000 to 4,000 schools in 43 states by the end of the year. Idiot Proof Archery, with over 350 pages and 325 photos and diagrams, has sold out 3 printings and has proven to be the industry’s first successful comprehensive instructional book. The advanced subject matter contained in the book includes equipment set-up, draw length, bow tuning, shooting form, personality profile, shot sequence, programming, back tension, form flaws and corrections, comfort zones, practice regimen, tournament nerves, target panic, estimating yardage, shooting outdoors in adverse conditions, plus much more. Roy Grimes, President of NASP said, “These kids have a tremendous amount of interest in advanced level archery. Bernie’s book can help provide them with that kind of information.” Bruce Cull, President of N.F.A.A. (National Field Archery Association) said, “The NFAA is excited about the opportunity to facilitate delivery of these books to the NASP State Coordinators throughout the country”. Bernie Pellerite of Robinhood Videos said, “By donating a book to every NASP school library, millions of kids will have access to advanced level information and techniques. This will help them bring their archery experience to the next level. This will not only help them shoot better and have more fun, but will help grow the archery industry as a whole.” Pictured, left to right: Bernie Pellerite, Roy Grimes, Bruce Cull.

ROBINHOOD VIDEOS A log book can give you five years of experience in three months, if you understand how to use it!

1600 Reynoldsburg-New Albany Rd. • Blacklick, Ohio 43004 614-322-1038 • fax 614-322-1039 E-mail: Bernie@robinhoodvideos.com www.robinhoodvideos.com Archery Magazine June/July 2007 23

SECTION & STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS Edited by Paul Davison • stringwalker@att.net Because of space limitations, only Sectional Indoor medalists are listed here. See www.fieldarchery.com for complete results.

GREAT LAKES SECTION Bob McCutcheon, Councilman prairie1@royell.net

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 GREAT LAKES OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 9-10, 2007 Host: Location: Directions:

Panther Creek Bowhunters Chatham, IL From I-55, Exit 88, go south on Frontage Rd toward Chatham for 0.9 miles. Turn right on Chatham Rd for 1 mile to Gilreath Rd. Turn left for 0.5 miles, then left on 1W for 0.8 miles. Range is on the left. Registration: Judy McCutcheon, 23358 Virden Rd, Virden, IL 62690. Tel: 217-652-5836. E-mail: jlynnmac@royell.org Deadline: June 4, 2007 Late Registration: At the range clubhouse. Friday, 5:30-7:00 pm and Saturday, 7:00-8:00 am. Schedule: Saturday, 28 Field and 14 Animal, and Sunday, 28 Hunter. Shotgun start at 9:00 am both days. Accommodations: Baymont Inn, I-55 Exit 90, 217-529-6655. Motel 6, I-55 Exit 90, 217-529-1633. Hampton Inn, I-55 Exit 94, 217-524-1100 Campgrounds: Double J Campground and RV Park, located approximately 5 miles from range, 217-483-9998 Miscellaneous Info: For additional information and accommodations, call Springfield Tourist Information at 800-545-2300. Additional contact: Call Bob McCutcheon, 217-652-5836 or 217-9655553

MID-ATLANTIC SECTION Mike LePera, Councilman brtesite@optonline.net

Section News – by John Pawlowski The 2007 Mid-Atlantic Indoor Sectional Tournament was held March 3 and 4 at ten locations: Cape May County Archery Association, NJ; Wa-XoBe Archers, NJ; Wopena Archers, NJ; Tuscarora Archers, MD; Prince William Archers, VA; Neil’s Archery, NY; Gander Mountain Archers, NY; Smith Point Sports, NY; York & Adams Archers, PA; and Walton Park Bowhunters, VA. This year, 370 archers participated, which is 82 more than last year. This is believe to be a record number of participants for the MA Indoor Sectional. For a number of years, various indoor rounds were used hoping to increase participation. This year the archers had the opportunity to try something different again. They had the opportunity to shoot either one or two times using their one best score asan official score for the tournament. The blue and white target indoor target was used. Archers who chose to shoot two times could have shot twice in one day or over a twoday period. Reportedly, 177 archers shot twice and 151 shot only once. One hosting club did not report how times each participant shot.

24 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

The Mid-Atlantic State Directors will hold their annual Section Meeting on Saturday June 16th. NFAA archery clubs and shooting ranges that wish to host a leg of the 2008 Mid-Atlantic Indoor Sectional Championship are asked to contact their State Director with that information well in advance of the June 16th meeting date. Host locations for 2008 will be decided then.

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 MID-ATLANTIC OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 16-17, 2007 Host: Location:

Garden State Archers Larrison Road, Jacobstown, NJ 08562. Clubhouse phone, 609-758-2222. Club website, www.gardenstatearchers.com. Directions: Take Exit 6 off New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) and go north on US 206 to Rt 528. Turn right (7-11 on left) and follow 528 approximately 5 miles. 528 turns right. Continue on 528, past fire house (watch 25 mph speed limit), and at fork in road, veer left onto Striker Rd. Go to stop sign and veer left onto Larrison Road. Club is 100 yards on left. Club is located across from Hanover Country Club. Registration: Peg Callaghan, 1 Harned Avenue, Apt. H8, Somerdale, NJ 08083. Tel: 856-627-7879, Cell: 215-840-0655. Deadline: June 2, 2007 Late Registration: Friday evening, June 15, 2007, until 8:00 pm at the range. Schedule: Friday, June 15: 14 targets available for practice ($5 fee). Saturday, June 16: 28-target Field Round, plus 14-target Animal Round. Sunday, June 17: 28-target Hunter Round Accommodations: Approximately 4 miles from range: Days Inn, Wrightstown, NJ, 609-723-6900; Quality Inn, McGuire AFB, 609-723-6500. These hotels are located at Exit 7, Pennsylvania Turnpike, approximately 10 miles from range (Bordentown, NJ): Best Western, 609-2988000; Econo Lodge, 609-298-5000; Hampton Inn, 609-298-4000; Days Inn, 609-298-6100; Comfort Inn, 609-298-7960 Campgrounds: Tip Tam, www.tiptam.com. Campground directory, 1-800-222-6765 Miscellaneous Info: Check out Six Flags Great Adventure at Jackson, NJ, plus affiliated (separate admission) water park, Hurricane Harbor. Enormous Six Flags complex has a drive-through Wild Safari park, and one of the country’s biggest and most popular seasonal ride parks.

Mid-Atlantic Indoor Sectional Results March 3-4, 2007 – Multiple Site Tournament Better-of-Two NFAA Indoor “300” Round PL SHOOTER

ST Score

PMFS C Kendall Woody 2 Jason Carbaugh PA

BetterRound X’s 300 300

60 60

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 25

3 Darrell Diehl VA 3 Roger Wellett VA SPMFS C Tom Coblentz MD 2 Ron West, Sr MD AMBB C Rick Stark VA 2 Dave Clem MD 3 Thomas Allen AMBH C Alan Paul CT AMBHFS Championship Flight C Timmy Ewers 2 Robert Reedinger PA 3 Kent Stigall Second Flight 1 Eugene Manalo 2 Bryan Zeller NY 3 James De Gaetano NJ Third Flight 1 Jim Cobb 2 Milton Lampkin 3 Nelson Mengel MD AMBHFSL C Thomas Lang NJ 2 William Bragg 3 Don Brongo NY AMTrad C Carl Lattimer VA 2 Mike Orlic NJ 3 Dan Loper NJ AMFS Championship Flight C Randy Hinkelman MD 2 Brad Baker, Jr 3 Rusty Ogden Second Flight 1 Terry Colin NY 2 Robert Morsdorf NY 2 Elmer Glick PA 3 George Wonder PA Third Flight 1 Tracy Neal NY 2 Ed Reichert PA 3 Shawn Kennedy NY Fourth Flight 1 Kenneth Descia NY 2 Bill Lofton MD 3 Greg Kulp PA Fifth Flight 1 Conrad Tyree VA 2 Ryan Miller NJ 3 Chris Feuste NY Sixth Flight 1 Mark Schiavo NJ 2 Al Coppola NJ 3 Daniel Bednarski VA AMFSL C Barry Reedy 2 Dave Russell 3 William Bragg AMFSLR/L C Bob Mulcahy 2 Jeff Hough NY 3 Robert Powers NY SMBB C Bill Vrabel 2 James Sorrell VA 3 Horace Eckman NJ SMBHFS C Bob Wise MD 2 Steve Oldham VA 3 Douglas Joyce NJ SMTrad C John Czekala VA 2 Mike Hand SMFS Championship Flight C Douglas Joyce NJ 2 Larry Weed NY 3 James Overfelt

26 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

300 300

60 60

300 300

59 52

296 290 282

36 34 20

265

13

300 300 300

60 57 56

300 300 300

49 43 43

298 298 297

36 31 37

294 288 287

29 24 19

286 258 254

20 9 11

300 300 300

60 60 60

300 300 300 300

54 54 54 54

300 300 300

52 51 51

299 299 299

52 50 48

298 298 298

45 42 42

294 294 293

33 27 32

297 295 293

39 33 30

297 290 277

36 18 20

262 260 205

11 13

300 300 299

50 47 50

250 190

5 3

300 300 300

53 49 46

Second Flight 1 Patrick Gallagher NJ 2 Lou Havel NY 3 Elmer Mckishen NJ SMFSL C Pierre Berthelon NJ 2 Roger Pruitt, Sr. 3 James Greager PA SMFSLR/L C John Krase NJ MSMBB C Ron Thompson MD 2 Jim Connor PA 3 Jerry Wenzel VA MSMFS Championship Flight C Jim Goins MD 2 Darrel Gehman PA 3 Jim French VA Second Flight 1 Wes Stigall 2 Frank Pasculli NJ 3 Lyle John NY MSMFSL C Larry Worrill MD 2 Vic Mathews VA 3 Alfred Towler PA YAMFS C Blake Loper NJ 2 Bryant Latourette 3 Rusty Card YMFS Championship Flight C Mitchell Scott 2 Andrew Everett MD 3 Jonathan Manalo Second Flight 1 Ryan Ferro 2 Conner Aubrey VA 3 Branden Aubrey VA YMFSLR/L C Luke Weber NY CMBB C Jacob Leimbach MD 2 Brian Roling VA 3 Josh Tammetta CMFS C Andrew Barnhardt 2 Hunter Bokash NJ 3 Lucas Kenley CMFSL C Hunter Davis VA 2 Jonathan Ripic 3 Austin Leimbach MD CMFSLR/L C Ghate Vikrant NJ PFFS C Christie Colin NY AFBHFS C Jennifer Byrne NY 2 Stacy Pruitt 3 Colleen McGowan MD AFTrad C Colleen Hayes NJ AFFS C Colleen McGowan MD 2 Heidi Snyder NY 3 Stephanie Gallagher NJ AFFSL 2 Vicki Leimbach MD AFFSLR/L C Katherine Horgan NJ 2 Brandie Mantha NJ SFBHFS C Vicki Clem MD SFFS C Gwen McMurray MD 2 Janice Wallace MD 3 Mary Wenzel VA MSFFS C Vicki Clem MD 2 Winnie Paris MD

295 295 294

44 31 25

293 291 287

28 23 25

262

14

262 231 198

12 3 2

300 300 300

51 48 45

298 294 294

38 42 33

291 262 250

32 10 9

300 299 298

53 43 29

300 294 293

55 30 41

258 256 255

7 6 10

255

9

295 285 222

30 24 4

300 300 299

60 53 52

299 299 289

44 40 26

263

17

300

57

299 299 297

46 40 47

157

3

300 300 299

43 42 47

281

22

210 178

5 3

298

37

300 296 285

38 42 26

299 278

39 15

3 Julia Eckman NJ MSFFSL C Claire Butler NJ YAFBB C Sarah Finney YAFFS C Samantha Neal NY 2 Kirsten Griesemer PA 3 Jeri Shuck MD YAFFSL C Katie Hogan 2 Kristan Spritzer YFFS C Marissa Ziems NY 2 Gabrielle Ziems NY 3 Caitlin Hayes NJ YFFSL C Amy Hogan 2 Devon Gottman PA 3 Jamie Card YFFSLR/L C Phoebe Horgan NJ CFBB C Hope Wymer CFFS C Katie Williams 2 Faith Ziems NY 3 Kiera Cooley CFFSL C Jessica Cash CFFSLR/L C Kim Voigt NY 2 Megan Mantha NJ

249

11

145 256

10

300 296 295

44 39 39

276 243

17 8

283 275 240

17 11 6

266 220 212

13 6 5

191

2

248

9

299 277 254

36 14 13

280

14

278 85

18 1

PENNSYLVANIA

John Pawlowski, Director bpjp@ccis.net

State Indoor Championship The Pennsylvania Field and Target Archers held its annual Indoor State Championship on March 24 and 25. Two locations were selected for the tournament. York & Adams Archers hosted the tournament in Eastern Pennsylvania, and the Charleroi Archery Club was the host in Western Pennsylvania. These ocations were chosen as hosts after determining where the most PFATA members lived. In all, 53 archers participated in the championship tournament. Nearly half of the participants posted perfect 300 scores on the NFAA blue and white indoor target faces. Ties were broken by both X count and “Inside-Out” X-count. Professional Jesse Broadwater posted the first perfect round at a PFATA Indoor State Championship — 300 total points, 60 Xs and 15 Inside-Out Xs. Shooter

Score

Professional Male Freestyle Jesse Broadwater 300 Tony Tazza 300 Chuck Reagle 300 Jason Carbaugh 300 Adult Male Freestyle Championship Flight Patrick Sinal 300 Charles Hunnell 300 Bob Marcinek 300 George Wonder 300 Greg Walker 300 Denny Halfhill 300 Josh Hollabaugh 300 Elmer Glick 300 William Jenkins 300 Second Flight Greg Hollabaugh 300 Greg Benner 300 John Patcher 299 Sylvan Glick 299 Scott Kearney 299 Steve Milcoff 299 Jamie Peterman 297

X’s X’s

Inside Out

60 60 55 52

15 11 9 10

58 58 57 57 55 52 50 48 48

11 5 11 5 10 8 8 8 6

46 45 56 53 42 40 37

4 7 11 7 5 5 2

William Haymaker 295 46 Darrell Shipley 294 34 Senior Male Freestyle Donald Roberts 300 51 Ed Reichert 300 51 Bruce Smith 296 40 Burnell Humbert 295 32 Philip Webb 293 41 Rich Finnegan 281 26 Kenneth Devore 279 18 Bob Maher 235 11 Master Senior Male Freestyle Darrel Gehman 300 55 Richard Alexander 300 46 Kenneth Alfather 294 35 Adult Male Freestyle Limited Paul Donahoo 292 35 Master Senior Male Freestyle Limited Alfred Towler 249 12 John Pawlowski 236 5 Adult Male Barebow Jim Laird 272 10 Master Senior Male Barebow Jim Connor 231 7 Adult Female Freestyle Claudia Charlton 295 38 Lisa Broadwater 292 27 Laurie Hutzell 283 20 Senior Female Freestyle Stella Devore 299 46 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle Thomas Tober 300 51 Scott Sanden 300 48 Greg McBride 298 52 Adult Female Bowhunter Freestyle Melissa McBride 295 37 Young Adult Male Freestyle Alex Blake 300 47 Young Adult Female Freestyle Donyelle Haymaker 284 31 Youth Male Freestyle Thomas Galerio 295 39 Natal Vidal 243 7 Youth Female Freestyle Limited Devon Gottman 220 5 Male/Female Crossbow Odrun Stevens 297 41 Connie Stevens 280 20

5 3 10 9 6 4 4 6 0 1 7 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 6 5 8 6 6 9 7 1 0 1 4

Other State News The Outdoor State Championship for the Pennsylvania Field and Target Archers will be held Sunday, July 29, starting at 9 am. Mechanicsburg Archers will host the tournament. Twenty eight targets will make up the championship round — 14 field targets and 14 hunter targets. Tournament registration forms will be mailed to all PFATA members. Professional archers are reminded that pro points can be earned at this tournament. Saturday, August 18, is the date of the annual PFATA general membership meeting. The meeting will be held at Mechanicsburg Archers at 1:30 pm.

VIRGINIA

Jim Quarles, Director jimquarles@earthlink.net or jimquarles@vfaa.org 2007 Outdoor State Championships NFAA membership from any state is required for these championship tournaments. Guests are welcome, but there are no awards for guests. NAA members with NAA membership card are welcome. June 9-10 – VFAA Animal Round Championship. Location is Prince William Archers in Brentsville, VA. Format is equivalent of four 28-target NFAA Animal Rounds with the bonus point spots. Twenty eight targets each day with two scoring shots at each target. Shotgun start at 9:00 am both days. Afternoon start time available only for shooters wanting to shoot both rounds in the same day. This is subject to sufficient shooters to make up afternoon groups. June 23-24 – VFAA State Open Outdoor Field Championship. Location is Wythe Bowhunters in Wytheville, VA. 28 Field targets on Saturday, 14 Hunter and 14 continued on page 28

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 27

Animal on Sunday. Shotgun start at 9:00 am both days. This is open to NFAA members from anywhere, so bring your best from WV, TN, KY, and NC; but you will not beat our best. August 11-12 – VFAA Outdoor Field State Championship. Location is Walton Park Bowhunters, Izaak Walton Park, Madison Heights, VA. 28 Field targets on Saturday and 28 Hunter targets on Sunday. Shotgun start 10:00 am both days. This is our State Championship, but we are so confident in the shooting ability of our state members that we open this up to NFAA members from any state to compete. We are not afraid of NFAA shooters from any other state. So bring on your hot shot shooters from Maryland and North Carolina, and remember to bring plenty of crying towels.

MIDWESTERN SECTION Ray Jones, Councilman iowaarchery@hotmail.com

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 MIDWESTERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 23-24, 2007 Host: Location: Directions:

Rapids Archery Club 13315 Hanson Blvd, Andover, MN 1.5 miles north of State Highway 242 on Hanson Blvd. Registration: Julene Hakl, 5656 317 St., Stacy, MN. Tel: 651-4621916 Deadline: None Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 am: 28 Hunter. Sunday, 14 Field and 14 Animal Accommodations: Fairfield Inn, 8965 Springbrood Dr NW, Coon Rapids, 763-785-8922. Americinn, 3430 Northdale Blvd. Coon Rapids, 763-323-0010. AmericInn, 13440 Hwy 65, Ham Lake, 763-755-2100. Comfort Suites, 6440 Hwy 10, Ramsey, 763-423-4800. Super 8, 1129 West Main St, Anoka, 763-422-8000. Miscellaneous Info: Anoka Area Chamber of Commerce 763-421-7130. Anoka County Parks, 550 Bunker Lake Blvd NW, Andover, MN 55304, 763-757-3920. www.rapidsarchery.org.

NEW ENGLAND SECTION Ken Moore, Councilman kmoore15@comcast.net

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 NEW ENGLAND OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 23-24, 2007 Host: Location: Directions:

Registration: Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule:

Accommodations:

Campgrounds:

Lunenburg Sportsman Club Reservoir Rd, Lunenburg, MA From SR 2 in Massachusetts, take Exit 35 to SR 70 heading north (Lunenburg Rd). Then turn right onto Leominster-Shirley Rd, then left onto Reservoir Rd. Follow Reservoir Rd to club on left. Lori LePage, 5 Sunrise Dr, Bradford, MA 01835. Tel: 978-372-8459 Make checks payable to NESFAA, and please include your phone number. None None Saturday: 28 Field and 14 Animal by assigned course. Start from 8:00 am until noon. Shoot all 28 Field, then shoot 14 Animal beginning on target #1 of same course and with same group. Animal targets are to go up at 2:00 pm. Sunday: Pick up scorecards at 8:00 am, general assembly at 8:30am, and then shoot 28 Hunter by assigned target with shotgun start at 9:00 am. Awards at 4:00 pm. Super 8 Motel, 482 N Main, Leominster, MA, 978 537-2800. Sheraton Four Points, 99 Erdman, Leominster, MA, 978-534-9000. Best Western, 150 Royal Plaza Dr, Fitchburg, MA, 978-342-7100 Camping available at club.

28 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

New England Tournament Info 2007 NEW ENGLAND SHOOT September 1-2, 2007 Host: Location: Directions:

Registration: Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule:

Accommodations:

Campgrounds:

Lunenburg Sportsman Club Reservoir Rd, Lunenburg, MA From SR 2 in Massachusetts, take Exit 35 to SR 70 heading north (Lunenburg Rd). Then turn right onto Leominster-Shirley Rd, then left onto Reservoir Rd. Follow Reservoir Rd to club on left. Lori LePage, 5 Sunrise Dr, Bradford, MA 01835. Tel: 978-372-8459 Make checks payable to NESFAA, and please include your phone number. None None Saturday: 28 Field by assigned course. Start from 8:00 am until noon. Steak fry at 4:00 pm. Sunday: Pick up scorecards at 8:00 am, general assembly at 8:30am, and then shoot 28 Hunter by assigned target with shotgun start at 9:00 am. Awards at approximately 3:00 pm. Super 8 Motel, 482 N Main, Leominster, MA, 978 537-2800. Sheraton Four Points, 99 Erdman, Leominster, MA, 978-534-9000. Best Western, 150 Royal Plaza Dr, Fitchburg, MA, 978-342-7100 Camping available at club.

New England Indoor Sectional Results March 24-25, 2007 Lunenburg Sportsman Club, Lunenburg, MA Single NFAA Indoor 300 Round PL SHOOTER PMFS C Chris Deston AMFS Championship Flight C Ken Kane 2 Brian Visco 3 Bill Simas Second Flight 1 David Ferrie 2 John Hooper 3 Bill Payton AMFSL C Todd Peters 2 Kenneth Moore 3 Paul Lewkowicz Jim O’brien AMBB C Michael Lehmann AMTrad C Larry Martin 2 Steven Evitt 3 Gary Marrier AMBHFS C Chris Mizner 2 Randy Cyr 3 Steve Harnois AMBHFSL C Joe Costa 2 Chuck Howard 3 Paul Ricard AMFSLR/L C Matt Hopkins 2 Jay Gauthier 3 Michael Crosby AFFS C Sharon Galipeau 2 Nicki Messier 3 Rexana Cote AFFSLR/L C Carolyn Backman 2 Sarah Bradley YAMFS C Matthew King 2 Jeremy Chapman 3 Jesse Liberty YAMFSLR/L C Adam Beauvais

TOTAL TOTAL ST SCOREX’s MA

30059

VT MA RI

30059 30058 30057

MA MA MA

29942 29938 29847

MA RI MA CT

29227 28927 28721 26610

AAE

26810

MA MA VT

2619 24710 2468

ME ME VT

30052 29949 29632

RI RI RI

29224 28211 27819

RI MA ME

29027 27819 2395

RI VT VT

29732 29636 29222

MA MA

26412 25310

VT VT ME

29837 29635 29341

MA

28725

2 Peter Adams 3 Sam Gladstone YAFFS C Kendal Nicely 2 Amanda Ferrie 3 Sarah Rosenfelder YAFFSLR/L C Kim Kneeland 2 Amber Boomhower YMFS C Joe Hunt III 2 Levi Cyr ME 3 James Rauch YMFSLR/L C Mackenzie Crosby 2 Cameron Hulme 3 Riley Perkins YMFS C Alyssa Green 2 Emily Parker 3 Teia Benoit CMFS C Owen Maskell 2 Nick Parks 3 Evan Pardee CMFSLR/L C Tanner Pelkey 2 Jack Eisenhower 3 Erik Eisenhower CMBB Sam Stoner CFFS C Hilary Peyrat 2 Gabrielle Cyr 3 Taylor Reynolds CFFSL C Katrina Pelkey CFFSLR/L C Mariah Visco 2 Julia Lewokwicz 3 Carolyn Harnois SMFS C Dan Whitehouse 2 Lee Rauch 3 Al Coppola SMFSL C Pat Pettengill 2 Rex Parent, Sr SMBHFS C Frank Minuto 2 Rhett Bishop 3 Rick Warren SMBHFSL C Richard Bierman 2 Ken Sarvia SMTrad C Rob Randall 2 Frank Kocian 3 Mike Martin SMFSLR/L C Cedric Leblanc 2 Ed Woodcome 3 E G Lebre SFFS C Janet Hooper 2 Suzi Price 3 Linda Ferrie MSMFS C Bob Macilvane 2 Jim Lamoin 3 Albert Panzeti MSMFSL C George Williams 2 Alivie Carpenter MSMBB C Jim Julius GUEST Melissa Cardinale

MA MA

27216 27016

ME MA MA

30049 29934 28526

MA VT

25811 1444

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 NORTHWESTERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 16-17, 2007

ME 300 MA

30054 50 29738

Host: Location: Directions:

ME MA ME

26110 2465 207

VT ME VT

29833 29736 29224

VT VT VT

29630 28021 26817

VT VT VT

2377 1992 1823

CT

DNF

VT ME VT

29424 28225 26715

VT

2488

MA MA VT

2417 1894 1852

VT MA CT

30052 30045 29936

MA NH

27521 27013

CT RI RI

29944 29741 29533

RI RI

26913 26414

MA CT MA

2436 1831 1731

MA MA MA

26717 25111 2342

MA VT MA

29326 28827 28210

NH CT MA

29950 29838 29137

MA MA

2324 2324

MA

2213

NJ

1472

NORTHWESTERN SECTION Bill Tiddy, Councilman tiddyw@aol.com

Camas Prairie Bowmen Grangeville, ID Grangeville is located on US 95 70 miles South of Lewiston, ID. Turn off US 95 at Main St exit; go East 1.1 mile through town to Grangeville-Salmon Rd; go South toward mountain 2.8 miles; range is on the right. [Do not turn left at drive-in theatre toward Elk City.] Registration: Barney Mowery, PO Box 102, Grangeville, ID 83530. Tel: 208-983-0287. E-mail: cioprntg@mtida.net Late Registration: At range, 6-8 pm Friday evening and 7-8 am Saturday morning Schedule: 28 Field 9:00 am Saturday, 28 Animal 3:00 pm Saturday, and 28 Hunter 9:00 am Sunday Accommodations: Super 8, Grangeville, 208-983-1002. Monty’s Motel, 208-983-2500. Elkhorn Lodge, 208-983-1500. Downtowner Inn, 208-983-1110 Miscellaneous Info: Limited primitive camping at tournament site, available on first-come, first-served basis. Beautiful range located in evergreen trees and sheltered valley. Fairly level with only a couple of climbs around courses.

Northwestern Indoor Sectional Results March 10-11, 2007 – Multiple Site Tournament Two NFAA Indoor “300” Rounds PL SHOOTER ST Senior Pro Male Freestyle C Dee Wilde ID 2 Ken Denning MT 3 Sid Carlson ID Pro Male Freestyle C Logan Wilde ID C Rob Morgan MT 2 Andrew Wilson AK 3 Josh Schaff MT Master Senior Male Freestyle C Dan Kolb WY 2 LeRoy Dukes OR 3 Sam Weatherford AK Senior Male Freestyle C Hubert Sims ID 2 Steve Porter ID 3 David Perry AK Adult Male Freestyle Championship Flight C Jim Miller WA 2 Jeremy Terthune WY 3 Andy Turnquist WY Flight 2 1 Wyatt Johnson WA 2 Nik Styhl ID 3 Don Starkweather WA Flight 3 1 Brandon Adolph MT 2 Glen Nirk WA 3 Andy Ludwig WA Flight 4 1 Michael Eichele AK 2 Bill Stanger ID 3 Ryan Westergard ID Flight 5 1 Bret Fuller ID 2 Simon Borkwell AK Senior Female Freestyle C Susan Hayes ID 2 Debbie Lane OR 3 Ilene Carey ID

ROUND 1 Scr X’s

ROUND 2 Scr X’s

TOTAL Scr X’s

300 300 300

57 55 50

300 300 300

58 56 52

600 600 600

115 111 102

300 300 300 300

60 60 60 59

300 300 300 300

60 60 59 60

600 600 600 600

120 120 119 119

299 299 294

54 37 35

300 299 299

56 30 42

599 598 593

110 67 77

300 300 298

50 45 45

300 300 300

51 51 51

600 600 598

101 96 96

300 300 300

60 58 58

300 300 300

60 60 58

600 600 600

120 118 116

300 300 300

52 51 46

300 300 300

52 53 45

600 600 600

104 104 91

299 298 300

38 48 50

299 299 297

43 53 46

598 597 597

81 101 96

296 293 295

35 37 36

298 298 294

44 47 33

594 591 589

79 84 69

261 265

12 16

260 248

16 16

521 513

28 32

299 300 285

38 47 29

299 295 298

45 50 34

598 595 583

83 97 63

continued on page 30 Archery Magazine June/July 2007 29

Adult Female Freestyle C Jane Sommers WA 290 40 299 2 Judy Vanderwilt AK 295 36 295 3 Nancy Lee WorthamAK 290 26 291 Senior Male Freestyle Limited Recurve C Roger Weggel AK 266 14 268 Adult Male Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Thomas J. Williams AK 281 23 281 2 Steve Coleman WA 257 14 256 Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle C Dennis Brieske MT 300 46 300 2 Dwight Coppock AK 300 43 300 3 Dave Mack WA 299 44 299 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle Championship Flight C Matt Schmitz WA 300 57 300 1 Ramie Haines WY 300 57 300 2 Harry Bates AK 300 54 300 Flight 2 1 Johnny Aguinaga ID 299 37 299 2 Shane Kinsel WY 298 45 299 3 Mike Miller WA 299 43 298 Flight 3 1 Michael Hearn OR 285 35 293 2 Gene Schanzmeyer WA 289 26 287 3 Steve Phillips OR 294 24 280 Senior Female Bowhunter Freestyle C Vicki Morgan WA 293 24 288 Adult Female Bowhunter Freestyle C Cyndi Kober MT 299 52 299 2 Mindi English OR 296 33 300 3 Reggie Lefever OR 298 38 296 Pro Female Freestyle C Crystal Parker WA 300 44 299 Adult Female Freestyle Limited C Jill Crinklaw AK 288 26 296 2 Linda Parker WA 261 10 261 Senior Female Freestyle Limited C Teko Phillips WA 262 14 259 Master Senior Female Freestyle Limited C Jeanie Hall WA 261 12 273 Master Senior Male Freestyle Limited C Jim Stanek OR 293 26 292 2 Bill Heineke WY 286 28 289 3 Charlie Black AK 286 28 286 Senior Male Freestyle Limited C John P. Bacho OR 293 29 295 2 Jack Hendricks OR 283 21 273 Adult Male Freestyle Limited C Dale Pauling AK 298 49 299 2 Bill Combs OR 297 43 298 3 Bruce Williamson OR 286 28 299 Senior Male Bowhunter C Lee Nordstrom AK 277 21 269 2 John Finsterbusch WA 255 8 252 3 David Nations WA 249 10 239 Adult Male Bowhunter C Paul Tucker WA 275 13 274 Senior Female Bowhunter C Mary Nations WA 193 6 203 Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle Limited C Jim Hendricks OR 288 23 284 2 Randy Wahler WY 283 15 285 Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyl Limited C John Wells ID 288 25 288 2 Woody Jercy OR 266 10 273 Adult Female Bowhunter Freestyl Limited C Wendy Truit WA 257 11 262 2 Cindy Warfel WA 258 10 239 Adult Male Master Senior Barebow C John Paddock WA 244 8 250 Adult Male Senior Barebow C John Templar WA 284 22 285 2 Paul La Rue WA 254 7 251 Adult Male Barebow C Nathan Brown AK 286 29 287 2 Greg Misner MT 280 17 280 3 Jeffrey Rentzel AK 232 9 257 Adult Male Traditional C Chris Richards OR 257 14 252 2 Ean Cook ID 242 5 248 3 Dave Johnston MT 220 7 243 30 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

39 32 23

595 591 581

79 68 49

15

534

29

16 9

562 513

39 23

45 55 42

600 600 598

91 55 86

55 54 57

600 600 600

112 111 111

40 40 41

598 597 597

57 85 84

25 21 29

578 576 574

60 47 53

26

591

50

52 37 35

598 596 594

104 70 73

49

599

93

27 8

584 522

53 18

11

521

25

9

534

21

33 19 14

585 575 572

59 47 42

30 19

588 556

59 40

49 33 31

597 595 585

98 76 59

12 13 9

546 507 488

33 21 19

18

549

31

1

396

7

25 26

572 568

48 41

31 15

576 539

56 25

8 9

519 497

19 19

12

494

20

19 10

569 505

41 17

21 17 5

573 560 489

50 34 14

12 6 4

509 490 463

26 11 11

Young Adult Male Freestyle C Micah Weggel AK 300 53 299 50 2 Alex Wagner ID 300 51 299 52 3 Chase Nicholson ID 298 41 300 46 Young Adult Female Freestyle C Kimberly Perkouzh AK 290 23 288 28 Young Adult Male Freestyle Limited C Damian Collum AK 221 1 202 6 2 Aidan Borer WA 200 2 192 2 Youth Male Freestyle C Kris Schaff MT 300 51 300 53 2 Tommy Hopkins ID 300 50 300 53 3 Christopher Barber AK 300 46 300 47 Youth Female Freestyle C Laura Verstoppen OR 296 31 293 35 2 Ashley Hartl OR 299 37 283 29 3 Joy Lessara-Lozier AK 283 22 283 22 Sarah Vanderwilt AK 203 4 235 8 Youth Female Barebow C Carolyn Collins AK 91 2 86 1 Youth Male Barebow C Joey Tallon AK 42 0 57 1 Youth Male Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Kyle Cramer OR 278 15 272 15 2 Joshua Raby WA 268 10 281 17 3 Cody Denton MT 228 4 243 9 Young Adult Female Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Amanda Sisson OR 265 12 257 6 2 Maya Inamura WA 243 6 235 8 Cub Male Freestyle C Justin Moore AK 298 40 291 35 2 Jesse Roehl AK 293 32 292 29 3 Brodie Fuller ID 286 26 284 29 Cub Female Freestyle C Chelsea Roehl AK 298 37 299 32 2 Kailey Herren WA 251 11 259 9 3 Katie Vanderwilt AK 232 2 265 13 Cub Male Freestyle Limited C Robin Hallett MT 289 28 285 20 Cub Male Freestyle Limited Recurve/Longbow C Dugan Denton MT 255 12 278 7 Cub Female Freestyle Limited C Klynn Miller WA 203 4 201 3 Cub Male Freestyle Limited C Colby Spady WA 260 14 283 22 Cub Female Barebow C Ashley Barrette AK 90 1 71 0

599 599 598

103 102 87

578

51

423 392

7 4

600 600 600

104 103 93

589 582 566 438

66 66 44 12

177

3

99

1

550 549 471

30 27 13

522 478

18 14

589 585 570

75 53 14

597 510 497

69 20 15

574

48

533

19

404

7

543

36

161

1

SOUTHERN SECTION Lee Gregory, Councilman lee@dlprint.com

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 SOUTHERN 3-D SECTIONAL June 2-3, 2007 Host: Location: Directions:

Irving Bowhunters Association West side of Spur 408 From I-20, Exit 460, go north on Spur 408, exit west on Keeneland Pkwy, first light turn left, second light turn left, stay on service road, turn right at the top of the hill. From I-30, Exit 38, go south on Loop 12, exit west Keeneland Pkwy, continue through light on service road at the top of the hill, turn right. Registration: Merissa Hughes, 7194 E. Hwy 80, Terrell, TX 75161. Tel: 972-551-3771 Deadline: Mail-in postmarked by May 28, 2007 Late Registration: In person only at range, Friday, June 1, by 7:00 pm. Schedule: Shoot to start at 9:00 am both days. Accommodations: Hilton Garden Inn, 972-283-9777, 800 N. Main, Duncanville (I-20). Ramada Inn, 972-832-8911, 711 E. Camp Wisdom, Duncanville (I-30). Campgrounds: Joe Pool Lake, 972-299-2227. Cedar Hill (I-20). Hours 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Miscellaneous Info: Tournament will be conducted the same as the NFAA Redding Marked 3D Shoot. Additional Info: For a copy of a map and complete run-down of tournament format, please go to www.ibatx.org.

2007 SOUTHERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 9-10, 2007 Host: Location: Directions:

Registration: Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule: Accommodations: Campgrounds:

Longview Archery Club Longview, Texas From I-20 East or West, Exit 587, go north on Hwy 42 to FM 2206 (second light). Turn right, go approximately two miles, and turn right on Valentine Lane. Go to Rose Lane, turn right, and follow Rose to Longview Archery Club sign on right. Earl Johnson, 514 Berkshire Drive, Longview TX 75605. Tel: 903-758-1969 or 903-738-3222 Additional fee of $10.00 after June 2, 2007. At range on Friday, June 8, until 6:00 pm, or Saturday morning, 7:00 to 8:00 am. Saturday, June 9, 9:00 am: 28 Field. Sunday, June 10, 8:00 am: 14 Hunter and 14 Animal Holiday Inn Express, 903-663-6464. Quality Inn, 903-757-7858. Ramada Inn, 903-757-0500 Shallow Creek RV, 903-984-4513

Southern Indoor Sectional Results March 10-11, 2007 – Multiple Site Tournament Two NFAA Indoor “300” Rounds PL SHOOTER ST CMFS C Patrick O’Bryant LA 2 Reece David TX 3 Carson Becker TX CFFS C Emily Fischer TX 2 Madalynn MartinezTX CMFSL C Zachary Brister TX CFFSL C Schuyler Combs TX CMBB C Hardy Trafford LA CFBB C Mariam Trafford LA YMFS C Nick Lagreca TX 2 Kevin Persinger TX 3 Claude Tomlinson TX YFFS C Coral McMinn TX 2 Jessica Tomlinson TX 3 Elizabeth Cotton TX YMBB C Chad Scott LA YMFSLR/L C Andre Huval LA 2 Codey Angelle LA 3 Luke Killam OK YFFSLR/L C Rachael Trafford LA 2 Heather Trafford LA YAMFS C Buck Beaver AR 2 Justin Locke TX 3 Will Seals MS YAFFS C Stacey Hughes TX YAMBB C Collin Crozier TX 2 Dillon Comb LA YAMFSLR/L C Clayton Welch MS 2 Joseph Robichaux LA YAFFSLR/L C Kat Adams TX 2 Krissy Ketelers LA MSMFS C Dean Pridgen OK 2 Bill Hensley TX 3 Dick Andrews AR MSFFS C Rosie Pridgen OK

ROUND 1 Scr X’s

ROUND 2 Scr X’s

TOTAL Scr X’s

300 299 296

50 35 33

300 300 298

50 46 39

600 599 594

100 81 72

265 234

14 6

289 234

31 6

554 468

45 12

284

18

284

18

568

36

295

30

288

33

583

63

201

3

243

15

444

18

258

7

266

15

524

22

298 284 261

44 29 10

298 287 275

38 21 14

596 571 536

82 50 24

291 262 239

27 10 5

262 254 217

14 5 4

553 516 456

41 15 9

125

1

84

0

209

1

127 123 121

1 1 1

144 133 104

1 3 2

271 256 225

2 4 3

254 220

5 4

252 192

9 2

506 412

14 6

298 295 294

38 33 31

300 296 282

49 33 22

598 591 576

87 66 53

279

18

286

18

565

36

248 96

12 1

249 103

8 0

497 199

20 1

259 131

14 0

280 131

17 4

539 262

31 4

244 155

8 4

260 183

10 2

504 338

18 6

300 299 300

54 49 46

300 300 299

52 44 44

600 599 599

106 93 90

299

50

298

48

597

98

2 Bulah Landry TX MSMFSL C Andrew PedelahoreLA MSMBB C Monty Heishman TX SMFS C Steve Coleman TX 2 Larry Wyrick TX 3 Clyde Miller TX SMBH C Sonny CharboneauOK SMTrad C Bobby Graham OK 2 Jim Metzger LA 3 David Jilge OK SFTrad C Wanda Newsom TX AMFS Championship Flight C Russell Payne TX 2 Nick Jayne OK 3 Shane Auman AR Flight 2 1 Steve Jenkins TX 2 Sy Buck TX 3 Kelly Williams OK Flight 3 1 Ricky Maddax TX 2 Andy True TX 3 Thomas Becker TX AFFS C Jodi Ingram TX 2 Theresa Hutchings TX 3 Merissa Hughes TX AMFSL C Gary Hawkins MS 2 Chris Coleman TX 3 Scott Whiteford TX AFFSL C Terri Bass TX AMBB C David Hughes TX 2 Sean O’Donnell TX 3 Charlie Hughes TX AFBB C Paula Dangler TX 2 Charlene Trafford LA 3 Cathy Sword TX AMFSLR/L C Bubba Bateman TX 2 Tim Meyers TX 3 Scott Whiteford TX AFFSLR/L C Teresa Myers TX 2 Kathy Varadi TX AMBHFS Championship Flight C Rayford Harmon TX 2 Bryan Hanus TX 3 Ricky St. Upery LA Flight 2 1 John Tullis TX 2 Chad Stansbury LA 3 Mark McMillan OK AFBHFS C Charmain Nelson TX 2 Gail Ewing LA 3 Neecie Falgout LA AMBHFSL C Bill Ayers LA AMTrad C Joseph Townsend AR 2 Mike Frizzell TX 3 Skip Trafford LA AFTrad C Liz Redfearn TX 2 Tina Barker OK PMFS C Troy Wesley TX 2 Nathan Brooks AR 3 Casey Barrera TX

299

48

297

42

596

90

285

27

269

20

554

47

275

17

264

16

539

33

299 298 298

54 43 38

299 300 297

54 52 36

598 598 595

108 95 74

219

4

238

6

457

10

262 221 243

6 5 5

252 248 223

8 5 5

514 469 466

14 10 10

68

0

100

1

168

1

300 300 300

59 58 56

300 300 300

59 57 59

600 600 600

118 115 115

299 299 299

44 41 55

300 300 299

51 45 54

599 599 598

95 86 109

294 292 292

32 32 35

294 295 294

33 30 30

588 587 586

65 62 65

300 299 292

46 40 28

300 300 287

49 49 16

600 599 579

95 89 44

295 287 275

23 24 22

299 281 291

39 14 25

594 568 566

62 38 47

272

17

277

21

549

38

294 279 280

24 21 23

289 285 284

25 23 19

583 564 564

49 44 42

278 255 192

16 8 4

278 250 214

25 7 6

556 505 406

41 15 10

294 293 276

37 34 18

296 286 269

39 28 12

590 579 545

76 62 30

274 257

18 9

286 277

19 22

560 534

37 31

300 300 299

55 51 56

300 300 300

55 55 56

600 600 599

110 106 112

297 295 294

50 32 36

296 297 296

40 30 43

593 592 590

90 62 79

299 296 294

47 34 32

299 294 296

47 29 31

598 590 590

94 63 63

279

18

279

16

558

34

265 262 256

12 11 6

276 266 256

23 8 8

541 528 512

35 19 14

248 147

7 1

242 139

7 2

490 286

14 3

300 300 300

60 60 58

300 300 300

59 58 55

600 600 600

119 118 113

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 31

PFFS C Connie Griffin PMFSL C Jimmy Williams PFFSL C Jennifer Gilley

AR

299

51

299

47

598

98

TX

299

30

292

29

591

59

OK

272

12

274

19

546

31

SOUTHEASTERN SECTION Tim Austin, Councilman flarchery@earthlink.net

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 SOUTHEASTERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 16-17, 2007 Host: Location:

North Carolina Field Archery Association Durham County Wildlife Club, 3616 Hopson Rd, Morrisville, NC. 27560 Directions: Durham County Wildlife Club (DCWC) is about 7 miles west of Raleigh-Durham Airport. From Raleigh, take Exit 280 off I-40. Turn left (south) on Davis Drive, and go past SR 54 for about one mile. Then turn right at the light onto Hopson Road for about one mile, and then turn left at the brown wooden DCWC sign. Proceed on dirt road to club grounds. Alternately, from intersection of SR 54 and 55 in Durham, go south on SR 55 toward Apex. Pass thorough one traffic light, and turn left at next light onto TW Alexander Drive. [Reference point: TW Alexander is on left, Durham County Water Treatment facility is on right.] On TW Alexander, cross the bridge over the RR tracks, turn RIGHT onto Hopson Road, then turn right at the brown DCWC sign. Registration: Joe Rozmus, 116 Trappers Run Dr., Cary, NC. 27513. Tel: 919-468-7115; Cell: 919-606-5692. e-mail: justxsroz@aol.com Deadline: Postmarked by June 7, 2007 Late Registration: Friday, June 15th evening until 9:00 pm, or by 7:00 am Saturday morning at practice range shelter Schedule: Saturday: 8:00 am announcements, 8:30 am, 28 Field, and 2:00 pm 14 Animal. Sunday: 8:30 am announcements, 9:00 am, 28 Hunter Accommodations: There are many hotels in the area. Here are just a few: Days Inn –Airport/RTP, 1000 Airport Blvd, Morrisville, NC, 919-469-8688. Fairfield Inn By Marriot – Airport, 2750 Slater Rd., Morrisville, NC, 919-4682660. Hampton Inn, 1010 Airport Blvd, exit 284, Morrisville, NC, 919-462-1620. La Quinta, 1001 Hospitality Court, Morrisville, NC, 919-461-1771. Campgrounds: Falls Lake State Recreational Area, 13304 Creedmoor Rd., Wake Forest, 919-676-1027, 919-596-0639. Jordan Lake State Recreational Area, Off US 64, Apex, 919-362-0586. William B. Umstead State Park, Crabtree Creek, US 70, Raleigh, 919-571-4170. Reedy Creek: Harrison Blvd & I-40, Cary, 919-571-4170. Miscellaneous Info: The Durham County Wildlife Club is located in the heart of the Research Triangle Park, within minutes of Raleigh-Durham International Airport, and convenient to the Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill areas of central North Carolina. There is fantastic shopping throughout the area. DCWC is more than just “a place to shoot.” The club has 96 acres of land, which includes an eleven acre lake complete with picnic tables and a large clubhouse. These are in addition to the well manicured shooting facilities. Forty acres of the property remain wooded, offering a serene respite from the pressures of life in the Triangle. There is skeet, trap, sporting clays, pistol and archery ranges. Shotgun shooting arrangements can be made with DCWC Members. The Archery Ranges are heavily wooded with mixed terrain. Several electrical camper hook ups are available at $10.00 per day. Primitive camping site will be available (no showers, potable water or dumping). Food service will be provided both days each morning and afternoon. Other Contacts: Websites: www.dcwc.net, www.ncfaa-archery.org

32 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

2007 SOUTHEASTERN 3-D SECTIONAL August 4-5, 2007 Host: Location:

Ft Gordon Sportsman’s Club Tactical Advantage Sportsman’s Complex (Range 14) Ft Gordon, GA.

Directions / Special Instructions: If coming from I-20, get off at the Belair Rd/Dyess Pkwy, and go south to Gate 1 of Ft. Gordon. If coming from the south, take Tobacco Rd to Gate 5 of Ft Gordon. Have your drivers license/ID ready, and be prepared to stop for a vehicle inspection. If you have any firearms in the vehicle, make sure the firearm and ammunition are stored in separate sections in the vehicle, and to declare to the vehicle inspector that you have a firearm, and are going to Range 14. If coming in Gate 1, go to 25th St, turn left, past three stop signs. After the 3rd stop sign, the road changes name to Range Rd. Continue on Range Rd past a 4-way stop. Go past golf course and take first right, which will be Carter Rd. Follow the signs to Tactical Advantage Sportsman’s Complex. If coming in Gate 5, take first left after service station onto Range Rd, and go to the 4-way stop sign, turn left, and follow above directions. There will be direction signs for Archery Tournament from both Gates 1 and 5 all the way to the range. Note: You must have vehicle registration, proof of insurance, and picture ID to enter the military installation. Registration: Thomas G. Boots, 6530 Robert Dr, Harlem, GA 30814, 706-556-3240; or Earl Watts, 3672 Larkin Rd SE, Dearing, GA 30808, 706-556-6145. Make checks payable to IMWRF. Deadline: July 28, 2007 Late Registration: At the range all day Friday and Saturday, and Sunday before 1st shooting time. Schedule: Both Saturday and Sunday: 8:00 am assembly and 8:30 am shooting time, and then 12:30 pm assembly and 1:00 pm shooting time. There are two 25-target rounds ... one unmarked and one marked. May be shot in one day; however, everyone must shoot the unmarked first. Accommodations: There are numerous motels located at I-20 and Dyess Pkwy, which is straight out Ft Gordon’s Gate 1 approximately 5 miles. Campgrounds: There are some camping spaces with water and electrical located on the Post on a first come basis. You must check in at the Sportsman’s Complex for directions and availability. Additional Contact: For additional Information about the tournament and the surrounding area, contact Fred Perry, 706-7915078 or 706-833-2834.

Southeastern Indoor Sectional Results March 17-18, 2007 - Shepherdsville, KY Two NFAA “300” Rounds [Underlined scores are new or tied SE records] PL SHOOTER AFBB C Sarah Kinder AFBHFS C Christina Looney 2 Malisa Reed 3 Lauren Wood AFFS C Tracey Morhew 2 Cindy Steele 3 Karen Butler AMBB C Glen Baxter AMBH C Sammy Duggins AMBHFS Championship Flight C James Price 2 Gwynn Medlin 3 Lonnie Williams Second Flight 1 Kevin Bryant

ST

Round 1Round 2Total Scr X’s Scr X’s

Scr

X’s

KY

268

10

264

10

532

20

TN KY KY

300 284 270

54 21 14

295 283 256

54 21 13

595 567 526

108 42 27

KY KY AL

299 298 299

50 30 39

299 299 294

51 43 33

598 597 593

101 73 72

KY

283

20

269

16

552

36

KY

275

14

277

17

552

31

TN TN TN

300 300 299

56 56 45

300 300 300

59 54 52

600 600 599

115 110 97

KY

296

41

297

38

593

79

2 Lewis Reed 3 Derek Green AMFS Championship Flight C James Malone 2 David Keith 3 James Harmon Second Flight 1 Josh Butler 2 Bernie Rosser 3 Jimmy Butler Third Flight 1 Randy Yarbrough 2 Colby Davis 3 Ronald Smith AMFSL C Frank Mosser AMFSLR/L C Chris Olsen AMTrad C Art Vincent 2 Gerald Hawkins 3 Phillip Baldowski CFBB C Chasity Bryant CMFS C Levi Smith 2 Logan Kennedy 3 Matt McDonald MSMBB C Jerry Barr MSMFS C Teddy Lynn 2 Sherman Bailey 3 Tommy Doerr PFFS C Kelly Ward 2 Cheryl Keith PMFS C Tony Foster 2 Lynn Riggs 3 Richard Brown SMBHFS C Nathan Hodges 2 Jerry Bush 3 Ernest Drowns SMBHFSL C Roger Richardson SMFS C Woody Noe 2 Tony Mongomery 3 Syndal Nelson SMFSLR/L C Jake Veit YAFFS C Lindsey Hood 2 Brittany Timberlake 3 Emily Johnston YAMFS C Joseph Newton 2 Josh Bostrom 3 Ethan Thompson YFFS C Jaclyn Kinder 2 Tiffany Bostrom 3 Autumn Richards YMFS C Will Thompson 2 Jerrett Greenwell 3 Kyle Newton GUEST Ronald Ellis Eric Franco Terry Williams Louie Travis Herb Atkins

KY TN

297 298

37 41

292 290

26 36

589 588

63 77

KY KY TN

300 300 300

60 57 59

300 300 300

58 59 56

600 600 600

118 116 115

KY KY KY

300 300 300

51 48 47

300 300 299

54 48 44

600 600 599

105 96 91

TN KY KY

298 296 298

40 31 36

300 298 294

46 43 27

598 594 592

86 74 63

KY

292

28

288

33

580

61

AL

278

20

284

21

562

41

TN KY GA

275 186 66

14 3 2

267 215 108

13 3 2

542 401 174

27 6 4

KY

157

2

193

2

350

4

KY TN TN

300 295 295

57 43 40

299 296 293

54 40 41

599 591 588

111 83 81

KY

230

8

215

3

445

11

SC KY KY

299 299 290

51 44 27

300 300 293

50 51 31

599 599 583

101 95 58

NC KY

300 300

57 55

300 299

58 54

600 599

115 109

KY AL AL

300 300 300

57 56 53

300 300 300

59 56 44

600 600 600

116 112 97

KY TN KY

300 300 296

50 57 34

300 298 291

54 41 29

600 598 587

104 98 63

KY

288

23

289

26

577

49

KY KY KY

300 300 299

54 44 51

300 300 300

55 48 51

600 600 599

109 92 102

GA

276

16

273

12

549

28

KY KY KY

297 296 271

34 29 17

295 295 287

29 29 31

592 591 558

63 58 48

KY KY KY

300 290 264

57 34 22

300 288 280

56 32 20

600 578 544

113 66 42

KY KY KY

300 285 280

45 33 23

298 291 275

40 29 20

598 576 555

85 62 43

KY KY KY

300 295 281

56 37 17

300 298 286

56 35 30

600 593 567

112 72 47

IN IN IN IN IN

300 298 277 269 256

47 41 18 16 15

300 296 293 271 267

35 36 23 14 10

600 594 570 540 523

82 77 41 30 25

SOUTHWESTERN SECTION Jerry Miller, Councilman swcman1@verizon.net

Section News Hi, everyone: Just a short note to remind you to come and shoot with a great bunch of archers at the Southwest Outdoor Sectionals on the weekend of June 30th and July 1st. The Timpanogos Archers of Provo, Utah, promise what looks like a great shoot ... with a beautiful range, a terrific view, and all the amenities. I hope to see you there. Speaking about seeing you there. I hope you’re all planning on attending your own State Championship. I’m attending California’s in June, at the Oranco Bowmen’s range. I’m not sure if I remembered to thank everyone for the terrific job they did in supporting the Southwest Indoor Sectionals this year; so I am thanking you again. This shoot is really growing, and because of the input we received, in 2008, you’ll only have to shoot one 450 round instead of two. I hope you all enjoy the tournament and hunting seasons and are successful doing both. See you in Utah. —Jerry

Sectional Tournament Info 2007 SOUTHWESTERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 30-July 1, 2007 Host: Location:

Timpanogos Archers Two miles south off US 189 (Provo Canyon Road) Club website, www.timparchers.com Directions: Traveling north on I-15, take Exit 266 (US 189, University Ave). Stay on University Ave for approximately 6 miles north to the mouth of Provo Canyon. Continue on US 189 about 3 miles to Squaw Peak Road, then turn south one mile, then left on Forest Service road at sign for one mile on unimproved road to range. Traveling south on I-15 take Exit 275 (Orem 800 N. Street) Go east on 800 N. St. Exit 275 for approximately 4 miles to the mouth of Provo Canyon. Move to the left lane to merge onto US 189, and follow directions as above to range. Registration: Timpanogos Archers, c/o Roy Hampton, 568 North 500 West, Lehi, Utah, 84043 Tel: 801-768-3453. Deadline: June 20, 2007 You may register at the shoot up to Friday, June 29. Late Registration: 6:30 am to 8:30 am, June 30. Late fee is $10.00. Schedule: Saturday, 9:00 am, 28 Field plus 14 Animal. Sunday, 8:00 am, 28 Hunter. Accommodations: Provo Motels: Colony Inn, National 9 Inn, Sleep Inn. Campgrounds: Dry camping on the range, 4-wheel drive must be used to pull trailers. Hope Campground, 10 Miles south of US 189 on Squaw Peak Road (Forest Service fee). Rock Canyon Campground, 12 miles south of US 189 on Squaw Peak Road (Forest Service fee). Reservation for Forest Service Campgrounds available by calling 1-877-444-6777. Miscellaneous Info: The one mile range road is a mountain road, passable by car at recommended speed of 5 mph. Due to the grade, 4-wheel drive must be used to pull camping trailers on the range. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PULL TRAILERS WITHOUT 4 WHEEL DRIVE ONTO THE RANGE.

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 33

—article by Glenn Campbell • photos by Greg Nielsen—

KWIKEE KWIVER

You Can Pay More But You Can’t Buy BETTER!! KWIKEE KWIVER CO., INC. BOX 130 ACME, MI 49610

231-938-1690 34 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

The second leg of the NFAA World Archery Festival 3 Star Tour was held at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville . Competitors must have competed at the Vegas Shoot and at the upcoming Stanislawski Open for a chance to shoot off for a new Ford Mustang! The Convention Center is located in the center of the city and was easily accessible to area hotels, shopping and restaurants. There was something there for everyone whether a competitor or a spectator. Folks had the chance to attend the tournament, enjoy the sights around the city, shop the area malls or take a drive about 10 miles down the road and enjoy the beautiful Kentucky countryside with its blue grass, rolling hills, white picket fences and fresh country air! This is also the place to be if you want to see hundreds of kids from the Kentucky Archery in the Schools program spending their time shooting in this great sport.

These kids are the future of archery and we must take time to tell them that we are glad they are interested in archery. We must also encourage them and teach them as they grow and learn in archery. The Trade Show was great as usual, offering shooters and spectators a chance to view all the latest and greatest archery products and equipment in the industry. There was one void in the Trade Show and that was the absence of our friend, Steve Gibbs, who has been very ill. If you are reading this Steve, we all want you to know that you are being missed! There were hundreds of shooters at this fabulous tournament! Competition was hot and everyone was having a great time. My friends George Dixon and Frank Pearson weren’t able to make this tournament. Anyone who knows these two guys will attest to the fact that the fun usually gets “stirred up” when they’re around! I’m hoping to see George at the next event, and wishing the best

to Frank and Becky as she battles with illness. We are all keeping you in our prayers Becky and Frank! As usual, members of the NFAA were scrambling around, trying to make this the best event ever. Sometimes I think these folks need to put roller skates on their feet so they can get around that much faster! Thanks to the NFAA for putting on another great tournament! I would like to congratulate all the archers who came out to compete in this year’s event. Top Dog positions in the Pro/Am event went to Pro shooters Richard Potter (1st), Michael Braden (2nd), Keith Trail (3rd) and Amateur shooters Al Avery (1st), Andy Sines (2nd) and Jon Eide (3rd). Among the flight winners in this years Pro divisions were Erika Anschutz (PFFS), Duane Price (PMFS), Randy Brabec (PMFSL), Chris Beling (SPMFS) and Larry Smith (SPMFSL). And congratulations to ALL the winners in ALL of the divisions at this competition! Archery Magazine June/July 2007 35

O

nce again I was privileged to attend the NFAA National Indoor Tournament in Louisville, KY as an archer/vendor. This shoot has been bundled with the Las Vegas Archery Festival and the former Atlantic City Classic, which has been moved to Pittsburg and is now billed as the Stanislawski Open, to form the World Archery Festival or WAF. Since the NFAA acquired the Vegas and Atlantic City shoots resurgence in the popularity of indoor shooting has occurred. Prize money has been increased

to shoot to win a new Mustang at the final shoot of the Tri-fecta, the attendance has shot up over the last few years. To top it all off a one million dollar prize has been offered to any archer who can shoot all three tournaments without a miss. So far several archers have made it through the first two shoots only to stumble at the difficult task of cleaning the Stan twice. There have been a couple of close calls for one round but two clean rounds is a mighty mountain to climb. Unfortunately this final shoot of

and three of the major bow companies have increased their contingency money for these three shoots to the point of making them a “must shoot” for archers from the 3d, target and field archery disciplines, in this country and around the world. With the addition of other “tournaments within a tournament” such as the marked 3d’s, pro/ams and novelty rounds, all shot for money, and the opportunity for any archer to qualify

the three has not fared as well attendance-wise as the first two. Ideas are now being sought to remedy this and hopefully a way will be found to restore the old AC Classic to its former glory. I stay outside of the city for this shoot and usually drive in, park and walk my supplies to the booth but this time I was early enough to be able to drive my car in to unload. Unfortunately I got the wrong loading dock and wound up walking into the

36 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Pape’s show which was running concurrently with the Nationals. When I saw row after row of booths and displays, the light dawned and I retreated back to the car. On the next try, I got it right and was able to drive right onto the floor of the convention center to unload. Many of the vendors did double duty, manning booths at the Pape’s show and at the same time working a booth on the NFAA tournament floor. In addition all of the vendors were invited to extend their stay through Monday when the annual Kentucky State NASP Championship was held. It’s quite a sight to see the archers of the future enjoying the sport at its most basic level. The idea of everyone competing with the same equipment at an entry level gives me hope that these kids will develop a love of archery that extends beyond only thinking about the highest score. Now let’s get to some of the highlights of the tournament. If your particular style or division is not mentioned, please forgive me for the lack of space and the huge number of winners in a tournament of this size. The class which generates

the most interest is, of course, the one where the big bucks are at stake and the top shooters reside, the Men’s Freestyle Pro Division. Once again, due to the pin point accuracy of today’s shooters, coupled with the ever increasing refinement of the equipment being used, a multi-man shoot off was required to determine the winner of the $14,500 first place prize money. Ten archers were tied with perfect scores after shooting 120 arrows into the X ring of the NFAA Indoor blue and white face. Among them were several major shoot winners, including Chance Beaubouef, Jim Despart, Jesse Broadwater, Duane Price and Braden Gellenthien. Also in the group were Rodger Willet, Scott Starnes, Josh Schaff and from north of the border, Detmar Trillus. Wow, how would you like to pick a winner from that high power group? Of course the list of pros who failed to make it contains the name of some of the world’s top bowmen, which only highlights the talent of those who did. After three ends only two remained, Chance Beaubouef and Duane Price and when the smoke cleared Duane Price was the winner by a single inside out X. Congratulations to Duane! On the distaff Pro side, a three way shoot off also was decided by a single X, with Erika Anschutz coming out on top over Holly Pagel and Christie Colin. The Senior Pro division was loaded with talent as usual, with a mixture of former champions from both the 3D and spot world. Chris Beling of NJ emerged from the pack to win the title with 119 X’s. Age fifty five and over and still going

strong. Archery is sure a sport for the ages. How’s this for a list of talented archers, Mike Braden, Duane Price, Dave Cousins, Tim Gillingham, Tony Tazza and Jeff Hopkins. These are the top four places, with ties, in the 3D Pro shoot and the list of big names continues on below them and can be looked up on the NFAA web site. Of course the largest group of shooters continues to be the Male Freestyle Division, where the list of top shooters can be scanned to pick out the new Pros for next year. Once again a four way shoot off was needed to determine the eventual winner, with Russ Payne besting Jon Eide, Ray Solomon and Brad Baker. Look at this division on the NFAA web site and see if you can pick out next years pros. In what I like to call “a blast from the past”, the legendary Bare Bow shooter David Hughes of Texas, won handily by a margin of 10 points to add another silver bowl to what I’m sure is a major collection of hardware. Now, last but not least, the Master Senior Freestyle divisions, both male and female, were won by the Biking Pridgeons, Dean and Rosie. Dean outdid himself, shooting a perfect 60X round

on Saturday and coasting to a final 114X total. I guess he got tired on Sunday. Meanwhile, the motorcycle mama was cleaning up the silver over on the distaff side. Watch out for this dynamic duo in Darrington. That’s the end of the highlights from the second leg of the triple crown. There was some rules controversy, which is bound to happen in a shoot of this size. I won’t go into any details but the NFAA took some hits for not enforcing the rules. In my personal opinion it’s not possible for them to be everywhere and see everything in a shoot of this size. It’s up to the archers to police the rules themselves, just like in golf. Of course we don’t have 2 million viewers looking at every move being made. This size police force brings about a situation whereby you almost have to call a rules infraction against yourself for fear of being called on it later and being disqualified. In our case it’s up to the other shooters to have the backbone to call the rules on each other. Not a pleasant thing to do, which is why these controversies continue to happen. If you see a blatant infraction and don’t call it, don’t complain about what happened later.

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 37

RESULTSINDOOR NATIONALSRESULTSINDOOR NATIONALSRESULTSINDOOR NATIONALSRESULT FLIGHT STATE TOTAL X’s ADULT FEMALE BAREBOW 1 PAULA DANGLER TX 599 34 SARAH KINDER KY 594 32 CANDACE WILSON IN 542 22 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER 1 DEB PECK CO 497 11 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE 1 CHRISTINA LOONEY TN 600 111 CINDY PANSEGRAU IA 599 91 JENNIFER BYRNE NY 598 93 2 MARCIA JONES IA 593 67 CAROL AYERS TN 591 75 MICHELLE BERANEK WI 590 83 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 ERICA STRASSMAN WI 587 62 LINDA PARKER MO 564 43 CONNIE RANDALL MO 562 48 SHERI STINE-TRUJILLO CO 561 34 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 CORRINE MC KENZIE MD 600 105 GEORGIANNA WITT TX 600 104 STEPHANIE GALLAGHER NJ 600 101 DIANE GALLAGHER NJ 600 98 BRENDA TEMPERLEY IL 600 97 JOAN SCHULTES MI 600 92 2 HEIDI SNYDER NY 599 85 KATHY PINDELL IL 598 100 JODI INGRAM TX 598 92 3 JODI RYCERZ WI 596 90 SHERRY JOHNSTON OH 594 90 SHERRY LANCE MI 594 77 4 KAREN LEWON IA 589 63 JULIE PRICE WI 588 59 ANN DARNELL MI 585 63 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 MELISSA GIBBS WI 588 63 JILL CRINKLAW AK 579 49 SUE BLICKENSTAFF MD 571 41 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD RECURVE/LONGBOW 1 ASHLEY KAMUF IN 573 48 ANGELA SPANGLER MI 554 33 DORTHEA GEORGE AL 544 27 ADULT FEMALE TRADITIONAL 1 DIANE ELLIOTT MO 532 21 SUSAN HANSON IN 518 19 ROBIN VOGEL VA 501 12 ADULT MALE BAREBOW 1 DAVID HUGHES TX 582 53 RICHARD STARK VA 572 46 GILBERT WILSON IN 572 43 2 GLEN BAXTER KY 546 26 ROBERT WILLIAMS WV 541 36 MICHAEL BROWN VA 541 36 MICHAEL STUART VA 538 27 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER 1 TEDDY KIBEL CO 588 56 SAM STEWART SC 581 55 JAY COTTRILL IN 552 35 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE 1 MIKE HOLLAND KS 650 125 DARRIN DAVIS VA 650 124 BILL HAKL MN 600 115 TIM EWERS VA 600 115

38 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

PLACE AWARD 1 2 3 1 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 3

FLIGHT STATE TOTAL 2 JAMES PRICE TN 600 JEFF HUMAN NY 600 HENRY NELSON OK 600 3 BRIAN KESSLER WI 600 STEVEN CARLSON MI 600 LYNN HOCH IA 599 4 DILLON SETHER CO 599 WALTER ERICKSON IL 599 PAUL LAHMERS OH 599 5 GARY HINTZ WI 598 JASON FORCK IL 598 BOB SHIPMAN IA 598 STEVE FINNEY IN 597 6 CHRIS SCHOMBERT IN 595 JON CANNON GA 593 JOHN ANDERSON WI 592 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 DEAN CONRAD IA 584 TIM RANDALL MO 582 PHIL SEATON MO 575 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE 1 RUSSELL PAYNE TX 670 JON EIDE ND 660 RAYMOND SOLOMOM CO 655 2 TODD NELSON MN 600 DENNIS HALFHILL PA 600 RYAN HEROLD MO 600 BRYAN QUICK MO 600 JACOB PHELPS VA 600 DARRIN MCCUTCHEON 600 TODD HOFFMAN WI 600 BOB MARCINEK PA 600 JASON AYERS TN 600 JAMES HARMON TN 600 3 LUKE LUCAS MO 600 SONNY DYE WV 600 ANDREW FAGAN ON 600 4 JON PETERS WI 600 ANDREW SINES PA 600 JAMES DARDEN MO 600 ZACK PARKER IN 600 MILES BLAIR OK 600 ANDY HUNNELL PA 600 5 ALAN AVERY NY 600 RON SYKORA IA 600 CHRIS RUNION WV 600 SAM MAUCELLI MO 600 BILLY WILLIAMS IN 600 6 JEFFREY DUMKE WI 600 JASON GNAGEY MN 600 TONY BUSSAN IL 600 ZACK PLANNICK PA 600 RICK PEGG IN 600 7 CHAD BROOKS MO 600 SCOTT MC QUESTION MI 600 GEORGE WONDER PA 600 8 JOHN DOLAN MN 600 TERRY COLIN NY 600 JERRY ROESLER IL 600 CLEVELAND YOUNG CO 600 9 JOSEPH BROOKS KY 600 DAVID DUNNING KY 600 STEVEN DAY II TN 600

X’s 111 109 107 100 82 112 106 102 99 97 95 95 95 75 78 72

PLACE AWARD 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 2 3 1 2 3

57 60 46

1 2 3

131 130 129 115 115 115 114 114 114 114 114 114 112 114 113 111 115 115 114 114 114 113 112 111 111 111 110 110 109 108 108 108 109 108 106 104 103 102 102 99 97 96

1 2 3 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 1 2 3 1 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 3 3 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 3 1 2 3

FLIGHT STATE X’s AWARD BRUCE HANDLEY MO TOTAL 600 96 PLACE 3 10 RICK CARDARELLI NY 600 94 1 KEN RAYMOND NY 599 111 2 JOHNNY INGRAM TX 599 110 3 11 MIKE TATMAN IL 599 103 1 SIDNEY JONES WV 599 102 2 BRUCE MEEKINS MD 599 100 3 12 DUGIE DENTON MT 599 101 1 ROY WARNER IL 599 97 2 TONY BERGH WI 599 91 3 13 JEFF SNOOK OH 599 87 1 BRETT REED MI 598 93 2 ROBERT WEBBER IN 598 87 3 14 CRAIG WAITE IA 598 84 1 BRIAN WENSEL VA 597 90 2 RICHARD DAVIS KY 597 74 3 15 STEVE HARMEYER WI 596 89 1 SCOTT BAILEY NE 596 80 2 MIKE STEFANINI OH 595 86 3 16 JOHN BACHERT IN 595 103 1 MITCHELL FEATHERS AL 595 96 2 WILLIAM S. HALE WV 595 94 3 17 JIM PORTER PA 594 84 1 RON LEWON IA 593 95 2 DON STARK NY 593 75 3 18 JEFF ROLLINGS MO 590 107 1 JOZEFF MAKA IL 590 80 2 GLENN PURSELL IN 589 67 3 19 TRACY NEAL NY 590 103 1 MITCH MULL MI 590 91 2 DAVID JONES IN 587 71 3 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 PATRICK VOGEL VA 592 72 1 LONNIE TRIPLETT OH 591 67 2 DAVE HRYN NY 589 78 3 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LTD RECURVE/LONGBOW 1 VIC WUNDERLE FL 599 91 1 RICHARD JOHNSON CT 597 87 2 JOHN MAGERA IL 588 61 3 ADULT MALE TRADITIONAL 1 CARL LATTIMER VA 554 41 1 BRAD REYNOLDS IN 548 34 2 JIM POWELL MI 539 34 3 CROSSBOW MALE 1 TERRENCE BUTLER PA 598 93 1 STAN PENNYPACKER PA 597 82 2 RONALD KRESHESKY PA 593 69 3 JAMES COOMBE OH 592 66 4 CUB FEMALE BAREBOW 1 MCKENZIE MIX SD 486 15 1 HOPE WYMER VA 446 10 2 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 KELLY DOLAN MN 599 111 1 MARISSA QUICK MO 599 106 2 JENNIFER ROESLER IL 599 78 3 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 SCHUYLER COMBS TX 579 57 1 JESSICA CASH VA 554 30 2 LAURA MARTIN NE 550 30 3 CUB FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD REC/LONGBOW 1 KIM VOIGT NY 560 30 1 CORA SPANGLER MI 521 21 2 JENA ECKERD MI 516 23 3 CUB MALE BAREBOW

All Indoor Nationals images courtesy of Greg Nielsen

FLIGHT STATE 1 JACOB LEIMBACH MD TOTAL 583 BRIAN ROLING VA 575 SKYLAR MIX SD 558 CUB MALE FREESTYLE 1 ANDREW BARNHART NY 600 HUNTER TUVESON MN 600 CHASE WILSON MO 600 LEVI SMITH KY 600 JUSTIN MORRISON TX 600 2 LUCAS KENLEY VA 598 QUINN JOHNSON MI 597 AUSTIN MCKENZIE PA 595 3 BRANDON CAMERON MI 574 HAYDEN BOSON WI 563 LEVI RICKY MI 556 CUB MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 CORY STORM NE 595 HUNTER DAVIS VA 594 JONATHAN RIPIC NY 593 CUB MALE FREESTYLE LTD REC/LONGBOW 1 DUGAN DENTON MT 561 ALEX THOMAS OR 337 ELEMENTARY FEMALE NASP 1 ASHLYN MILLS KY 549 SHELBI CLARK KY 454 HEATHER FORD KY 406 ELEMENTARY MALE NASP 1 TYLER STULL KY 556 ALEXANDER SHAWEN KY 515 JUSTIN RAY KY 482 HIGH SCHOOL FEMALE NASP 1 COURTNEY CAMPBELL KY 586 MASTER SENIOR FEMALE BAREBOW 1 MARIE CALAWAY CO 487 MASTER SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 ROSIE PRIDGEN OK 596 VICKI CLEM MD 590 SARAH DAVIS TN 542 MASTER SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 JEANIE HALL WA 556 MASTER SENIOR MALE BAREBOW 1 CHARLEY WASHBURN CA 570 MAURICE SHELTON FL 560 TRAVIS LOUIS IN 554 MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE 1 DEAN PRIDGEN OK 600 CLAYTON VENNE WI 600 GARY SANDERS MI 599 2 STANLEY PARMENTIER VA 596 KEN MAPLES VA 594 JULIAN NICHOLSON ID 592 MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 DALLAS BRAKEVILLE KS 585 LARRY WORRILL MD 585 RON MOSCHETZ WI 582 MIDDLE SCHOOL FEMALE NASP 1 AMBER KESSINGER KY 573 HANNAH BLEVINS KY 535 MIDDLE SCHOOL MALE NASP 1 JESSE BURGESS KY 207 PRO FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 ERIKA ANSCHUTZ NE 660 HOLLY PAGEL MN 660 CHRISTIE COLIN NY 650

X’s AWARD 50 PLACE 1 45 2 36 3

118 117 117 115 115 88 83 79 40 41 34

1 2 2 3 3 1 2 3 1 2 3

78 75 64

1 2 3

38 6

1 2

23 6 3

1 2 3

27 14 4

1 2 3

46

1

8

1

82 80 25

1 2 3

34

1

40 35 23

1 2 3

114 92 104 78 72 81

1 2 3 1 2 3

64 54 56

1 2 3

37 13

1 2

0

1

128 127 125

1 2 $1,019.00 3 $554.00

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 39

TIONALSRESULTSINDOOR NATIONALSRESULTS FLIGHT STATE TOTAL X’s PLACE AWARD PRO MALE FREESTYLE 1 DUANE PRICE WI 700 140 1 $7,500.00 CHANCE BEAUBOUEF TN 700 139 2 $3,000.00 SCOTT STARNES IN 675 134 3 $1,500.00 PRO MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 RANDY BRABEC CO 600 96 1 $1,030.00 CHAD WATTERSON PA 600 80 2 $560.00 JEFF FABRY CA 599 104 3 $420.00 SENIOR FEMALE BAREBOW 1 RHONDA WALL TX 566 36 1 SENIOR FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE 1 MARY NEMEC-WOOD MN 584 70 1 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 MARTHA LORENCE OH 600 107 1 MADONNA HASTY IN 600 106 2 LORA SMITH MI 598 93 3 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 TEKO PHILLIPS WA 534 24 1 SENIOR FEMALE TRADITIONAL 1 JOAN HINTERBICHLER NM 325 3 1 SENIOR MALE BAREBOW 1 DAVID CLEM MD 570 50 1 JOSEPH J MAURIN WI 556 26 2 LEE GREGORY TX 547 29 3 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER 1 GLENN SCHULTZ CO 544 29 1 SONNY NICHOLSON IL 506 29 2 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE 1 STEVE COLEMAN TX 600 103 1 NATHAN HODGES KY 599 105 2 JIM BATH KS 599 104 3 2 STEVEN OLDHAM VA 596 90 1 GENE UNGER CO 595 87 2 JOHN ELLIOTT NE 595 78 3 SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 JEFFERY WYLER IL 591 75 1 CARROLL WALKER MO 585 70 2 ROGER RICHARDSON KY 580 44 3 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE 1 WOODY NOE KY 600 108 1 EDWARD CHRISTMAN NE 600 106 2 RANDY RUTLEDGE IL 600 103 3 DOUGLAS JOYCE NJ 600 103 3 2 DON DICKINSON LA 600 93 1 RAY PRATER OH 599 99 2 DOUGLAS GRADE WI 599 95 3 3 KARL OKITA OR 597 85 1 AL CHICKERNEO WI 596 89 2 TY DAVIS TN 596 85 3 4 CHARLES NEASE WV 594 100 1 LOREN PAGEL MN 594 93 2 MICHAEL CASE KY 594 77 3 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 ROD MILLER IN 596 80 1 CHARLES MAY KY 588 66 2 ROGER PRUITT SR VA 574 60 3 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LTD RECURVE/LONGBOW 1 STEVE ROBINSON OH 570 52 1 DR. DAVID BRANDFASS FL 566 34 2 STAN BOYD KS 560 42 3 SENIOR MALE TRADITIONAL 1 MIKE FRIZZELL TX 525 30 1 BJ WORKMAN WV 512 20 2 GARRY WEDDINGTON NC 505 21 3 SENIOR PRO MALE FREESTYLE

40 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

FLIGHT STATE TOTAL X’s PLACE AWARD 1 CHRIS BELING NJ 600 119 1 $1,285.00 DENNIS NEELY CA 600 118 2 $715.00 BOB WEBB IN 600 117 3 $568.00 SENIOR PRO MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 LARRY F. SMITH WI 579 62 1 $285.00 KENNETH YEATER IL 539 31 2 $0.00 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE BAREBOW 1 TAYLOR PANKOSKI CO 245 3 1 ALISHA CHAB NE 227 0 2 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 SAMANTHA PRUITTE GA 600 102 1 LINDSEY ROBERTSON IN 600 81 2 KRYSTA WIEGERS MI 599 104 3 2 KACEY EGGERS NE 584 56 1 JESSICA BUTTON WI 577 51 2 SAMANTHA HARRIS KY 560 40 3 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 KELSEY KEOUGH GA 536 33 1 KRISTAN SPRITZER IV NY 507 19 2 YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD REC/LONGBOW 1 MOLLY SOLC ON 524 21 1 BRITTANI SONKE IN 513 18 2 BELINDA HICKMAN NE 452 9 3 YOUNG ADULT MALE BAREBOW 1 COLLIN CROZIER TX 438 11 1 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE 1 PHILLIP TUCKER IL 600 113 1 JOSEPH NEWTON KY 600 113 2 QUADE ROMSA WY 600 112 3 2 DAVID MULLIGAN MI 600 102 1 CHAD PERRY MI 600 100 2 DALLAS SPURGEON MO 600 99 3 DUSTIN ECKES WI 600 99 3 3 MATTHEW MAMO MI 598 101 1 GREG HOPPE IL 598 83 2 KODY DONALDSON PA 598 80 3 4 RILEY ELLIS MI 594 94 1 MARC CONCANNON IN 590 79 2 QUENTIN YOUNG KY 589 96 3 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 COLE EILAND NE 535 29 1 MARK THOMPSON IN 483 17 2 YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LTD REC/LONGBOW 1 BEN NGUYEN-ZHU VA 558 37 1 GREGORY WONG ON 554 35 2 JAY CEE HEETER IN 468 10 3 YOUTH FEMALE BAREBOW 1 SAMANTHA GRIFFIN NE 465 12 1 YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE 1 KAILEY JOHNSTON GA 600 97 1 SARAH LANCE MI 599 98 2 HUNTER JACKSON MI 598 81 3 2 HOLLY SPRAY IN 576 56 1 AMANDA FAUST WI 566 32 2 ASHLEY GILLEY OH 562 43 3 YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 EVIE MC MANUS NE 418 12 1 YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE LTD REC/LONGBOW 1 MIRANDA LEEK IA 546 38 1 KILEY LARRICK FL 537 18 2 MARCIE HEBERT WI 493 17 3 BRYANNA CERVENY MO 446 16 4 YOUTH MALE BAREBOW 1 JESSE CALDWELL WI 362 6 1 QUN MAURIN WI 243 3 2 RYAN DELANEY GA 191 1 3 YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE 1 DYLAN NIEMEYER IL 600 107 1 CHRIS PERKINS ON 600 106 2 MITCHELL SCOTT NY 600 101 3 2 LEVI CYR ME 595 111 1 ZACK WILHITE KY 592 65 2 RODNEY EPLING WV 591 68 3 3 BRANDON SKWIRSK MI 571 46 1 DILLON SCRIPTER NE 559 29 2 TAYLOR BANGERT WI 553 49 3 4 KRISTOPHER ZAKFELD MI 439 15 1 SAM WOODBURY MI 428 14 2 CHRISTOPHER TRAN MI 421 10 3 YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED 1 LANCE CAHILL MO 523 25 1 YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE LTD REC/LONGBOW 1 NICK ECKERD MI 490 16 1 ADAM MAGERA IL 478 9 2 CODY DENTON MT 476 12 3

REMINISCING COMPOUND BOWS, THE EARLY DAYS

A

There Were So Many Hard Lessons to Be Learned

s a pro shop owner in the early 1970s, I had seen the VERY small ads on Allen “Compound” bows but like everyone else I hadn’t a clue as to what it was all about, or even imagined how it would soon dramatically change the entire sport and industry. Like so many others I joked and made fun of them and never in my wildest dreams imagined how much a part of my life they would soon become. I love to tell the story about the day I saw the first one in person. It was at the Texas NFAA state field tournament, just hanging among all our recurves on the bow rack in the practice area. The only one at the shoot, no one would even dare go near it and there were little groups standing all around pointing and snickering and cutting up as it just hung there as the center of attention. I believe it was a black rod limb model belonging to Joe Butts, husband of our Texas state secretary, Nelle. Finally one guy walked up and took it off the rack. After giving it the once over he raised it and drew it back. I’m sure the noise wasn’t nearly as loud as I remember but it was loud enough to get the attention of everyone in the area, CRACK, and it collapsed in a heap with a broken limb. No telling how many years that may have set back compound bow sales in Texas. ALLEN’S PATENT. His early little “2 x 4” inch ads in a few magazines showed Mr. Holless Wilbur Allen kneeling behind a bear with the statement of “knock down power no other bow can equal” and he had a long row-to-hoe before it finally took hold. As you might imagine he was on a low budget and only making a few in his backyard shop for some time. That limb breakage was more or less no more

than Phase-1 of many, many learning cycles every manufacturer had to learn the hard way in the years to come. Heaven only knows all the problems Mr. Allen had to solve just to bring it to that point. Every one of the earliest manufacturers lived through broken limbs, broken handles, broken eccentrics, broken brackets, broken cables, broken strings and everything you can imagine as they figured it out by the seat of their pants. There were and still are no college courses on compound bow technology and no one could afford spending “millions” on stress engineering and testing so they all had to solve each situation themselves. Legend has it that Mr. Allen came home mad from a deer hunt after one had “jumped the string” after hearing his recurve shoot and there and then he decided there must be a better way to get a faster arrow without drawing a “hundred” pounds. Be that as it may, I heard that one of his sons was an engineer type and that he convinced him to take a leave of absence from his work so they could put their heads together on the project, but again, legend has it. PATENT PROTECTION. The result was the basic compound bow principle and they carried it through to the point that on December 30, 1969 he earned patent, # 3,486,495 for “An ARCHERY BOW WITH DRAW FORCE MULTIPLYING ATTACHMENTS.” Contrary to popular belief, the patent drawing does contain a “2 wheel” model equipped with oblong shaped “cam” eccentrics and adjustable flat, forked limbs. In later years almost every manufacturer building under his license applied for and received other patents for minor improvements and there is a large number Archery Magazine June/July 2007 41

of them for minor alterations. As one manufacturer reflected to me, “The only reason you patent something is to keep anyone else from hassling you for manufacturing your own idea.” There were only about a dozen licenses to manufacture compound bows ever issued by Mr. Allen. Jennings, PSE and Olympus were the first three I believe and Carroll, Outers, Browning and Astro plus a couple others that I just can’t recall now were the only selections you had, until years later after the patent was no longer in effect. Licensees were all required to pay a small fee for each unit they manufactured. As for all those other patents issued which were no more than slight improvements” to compound bows, probably very little money ever really changed hands based on their use because in many cases it was only an agreement of “if you don’t charge me to use your idea, I won’t charge you to use mine.” Anyone can copy a patented design idea for their own personal use as long as they are not sold. Patent rights can only be enforced for 14 years I believe and after that the door is open to anyone to manufacture so now you can see why after 1983 or so there were so many new brand names of compound bows appearing on the market. During the evolution

RAGSDALE & ASSOCIATES • INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS, • EXPERT WITNESS PROGRAM

RAGSDALE & ASSOCIATES 14230 Shadow Bay Drive Willis, TX 77318-7406 888-407-3084 936-856-0928

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Robert Ragsdale, A. E. See services listed on home page at: www.bowhunting.net/bobragsdale/ragsdale.html 42 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

period some of what were then the leading recurve bow manufactures held out for a few years and did not adopt compounds until after it was very obvious that they were here to stay. SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS. All of the earliest compound manufacturers paid a high price for all those oversights and growing pains. Every one of them had breakages and problems develop that they had to take care of at great expenses and most went years hanging by their fingernails to survive. The later “johnny-come-lately” builders avoided all that and went right into business. Allen had even more things to resolve well before the first licensed manufacturer ever went into production. The earliest ones were crude, but then that’s where he was in the scheme of things then. His earliest rod limb “6 wheeler” (2 eccentrics and 4 little pulleys as in the photos) for example required nothing to hold crossing cables out of the way and had a homemade round fiberglass rod limb with a metal plate folded over the end to hold the eccentric pulley. Yes, that is nothing but a 3/16th inch all thread stove bolt going through an aluminum bushing simply cut from tubing in the eccentric with the threads hammered over to secure the nut. Frankly I loved the later “bracket mounted” eccentrics, they kept everything aligned and we never had a complaint of a “leaning” wheel or a “twisted” limb. We joked that we just sold them and never heard form them again. The limbs were so easy to make without a fork and nothing but two mount holes and I personally liked fact that when you leaned you bow against a tree it was the limb tip in the mud and not the wheel and string. Accuracy was great, for example at the NFAA field nationals in the early 1970’s the first ever 2800 perfect scores were posted by 2 men, one with a bracket limb bow. That was five 560 rounds on our earliest larger 3-5 face before it was made more difficult with 5-4-3 scoring as it is now. I am confident that all of the earlier manufacturers also proceeded by the seat of their pants with small experiments and modifications exactly as Allen did. To me, compound bows are by no means high-tech or even complicated. To me, their only significant feature is the reduced holding weight while aiming and their basic principle is no more than “temporarily making the limbs longer and therefore weaker.” Get it, that’s where the “letoff” comes from. Before you draw, the bowstring is near the end of the limb but at full draw the

bowstring has moved out and break after so many several inches away from shots. If you have every seen the limb tip so it is effecthe slow motion videos and tively longer and therefore watched the arrowrests, weaker while you are holdsights and limbs and handles ing it with your “block and vibrate you have seen what tackle.” Of course the extra caused all the stress. For arrow speed over the same years it seemed to me that peak weight with a recurve you couldn’t go to an indoor or longbow is nice but that shoot where you didn’t hear is not as necessary for inat least one scope hit the creased accuracy as being floor after its small 3/16ths able to take all the time you inch shaft broke from the vineed to aim precisely. brations. When compounds first I remember way back came out they essentially when Olympus Archery in all shot the same speed beHouston was struggling cause they all had about the with their laminated limbs same draw force curve enthat were delaminating and ergy storage level from their they finally decided they round eccentrics with a 9 to Figure 1. This is one of the later improved rod limb were squeezing all the glue 10 inch brace height and models. Earlier models had less graceful handles out when they clamped all used an energy wasting and the limb rods were not flat on the top. Note them to dry so they added Dacron bowstring that con- how the Dacron string loop is attached to the ca- tiny grains of sand or glass tinually stretched and con- bles with “S” hooks and the cables were not even to hold them slightly apart, coated with only shrink tubing added where they tracted. The very earliest crossed and rubbed each other. Every part was and it worked. ones had about 33% let-off handmade, including the round plastic eccentrics For years the steel cables that we thought at first felt that were cable grooved on a lathe. I shot one for were not even plastic coatlike 90%. In later years pub- a long time and harvested deer with it. ed. Even years later after lic demand was for 50% and they were vinyl coated evlater on to 65% for more comfortable aiming. eryone was so paranoid about cables that essenFor a great many years no bow company even tially “everyone” would replace their cables before bothered to list the velocity ratings of their models the start of every hunting or tournament season. in catalogs since every bow had virtually the exact There was a lot of money to be made replacing same list of “mechanical advantages” to perform cables back then. virtually the same. At that time it was enough to The fact that the modern high-tech string masimply know that they were all significantly fast- terials ended up being so much stronger the steel er that a recurve or longbow of the same peak cables are only used as “buss-cable” on a few modweight and that’s all anyone cared about. els. The “buss cables” are the 2 matched shorter ones on 2 wheel models or the one short one on MORE ON GALVANIZED STEEL CABLES. Under- “one-cam” models that have the easiest job in stand that this was only “phase-one” of what was town. The buss cables do no more than hold the to be dozens of phases over the following years to 2 limb tips together while at full draw. That is, if resolve all of stresses and cracks and breakage to they don’t break during the draw it never gets any end up where we are now. Every one of the early worse, because you can’t rip something in half by manufacturers had to find solutions by trial and suddenly changing it from “heavily loaded-toerror and address every situation as it developed. loose.” There was limb breakage, handle riser breakage, For many years every bow on the market sported cable problems, string problems and the accesso- 1/16th inch diameter 7x7 galvanized steel cabling ry market REALLY took a hit. Sight mount screws and some still do today. Back then, breakage in had to be enlarged from #8 to #10 to stay tight, that portion of the cable used as the longer buss and essentially every bolt-on accessory was in dire cable section was essentially unheard of, it was straights because the recurve stuff would crack the short “pigtail” portion on the other side of the Archery Magazine June/July 2007 43

eccentric that conern string material nected to the Dacron doesn’t give any at bowstring that had all and since it is sevthe hard duty. You eral times stronger guessed it, the reathan the steel cable, son the cables broke BOTH cables will rip in that area was bein two at the stress cause on the shot it point where it is exitsuddenly changed ing the eccentric cafrom “loose-to-tight” ble groove. The zinc and that heavy stress string attachments could take its toll fitting would only anytime the metal rip off instead when fatigue from the con- Figure 2. Even as crude as they were we were all amazed at it happened to be a tinual wrapping up how quiet the rod limb models were. This is a later model weaken fitting from a around the eccentric made with stock that was made with a flat area on both bad casting. sides of the rod but still sanded down for different weight became excessive. That “free” exranges. As a dealer I think I paid around $78 for these modIn one of my projtra velocity is due to ects I needed to re- els. There was another model with forked, flat, laminated the fact that Dacron limbs. duce the fatigue adbowstrings actually ministered to a cable “waste” a significant and during my research I discovered a same di- amount of the stored energy during the shot. ameter galvanized cable virtually as strong but Once you realize that there is more weight on the MUCH more flexible. The 7x7 mentioned above bowstring when it is setting at rest than when it is reflects that the cable is made up of 7 bundles of at FULL DRAW you can understand what is hap7 strands each. The cable that was 7 x 14 was 7 pening. To prove the point, at full draw you’ll find bundles of 14 much smaller strands. Wrapping a you can wrap the bowstring around your 3 fingers 7x7 to where it felt tight was about twice as large but you can’t even come close while it is still at as where the 7x14 would begin to stress. The 7x14 rest. The situation is that Dacron stretches. Stretch solved that breakage situation and for years after means “becomes longer under load, but retracts that I used only 7x14 cables on all of my fami- back shorter when the load is removed.” For more lies personal bows as extra insurance. Strangely proof, the next time you are around a bow with enough, to this day I still shoot my indoor events a short Dacron bowstring measure it while at rest with my all-time favorite SMOOTH feeling round and then measure it while at full draw and you’ll wheel, laminated wooden limb bow with 7x14 find it about an inch SHORTER while at full draw cables, which have not been replaced since 1986 because the load is so drastically reduced. These when I built it. That’s 21 years you know. days the wrong term is commonly used when fiber strings or cables settle and have become a bit BOWSTRINGS. Those cable “pigtail” extensions longer. Since it will never contract back shorter to coming out of each eccentric to which we at- its original length, it has actually EXTRUDED, or tached the short 32 to 43 inch bowstrings was the CREEPED, to a longer length, proving that it did weak link. It really became problematic when we NOT stretch. found that changing from Dacron to the earliest Again, when you draw a bow equipped with modern material (Fastflight) would increase ar- a Dacron string you stretch the string out longer row speed by 3 to 15 fps depending on the peak and longer as the weight increases, but as it breaks weight. That extra “free” velocity was great, until over and the weight reduces, the bowstring inyou made the mistake of shooting after forgetting stantly gets shorter and shorter which means that to load and arrow or shooting an arrow with a the bow has to waste some of its stored energy cracked nock to essentially dry-fire the bow. With to stretch it out again during the shot while the a modern bowstring material attached to a steel arrow is still on the string. A rule of thumb I’ve cable pigtail you only get one mistake and it’s over. used all these years since the fantastic high perWhere the Dacron would stretch out and absorb formance bowstring materials became available, the stress as the bowstring tightened, the mod- is a gain of about 3 fps on very light target bows 44 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

but with no more than about 15 fps gained on heavier bows. LIMB EVOLUTION. In the earliest days of compound bows public demand was for laminated wooden limbs. At that time, everyone felt that if they weren’t laminated wooden limbs they were dime-store-junk like the toy bows we started our kids out on. It actually took years of slow education to convince the multitudes that “glass” limbs were the only way to fly. When I was involved in the project of getting our first molded glass limbs into production it didn’t take long to make a believer out of me. I’ll say the odds are that every bow now on the market with molded composite-fiberglass limbs (molded so that every fiber strand runs completely from one end to the other uncut) will still be functioning fine when your grandkids start shooting your same bow. I often tell of the early tests where I measured the spine reading of each limb and then built bows and recorded the peak weight and left them for weeks jammed at full draw on the factory hot black roof in Arizona and found they still had the same peak weight and limb deflection figures. Plus always receiving questions about what happens to the limbs in hot and cold weather I also found no weight or velocity changes after putting them in a freezer or a hot truck cab. My point being that in extreme weather all the other things we can do that cause us to miss are still in effect, so there is no need to inject a new excuse of extreme lousy weather. As you can see, the original Allen limb weight bolts were fashioned with the recurve bow philosophy in mind. They had a T handle welded on the bolt head so the weight could easily be removed EVERY night. We all looked and felt stupid standing there counting out the 8 or 10 turns out and then back on the next morning, hopefully back to exactly where it was before. In my circle of friends at least that silly drill lasted only a few weeks before we said “to heck with that nonsense.” None of us realized at that time that it was actually the reason we had so much trouble keeping our sight settings accurate, we had no idea that moving either limb bolt any at all from where the settings were made would move our nocking point up or down and move us off our sight scale. A section of stock fiberglass round rod sanded down flat on one side to weaken them to the stiffness needed was simply glued into a block of wood on one end with an aluminum plate folded

over the other to hold the eccentric. We often used knives and files and sandpaper to fix splinters and glass strand ends in gouge damage and then just kept on using it without a problem. Hey, a pound is a pound wherever it comes from. MORE FUNCTIONING. The only, real, official velocity rating system is the AMO test. Using only the 30inch draw, 60pound version of each model, a 540 grain arrow was clocked at one yard out. It was great in the sense that you could just figure that no matter what peak weight or draw length you were buying your draw length would be proportionally slower or faster than the difference in the 2 models you were comparing. Rule of thumb was that for every inch different in draw if you used the same 540 grain arrow it would be 5 fps less and for every inch shorter and 5 fps faster for each inch longer, so you could compare models in that manner if you were not a 30 inch draw yourself. All of these early models were rated from about 190 to 200 fps back then, but no one ever asked, or cared. THE RACE IS ON. The “tweaking” begins. The first mechanical advantage added was to “ruin” the hard working, smooth drawing round eccentric and then calling it a “cam,” which all eccentrics actually are. This increased the ratings to about 209. Then, the brace height was lowered an inch or so which added another inch of power stroke and raised the rating to about 214. Then when Dacron strings were replaced with a modern high tech no-stretch material about another 15 fps was gained under the same AMO test which pushed the speed up to about 229 fps where we remained at a stalemate for some time. Making the “cams” even harder to draw and lowering the brace height as low as the traffic will bear has pushed them up to very near 250 fps. With the speed craze epidemic created by the 3D target crowd, creative marketing took over and introduced an unofficial rating system that virtually no customer understands that makes these very same models AMO rated from about 235 to 245 look much more impressive by using figures slightly over 300 fps. A very few catalogs do actually list both figures for their models. You can see there is no magic, just maneuvering. The capability of every model is simply a matter of how many of the very few mechanical advantages it contains, each of which makes the archer have to work harder during the draw to get it. Archery Magazine June/July 2007 45

continued on page 48 46 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 47

What Is GOOD Form?

By Ter r y M. Wunderle

If you asked a dozen archers to describe good archery form, you would get a variety of answers. Then what is proper form? First, it’s important not to confuse good-looking form with effective form. Most of us have a mental picture of what an archer’s shooting style should look like. This does not mean that in order for an archer to be successful, he or she must execute a shot in this particular manner. Some archers and many coaches think that all archers need to use a style that looks good and fits a “perfect” stereotype. I understand how they may feel this way, because they have watched archers being successful in this manner. Remember, there is more than one way to peel an apple. The ideal situation in the coaching world is to get “want to be archers” when they first start

48 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

and teach them perfect form. However, taking experienced archers and attempting to completely over-haul their form to the “cookie-cutter mold” ruins far more archers than it helps. If a structurally sound house has defects that keep it from being the quality that is desired, you would probably remodel and correct the flaws, rather than destroy the house and build a new one. It’s much the same in archery. You do not have to completely change an archer’s form to the expected mold when fixing a flaw will solve the problem. As a coach, I believe in making only those changes that are needed in an archer’s form. If a person can shoot a shot the very same way every time, in practice and under pressure situations, then I would classify that individual as having good form. Does the archer’s shot execution conform to what is the expected model? Not necessarily. Look at the style of the last eight archers who won Vegas or the NFAA Indoor Championship. There are many differences in the way they execute their shots and there are many similarities. One of the winners even pulls the release almost completely with arm muscles and no back muscles. Still, he captured the title, and wasn’t disqualified because he didn’t shoot the “perfect form.” Consider the techniques used by the top four archers in the last two Olympics. Their shot executions had likenesses as well as variations. An example was Marco Galliazo. He had a “dead release” and shot it consistently enough to win the Olympic gold medal. What is important is not having one perfect way to shoot a bow, but making certain every shot is executed in the very same manner. In tournaments there are no extra points or penalties for style. The major question that needs to be answered is, “Can you shoot the form you are using under

pressure situations?” When an archer gets nerGood, consistent form cannot be accomplished vous, muscles in the neck, shoulders, and arms without effective thinking. When self-doubt and tighten, which can make the successful execution anxiety occupy an archer’s mind, it becomes very of some forms nearly impossible to duplicate. In- difficult to replicate each shot. The mental con-

You don’t have to completely change an archer’s form...when FIXING a flaw will solve the problem. corporating certain muscle groups to pull the bow trol in archery is just as important as the physical apart and release the arrow makes it much easier aspect. Many archers can shoot 60Xs on the practo perform when there is more tension and you tice range, but very few can accomplish this feat are out of your comfort zone. I tell my students in a tournament. Why? Their thinking process that if they can prove to me that they can dupli- changes, muscles tighten up, excessive pin movecate their shots under pressure, I will not change ment appears, and then the form breaks down. A their forms. There will be no need for it. huge crowd was thrilled to witness the high-presIn my opinion, the most coveted world record sure finish of the NFAA Indoor Championship in is the FITA World Record. The archer has to shoot 2006 when Braden Gellenthien and Jessie Broad144 shots with precise accuracy. Roger Hoyle holds water had a 35-arrow shoot-off for the title. There the male compound record with a score of 1414. was no loser. Both archers were phenomenal and Does he have conventional form? No, but he has Braden won the championship. What was going proven he can shoot it consistently. Roger is one through Braden’s mind in order to stay focused? of the most “coachable” archers that I have had Years ago, we had programmed his thinking to fothe pleasure to assist. His brain works like a com- cus only on perfect shot execution. This enabled puter and his body operates like a smooth-running him to stay calm and use precisely the same form machine. Jamie VanNatta holds the female com- with every shot. This consistency is what good pound record with a score of 1402. Jamie was form is all about. a finger shooter that I helped convert to a release shooter when she was a young teenager. She has a conventionallooking form that is smooth featuring: and strong. Sung-Hyun Parks • Three size blades available holds the FITA World Record 5/32" - 3/16" - 1/4" in the female recurve division • For aluminums or carbons with a score of 1405. The re• Positive ball detent .007 click stop adj. markable part of this feat is that • Numbered windage micro adj. her score is higher than that of • No tools needed for adjustments • No moving parts to wear out (bushings & springs) the female compound archers. • Extra strong and durable When you watch a video of her performance, it appears that The Original Brite Site "The Rest of Your Life" every shot is a video replay. 34 Kentwood Rd. | Succasunna, NJ 07876 | (973) 584-0637 • (973) 927-6779 | email: brtesite@optonline.net That is why she is great. Archery Magazine June/July 2007 49

Milk River Madness THERE IS NOTHING BETTER than walking to the mailbox in early spring and reaching in and grabbing an envelope from the Montana Fish & Wildlife. Another successful draw for my Milk River Whitetail lease! As if it isn’t bad enough that hunting season goes so long from spring until fall now I have that much more to wait for. I know you have all seen it so many times on the monster buck videos, the abundance of deer and especially bucks. I usually sell several rifle hunts to help cover the lease and allow me to bow hunt during the early season. This year my gun hunters were my good buddies the Hoffs and they were only interested in the mule deer (which they all got their first day of the rifle season) so the whitetails were all mine! I planned on hunting the Milk River this year immediately following my antelope hunt in South Dakota, part two of my western tour. The early season can be so productive for a bow hunter due to the fact that the deer are predictably consuming a steady diet of alfalfa and oats. Fortunately for me I filled the Antelope tag very quick and I was soon on my way to Montana. It was a beautiful drive, with one of the most spectacular sun rises. I tried taking a photo of it but sometimes a picture just doesn’t do it justice. I did however go through a town named Bowman North Dakota that had a neat sign and I took a photo 50 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

there and the sun rise is just visible behind me. I also stopped at the Realtree farm and visited with the people that take care of the Monster Buck deer and caught up with how things had been going since I had hunted there in 2001. The drive time in its entirety was about 6 hours long from where I was hunting in South Dakota and went quickly enough that I was able to get to my lease in time for an evening hunt. Soon after I arrived to the camp cabin I was greeted by one of the owners. She told me they had seen several nice bucks and they had just hung a few new stands for me a few weeks ago. To say I was excited would have been such an understatement. I quickly unpacked all my gear out of the truck and starting organizing my gear out on the patio of the cabin. There were some small fawns and does already moving about in the oat fields along the river. I had asked Crystal if she could have her husband Omar come out that evening to film me and try to capture another successful hunt on camera for the western tour video I planned on putting out on DVD. Once Omar got off work he came out and we caught up on a few stories and headed to stand and the action started really quick! We had only just sat down in stand and I had hung my Hoyt up on the easy hanger when the first bucks appeared. Along the

By John Dudley

river bank about 80 yards away I see a string of bucks walking my way. As always the first several bucks were small ones and I was thinking the little guys were already moving out for the evening. However, the last buck in the pack was a really knarly buck that I immediately had interest in. He was an old deer that appeared to only be a crab claw eight point with good mass but his G1 tines were among the longest I had ever seen on a whitetail. They must have been about 12 inches in length, which was amazing for eye guards on a whitetail deer. The bucks walked parallel to us along the river bank at about 80 yards. There were no chances for a shot. It really spurred me with more adrenaline to see that already after the first half hour on stand. As the evening continued to close more and more whitetails and mule

deer fed out into the field. There were maybe 20 does within 100 yards of me well before sunset. Several does passed right by us and didn’t even take notice to us wearing the new Max 1 Realtree. Finally about a half hour before dark some of the smaller bucks I had seen earlier appeared in the field. They were now down wind of me and I knew my chances of getting an opportunity at a shot were not likely to happen. I was pretty occupied watching the smaller bucks and the does when all the sudden the buck I had seen with the long eye guards appeared. I was really excited and my heart rate got a little boost. It seems like time goes so slow when you are waiting for bucks that you see a long way off. More does were coming out in the opposite direction from me and the buck.

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 51

new caption here They started feeding my way as well and the wind was in a better direction for the does. As the light faded the does had made their way directly under me. I was trying to stay focused and the big buck behind me and a mature monarch doe finally got a look at me moving around and started snorting. The whole field was alerted to her noise. The buck became very cautious and alert. What is good about hunting at this spot is there are only a few days a year when it is hunted so the deer are more leery of natural predators like coyotes then they are of people. The deer in the field eventually relaxed and went back to feeding. By the time the buck I wanted to shoot came my way it was well after legal shooting time. I waited for some deer to clear out so I wouldn’t spook anything getting down from stand. I did watch through my Nikon binoculars as the buck I wanted to shoot walked right by me at about 15 yards. I was really excited and couldn’t wait for the next evening. After that hunt we headed to the cabin and had a nice meal and all the owners were there and we watched the footage of the evening hunt and caught up 52 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

on what had gone on over that past year. The next morning I got up before dark and made a pot of coffee. On the Milk River the cover for the deer is very small and mornings are more wisely spent glassing the animals and seeing where the bucks exit the field so your evening hunt can be more productive. What I do is sit right on the porch at the cabin and watch deer through my spotting scope and take photos of them with my Nikon Digiscope bracket. It was an awesome morning as I watched whitetails and mule deer for nearly 3 hours. I had about a pot of coffee and a few bowls of cereal, it was so nice. I saw about three new bucks that I was interested in. One was a nice 10 point, another was an 8 point in velvet still and the other was a nice 8 point with sticker points on the G2 tines. After everything had cleared the field I got out my broad head target and my Ultra Tec bow and did some practicing. I am so happy with the group this thing shoots with broad heads. The only problem with the Milk River hunt is that after you watch the field and shoot your bow some there is still a lot of extra time. So I was able to write the first part of the western

tour story and take some photos. A small antelope came and bedded close to the cabin so I took a few photos of him. I took a nice nap and before I knew it Omar had driven up and was ready to help me with the camera for another hunt. We got in stand earlier this night and it was a beautiful evening. Low winds nice and bright with comfortable temperatures that allowed me to just wear a single layer of my scent loc. After we got all situated in the stand I started looking around and getting a feel for the location. I quickly noticed two really nice mule deer bucks bedded on the other side of the river bank. The sun was on them so they showed up brightly. The range finder said 188 yards. I was debating for about 30 minutes if I should get down and try to stalk up to the edge and make a shot. I was trying to range the deer, as well as, my side of the bank so that I could know about how far the shot would be. I came up with about 70-90 yards so decided to pass on that. Only a short time had passed and deer just started piling out of the river bank right across from the mule bucks into my field. We were laughing about

how big of a mistake it would have been to stalk over there. I would have blown out so many deer long before reaching the water and would have ruined my hunt. It was well before dark and today there must have been 30 deer in the field already. I turned around and looked down the field in the other direction and saw a shooter buck and coming our way! I couldn’t believe it but the 8 point that I had taken the photos of with the sticker points had came in to the field and was making a line right for us while feeding in the oats. It was difficult because he wasn’t the biggest of the bucks I had seen by any means however I told Omar if a good buck comes with good camera light we would need to take the opportunity. I wanted to get another successful hunt with my Hoyt on camera and this was the perfect opportunity. The oats along this stretch of the river was about 50 yards wide and he was half way in, just coming right to us. Omar and I spent several minutes debating to wait or to shoot. As the buck came in with the sun on his face and stood broadside eating oats at 25 yards I told him to get ready cause I was going to take this shot. Too many times have I missed chances on respectable deer because I was too picky. This was a great deer and the camera was running, the deer was at ease and I was confident in the shot. I slowly stood up and started to draw and Omar was in the way. Since we were in a double ladder stand we needed to reposition. I let down and moved slowly to the edge of the stand. Omar leaned back against the tree and steadied the camera. I drew again and settle the

pin I looked to Omar to get the nod that the camera was steady. He gave me the assurance and I settled in on the bucks vitals. I went through the motions of my shot routine and watched that Easton arrow almost rotating through the air and hit its mark. His reaction was as fast as lightning and he turned and bolted out of there and went about 40 yards before dropping in to an irrigation ditch. The broad head had done its job. I turned to the camera and was so excited. This was my third day of hunting on the western tour and already had a nice antelope and now a gorgeous whitetail. Omar and I gave several high fives and we settled down and got quiet again. I told him since there was only an hour before dark we should stay in the stand and see what else comes out. The field absolutely filled with deer. At one point there must have been about 20 deer within 20 yards of us. I couldn’t believe it, but once again the Max 1 camo did its job. The buck with the long eye guards was one of them and after getting a really

good look at that buck I realized he was only a weird looking 6 point but the G1’s were so long that it was confusing and made hear appear to be an 8 point. As it grew dark I scanned the field was happy with our decision to take the buck I did. The land owners were happy that the hunt went successful that night as well. Omar is now hooked on a video camera and wants to starting filming more often. That night he made some of the best steaks from one of the family’s cattle they had recently butchered. They too were awesome and much needed since I hadn’t eaten much for healthy food since leaving my house. In the morning I got some nice photos and did some recovery shots for the video camera and called my buddy Darin Cooper to give me a report on the Elk in Idaho. He said they were expecting snow in the mountains and that the elk hunting should be perfect for us. My next stop on the western tour is in the mountains of eastern Idaho for elk with my buddies Darin, and Kurt. But that is yet another story. Stay tuned!

The author’s buck. Archery Magazine June/July 2007 53

by Paul Davison

H a p p y 3 0 t h B i r t h d a y. . . Bowhunter Freestyle

W

When the NFAA first started holding tournaments, there were just two styles of shooting: barebow and freestyle, both of which represented recreational, or “light” archery tackle. No release aids in those days either. Then in 1956, “Heavy Tackle” was introduced as a separate division of competition. A little later, this new style was renamed “Competitive Bowhunter” division. For either practice or competition, the intent was for the bowhunter to merely exchange the broadheads on his hunting arrows with “field” points of same weight. It was generally accepted that the points should weigh no less than 125 grains for men and 100 grains for women. The field point looked like this:

When one missed the target, the concave nose helped the arrow to “dig” in, rather than skip off the ground. Starting in 1978, the quarter-inch minimum length of the concave portion of the point was actually specified in the NFAA rules. Bullet points 54 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

were left to the target archers. The Competitive Bowhunter Division remained “barebow” for more than twenty years. Then when the release aid was approved for competition in 1971, what was previously fingersonly “Freestyle,” was now called “Freestyle Limited.” Freestyle was now “Unlimited,” meaning sights and release aids were allowed ... but not for the Bowhunter style. Then in 1977, thirty years ago, the NFAA Board of Directors created the Bowhunter Freestyle (fixed pins and release aids) Division. Although it was probably the most popular form of bowhunting in those days, Bowhunter Freestyle Limited (fixed pins and fingers) wasn’t formally approved as an NFAA style until 1978. Most of us blame this delay on an administrative oversight. A few years later, the arrow manufacturers lobbied to delete the field point requirements from the Bowhunter styles. Alas, the “shoot-what-you- hunt-with” tradition was now dead. Today, the only significant differences between Bowhunter Freestyle and ordinary Freestyle are associated with stabilizers (number and length) and sights (fixed pin and no optics versus unlimited). As a result, Bowhunter Freestyle ranks just behind Freestyle as the most popular NFAA shooting style.

Moreover, there’s not a lot of difference between the scores shot ... especially indoors. The next time you go to a tournament, ask a Freestyle Bowhunter if he could exchange his target points with broadheads, and if he would go bowhunting with the same equipment. His response: “You must be crazy.” So much for nostalgia!

Visit

Paul Davison’s �������������������� Official adjunct to NFAA’s �������������������� � NFAA History and historyrelated articles published in ������� magazine � Recent NFAA/WAF tournament write-ups and photo galleries � Lists of all National Outdoor (from 1946) and National Indoor (from 1980) Champions � NFAA Barebow Fraternity news and membership roster � Field and 3-D Range Design Guidelines � Every ��������� ������ article published in ������� � Recently-published general interest articles by Paul Davison in �������

“NFAA and WAF news for all archers” Archery Magazine June/July 2007 55

The arrows with the built-in advantage for broadheads: Built-in Weight Forward Technology Introducing the arrows built especially for broadheads that can help you shoot better. Farther. Built-in Weight Forward means faster recovery out of the bow, giving you better down range accuracy and superior penetration. Add the unsurpassed strength and performance of Carbon Express®—plus the tightest engineering tolerances in the industry—and you have some of the finest hunting arrows ever made. Available on Rebel™ Hunter, Terminator™ Lite Hunter, Maxima™ Hunter and Maxima™ Hunter Crossbolt series.

www.carbonexpressarrows.com 56 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 57

What Every Archer Should Know First About The Mental Game

What Every Archer Should Know First About The Mental Game is the first of a series of Mental Management products designed for the competitive Archer. This CD explains the top three mental mistakes most Archers make and teaches how to overcome them. Instructors find that this CD makes learning technical skill easier and faster by helping to eliminate mental error common to archery. Cost: $25.00 (USD)

TOURNAMENT PROVEN QUALITY!

SUPREME with BLACK EAGLE SCOPE THE ULTIMATE TARGET SIGHT! • Precise .002 click adjustment • Push-button rapid travel • Super-tough, 40% lighter titanium guide rod • Cam-assist 3-axis leveling

Mastering The Mental Game of Archery VOL 1

–patent pending–

U.S. Patent #RE36,266

Volume ONE, Building the Triad, teaches Archers how the Conscious, Subconscious, and Self Image work to generate performance. This is the first volume of a series that teaches competitive archers how to generate a consistent mental performance under pressure. This CD explains how to create balance within all three areas to form a proper Triad State, which increases good performance. You will learn Principles of Mental Management that are applicable to archery. Cost: $30.00 (USD)

Mastering The Mental Game of Archery VOL 2

archery_focus_1-2h.indd 1

58 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

A S S H A M

C.S. Gibbs Corporation • (812) 689-9926 • www.sureloc.com

B

To Order call 1-800-879-5079

or online at www.mentalmanagement.com

R O Y

NOBODY DOES IT BETTER

T

Volume TWO, Improving the Conscious Mind, is a discussion of pre-shot preparation and how it relates to the Pre-Shot Routine, the Preload and the Mental Program. This audio CD addresses pressure and how champions use this phenomenon to their advantage. Archers will also learn how to develop a proper mental program and increase their ability to perform well under stress. Cost: $30.00 (USD)

NEW!

29mm • 35mm • 42mm AMAZING SCOPE CLARITY! • Extra-clear SWAROVSKI OPTIK® acromat lens • Various diopters available

6/12/06 2:40:19 PM

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 59

�������������� ������������������������������� ��� ��������������������������������� ��������������������������

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60 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 61

QuikSpin

TM

Shrink your Groups... Period!

VANES

For maximum stability and head-turning accuracy, nothing spins a broadheadtipped arrow faster than QuikSpin vanes from N.A.P. QuikSpin’s revolutionary patented “kicker” rotates arrows up to 300% faster than feather helicals. And Standard Vane faster spin means tighter groups and better accuracy. Durable, all-weather reliable and easy to apply with any standard fletching machine in straight, offset right or right helical fletch. QuikSpin Vane The unique combination of our patented kicker and micro-grooves stabilizes an arrow in less than half the distance of a conventional vane or feather.

4” 2.25”

Patented micro-grooves on one side of each vane channel air over vane for flatter trajectory compared to conventional vanes.

1.5”

2004 IBO World Champ Adam Gibson trusted QuikSpins to take the Gold!

Game Ear Works For Me!

The #1 selling Sound Amplification with Hearing Protection device for more than 13 years. The Pro’s Choice

Worn and endorsed by more professional hunters than all other amplifying with hearing protection devices combined! • Wayne Carlton • Paul Butski • Ray Eye • Harold Knight

GAME EAR . . . . . . . . . . . $172.95 GAME EAR II w/AFT. . . . $227.95 GAME EAR III w-c . . . . . $324.95

(with wireless voice communication)

Digital GAME EAR . . . . . $489.95

Add $10.95 S&H • PA residents add 6% sales tax Walker’s GAME EAR II & III features Adjustable Frequency Tuning (AFT) allowing hunters to tune in specific sound frequencies to meet their individual needs, while protecting them from muzzle blasts.

MUFF-STYLE HEARING ENHANCEMENT AND PROTECTION POWER MUFFS . . . . . . . . $209.95 POWER MUFFS QUAD . . $259.95 Walker’s Game Ear, Inc. PO Box 1069 • Media, PA 19063 (800) 424-1069 • (610) 565-8952 www.walkersgameear.com

Used proudly and responsibly by Ralph & Vicki Cianciarulo, America’s Favorite Bowhunting Couple on “The Archer’s Choice” weekly t.v. show on The Outdoor Channel.

New Archery Products TM 7500 Industrial Dr., Forest Park, IL 60130 708.488.2500 Toll Free: 800.323.1279 Fax: 708.488.2515 www.newarchery.com info@newarchery.com 62 Archery Magazine June/July 2007

Archery Magazine June/July 2007 63


June/July 07