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2011 SHOOTERS OF THE YEAR! Congratulations to the professional and amateur shooters of the year! Details page 2.

Outdoor National Championship »YANKTON | Results & Photos

DROP-DEAD FOCUS » Using Animal Targets

2011 Hoyt Open Tourney Draw Weight + Bow Power Section & State Assn News STAYING IN RHYTHM and more!

Archery Magazine 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078

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Shot Doctor, the

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U.S. & International Archery Magazine

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The voice of field archery, the NFAA®, Ted Nugent United Sportsmen, the IFAA and bowhunting.

Archery THIS ISSUE:

Visit our Web site www.fieldarchery.com

EDITORIAL BOARD Bruce Cull Brian Sheffler John Pawlowski EDITOR Marihelen Rogers PUBLISHER Rogers Printing Inc. 3350 Main St. PO Box 215 Ravenna MI 49451-0215 ELECTRONIC LAYOUT P.A. Rogers SALES MANAGER Jim Stewart DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Scott Robbins

ADVERTISING SALES Marihelen Rogers 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 (678) 901-9861 (605) 260-9280 fax E-mail: info@fieldarchery.com

4

from the president’s desk

6

drop-dead focus

8

standing up for archery

ISSUE Feb/March April/May

DEADLINE December 15 February 15

ISSUE June/July Aug/Sep

All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on diskette and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. DO NOT include digital photos in your Word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors. The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which are published.

DEADLINE April 15 June 15

ISSUE Oct/Nov Dec/Jan

DEADLINE August 15 October 15

All material will be published at the discretion of the editorial board. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under the rules of fair chase will be considered. Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to: Marihelen Rogers, Editor, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279 • E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com

LETTERS POLICY: Letters printed in Archery Magazine will be at the discretion of the editor. The following guidelines for letters will apply: Clearly state your point. Stick to one item, or one point of view. Be accurate. Use words that are respectful and avoid personal attacks. Send your letter by email to NFAArchery@aol.com. All letters must contain a name, address, phone number and email address.

Archery is published bimonthly by the National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with self-addressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. 2 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

A MESSAGE FROM BRUCE CULL

GAIN HUNTING SKILLS USING NFAA ANIMAL TARGETS | DEBRA SIELOFF PROPER FULL-DRAW POSITION AND STANCE | LARRY WISE

draw weight and bow power

18

2011 outdoor national championship

23

2011 hoyt open tournament

26

stay in rhythm

33

Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published bi-monthly. Editorial deadlines are as follows:

Vol. 31 • No. 3 © 2011 NFAA®

12

28 EDITORIAL POLICIES

August/September 2011

THE DYNAMIC DUO | DAVE HOLT

RESULTS & PHOTOS | YANKTON, SD

WORLD OUTDOOR ARCHERY FESTIVAL | YANKTON, SD | TERRY WUNDERLE

section and state association news TOURNAMENT INFORMATION AND NEWS BY REGION

nfaa calendar of events

2011-2012 TOURNAMENT DATES AND LOCATIONS

COVER STORY The 2011 Shooters of the Year, from left: professionals Dave Cousins and Samantha Neal with amateurs Becky Pearson and Steve Wagner.

tournament information and registration forms

11 » chuck cooley, pro chair feature 15 » nfaa memorial scholarship program 17 » bowhunter update: hunting with crossbows — NFAA bowhunting chairman tom e. vollmer 22 » school of advanced archery — bernie pellerite 25 » IFAA north american field archery championship registration form 34 » easton foundation scholarship opp 37 » NFAA council and board of directors AND MORE! ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 3

DROP-DEAD FOCUS: »Gain Hunting Skills Using NFAA Animal Targets DEBRA SIELOFF

EASTON FOUNDATION AND NFAA FOUNDATION AWARD $16,000 ARCHERY SCHOLARSHIPS Easton Sports Development Foundation and the National more student scholarships, and increase the scholarship levels. Field Archery Association Foundation are pleased to announce In 2011, $16,000 was awarded to 23 recipients. We expect the the Archery Scholarship Recipients for 2011. $16,000 in total number of applications to increase in future years, and plan to scholarships was awarded to 23 student athletes in middle award up to $50,000 in total annual scholarships in 2012,” said school, high school, and college that compete with either comGreg Easton, President Easton Foundations. pound or recurve bows. Individual scholarship awards varied The 2009-11 scholarships are funded by an initial $150,000 from $500 to $2,500. Top scholarships were awarded to Forgrant from the Easton Foundation to the Easton-NFAA Foundarest Blakley of Cobdin, Illinois and tion Scholarship Program. Future Riley Whiting of Logan, Utah. net revenue from the NFAA “Archery is a lifestyle for me Easton Yankton Archery Comand has taught me discipline plex, plus scholarship donawhich has benefitted me not tions from both individuals and only in the field but also in the companies will be held in an classroom”, Forrest stated. He endowment account to fund is pursuing a degree in Agriculthe scholarships in 2012 and tural Engineering at Shawnee beyond. Community College in southern Dave Gordon, of GorIllinois where he also started an don Composites, made a large archery team. Forrest has been personal contribution to the on the US Junior USAT for two scholarship endowment fund. years and participated as a memDave stated, “Archery has been a ber of the Junior World Indoor big part of both my personal and and Outdoor teams. He plans business success. I believe the on attending the Olympic trials Easton-NFAA Foundation ScholPresident Easton Foundations, Greg Easton (L), and Riley Whiting (R), 2011 this fall. arship program is an outstanding ESDF/NFAA Scholarship recipient. Riley said, “Receiving this program to support our youth scholarship is not only a pleasure, but it creates a wonderful oparchers, and allows me to give back to the sport I love. Awardportunity for me to go to college and accomplish my goals and ing our best archers and student athletes scholarships that allow dreams in archery.” Riley recently made the United States Junior them to pursue further education while competing in archery team and will be competing in Poland in mid-August. will help develop much stronger youth and college archery “Forrest and Riley are both outstanding athletes that develprograms. I encourage everyone that shares my passion for oped their archery skill in youth programs, and have become archery and desire to support our young archers to make their seasoned competitive archers and we are very pleased to award own donation to the scholarship program.” Individuals or comeach of them our top $2,500 scholarship awards for 2011,” panies interested in donating to the scholarship endowment stated Bruce Cull, President, NFAA. fund or learning more about the program are encouraged to NFAA Scholarships were first awarded in 1990 to student contact Bruce Cull, NFAA President. The NFAA Foundation is a athletes that compete in archery and excel in academic and 501(c )3 Public Charity and all donations meet the IRS requireintellectual achievement. The limitations of the original scholarments as charitable donations. ship program were resolved in 2009 with the creation of the Scholarship applications, program requirements, and adjoint NFAA/Easton Foundation Scholarship Program. “The ditional information is available on the NFAA website at www. Easton and NFAA Foundations share the goal to support student fieldarchery.com, or from the NFAA Headquarters, 800 Archery athletes that compete in archery. We believe these scholarships Lane, Yankton, SD 57078. All applications for 2012 scholarships will help us to develop stronger college archery programs and must be submitted to the NFAA Office by December 31, 2011. strengthen future Olympic and World Championship Teams. By For additional information contact Natalie Vollmer, NFAA Execucombining our respective Foundation programs, we can award tive Secretary, at 605-260-9279 or at info@fieldarchery.com. ■ 4 ARCHERY ARCHERY MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

■■

June August/September / July 2011 2011

DO YOU PUT YOURSELF THROUGH THE UPS-AND-DOWNS OF AN NFAA ARCHERY TOURNAMENT as a way of increasing your chance of success on the hunt? Tournaments will definitely give your shooting and focus skills a challenge. When you’re done, the results go down on paper—and, if you’re like some of us, live on and on when you post them on the fridge or are short-lived if you pop them in the can. Either way, you can use the scores to assess your improvement as you prepare for an upcoming hunt. NFAA has a variety of formats that archery hunters can enjoy shooting during the off season. NFAA gives archers Field, Hunter and Animal Rounds which use paper targets, as shot at the NFAA Outdoor Nationals. NFAA also offers 3-D tournaments which use the molded animal targets, such as Redding and Yankton for marked and unmarked NFAA 3-D Nationals respectively. The spot targets give you a chance to build a repeatable, consistent shot. The animal targets, which you shoot 1-2 arrows per target, may have less repetition, but you will get more practice visualizing the shape, placing the sight pin in an effective shot spot, and focusing on the spot as you finish the shot. Professional athletes in all major sports practice visualization, as well as technique.

Sieloff uses NFAA tournament to collect a 2011 NFAA Pro Women Limited Compound National Championship before going out to hunt black bear a few weeks later.

Chris Batha, in his book “Breaking Clays,” says that people use their visual techniques unconsciously in day-to-day activities. The difference between good shooting sport athletes and the average shot is that the good shot learns to use visual skills along with continued on page 6 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 5

DROP-DEAD FOCUS

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

» THROW

AN ANIMAL PARTY!

Broadside shot responses can be quicker by practicing on NFAA targets that simulate the animal position.

other technique.

they are 2-D paper targets with several

“You need to do more than just

benefits:

look at the whole target,” writes Batha. He says that intense concentration on

• Realistic animal shape to train visual-

the target is important. However, more

ization on the shape and the aiming

importantly is concentration on a small

spot on a realistically-colored target,

part of the target, such as the bulls-eye

e.g., brown moose, black bear, red

on the NFAA Animal Round target. “In-

fox, grey wolf

tense concentration on a small part of

• Clear background around the animal

the target blocks out negative thoughts

to allow the brain to memorize the

and, effectively, causes the target

shape outline and be able to build

to appear to become larger...[so] to

faster response time to visualizing a

consistently shoot well, we must learn

broadside shot

to maintain hard focus on the target throughout the shot.”

• Lower cost than molded targets, from a few dollars

Popular among the hunters are the NFAA Animal Round targets. While

• Targets are posted to a target bale, which provides a backstop to capture

Hunters know how to put together a lot of fun, which is how NFAA got its start in the first place. The rounds are challenging and they really do help you develop skills for successful hunting. Here’s a format my local gun club runs on Tuesdays in the summer league using its archery range—and fills every shooting line spot. It takes 1.5 hours to shoot and is would be good for a single event or league:

• 1 Shooting Line: All archers on the line, 2-4 people per target, so everyone can see who is shooting and socialize between shooting • Pizza party at the end of shooting

The current NFAA Animal Round targets

your arrow went in the right direction.

have a bold line that shows an area that is similar to a serious-to-mortal wound.

of the animal target that is far better for

On dark animals, this will be a bright

the hunting shot and it scores higher. continued on page 38

• Shoot 1 target at a time with 3 arrows, score, pull, and go back to the next station on the shooting line; repeating this for all 12 targets • 3-D animal targets are placed in front of a bale to catch arrows shot by archers who have difficulty judging distance (even though the targets behind them are known distance, most novice shooters get nervous and fail to remember their yard marker, as they would forget in the field, too)

going home with only the feeling that Then there’s the area in the middle

• 12 Animal Targets: 6 molded 3-D animal targets, 6 2-D NFAA Animal Round target faces on targets

• Distances 10 – 35 yards: so all ages, experience levels, and set-ups can shoot a practical distance that the average hunter would attempt

While he’s growing antlers, you can be working on developing your visual skills with NFAA Animal Round Targets.

Spring and fall turkey are tough to take with a bow and the 2-D target practice can help you better visualize on the real game, such as this group of fall tom turkeys.

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arrows that go over, under or around the animal—well suited for people getting into archery, getting back in, or working through release control issues With all these reasons to use NFAA Animal Round targets to prepare for hunting, there’s another bonus. They’re fun to shoot and you can pretend that you’re hunting when you’ve got your hunting wings clipped.

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For example, the animal shape has an outline that follows the whole body. The line indicates that you hit somewhere on the animal. Score-wise you get the fewest points. It’s the same as

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making a wound shot—you get all excited, but in the end realize that you’re 6 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 7

2

» Standing Up for Archery

THE REALLY GOOD FIELD ARCHERS DO TWO THINGS exceptionally well: first they place their bodies in proper full-draw-position (see Archery, JULY 2011) and, second, they stay focused on the present while properly executing a shot. Pairing these two skills enables them to stay relaxed so they can shoot more like they do in practice. Using both their biomechanics and their mind to full capacity enables the better archers to get that “repeat” performance we are all looking for. And keep it working during a tournament.

You must know your

FULL-DRAW POSITION

so you can set your stance to best achieve that position. UPPER BODY POSITION Now, if you plan to use the present-process-thinking objective of “EXECUTING THIS SHOT WITH BACK TENSION” then you’ll be concerned about getting your upper body in the best possible position for using the required back muscles. Proper posture at full draw is essential to using your skeleton to its best advantage thereby allowing most of your muscles to relax which in turn results in your steadiest aim and most consistent release. Therefore, this article is about STANCE. Yep, STANCE. Using your skeleton properly begins when you stand 8 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

T FORM SPREAD – Spreading your feet to hip-width while standing in this “T” position demonstrates how many leg muscles can be relaxed while maintaining stability. Try this little test for yourself and you’ll know what I mean and then be willing to pass it along to your students.

LARRY WISE

properly. How you connect yourself to the ground affects every step of form that follows and that makes your STANCE really important. You must know your full-drawposition so you can “set your stance” to best achieve that position. In fact, the first eight form elements that I teach are all evaluated by how well they enable you to establish full-draw-position and execute the shot with back tension. We don’t build a single form element independent of the other form elements or independent of the final desired objective. The beginning form elements must relate to and prepare for your full-draw-position and to our final shot objective “executing this shot with back tension”. If any element doesn’t, then why do it? If a particular action PRIOR TO THE RELEASE doesn’t setup your full-drawposition and also promote back tension then it must be altered so it does . . . . or eliminated.

erly erected base scaffold will promote sound upper body archery technique. Here’s a simple test to try: stand for a few minutes with your knees slightly bent. Tired yet?! You get the picture quickly with this test because bent knees recruit most of your leg muscles and after only two minutes fatigue sets in. FEATURE 1: STANCE SPREAD Leg bones and how we position them are the first step to achieving proper execution with back tension. You have to get this part correct from the beginning or your success will be limited. Build the scaffold too narrow and the top will teeter-totter back and forth. Build it too wide and it places too much stress on your lower back and also recruits more muscle to hold the position. How far you spread your feet, distribute your weight and how you angle your torso relative to the target are the main features of the stance form element. Following is what I teach beginners, as well as advanced archers. Determining spread is easily taught using the beginners “T” body position. Stand with your heels together, eyes closed and arms raised to form the archer’s “T” as illustrated. (1: T FORM) In this position it takes only a few seconds to feel your body swaying back and forth. When your heels are together you must use lots of small leg muscles to keep your balance – it’s close to the feel you get when stand-

BUILDING YOUR BASE SCAFFOLD You have an intuitive understanding that your upper body stability will best be served by a steady and sturdy base. After all, most of you work on your feet for some part of the day and know that proper leg use reduces fatigue. With proper leg use you can stand or walk for hours and effectively get your work done. All day, every day, you rely on your leg bones to hold your body upright. You don’t use a lot of leg muscle. You only use enough small muscle groups to keep your leg bones lined up so they support your body weight. In archery, you use your leg bones to build the scaffold for your upper body and your upper body bones and a few back muscles to hold the force of the bow. A propT FORM CLOSED – Teaching stance to any archer should begin with the “T” formation. Standing with arms raised to shoulder height and eyes closed allows your students to feel for themselves the unstable sway they have when their feet are together. To keep their balance they must activate many of their leg muscles instead of relaxing most of them.

1

3

EVEN STANCE – Standing with both sets of toes even with the line to the target like this left-hander is doing puts you in the “even” stance position. This is a good stance for beginners to use until they learn to test their stance position with the “closed eye” test.

ing on just one foot. Repeat the closed eye “T” position again. This time after a few seconds spread your feet to hip-width. (2: T FORM SPREAD) You should immediately feel most of your leg muscles relax and the wobbling dissipates. At this point you can experiment with different spread distances—from ten inches to eighteen inches —to find what feels most comfortable, most stable and allows your body core to be most steady. You can bend your knees for a few seconds to remind yourself about leg bone alignment. Repeating a point made earlier, the leg bones should be in line so they are supporting the weight of your upper body. To keep them in line requires only a few small muscles and there’s no need to “lock” your knees - just use enough small muscle groups to keep the bones in line. Therefore a quality stance will have feet spread to a “comfortable” stable width, leg bones lined up and most of your leg muscles relaxed. FEATURE 2: STANCE ANGLE TO THE TARGET The second aspect of stance is body presentation to the target. At what angle to the target do you want your hips, chest and shoulders so that you can aim most effectively in line with the target center? » EVEN STANCE: The even stance aligns the feet so that the toes are even with a line to the target. A line through your shoulders will be parallel to this line. (3: EVEN STANCE) » OPEN STANCE: The open stance presents more of one’s chest to the target by setting the target-side foot a short distance from the straight line to the target. (4: OPEN STANCE) » CLOSED STANCE: Moving the foot on one’s releasehand side away from the line to the target will point the chest slight away form the target or close it relative to the target. (5: CLOSED STANCE) What’s correct for you when shooting a compound bow? Determining the presentation angle that is most continued on page 10

5

4

OPEN STANCE - The most used stance turns your chest slightly towards the target or “open” to the target. This right-hander shows how your left foot is pulled several inches away form the line to the target to form the open stance. Most archers find that their upper body wants to hold this position naturally even when they close their eyes for eight or ten seconds.

CLOSED STANCE – The closed stance for a right-hander is shown here with the right foot pulled away form the line to the target. This would turn your chest slightly away form the target. A few archers need this position to maintain their natural upper bodyline to the target. or ten seconds.

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 9

STANDING UP FOR ARCHERY

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7

effective for you is vital to your success. The upper body must be calm, steady and stable over top of the hips and feet if aiming is to be high quality and if you are going to execute back tension effectively. You should not be working against your natural upper-body position over your hips. Instead, find it and embrace it. There are many techniques for finding one’s natural upper body over-the-feet position. One simple method is raise, draw, and aim your bow at a target. While aiming, close your eyes and after a count of eight open them. Note any left/right drift away from the target - up or down is not important. A closed-eye right-drift (righthanded archer) indicates the need to open your stance slightly while a left-drift indicates a need to close your stance a little. When the correction is made in your stance then open-eye aiming can be maintained without fighting against any natural drift. Less fight against unseen forces will help make aiming steadier. Note that I didn’t say “dead still” because that’s not always possible and may be an unrealistic expectation that adds muscle tension instead of keeping it relatively relaxed. For more advanced shooters I have another test. Place five indoor target spots in a horizontal row across the target butt at twenty-yards. Spread them so that they are about 18 inches from the far left to the far right spot. Set one stance position for the center spot and begin shooting from twenty yards. (6: FIVE SPOT) Shoot some ends left-to-right, others right-to-left and some in random order. Save the target and repeat this test for two or three days and then examine the target to

  

          

FIVE SPOT – Place five aiming spots in a horizontal line as shown. Using an even stance, shoot some practice ends each day for four or five days. Shoot leftto-right sometimes and right-to-left other times. Notice if you shoot any particular spot or spots better than others. I found that I shot the right-most spot better, which indicated that I was shooting best when my torso was more open to the target.

6

find which spot of the five you are shooting the best. After my shoulder surgery a few years ago this test showed me that I needed a more open stance because the spot on the far right showed the best grouping in the x-ring. FEATURE 3: LEFT/RIGHT WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION I recommend distributing your body weight equally on each foot whenever possible. That means in your proper full-draw-position you will support 50% of your body weight on each foot unless certain physical challenges dictate otherwise. Standing with one foot on each of two scales will verify your weight distribution. You can also have a friend tell you if you are standing with good vertical alignment and distributing your weight equally. Have your friend take a picture showing your back and, therefore, your vertical alignment. (7: BACK VIEW)

BACK VIEW – Standing with your spine vertical will distribute equal amounts of weight on each foot. It will also lead to a more relaxed but more stable stance position. Note that Tom Dorigotti’s shoulders are now level giving optimum leverage from his back and shoulder muscles that lead to consistent shot execution.

7

      

           

   

10 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

FEATURE 4: TOE/HEEL WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION The final stance consideration is your forward weight distribution onto the “balls” of your feet. I hate shooting field targets with my toes pointed uphill. It’s the most uncomfortable feeling for me as my body wants to fall over backward constantly when I’m at full draw. To compensate I wear hiking shoes which have a slightly higher heel than my cross-training shoes placing 55-60% of my weight forward on my feet and only 40-45% on my

heels. (8: REAR VIEW) Weight-forward is more stable as your toes are on that end of your feet and help you maintain your balance. Pitching your upper body slightly forward will help you keep your back straighter so it’s not arched. Experimenting with different shoe-heel types will lead you to a good heel height for your body type and enable you to place your center of gravity between the balls of your feet and not between your heels.

REAR VIEW – Standing vertical or placing about 55% of your weight forward on your feet will be most stable for the large majority of archers. This old picture was taken at Vegas in 1982 and shows Dean Pridgen and myself in good vertical form. Shooting in hiking boots or work shoes that have slightly higher heels will be enough to tip your weight forward and avoid the “tipping backwards” feeling when your toes are pointed uphill..

» Chuck COOLEY

Pro Chair

Congratulations to Chuck Cooley on his election to the NFAA Professional Division Chairman! Chuck explained that his strategy for the future of the Pro Division will be to listen, learn, and put in motion plans that the leaders and members of the Pro Division put forward. He is dedicated to finding common ground and common goals to move the entire division forward, all of us as a group not just a few, we are all archers in a unified division.

8

He is researching ideas to have the financial ability to pay ourselves more, to have a viable product to sell to investors and sponsors, to gain respect among our peers and the public, and to have a division that is truly professional in every sense of the word. I believe these goals can only be accomplished with dedication and perseverance by our membership. We must look forward to the future, not backward.”

SET AND MAINTAIN Humans learn at different rates as we all know but, in general, it takes us about three weeks or 21 days to learn a new habit. It takes only a short time for our subconscious to establish the necessary brain function but our muscles take a little longer to be conditioned. Therefore, practice time with our new stance will have to be allotted before it is fully an automatic, subconscious-controlled activity. During this training and while you are shooting an end of arrows you must learn to maintain your stance. That is, you must learn to set your stance for the first arrow of the end and then not move your feet again until the end is complete. I assume that you are setting it correctly on the first try and, therefore, you should not need to change foot position for the remaining shots. At any tournament or at any local league shoot I see many of the archers establish their full-draw-position and then shuffle their feet. Immediately I know that they will never be able to repeat that shot – their stance will be different every time they shoot an arrow. Set your stance correctly as your first step of form and don’t change it. If it feels bad when you get to full draw then let down, reset your feet and start over. Build it correctly from the start. Shuffling feet during an end of arrows introduces unwanted and unnecessary tension and nervousness. Maintaining ones stance can be used to help reduce tension and nervousness. Trusting your stance is a big first step to getting your self-confidence elevated and maintained.

Chuck’s goals for the Professional archers include: • Improving on communication. Through the web and social media. • Put the Pro Council back into the process. • Identify how we work within the NFAA and find ways to make it less confrontational and more beneficial to both groups. There is a clear need for us to have some control over our own future, yet an equally clear and important need for us to help the NFAA. We add value to each other. • Finding our identity, our demographic. We must make it desirable to investors and sponsors. • Grow our division. There is strength in numbers. • As we grow we should offer training on several levels. Programs that help you to be a better pro when not on the line. • Programs that demand excellence from shooters. Eventually meeting and maintaining a minimum standard. • Develop Pro Events/Pro Series that will increase our visibility, marketability, and financial power. • Address our Pro Points system to implement a true ranking system for ALL professionals. That ranking system should include financial incentives based on placement. • Create a business plan to put these and other ideas into action developing short, medium, and long range goals for the future. Please visit Chuck’s website www.ChuckCooley.com and submit your ideas. ■

continued on page 27 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 11

» Draw Weight and Bow WHEN PREHISTORIC MAN INVENTED THE FIRST BOW, he probably didn’t fully understand the complexity of his invention. He knew it would hurl a small, feathered “spear” farther than ever before, but I am sure how and why remained a mystery. But on that long

roll in that particular bows power. Currently, performance varies substantially even within bows of each type, and these differences are magnified when all three-bow types -- compounds, recurves, and longbows -- are compared. Now, it is common for a particu-

energy was converted to kinetic energy -- energy of mass in motion. Kinetic energy has the ability to do work: the arrow will deliver its energy to the target. The more kinetic energy a given arrow possesses, the harder it will hit and the deeper it will penetrate.

The energy you put into the bow could be compared with the FUEL IN YOUR CAR. The more gas you have, the greater potential you have for traveling a long distance.

ago day when the first arrow took flight bows and arrows became the original dynamic duo. Today, we have a much better understanding of how bows and arrows function as a team. Moreover, most scientists from the field of ballistics agree kinetic energy is the most accurate way to measure the force that causes an arrow to penetrate. Draw weight has never been an entirely accurate way to measure a bow’s ability to make an arrow penetrate a target. Why? Because of the differences in individual draw lengths, bow types, brace heights, cam types and bow designs. The advent of the compound bow, as well as a larger selection of materials and improved designs in all bow types, has expanded this gap in performance. When we consider all bow designs, draw weight is not an accurate measurement of bow power. However, when we consider one single bow with all design features set draw weight plays the major 12 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

lar 60-pound bow to shoot arrows of equal weight with more kinetic energy than another bow of 80 pounds draw weight. If we consider all other factors such as draw length, brace height bow types and designs that number jumps to over 100 pounds. Before I explain why, let’s look at how a bow operates. That prehistoric fellow who invented the bow didn’t realize that he had designed one of the world’s first machines. That’s right, all bows are machines, and here is how they function. First, you exert effort to move the string of the bow -- the draw stroke. As you do, your energy is transferred and stored in the bow (stored energy). When you release the string -- the power stroke -- much of that stored energy (your effort) is again transferred -- this time, to the arrow. As the arrow is propelled forward, it absorbs most of the bow’s stored energy and then uses that energy to fly through the air and penetrate its target. As the arrow left the bow, the stored

If you stop and think about what has just been described, it is rather amazing. The bow absorbs energy from your body’s work, and then transfers much of that energy to the arrow. The arrow uses your energy to penetrate the animals and targets we shoot. In this way, a bow is quite different from a firearm, which uses an outside source of energy (burning gun powder) to provide the kinetic energy that the bullet delivers to the target. The energy you put in to the bow could be compared with the fuel in the tank of your car. The more gas you have in the tank the greater potential you have for traveling a long distance (penetrating a target). But wait, what about gas mileage? Vehicles vary in the miles per gallon they return, and bows vary in the percent of stored energy they deliver to the arrow. If the goal is to have a hard-hitting arrow, we need to store as much energy as possible and then deliver most of that energy to the arrow. The delivery part

Power—The Dynamic Duo DAVE HOLT

(gas mileage) is known as dynamic efficiency. Almost all bows deliver between 70 and 90 percent of their stored energy to an arrow of equal weight. The normal dynamic efficiency range is between 77 and 87 percent with arrows in the 400-grain weight range. As noted, most of today’s top-of-the-line bows vary less than 10 percent in dynamic efficiency. But that can still amount to 15 feet per second (fps) in arrow velocity – again with arrows of equal weight, and that 15 fps is free. It’s like receiving better gas mileage from the same vehicle. Now that we know how this simple machine functions, let’s look at why it is inaccurate to compare bows by draw weight. Here are the factors that help us put more fuel in the tank:

cam bow in arrow velocity. Why? Because a high-energy cam bow causes the shooter to work harder -- thus more energy (fuel) is stored, even though the draw weights and lengths were the same. This is one reason that a bow’s peak draw weight means so little. But as mentioned, we know that high-energy cam bows are more difficult to draw -- that’s why they store the extra energy. The shooter exerting more effort during the draw the stroke puts the extra fuel (stored energy) in the bow. The amount of effort equals the amount of energy stored and again peak draw weight is just one factor. To review, an 80-pound mild cam bow and a 70-pound aggressive highenergy cam bow might cause an equal

amount of energy to be stored. So even if you shoot several pounds less draw weight you may be ahead in terms of arrow velocity. Each bow has its own special qualities, and this is one of the many reasons you should shoot and compare a variety of bows before making a purchase. 3. The power stroke is another element that influences the amount of energy a bow stores. The power stroke is the distance over which the bow delivers force or power to the arrow upon release of the string. Two elements affect the power stroke of a bow: the shooter’s draw length and the bows brace height. The brace height is set, to a large degree, by continued on page 12

1. Peak draw weight is the most obvious ingredient in the quest for a fast hardhitting arrow. But, unfortunately, it is not an accurate big picture measurement. And, if the truth were known, most of us push that draw weight limit farther than we should. It is important to remember that accuracy and your physical longevity are far more important than arrow velocity. 2. When compound bows are set at the same draw weight and draw length, the main variable in their ability to store energy is the shape or design of the cam. For example, a 60-pound bow with a mild cam might store 70 foot-pounds of energy if the draw length is 30 inches. However, a bow with today’s most aggressive energy cams (set the same way) may cause over 90 foot-pounds of energy to be stored. That equals over 1.5 footpounds of stored energy per pound of peak draw weight. For those of you who may be getting ahead of me -- you’re right -- the draw weight of that mild cam bow would need to be set at over 80 pounds to match the 60-pound high-energy ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 13

DRAW WEIGHT AND BOW POWER

a bow’s design, and draw length is limited by the shooters physical size. Drawing the string is what causes bows to store energy so it is correct to assume that moving the bow’s string a greater distance will cause more energy to be stored. A 3-inch difference in the power stroke can amount to a 10- to 15-percent difference in stored energy, when all other factors are equal. This may amount to 30 feet per second in arrow velocity. Be sure to consider this fact when comparing your arrow velocity with other bows and shooters. As described draw length is an important factor when it comes to storing energy and the resultant arrow velocity. Regardless of this reality, you should not increase your draw length arbitrarily. In fact, if accuracy is the goal, some compound bow shooters would be better served by slightly shortening their draw length. Over the years, I shortened my draw length slightly on three separate occasions. In all cases, I lost a little arrow velocity but improved my accuracy.

14 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Without seeing your form I’m not suggesting you shorten your draw length, but I would certainly recommend that you don’t increase it just to gain arrow velocity. Several times, I stated that peak draw weight is not an accurate way to measure bow power when we are discussing all bow types and designs. The result is that bows of equal draw weights may shoot arrows of equal weights at tremendously different arrow velocities. This information should help you understand why it is inaccurate and misleading to use draw weight as a measure of the bow’s ability to make an arrow penetrate. Note: Again, when speaking about a single bow its draw length and design are most likely set. In these cases draw weight is the only major remaining arrow velocity factor at your disposal. Kinetic energy was also mentioned as the most accurate measurement of an arrows ability to penetrate when all else is equal. The term “kinetic energy” may sound complicated, but it is not. All you need to know is your arrow’s velocity and weight. Once you have that information, there are many quick reference charts you can check to find your arrow’s kinetic energy. I’ve included one such chart in my book, Balanced Bowhunting II. If you don’t have a chart or would like to determine your setup’s exact kinetic energy, simply arm yourself with a calculator. Remember, all else being equal, penetration is a function of kinetic energy. Kinetic energy is a function of the arrow’s weight and velocity combined. It can be calculated by using the following formula: Arrow velocity times arrow velocity; times arrow weight; divided by 450,240, equals kinetic energy in foot-pounds. Example: 240 fps x 240 fps = 57,600.00 x 500 grains = 28,800,000 divided by 450,240 = 63.965 footpounds of kinetic energy. Now, the next logical question is “how much kinetic energy do we need for each species of game animal?” Al-

low me to use a large whitetail deer to answer. If you have proper shot placement, almost all bowhunting equipment, including traditional styles, will generate more than sufficient arrow velocity to kill a whitetail deer and animals of similar size. Conversely, if the shot placement is poor and the arrow strikes the ridge of the scapula, or other major bone I’m not sure 100 foot-pounds of kinetic energy would be enough. Again, I am hesitant to put a minimum on kinetic energy, particularly for medium size game, because of my fear of leaving someone out of this wonderful sport. During my teenage years, I killed several deer with arrows that I’m now sure left my 45-pound recurve bow possessing less than 30 foot-pounds of kinetic energy. Those were some of the most memorable hunts of my life, and I’m thankful that no one prevented me from participating because of my equipment. I have intentionally left arrow weight out of this discussion because all bow designs (including longbows and recurves) react in a similar way to arrow weight changes. It’s enough here to point out that a bow’s dynamic efficiency increases as the arrow weight increases because mass resist motion. A 100-grain change in arrow weight most often results in a 1- to 3-percent change in a bows dynamic efficiency, when varying between 350 and 700 grains. In conclusion, I would like to make it clear that I am not endorsing highenergy cam bows, nor am I rejecting recurves, or longbows. These bows just happen to be on opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to arrow velocity. My purpose here is to describe how the bow and arrow function as a team. And to point out why draw weight is not an accurate measurement of a bow’s ability to harvest game. All the bows mentioned have proven themselves to be more than adequate. When it comes to equipment, it is helpful to understand the differences, but you should shoot the bow you enjoy the most. ■

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ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 15

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» Bowhunter Update TOM E. VOLLMER, BOWHUNTING CHAIRMAN

GREETINGS FELLOW BOWHUNTERS! Well this year has passed by pretty fast and many archery happenings have come and gone. We have hosted many out-

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door and 3-D tournaments and even had the opportunity to see some Olympic hopefuls shoot on our new Olympic archery

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range. It was really something to see those archers perform in the gusty winds of South Dakota and to suffer through the gnats and mosquitoes that live here. This spring the First dumped several inches of snow and rain on Yankton. During the summer we hosted a Ted Nugent Camp for Kids. Take it from me, it was pretty cool to see the faces of all those youngsters, fishing and shooting just for fun. I think it is a great way to build confidence and love for our sport. As I listened to the comment s from the kids moving through the fishing pond, they were all excited for the 3-D archery shoot that was to follow. A great deal!! for the future of our sport. I suggest that all bowhunter clubs and archery clubs try an and let them have at it, incorporate some BB gun or slingshot events or a fishing derby and stand back and watch the fun. It helps to have a celebrity around, Thanks Ted!!. If one is not available just do it anyway. Three Dimensional targets are reasonably priced and can be sold to your club members after

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two or three events because they will have plenty of shot- life left in them. I saw that one archery club in Virginia, had posted their 3-D event on-line inviting anyone to join in on the fun.

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and get some quality practice in as well. These events go well

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that will keep your bow at full draw. In all there are at least a dozen states that have changed the rules on crossbows. These changes are in no small part due to the increase in vehicledeer collisions and are meant to reduce the deer populations in many areas. I think it is wise and prudent to increase the number of ways to legally take game animals and these

It should be

controlled with special

season dates because of the LETHALITY of crossbows. Their similarity to rifles can make for legal complications in states that have archery only seasons.

They had twenty targets and unlimited shooting for $10.00. Sounds like a great way to bring in some money for the club

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tions have been dropped, such as having a locking mechanism

Dakota Classic was held the day after a freak winter snow storm

outdoor event to get kids involved. Put up some 3-D targets

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unrestricted crossbow hunting and some other past restric-

with membership drives too!

changes effectively serve that purpose and they also increase the number of hunting opportunities available. There are many states that allow the use of crossbows for hunting if the hunter

I have been scanning the hunting regulation changes in

has a disability or special license to use one, and they can only

several states and have noticed that crossbow regulations have

be used for certain game. For example, in Georgia a crossbow

been changing. In our area there are some restrictions on

may be used in hunting feral hogs and any other game except

using crossbows to hunt, generally, it is allowed during rifle or

waterfowl. Ohio permits crossbow hunting of deer, turkeys,

special seasons and only to those who are physically limited

hogs and other game. On the other extreme, Oregon, for

and cannot draw a bow. Some other states are more lenient,

example, has a complete ban on crossbow hunting. The winds

New York’s Gov. David Paterson signed into law a bill for legal-

of change are blowing and I think we will be seeing more open

izing crossbows for hunting in 2011-12. North Carolina has legalized crossbow hunting this year. Nebraska has allowed for 16 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

continued on page 38 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 17

2011 Outdoor »National Championships Yankton, South Dakota

THE HIGH WATERS OF THE MISSOURI RIVER DIDN’T

Jamie Van Natta, PFFS, tied her own 2008 Animal Round record

STOP the 2011 NFAA Outdoor National Championships. Two

of 579, and Christie Colin of PA matched that with her score of

ranges were redesigned on higher ground, and one temporary

579. PMFS Jesse Broadwater tied his 2009 Field 560, and Kevin

range was set up on Yankton City property, making it possible

Wilkey (UT) joins Jesse and Dave Cousins with a 560 Hunter Rd.

for the show to go on. Thanks to Tim Austin, Ray Jones, Shorty

Jesse tied his 2009 Animal Rd record of 587.

Faber and Tim Withers, the re-design of the ranges worked out

SFFSL, Pat Bridge (IA) set a new record Field score of 472,

great. With much help from Bill Hewes and Jarod Myer, along

11 points over the previous record of 461 held by Linda Parker,

with a crew of SD state prison inmates, the work was complet-

of WA. SMBH Gary McCain (CA) beat his own Hunter record

ed in time for several days of practice before the competition

of 483, set last year. New record is 493. SMBHFS Gary Marrier

began.

(VT) beat his own Hunter record of 540 from last year by 4

The high temperatures made for some high scores, as

Jesse Broadwater, Professional Freestyle winner also took Gold in the US Archery Field Nationals, the US Archery Target Nationals and won his third new car in the WOAF shoot off.

points to raise the bar to 544. SMFS Jim Burns (WI) tied Gary

several records were broken. AFFS Becky Pearson (AZ) tied the

Brodhead’s 549 field record, and YAMFS Hunter Tuveson (MN)

2008 Animal Rd record of 577, while Erica Strassman, AFFSL of

set a new record Animal with 583.

WI, set two records: Field 520 and Hunter 513. In the Recurve Division, Justine Barden (VA) tied the Animal Rd record of 549.

The top three in each division are reported here, and complete results can be seen at www.fieldarchery.com. ■

Thanks to Ralph LePera of Original Brite Site for photos.

results | top 3 finishers TOTAL

Adult Female Bowhunter Sandy McCain 1415

Field

447

Hunter Animal

455

Adult Female Bowhunter Freestyle Julene Hakl 1630 525 534 Raeanne Klein 1515 474 484 Adult Female Freestyle Carli Cochran 1664 Becky Pearson 1657 Heidi Snyder 1641

539 542 533

Adult Female Freestyle Limited Erica Strassman 1508 520

549 538 535 513

513 571 557 576 577 573 475

Adult Female Freestyle Ltd. Recurve/Longbow Allison Eaton 1436 453 455 528 Justine Barden 1424 438 437 549 Lynn Walter 1355 406 422 527

ST

CA MN SD PA AZ NY WI NC VA CO

Adult Male Barebow Glen Baxter 1505 Tim Holt 1478 Gilbert Wilson 1473

478 465 457

479 466 472

548 547 544

KY TX IN

Adult Male Bowhunter Dave Baxter 1413 Lyle Poland 1402

439 430

442 443

532 529

TX NE

Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle Bill Hakl 1657 536 Gary Cowart 1653 541 Jeff Human 1642 538

549 539 534

572 573 570

MN UT NY

18 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

TOTAL

Field

Hunter Animal

Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle Ltd. LeRoy Capp 1580 509 508 Joseph Pfannenstein 1536 492 496 William Caires 1535 476 500 David Allen 1427 452 447 Adult Male Freestyle Joshua Binger 1688 Garrett Abernethy 1687 Steve Wagner 1686

556 554 555

Adult Male Freestyle Flight 2 Stephen Anderson 1668 541 Bernard Punzalan 1661 539 Ray Manfull 1660 540

556 553 549 549 549 547

563 548 559 528 576 580 582 578 573 573

ST

TOTAL

SD MN CO TX

Cub Male Freestyle John Klus Jr. 1683 Alex Thomas 1616 Easton Rollings 1506 Derek Hipple 1220 Dylan Crowe 1161

CT SC CA ID AK KS

Adult Male Freestyle Flight 3 Mike Thomas 1622 521 David Rowson 1621 518 Ryan Fitzgerald 1620 525

531 531 524

570 OR 572 NSW 571 MO

Adult Male Freestyle Limited Paul Lewkowicz 1512 483 Oliver Austin 1279 370

475 379

554 530

Adult Male Freestyle Ltd.Recurve/Longbow Robert Webber 1545 492 489 564 Steven P Baldowski 1544 489 498 557 Earle Bateman 1532 477 497 558 Adult Male Traditional Jeff Zylla 1051

339

309

403

Field

554 536 507 294 368

Hunter Animal

552 522 467 419 368

577 558 532 507 425

TOTAL

Field

Hunter Animal

1683 1681

549 551

555 554

579 576

PA OH

Pro Male Freestyle Jesse Broadwater 1706 Dave Cousins 1701 Kevin Wilkey 1699

560 558 555

559 558 560

587 585 584

PA ME UT

ST

WI OR MO SD CO

Master Senior Female Freestyle Judy Doub 1511 490

486

535

KS

Master Senior Male Barebow Tom Daley 1510 483 Dick Hanlon 1461 456 William Vrabel 1447 448

479 465 455

548 540 544

CA MI PA

Master Senior Male Freestyle Ray May 1647 532 Frank Pearson 1643 530 Lynn Umbarger 1638 528

544 542 535

571 571 575

MD AZ KS

Christie Colin Erika Anschutz

ST

Pro Male Freestyle Limited Dustin Landsinger 1544 Emory Budzinsky 1420

493 477

497 432

554 511

WI IN

Senior Female Barebow Claudia St.Clair 1182

350

351

481

TX

Senior Female Bowhunter Freestyle Marcia Jones 1551 504 492 Linda Townsend 1525 491 483

555 551

IA NY

Senior Female Freestyle Lora Smih 1618 Karol Swank 1579 Linda Beck 1578

530 500 502

525 515 509

563 564 567

MI IA MN

Senior Female Freestyle Limited Patricia Bridge 1486 472

468

546

IA

Master Senior Male Freestyle flight 2 Bill Hensley 1577 499 515 Jerry Brabec 1562 499 507 David Tarry 1536 494 492

563 556 550

IN CO NJ

IN GA TX

Master Sr. Male Freestyle Ltd. Rod Miller 1556 492 Jerry Wenzel 1382 412 Don Iverson 1348 400 Jack V. Lyons 1299 383

561 525 520 522

IN VA SD CO

Senior Male Barebow Patrick Coker 1492 Randell Brimager 1474 Ron St. Clair 1470

468 468 470

475 466 457

549 540 543

TX MO TX

MN

Pro Female Freestyle Jamie Van Natta 1684

OH

Senior Male Bowhunter Gary McCain 1508

491

493

524

CA

MA FL

552

503 445 428 394 553

579

TOTAL

Field

Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle Gary Marrier 1654 539 Barry Arnold 1641 530 Steve Cook 1614 525

Hunter Animal

ST

TOTAL

Field

Senior Pro Male Freestyle Tom Coblentz 1684 Allan Ruddock 1683 Dee Wilde 1682

555 551 551

551 553 552

578 579 579

MD OR ID

Young Adult Female Freestyle Judy Zhou 1606 509 Kelly Hickey 1548 504

523 483

574 561

WA OK

544 540 519

571 571 570

VT MN WI

Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle Ltd. David Reiss 1504 471 475

558

NY

Senior Male Freestyle Jim Burns 1657 Rusty Mills 1653 Neil Newkirk 1644

Hunter Animal

ST

549 541 536

542 539 536

566 573 572

WI CA NY

Senior Male Freestyle Flight 2 Steve Tuveson 1620 513 Thomas Gallaher 1616 516 John Grossl 1611 519

Young Adult Male Freestyle Danny Button 1675 547 Hunter Tuveson 1673 540 David Thomas 1663 538

551 550 544

577 583 581

WI MN OR

533 529 529

574 571 563

MN VA WV

Young Adult Male Freestyle Ltd. Allen Capp 1481 468 Jacob Foiles 1311 405

484 416

529 490

SD SD

Senior Male Freestyle Limited Dave Hryn 1596 509 Dale East 1548 489 Frank Mosser 1537 489

524 494 488

563 565 560

NY FL KY

Youth Female Freestyle Catherine Thomas 1567

503

502

562

OR

Senior Male Freestyle Ltd. Recurve/Longbow Mike McCarty 1439 455 444 540 David Brandfass 1437 452 458 527 Jim Harris 1429 433 470 526

MN FL WV

Youth Male Freestyle Matthew Peterson 1629 Kaden Pearce 1595 Kyle Thomson 1588 Caleb Sandberg 1478 Colton Hipple 1327

533 510 504 471 431

527 525 521 466 429

569 560 563 541 467

SD CA MN CT SD

Senior Male Traditional Bobby Graham 1304 Jerry Grabman 1143 Marvin Gibson 1051

388 336 294

404 337 283

512 470 474

OK IN NE

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

continued on page 20

August/September 2011 19

OUTDOOR NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

RIGHT: Greg Easton assisted at the awards ceremony. Professional men freestyle division, left to right, Greg Easton, Kevin Wilkey 3rd, Jesse Broadwater 1st, Dave Cousins 2nd and NFAA President Bruce Cull. BELOW: Husband and wife team of Bill and Julene Hakl, both winning the Adult Bowhunter Freestyle divisions.

TOP LEFT: The Youth freestyle division; Kyle Thompson, MN 3rd – Matthew Peterson, SD 1st – Kaden Pearce, CA 3rd. TOP RIGHT: Dave Hryn, newly elected Mid Atlantic Councilman wins Senior Men Freestyle Limited. RIGHT: Wisconsin archers take home some Silver Bowls. Dustin Landsinger PMFSL, John Klus, Jr. CMFS, Danny Button YAMFS and Josh Binger AMFS. BOTTOM LEFT: The vendors trade show.

ABOVE: The vendors trade show.

BOTTOM RIGHT: Young Adult freestyle David Thomas OR, 3rd, Danny Button WI,1st Hunter Tuveson MN, 2nd . Hunter also set a new Animal Round record of 583.

BOTTOM RIGHT: Cub Freestyle John Klus, Jr. of WI, 1st and Easton Rollings of MO, 3rd, flanked by Greg Easton, far left, and NFAA President Bruce Cull, far right.

20 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 21

Hoyt Open » 2011 Tournament World Outdoor Archery Festival | Yankton, South Dakota | July 2011

BERNIE PELLERITE

OR THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY, THE NFAA, NFAA FOUNDATION AND US ARCHERY JOINED FORCES along with Hoyt, USA to host the World Outdoor Archery Festival.

F

The School of Advanced Archery & Instructor Certification—a.k.a. “A Weekend at Bernie’s”—is well into the 2011 season. So far, the ever-popular mobile Shooter’s School (formerly the NFAA Shooter’s School) has conducted 47 schools. 592 students have attended with 547 becoming Certified Instructors. Interested shooters should contact your pro shop owners or club presidents and book a Shooter’s School near you! Remember, the host shop or club receives 10% and the contact person attends for free.

This ten-day event covered five separate tournaments: US Archery FITA Field Championships, the NFAA Outdoor National Championships, US Archery Target Nationals, Hoyt Open and Pan Am Trials.

The Shooter’s School is offering NFAA Certification. To date, there are 125 new NFAA members and 233 new NFAA Level III Instructors. For more information about attending or hosting a school go to www.robinhoodvideos.com. GRADUATES OF SCHOOL HOSTED BY TAYLOR’S ARCHERY, TULLAHOMA, TN • MAY 6-8, 2011 Listed alphabetically, (*denotes Certified Instructor, **denotes dual certification with NFAA) *Clint Bailey, *Kevin Currin, *Martin Dixon, Clay Duke, *Josh Harris, *Chris Harwell, *Dan Jensen, **Drew Keesey, **Tracy Taylor, **Chris Worthen, Carson Yarbrough, **Walter Yarbrough, *Tommy York GRADUATES OF SCHOOL HOSTED BY AO ARCHERY, GERMANTOWN, OHIO AUGUST 20-22, 2010 Listed alphabetically, (*denotes Certified Instructor, **denotes dual certification with NFAA) *Orry Bettker, Ken Conley, *Tom Duncan, *Tim Dyer, *Mike Graham, **James Haas, *Buck McReynolds, **Andy Oney, **Frank Smith, **Robert Spangler, *Tyler Warren, *Mike Watkins GRADUATES OF SCHOOL HOSTED BY SMITH POINT ARCHERY, PATCHOGUE, NY APRIL 15-17, 2011

Listed alphabetically, (*denotes Certified Instructor, **denotes dual certification with NFAA)

NFAA and Foundation employees, along with many volunteers, scrambled to prepare for the arrival of US Archery staff and their scoring team. International teams arrived from Great Britain, Chinese Taipei, Australia, Denmark and Canada to compete alongside the best archers from the USA.

1333. The match play results ended with Tan Ya-Ting gold, Heather Kohl (WI )silver and Naomi Folkard (GBR) bronze. In the Compound division on the men’s side, Jesse Broadwater led with 1412, then Braden Gellenthien 1409 and Dietman Trillus (CN) with 1405. After the finals matches, Jesse took gold, Dietmar silver and Kevin Wilkey (UT) with bronze. continued on page 24

In the Recurve Men division, Brady Ellison of CA shot a 1362 ranking round and never looked back, taking gold in the final match with Jake Kaminski. The Recurve Women were led in the qualification round by Tan Ya-Ting (Chinese Taipei) with 1350, Naomi Folkard (GBR) with 1340 and Miranda Leek (IA) with

**Billy Altman, **Ellen Clay, **Lee Clay, **Kenneth Desch, **Tony Fontanella, **Lou Havel, *Cyrus Lai,* Ken LaPeters, **Ron Mulderig, **Scott Samsoe, **Jared Schneider, *Brian Tien, *Tony Tom, *Melvin Torres, *Craig Wagner

Robinhood Videos 1600 Reynoldsburg-New Albany Rd. Blacklick OH 43004 • 614-322-1038 • fax 614-322-1039 Email: AskBernie@aol.com • www.robinhoodvideos.com 22 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 23

WORLD OUTDOOR ARCHERY FESTIVAL

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

IFAA NORTH AMERICAN FIELD ARCHERY CHAMPIONSHIP (NAFAC 2011) December 9-10, 2011 at Homestead, Florida The IFAA, in cooperation with NFAA-USA and its member Florida Archery Association (FAA) have approved the Everglades Archery Club to host the IFAA-sanctioned 2011 NAFAC on 10-12 December 2010. FAA will lend assistance and administration to the shoot. The Everglades Club is located south of Miami in Homestead, Florida. If you have never been to Everglade Archers range, you are missing a very diverse shooting experience. The venue offers shots over the lake with mild up-hill and downhill settings. There are no other ranges in Florida like this one. You really do need to be in Florida at some time during the “winter” months. What an excuse to go South with the Snowbirds and enjoy, even for a few days, what they enjoy all winter. Many “Snow Birds” will already have made their way South for the winter. We invite you to come on down! The Price is Right — the time is right!! With the normal format of 28 Animal, 28 Field, and 28 Hunter, the range is set up for four across shooting and you will have plenty of arrows to shoot. Everglades is noted for its “Beast Feast” and food will be served both days. th LOCATION — For directions and map to range, enter 17415 SW 264 St., Homestead, FL, at http://maps.google.com/. SCHEDULE — Friday, 9 December: 11:30 assembly, 12:00 28 Animal (no bonus spots). Saturday, 10 December 7:30 am assembly, 8:00 am 28 Field. Sunday, 11 December: 7:30 am assembly, 8:00 am 28 Hunter. Awards within 30 minutes after last person finished. RULES (Games and Equipment) — As per the IFAA Book of Rules. SCORING — As per the IFAA Book of Rules (must cut the line to score). NFAA Field, Hunter, and Animal Targets st nd rd AWARDS — NAFAC Medals – 1 , 2 and 3 in all division/styles. REGISTRATION FEES (US Dollars) — NAFAC Fees: Adult, Veteran and Pro, $35.00; Junior and Cub, $25.00; Pro Pot (100% payback) $100.00 in addition to registration fee. Mailed entries should be postmarked by 2 December. Phoned or E-mailed registrations through 8 December will be accepted for a $2.00 surcharge for paying at the shoot. Registration at the shoot will require a $15 late fee added to the normal registration fee. SEND REGISTRATION form and check to: Florida Archery Association, Timothy O. Austin (Sec/Treas), 1710 SW 76 Terrace, Gainesville, FL 32607-3418; 352-332-1969 or 352-332-1914; E-Mail: flarchery@earthlink.net or flarchery@bellsouth.net ADDITIONAL INFO — Host club: John G. Laudicina, 305-545-5829, E-mail: archeryking@mindspring.com, or Shelly Mascaro, 305252-9750, E-mail: r_mascaro@hotmail.com. MOTEL — CAMPGROUND — Available at Florida City Campground, 305-248-7889.

24 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

Historic Bow (HB)

Longbow – (LB)

Bowhunter Limited – (BHL)

Bowhunter Unlimited – (BHU)

Bowhunter Compound – (BHC)

Bowhunter Recurve – (BHR)

Barebow Compound – (BBC)

Barebow Recurve – (BBR)

Freestyle Limited Compound (FSLC)

Freestyle Limited Recurve – (FSLR)

Freestyle Unlimited – (FSU)

Female – (F)

Names

Junior – 13-16 (J) (No Historic)

For complete scores and match by match results please see www.inaseo. net. ■

Adult Division-17 and over (A)

��� ��� ��� ����

Veteran Division- 55 and over (V)

Total__________

Male – (M)

Cash__________ Check_________

Professional (P)

The women’s qualification round Jamie Van Natta (OH) shot 1412, followed by Erika Anschutz (OH) with 1393 and Christie Colin (PA) with 1388. After the final matches Christie took gold, Jamie silver and Samantha Neal, NY came from 10th place to take bronze.

Cub – Under 13 (C) (No Bowhunter or Historic)

NOTE: If you give the registration chairman your NFAA shooting style/division, he will make the appropriate IFAA conversion

Totals

August/September 2011 25

»Stay in Rhythm

STANDING UP FOR ARCHERY

TERRY WUNDERLE

THE FINAL SHOTS WERE FIRED AND SCORE CARDS WERE totaled at the Indoor National Championship. Hunter Tuveson of the young adult division found himself tied with 118X. Minutes clicked by as we waited for the opportunity to determine the winner. My advice to Hunter was simple... “Before the shoot-off, run your mental program so you will be ready. During the practice ends, be aggressive and establish your rhythm. Shoot the scoring ends the same way.” The young man made all of his shots like a programmed machine, as he walked away with the national title. Maintaining a rhythmic shot sequence is an essential element in producing tight arrow groups. Good archers shoot every shot within one second of their normal rhythm. Then why does an archer change his or her rhythm during a tournament? Why does it seem easier to shoot a strong aggressive shot during practice than it does in a tournament? The answers to these questions can be found by looking at an archer’s objective and attitude. During practice, the main emphasis is normally on making a shot with good form. You are relaxed, so there is very little sight movement and the shot seems much easier. In a tournament, however, ones thinking often shifts from proper shot execution

to that of hitting the bulls-eye or capturing the winner’s trophy. The added pressure builds anxiety and produces tension that causes excessive sight movement. What is the best way you can overcome this problem? First, try to keep your thinking focused on creating a perfect shot and not on the result of where the arrow might hit. In an important tournament, most archers encounter more sight movement than they do during practice. The difference between the winners and the losers is how well they control this stress and strive to carry out a strong shot. When unnecessary seconds are added to your normal sequence, as you wait for the pin to be in that perfect spot, your back pressure begins to decrease and a poor shot execution is inevitable. Instead, you have to learn the process of trusting your form and shooting a strong, aggressive shot. If you realize that you are more nervous than you can comfortably handle, let the bow down. Take several seconds of slow, deep breathing and concentrate on relaxing the muscles in your neck and shoulders. Accept the fact that you are going to see more sight movement. Then draw the bow, trust your form, and follow through with the completion of the shot. When you do, it will be the best shot you are capable of making under those circumstances. In a tournament, there are often two typical times that an archer becomes more nervous. One happens during the first two targets, since most archers want to start the competition on a positive note and have built up apprehension about how well they are going to perform. To alleviate this potential difficulty, continued on page 39

26 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

There is an exception to this. When shooting the NFAA indoor five-spot target face I often find my self wanting to shift my stance a little to shoot the two rightside spots. The five-spot target is rather wide from side to side so you may prefer to set your stance for the left-side spots and then shift it slightly to accommodate the center and two right-side spots. Just never shift your stance while at full draw.

that’s why we love field archery. The only way to get good at this is to practice shooting on difficult terrain. Find a location that offers an uphill practice lane so you can prepare for this difficult shot. Place a target butt at the top and another at the bottom of the hill so you can shoot one end uphill and then the next end downhill.

ON-COURSE ADAPTATIONS TO STANCE

An archer’s stance is the first element of an interrelated system of shooting form steps. Every step that follows depends on the stability that is created by that stance so get it right from the beginning to maximize your success. Pay close attention to the stance features of spread, angle, left/right weight distribution and forward weighting. Connect yourself securely to the ground and reap the benefits of a solid launch pad. Keep well, shoot straight. ■

To this point we have been focused on “model form”. That’s important because you must first build the model you need when conditions are ideal and then, and only then, is it prudent to build form for those conditions that are not ideal. You are always comparing your altered form to what form works best and if you don’t have that model you’re just blind guessing at what to do. When you shoot field archery courses the terrain forces you to compromise. That’s what field archery is, a game of compromise. Most uphill shots, for instance, have an uneven place to stand since the ground at the shooting stake is usually uphill also. The recommendation I can make is to keep your heels close together so they are nearly the same height and, therefore, can hold nearly equal amounts of your body weight. We understand that this makes us a little more likely to teeter back and forth but conditions are not perfect and this, for most, will be the best compromise. With heels together and weight distributed equally on your feet you can at least maintain your upper body integrity; you can keep you “power unit” together and use back tension effectively. Keep your “back tension” objective in mind as you make compromises to model form and you will be able to get consistent results. Understand also that you may not get as good a result as you do under ideal conditions but you can at least be consistent with a disciplined stance. Downhill shots are not nearly as difficult for me but I still put my heels together if the ground is uneven. I’m sure that with my heels together I can bend easier at the waist and that helps get my upper body in good position relative to the target. Side hill shots offer a different set of conditions. Usually your toes are either pointed uphill or downhill and your body is either leaning into the hill or falling down it. Before you raise your bow prepare yourself by leaning slightly into the hill. Lean beyond vertical so that by the time you get to full draw you will be vertical. If your toes are uphill then put more weight forward on your feet. If your toes are downhill then keep more weight on your heels so the slope doesn’t pull your upper body downhill while you are aiming. As a right-handed shooter my toughest shot, then, is an uphill target that is sloped down to the left. This puts my toes uphill and my heels together. I have to aim while wobbling and falling over backwards – it ain’t easy but

CONCLUSION

NOTE: Check Larry’s web site larrywise.com to learn about his new DVD on back tension.

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 27

SECTION & STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS Edited by NFAA Headquarters Complete Results of the Indoor Sectional Tournaments are available on line at www.fieldarchery.com/results

Bob McCutcheon, Councilman Prairie1@royell.net

2011 OUTDOOR SECTIONAL Tournament Date: June 18-19, 2011 HOSTING CLUB: Washtenaw Sportsman’s Club Complete results at www.fieldarchery.com ST

FIELD

Pro Male Freestyle Lee Gibbs* Ron Hardesty* Joe Stagg

WI MI MI

555 535 536

552 544 537

290 284 285

1397 1363 1358

Pro Female Freestyle Sandie Swirles-Duncan*

MI

525

526

282

1333

Senior Pro Male Freestyle Joe Kapp* Jeffrey Hunt* Bill Schuh*

IN MI IL

549 544 540

546 550 549

286 287 287

1381 1381 1376

ONT OH OH

556 548 543

548 550 549

287 286 286

1391 1384 1378

Adult Male Freestyle Craig Voorn Skip Zmuginsky* Dan Lane* Adult Female Freestyle Fiona McClean* Ann Darnell*

ONT MI

539 505

HUNTER ANIMAL TOTAL

538 515

284 279

1361 1299

Adult Male Freestyle Limited Mike Darnell* MI

481

494

275

1250

Adult Male Barebow Gilbert Wilson*

IN

446

434

256

1136

Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle Dan Reed MI Bryan Martin* MI Charles Willoughby MI

532 508 479

526 514 486

281 276 280

1339 1298 1245

Adult Female Bowhunter Freestyle Jill Willoughby MI

431

462

261

1154

Adult Male Traditional Jim Powell

MI

340

345

215

900

Senior Male Freestyle Paul DePover* Vern Klein Martin Singletary*

MI MI WI

548 531 528

532 544 540

287 286 283

1367 1361 1351

Senior Female Freestyle Lora Smith* 28 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

MI ■

505

511

August/September 2011

278

1294

480 271

277 181

493 285

1250 737

Y M FSL SC HUNTER RENEN

102

56

181

334

YA M FS SC JAKE DEAN 2 ZACK GROSSL 3 TREY SETTLE

525 522 493

285 285 283

525 536 485

1335 1333 1261

A F BB SC CAY MCMANUS

458

259

413

1130

A M BB SC JOHN MASON

437

262

463

1162

MS M BB SC DENNIS KLINE 2 BILL VRABEL 3 ROY STURGILL

458 456 424

264 238 227

464 426 227

1186 1120 1036

A M BHFSL SC RAY MILLER

507

271

496

778

483

271

494

524 502 380

284 283 266

449

518 477 445

1316 1262 1091

252

439

1140

AMFS Championship Flight Dan Jasa Jeff Rollings Jeremy Boyer

MO MO NE

552 548 544

277 272 273

291 284 287

1120 1104 1104

553 554 533

289 285 286

548 541 541

1390 1380 1360

AMFS 2nd. Flight Jarod Myer Jamie Jennings Todd Ahrenstorff

SD MO IA

541 541 528

275 270 287

287 289 270

1103 1100 1085

S M BHFS SC MATT SETZER

536

283

533

1352

A F FS SC SUE WEINSTEIN 2 HEIDI SNYDER 3 JESSICA TOMLIN

539 534 514

286 288 282

536 530 511

1361 1352 1307

AMBHFS Bill Hakl Rob Riedel Todd Hanten

MN MN SD

541 540 526

274 264 257

287 282 282

1102 1086 1065

MS F FS SC GWEN MCMURRAY

504

222

489

1265

SMFS Bill Myers Dwight Peschong Norm Swank

MO SD IA

536 527 529

271 263 260

284 285 283

1091 1075 1072

SMBHFS Jim Borg Ray Jones David Cizadlo

MN IA SD

500 491 484

252 249 243

280 279 282

1032 1019 1009

AMFSLR/L Greg Bouras Justin Whitworth

MO MO

464 423

215 209

264 256

943 888

527 517

533 516

281 278

1341 1311

Senior Female Bowhunter Freestyle Sue Hindbaugh* MI

490

457

268

1215

Senior Male Traditional Jay Ryno*

OH

365

349

218

932

Master Senior Male Freestyle Doug Grade* WI Walt Moyer* MI Paul Payne* MI

532 525 521

528 525 516

283 281 283

1343 1331 1320

Master Senior Female Freestyle Rit Portuesi* MI

495

499

270

1264

Master Senior Male Freestyle Limited Robert Fenton* MI 487

485

252

1224

Master Senior Male Barebow Dick Hanlon** MI Lou Travis** IN

438 413

451 404

249 219

1138 1036

Young Adult Male Freestyle Danny Button* WI D.J. Hunt* MI Joe Ziegler MI

540 534 535

543 540 528

286 283 285

1369 1357 1348

Young Adult Female Freestyle Kayleigh Nemets* MI Leighcia Meylan* MI

488 492

501 501

279 272

1268 1265

Female Youth Freestyle Gabrielle Meylan*

514

521

281

1316

MS M FSL SC JERRY WENZEL A M BHFS SC THOMAS WARNER 2 JEREMY DEAN 3 VANCE STALLARD

A M FS 1ST FLIGHT SC TONY HARRIS 2 BRAD BAKER JR 3 JUSTIN PAULINO

549 551 551

289 286 286

555 553 548

1393 1390 1385

2ND FLIGHT 1 RUSSEL RENNER 2 BILLY TICHO 3 DANNY ALGIER 3 ROBERT KENLEY

542 527 537 533

287 285 284 286

537 535 534 536

1366 1357 1355 1355

3RD FLIGHT 1 JOHN BRYAN 2 LOWELL DANIEL 3 GREG KULP

514 534 537

284 276 286

521 507 473

1319 1317 1296

MS M FS SC DOUGLAS JOYCE 2 SONNY FOOTE 3 GLEN SHUEY

465

1206

2011 OUTDOOR SECTIONAL June 25-26, 2011 • Rapids Archery Club Complete results at www.fieldarchery.com

1094

Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle Mike Spence** MI David Hindbaugh* MI

272

Ray Jones, Councilman IowaArchery@hotmail.com

287

S M FSL SC DAVE HRYN 2 DENNIS WALLACE 3 JIM HARRIS

469

MIDWEST SECTION

270

1258

898

1391 1369

537

273

370

551 537

MN

497

210

288 289

PFFS Serena Mollenhauer

488

318

552 543

1248

1231

C M FSL SC LOGAN WELLER

P S M FS SC TOM COBLENTZ 2 RON WEST

Total 1114 1105 1101

268

C F FSL SC MORGAN COLETTI

1398

Animal 289 286 289

496

2011 OUTDOOR June 11-12, 2011 • Augusta Archers Complete results at www.fieldarchery.com

553

Field 275 271 270

467

Dave Hryn, Councilman midatlcouncilman@hotmail.com

287

Hunter 550 548 542

MI

MID-ATLANTIC SECTION

558

State Mo Mn IA

Senior Male Freestyle Limited Sam Conklin Sr.* MI

MI

P M FS SC KENDAL WOODY

PMFS Richard Potter Eric Lydeen Tyler Heck

S M BHFSL SC JIM LITTLE

Carol Bitner**

GREAT LAKES SECTION

Y M FS SC MATTHEW MURPHY 2 CODY REYNEN

540 539 524

283 283 284

527 526 517

1350 1348 1325

S M FS 1ST FLIGHT SC MIKE POE 2 J C BRADWAY 3 DAVE TOWNSEND

549 539 538

286 284 284

544 542 539

1379 1365 1361

2ND FLIGHT 1 ROGER SALMAN 2 DON DAVIS 3 TONY MCDAVID

525 523 514

282 281 276

525 518 516

1332 1322 1306

MSMBB Steve Cline

IA

436

206

261

903

MSMFS Carl Thiessen Roger Dobias Charlie Crockett

SD MO MO

530 527 520

264 261 260

284 284 278

1078 1072 1058

AMBHFSL Leroy Capp

SD

503

253

280

1036

SMFSLR/L Mike McCarty Earl Lysne

MN MN

440 394

194 169

251 226

885 789

AFFS Samantha Jacobs Kathy Potter

IA MO

508 487

238 243

277 282

1023 1012

AFBHFS Julene Hakl Marcia Jones Melissa Eiklenborg

MN IA IA

517 505 382

256 250 208

286 276 238

1059 1031 828

continued on page 30 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 29

SECTION & STATE ASSN NEWS MSFFS Judy Doub

KS

SFFS Karol Swank

482

248

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

267

501

243

284

1028

YAMFS Steven Manfull Brandon Zurowski

KS MO

543 515

270 262

285 276

1098 1053

YAMFSL Allen Capp

SD

457

239

270

966

YMFS Jared Eklenborg

IA

313

153

202

668

YAFFS

Amanda Eklenborg CMFS Bryant Pletan

IA SD

417 314

201 179

262

880

185

678

NEW ENGLAND SECTION Ken Moore, Councilman kmoore151@verizon.net

2011 OUTDOOR SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT DATES: June 25-26 HOSTING CLUB: Lunenburg Sportsman Club See complete results at www.fieldarchery.com

Tim Austin, Councilman flarchery@earthlink.net

NORTHWEST SECTION

997

IA

SOUTHEAST SECTION

Dan Kolb, Councilman bhfsdjk@hotmail.com

2011 SOUTHEAST OUTDOOR SECTIONAL ARCHER AFBHFSL C Sandy Pettitt

2011 OUTDOOR SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT DATE(S): June 18&19, 2011 HOSTING CLUB: Cascadian Bowman AFBHFS Becky Witse

FLD

HNTR

ANML

477

535

482

TOTAL

1494

Cub Male Freestyle MATTHEW SOUCY

449

MA

385

Senior Male Freestyle RON ROCKEL MA JOHN BRANDENBURGMA ROBERT LINCOLN MA Senior Male Freestyle Limited KENNETH MOORE RI PATRICK PETTENGILL MA

542 511 507 475 407

Senior Male Bowhunter Freestyle GARY MARRIER VT 537 WARREN WILLARD MA 463

261 218 282 282 281 270 260 285 261

472 385 542 504 505 490 464 542 474

1182 988 1366 1297 1293 1235 1131 1364 1198

1355-81 1336-87 1324-87

1681 1672 1660

AMFS

AMFLSR/L Timm Hines Steven Coleman

FL FL KY

551 546 546

289 286 285

550 544 543

1390-120 1375-113 1374-125

494 447

549 524

512 467

1555 1438

1-Flt 2 Locksley Hutchens 2-Flt 2 Donnie Lewis

NC

533

286

531

1350-86

MSMFS Karl Okita Leroy Dukes

521 501

560 563

526 334

1607 1398

MSMFSL Robert Stivison

501

547

494

1542

SFBHFS Cheryl Freese

445

535

462

1442

SMBH Stephen Faust

465

515

464

1444

SMBHFS Joseph Garcia

497

562

497

1556

SMFS Bob Looney Gary Broadhead Patrick Berger

533 517 497

565 565 538

540 530 496

1638 1612 1531

493

1539

Senior Female Freestyle DARLENE MARRIER

509

285

512

1306

SMFSLR/L Tom Samuelson

226

300

179

705

August/September 2011

533 528 523

558 550 547

547

287 287 285

572 576 569

499

30 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

535 521 516

551 546 544

SMFSL Vince Herschell

1346 1343 1334

FL NC NC

991

364

530 532 519

1329-73

376

136

282 285 285

529

255

66

534 526 530

279

360

162

Master Senior Male Freestyle GLENN MONESMITH NH JOHN FOURNIER RI GABE LAMANNA MA

521

FL

Senior Male Traditional MICHAL MARTIN MA

VT

FL

YMFS C Allen Abe 2 Justin Hutchens 3 Hunter Riddle

AMFS Mark Eaves Daren Thornton Steve Anderson

1380 1175

Young Adult Male Freestyle NICHOLAS ROACH MA

YFFS C Paige Klawitter

AMBHFSL C Oliver Austin

442 377

1294

1169-24

1319-69 1319-57 1316-71

502 471

502

449

527 513 522

436 327

282

264

282 282 279

MSMBB Don West Richard Maxson

510

456

510 524 515

1334

MA

FL

NC AL FL

407

Adult Female Freestyle CARMEN SARVER

AFFSLR/L C Natasha Coats

1659 1657 1642

491

812

1181-26

544 546 535

436

332

466

569 569 569

CFFS Kaitlyn Sizemore

180

261

546 542 538

1684

300

454

AMBHFS Scott McCurdy Tim Davis Mike Palmer

558

Adult Male Traditional DAVID SARVER MA

FL

1203-34

579

1185

1270-37

485

547

459

488

277

PMFS Ben English

259

284

441

1254

467

498

KY

503

Adult Male Bowhunter Freestyle STEVEN SOUCY MA

FL

SMFSLR/L C David Brandfass

AMBHFS C Tim Eaton 2 Mike Albertson 3 Rick Dorey

269

YMFS Tor Samuelson

471

520

476

1467

YAMFS Cody Simons

538

568

547

1653

1383-133 1367-97 1364-107

1354-96 1297-61

1490

482

548 546 534

532 516

488

Adult Male Freestyle Limited PAUL LEWKOWICZ MA

286 284 288

285 285

532

1119 926

549 537 542

537 496

470

340 296

KY FL KY

FL FL

AMBH Boyd Koehler

436 375

SMFS C Eddie Whobrey 2 Jake Pettitt 3 Mark Rounds

AFFS C Cheri Klawitter Shelly Mascaro

775-1

343 255

1029-10

SMFSL C Dale East

286

AMTRAD Tom Burnham Don Mendez

378

1172-17

182

1393 1359 1356

246

459

307

552 541 532

405

268

FL

288 284 283

FL

445

AMBB C Glen Baxter

553 534 541

SMBHFSL C Hermit Gann

FL

AFTrad C Helen Claudio

CT MA MA

Adult Male Freestyle MIKE LAMAR WILLIAM LARAMIE MIKE HULME

1247-39 1171-26

TOTAL

1610 1607 1603

TOTAL

492 453

HTR

536 516 527

HNTR

275 260

ANL

549 571 558

ANML

480 458

FLD

525 520 518

FLD

FL FL

ST

AFFS Jennifer Thornton Karen Palmer Christina Davis

ST

SMBHFS C Roy Peters Pete Murphy

C 2 3

Brent Gandy Damon Ryan Corey Shive

SOUTHERN SECTION Lee Gregory, Councilman lee@dlprint.com

2011 SOUTHERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT DATE(S): June 11 – 12, 2011 HOSTING CLUB: Red River Bowmen Archery Club, Inc. Complete results at www.fieldarchery.com ST

FLD

HNTR

ANML

TOTAL

LA LA LA

500 497 458

255 244 244

278 279 278

1033 1020 980

TN

530

282

531

1343-106

3-Flt 2 Steve Carson

NC

524

287

531

1342-51

AFBHFS Barbara Stansbury Kathleen Hemphill Neecie Falgout

AMFSL C Densel Landrum

FL

465

273

491

1229-40

AFFS Jacki Taylor

TX

519

258

285

1062

AMBB Steve Jenkins

TX

457

225

267

949

AMBH Dave Baxter Terry Credeur

TX LA

447 336

219 208

274 258

940 802

AMBHFS Ricky St.Upery Steve Coleman Ray Scarborough

LA TX MS

526 537 527

265 253 261

284 281 283

1075 1071 1071

AMFSLR/L C Phillip Baldowski 2 Dennis Walter Mike Niedwick

GA KY KY

497 432 407

280 264 233

499 446 438

1276-41 1142-15 1078-13

CMFS C Darius Ford

TN

480

275

485

1240-31

MSMBB C Jerry Stemich Shannon North

FL FL

449 388

257 221

449 0

1155 609

MSMFS C Kevin Bergenroth 2 Blair Peterson 3 James Maze

FL FL TN

533 524 526

288 285 284

532 529 524

1353-98 1338-78 1334-69

AMFS Ty Adkins Jeff Reid Chip Hemphill

LA MS LA

540 542 543

279 275 269

287 287 286

1106 1104 1098

1-Flt 2 Jake Veit

GA

487

281

495

1263-44

AMTRAD Randy Koopman

TX

364

185

240

789

LA

386

169

209

764

2-Flt 2 Clay Caudill

KY

484

278

497

1259-49

CFFS Zoe Falgout

3-Flt 2 John Boutin

NC

490

259

508

1257-49

MSMBB Eddie McCrary

TX

458

228

269

955

MSMFS Mike Reynolds Bill Brown

TX LA

528 521

260 254

279 281

1067 1056

MSMFSL Robert Richardson

TX

471

236

262

969

PMFS Jay James

LA

538

271

285

1094

MSMFSL C Terry Wilson PFFS C Diane Watson PMFS C James Malone 2 Glen Klawitter Eric Helfritz

FL

475

277

480

1232-32

FL

539

284

545

1368-95

KY FL FL

551 540 518

289 290 279

550 546 536

1390-143 1376-130 1333-81

continued on page 32 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 31

SECTION & STATE ASSN NEWS SMBH Earle Bateman SMBHFS George Avouris Garry Randall SMFS Jack Laws SMFSL Mitchel Broussard YAFFS Kayla Hemphill YAMFS David Reece

TX

439

212

252

903

TX MS

517 490

258 261

275 285

1050 1036

LA

485

259

280

1024

LA

488

250

283

1021

LA

493

251

276

1020

TX

498

259

288

1045

SOUTHWEST SECTION Bob Borges, Councilman archer_nm@yahoo.com

2011 SOUTHWEST OUTDOOR SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT DATE(S): June 4 and 5 2011 HOSTING CLUB: Oranco Bowmen Complete Results at www.fieldarchery.com Field CFBB K. Gardner G. Borges CMFS C. Weaver YMBB M. Gardner YMFSL M. Pierce YMFS C. Sandberg YAMFSL R/L YAMFS D. McNealy C. Marshall J. Zador MSFFS C. Miller MSMFSL M. Willis B. Baker J. Hix MSMFS F. Pearson B. Leslie K. Miller SFFS K. Nakano SMBH J. Avery B. Borges SM TRAD D. Potter J. Bunten L. Ott SMBHFS L. Milanesi W. Raupe 32 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

Animal

Hunter

NFAA® CALENDAR

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Total

D. Martin SMFS D. Snipes C. Hix G. Nakano AFFSL R/L L. Walter J. Robinson AFBHFSL M. Ison R. Pierce AFFS B. Pearson AMBB T. Daley AMBH G. McCain D. Bridgewater AMTRAD B. Jensen AMBHFSL J. Dotterer D. Ison AMBHFS J. Marshall C. Funes D. McNealy AMFS J. Weaver S. Wagner R. Donaldson

489

557

498

1544

537 529 528

570 569 560

539 532 525

1646 1630 1613

409 414

516 496

433 403

1358 1313

462 370

534 485

449 383

1445 1238

534

569

548

1651

486

536

483

1505

496 387

559 487

496 366

1551 1240

2

2

179

183

446 451

525 529

475 444

1446 1424

521 534 519

576 565 566

538 533 500

1635 1632 1585

548 549 482

579 577 545

551 550 496

1678 1676 1523

2011 TOURNAMENT

of events

DATES

North American Field Archery Championships .............. Dec 9-11 ..............................Homestead, Florida

2012

NFAA Council and Board of Directors meeting ............... Feb 4-7 ....................................... Las Vegas, NV FITA World Cup ............................................................ Feb 5-11 ...................................... Las Vegas, NV The Vegas Shoot .......................................................... Feb 10-12 ..................................... Las Vegas, NV NFAA Indoor National Championships ......... March 31-April 1 .......................... Louisville, KY NFAA National Field Championships ..................July 25-29 ......................Mechanicsburg, PA

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT REGISTRATION FORM ���� ��������� ������������ �������� ������������ ����

218 70

262 80

229 94

709 244

486

538

498

1522

���� �����

����� �����

353

458

363

1174

��������

�����

277

415

288

980

����

������

542

471

1481

��� ��������

������

������� ����

468

VENUE

������

������ ������� ������ ���

����� ���������������

������

���������������� ��� 539 487 480

572 533 529

546 489 492

1657 1509 1501

464

536

436

1436

511 482 458

559 521 538

516 479 469

1586 1482 1465

535 524 510

565 571 552

542 531 516

1642 1626 1578

500

554

520

1574

458 427

515 493

437 399

1410 1319

413 372 272

493 521 438

435 397 255

1341 1290 965

526 504

567 560

527 502

1620 1566

August/September 2011

���

���

���

���

���� ������������

���� ��� ���� ��� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������ ������������ ����� �������� �����

������

����� ���������

����� ��������� ������� ��������������� ����� ��� ������ ��� ������������ ����� ����� ������ ����� ����� ������� ����� ��������� ����� ��������� ������� ����� ��������� ��� ���������������

����� ����� ��� ������ ����� ��� ����� ������� ����� ��������� ����� ��������� ��������� ����� ��������� ��������� ������� ����� ����������� ����� ��������� ������� ����� ��������� ����� ��������� ���� �������� ������� ������ ������ ����� ��� ����� ������� ������ ��������� ����� ��������� �������

��� ������� ������� �� ������� �� ������ ��� ������ �������� �������� ����� ��� ������ ��������� ��� ��� �� ������� �� ��� ��������� �������� ���� ����� ������ ������ ������ ��� ��� �� ������� �� ��� ��������

���������� ����� ��� �������� ����������� ��� �������� ������ ��� �� ����� �� �������������������� ����� �������������� ��� �����

������ ��� ��� ����� ���� ��� ���� ������ ���� ������ ������� �� ���� ���������� ���� ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 33

Easton Foundations National Field Archery Association Foundation

EASTON FOUNDATIONS NATIONAL FIELD ARCHERY ASSOCIATION FOUNDATION JOINT SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 1.

2.

3.

4.

Deadline for 2012 scholarship applications to be received at the NFAAF Office in Yankton is December 31, 2011. The winners will be announced at the World Archery Festival Vegas Shoot, February 2012. The NFAA Scholarship Committee will review and rank the applications, place each applicant into the appropriate category and present their suggestions to the Joint Scholarship Approval Committee for their approval. The Joint Scholarship Approval Committee, consisting of two Directors of the National Field Archery Association Foundation and two Directors of the Easton Foundations, will make a joint decision on winners and the final amounts for each scholarship. The NFAA National Office will notify all applicants if their application was denied or approved, and the amount of the scholarship. If approved, it will also describe the procedure for the scholarship payment. For all scholarships greater than $500, the recipient will receive an Archery Activity Report form that must be completed and sent to the NFAA National Office twice a year, showing their archery activities during the year.

APPLICANT REQUIREMENTS The maximum amount of all scholarships for the first three years will be $50,000 per year. The goal is to provide 50% of the scholarships to recurve archers and 50% to compound archers. A secondary goal will be to split the scholarships equally between men & women. • Applicants must be a member of the NFAA or the NAA/USA Archery. • Applicants that are not graduating from high school in the current year (JOAD, NASP, junior high, or high school freshman/sophomore archers) may apply. ■ For this group, any approved scholarships will be held by the Foundation until the student notifies the Foundation they are graduating from high school, and the name of the qualified school they plan to attend. • High school applicants must be applying to be full time students at a two or four year college/university or a technical training college (these are considered qualified schools). ■ Applicant must maintain a 2.0 GPA minimum on a 4.0 scale in the current year. • College applicants must be full time students at either a two or four year college or university. 34 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

Applicant must maintain a 2.5 GPA minimum on a 4.0 scale in the current year. Scholarship recipients must compete in archery during the entire academic year. Olympic, PanAm, or World Team members that have graduated from college may apply for training grants. ■

• •

SCHOLARSHIP LEVELS 1. JOAD, NASP, Junior High, High School, Junior College or Trade College Students: Eligible for $500 scholarships. 2. College Freshmen, Sophomore, or Juniors: Scholarship amounts will vary between $500-2,500 based on the archer’s accomplishments, future competition plans, and the following: a. Applicant is attending college, participates in the college archery club program, and is shooting competitively. b. Applicant is attending a college that does not have an archery club program, but the student is shooting competitively on their own. i. If the student starts a new archery club program at their school, this will be a major factor to receive a scholarship the next year. ii. Students that are more successful starting archery clubs will be considered for greater scholarship amounts. 3. If the Applicant has made the current Olympic, PanAm, or Other International Team through the USA Archery selection process: Scholarship amounts will vary between $2,500-5,000 based on the archer’s accomplishments and future competition plans. a. The Joint Scholarship Approval Committee may approve a ‘training grant’ for Olympic, PanAm, or World Team members that have graduated from college, and allow them to use the grant to pay for training, and competition travel expenses without needing to be spent on the archer’s education. (Though this situation is expected to be rare, it will allow top US archers to apply for financial support.) 4. The Joint Scholarship Approval Committee has the discretion to create a larger scholarship for an extraordinary applicant (up to $20,000) depending on specontinued on page 39

SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION Please type or print and submit application to: NFAA Headquarters, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (Completed applications must be received by the NFAA Office no later than December 31, 2011.) Last Name __________________ First Name _________________ MI __ Birth Date ____________________ 1. Male _______ Female _______ (optional response) 2. Address: ________________________________ City ____________________ State ___ Zip _______ 3. Phone: ____________________________ E-Mail: ________________________________________ 4. Social Security Number: ______-_____-_______ Age or Date of Birth: _______________________ 5. Are you a current member of the NFAA ____________or USA Archery/ NAA __________ . a. When did you first join NFAA _______________ USA Archery/NAA ____________ b. Other archery organization membership___________________________________ b. Other archery organization membership _________________________________ . 6. Do you compete with a compound ___________ or recurve ___________ bow. Applicants that are not currently enrolled in a college or university, complete Section 7-8. College/university students please complete Section 9. All applicants are to complete Sections 10-16 and sign the application. APPLICANTS THAT ARE NOT IN COLLEGE, PLEASE COMPLETE SECTIONS 7 & 8, AND SECTIONS 10-16. 7. Name of the school you are currently enrolled in: ____________________________ a. ( Is this a High School _____ Middle School _____ Primary School _____) b. Date of planned high school graduation: ___________________ c. If you have already graduated, date of graduation: ________________ i. Class rank at graduation (numerical position/total in class):____/____ (Please attach a school letter or copy of graduation ranking to confirm.) ii. High school GPA: _____________ (Please attach a copy of transcript showing GPA.) 8. If you are in high school, what college do you expect to attend?_______________________ College City and State: __________________________________________________________ a. Have you been accepted to this institution? _________ b. List the year and month studies are expected to start ________________ c. Major you intend to pursue _______________________________ d. Does this college have an archery club? _______________ i. If not, are you interested in starting a college archery club? __________ APPLICANTS THAT ARE IN COLLEGE, PLEASE COMPLETE SECTION 9 AND SECTIONS 10-16. 9. Name of college/university you attend: _______________________ City ____________ State _____ i. College hours completed: ______ Quarter or Semester Hours? ______ ii. Cumulative College GPA (4.0 scale) __________ (Please attach a copy of transcript showing GPA.) ARCHERY MAGAZINE

OVER

August/September 2011 35

iii. Does this college have an archery club? ___________ iv. Do you participate and compete with the school archery club? ________ 10. Tell us about your archery experience. a. What was your USAT ranking at the end of the prior year __________. i. What is your current USAT ranking _________ As of what date ________ . b. Have you been a resident athlete at the Olympic Training Center ________ . i. Have you trained at the OTC? ______ When _______________ c. Have you been a member of the US Olympic, PanAm or other International Team? What year (or years)? __________________________________________________ d. Were you a JOAD Olympian or Junior World Team Member? What year(s) _____ i. Did you compete at the JOAD National Championships? What year(s) ______ e. Did you participate at the USIAC in the prior year? ______What was your score and what place did you finish? i. Year______ (Score) _______ (Place)_____ ii. Year______ (Score) _______ (Place) _____ iii. Year ______ (Score) _______ (Place) _____ f. Did you participate in the NAA or NFAA Sectional Tournaments in the prior year? i. Sectional ______________ Score ________ Place _______ NAA _____ NFAA _____ ii. Sectional_______________ Score ________ Place _______ NAA _____ NFAA _____ iii. Sectional _______________ Score _______ Place _______ NAA _____ NFAA _____ g. Did you participate in the NFAA Indoor, Outdoor, or 3-D Nationals in the prior year? i. Indoor _________ Division __________________ Score ______ Place _____ ii. Outdoor _______ Division __________________ Score _______ Place _____ iii. 3-D _________ Division __________________ Score _______ Place _____ h. Did you participate in the World Archery Festival 3-Star Tour in the prior year? i. Vegas Shoot Division __________________ Score _______ Place _____ ii. Indoor National Division __________________ Score _______ Place _____ iii. Stanislawski Open Division __________________ Score _______ Place_____ 11. Have you applied for any other archery scholarships? _______ a. Describe the archery scholarship that you have applied for, indicate the amount requested, and the amount of any scholarship that has been approved. _____________________________________________________________________ 12. Have you previously received a scholarship from Easton Foundations or the NFAAF? a. Date __________ Amount _________ b. Date __________ Amount _________ 13. Extra curricular activities (non-archery clubs and organizations you belong to, use reverse side if necessary). ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 14. What are your hobbies & interests besides archery. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 15. What are you goals in archery. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ 16. Other comments: ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ❐ I confirm that all information submitted on this Scholarship Application Form is correct to the best of my knowledge. Applicant Signature:______________________________________________ Date: __________________ (All applicants must sign the application) Parent/Guardian Signature: _______________________________________ Date:__________________ (Parent or guardian must sign for all applicants under the age of 18.) INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED. 36 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 archery@iw.net

GREAT LAKES Judy McCutcheon Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/652-5836 jlynnmac@royell.org

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbsheff@comcast.net NFAA® Office 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 605/260-9279 605/260-9280 fax NFAArchery@aol.com

Rocky Kline Director - IN 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 765/457-7086 rlkline@insightbb.com Bill Jones Director - MI 2049 Lake St. National City, MI 48748 989/469-3939

Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 651/462-1916 wehjkh@frontiernet.net Kathy Potter Director - MO PO Box 108 Huntsville, MO 65259 660/651-3175 potter.mbh@cvalley.net Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com

Great Lakes Robert McCutcheon 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/827-2831 prairie1@royell.net

Norm Newman Director - OH 103 Silver Gate Kenton, OH 43326 419/673-0021

Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) tebelius@gra.midco.net

Mid-Atlantic Dave Hryn PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224-0341 716/481-4699 midatlcouncilman@hotmail.com

Mike Strassman Director - WI 2402 W. Camerson Eau Claire, WI 54703 715/834-9975 mstrassman9975@charter.net

Reginald “Shorty” Faber Director - SD P.O. Box 66 Carthage, SD 57349 605/772-4468 shortyfaber@gmail.com

Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 IowaArchery@hotmail.com

MID ATLANTIC Ron West Director - MD 802 Painter Pl. Capitol Hts., MD 20743 301/336-7961 WestArrowsWest@aol.com

NEW ENGLAND Gary Marrier Director - VT 1525 Gibou Rd. Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471 802/326-4797 bowdoctor@pivot.net

New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore151@verizon.net

John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net

Jim Lamoin Director - CT 138 Albrecht Rd. Torrington, CT 06790 860/489-9452

Northwest Dan Kolb 9106 Cactus Lane N. Sun Lakes, AZ 85248 307/262-7598 bhfsdjk@hotmail.com

Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com

Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 352/332-1969 Flarchery@bellsouth.net

Dave Hryn Director - NY PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224-0341 716/481-4699 midatlcouncilman@hotmail.com

Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 512/863-8296 lee@dlprint.com

Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@vfaa.org

Steve Coleman Deputy Councilman 909 LCR 120 Mount Calm, TX 76673 254/993-2900 j13scoleman@yahoo.com

Steve Tincher Director - WV 214 Seneca Valley Estates Charleston, WV 25320 304/984-0090 jstincher@cebridge.net

Southwest Bob Borges 5332 River Ridge Ave NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 505/890-4665 archer_nm@yahoo.com

MIDWEST Norm Swank Director - IA 403 Main Street P.O. Box 31 Reasnor, IA 50232 563/578-8534 nswank@netins.net

Archery Magazine Editorial Board Bruce Cull Brian Sheffler John Pawlowski Marihelen Rogers

John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net

Pam Gallant Director - ME 26 Windsor Place Poland, ME 04230 207/988-2793 psgallant@fairpoint.net Paul Lewkowicz Director - MA 3 Davis Road Southborough, MA 01772 luke84@charter.net Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/876-4249 barebownh@aol.com Bruce Mulneix Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401-885-5684 NORTHWEST Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 208/476-5377 hmsarchery@email.com Doug Tate Director - MT 3499 Blacktail Loop Rd. Butte, MT 5970d1 406/494-4393 DOUG.TATE@northwestern.com Harry Bates Director - AK PO Box 875074 Wasilla, AK 99687 907/373-7731 hnbates@alaska.net

LeRoy Dukes Director - OR P.O. Box 422 Fairview, OR 97024 503/201-4961 Paul LaRue Director - WA 12613 SE 21st Place Kent, WA 98031 253/350-9749 Andy Turnquist Director - WY 2060 Wolf Rd. Gillette, WY 82718 307/257-7509 andyturn@bresnan.net SOUTHEAST Patrick Sinal Director - AL 105 Adams St., Greenville, AL 36037 724/366-3596 psinal@hotmail.com Oliver Austin Director - FL 1620 Yearling Trail Tallahassee, FL 32317 850/309-1918 oaustin@admin.fsu.edu Tom Boots Director - GA 6530 Robert Dr. Harlem, GA 30814-5360 706/556-3240 boots6530@charter.net Glen Baxter Director - KY 9301 Whitley Rd. Louisville, KY 40272 502-262-6738 gbaxter@heiltrailer.com Chris Wilson Director - NC 114 Water Filter Plant Rd. Morganton, NC 28655 828/403-1795 rockinarcher@charter.net S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com Clinton A. Berry, III Director - TN 1802 Porter Road Nashville, TN 37206 615/227-4211 caberry3@earthlink.net SOUTHERN Garry Randall Director - MS 5301 Baron Rd. Summit, MS 39666 601/249-2988 Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 479/855-6066 andr-ds@cox.net

SOUTHWEST Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 frank@frankpearson.com

Committee Chairmen Pro Chairperson Chuck Cooley 404 10th St. Watkins Glen, NY 14891 607/343-8990 chuckcooley@gmail.com

Tom Daley Director - CA 12916 Austin Forest Circle Auburn, CA 95602 650/722-2713 nfaadir@cbhsaa@org

Certified Instructor Committee M.J. Rogers 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 605/260-9279 rogers_mj@msn.com

Sheri Stine-Trujillo Director - CO 7723 Raritan Street Denver, CO 80221 303/427-4430 sherist1000@msn.com

Bowhunting Chairman Tom Vollmer 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078-4174 605-260-9279 nfaasec@knology.net

George Kong, Jr. Director - HI 1255 14th Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816-3838 808/734-5402

THE NFAA® HAS 50

Carl Jamison Director - NM 6763 Forest Hills Dr. NE Albuquerque, NM 87109 505/857-0815 carl_jamison@msn.com

CHARTERED STATE ASSOCIATIONS AND OVER 1,000

John Thayer Director - NV 7215 W. Tara Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89117 702/222-9878 mdthayer@cox.net

AFFILIATED CLUBS IN

Judd Wathen Director - UT 675 N. 460 E Ephraim, UT 84627 435/283-3129 Wathen_1@msn.com

SPORT OF ARCHERY

THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. THE

IS A HEALTHY AND EXCITING SPORT PROVIDING AN

Professional Representatives

ACTIVITY IN WHICH

Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 608/839-5137

THE ENTIRE FAMILY

New England Chris Deston 74 Springbrook Dr. Glastonbury, CT 06033 860/673-8594

CAN PARTICIPATE.

WRITE US ON HOW TO OBTAIN INFORMATION

Midwest Sharon Henneman 9 Aspen Belton, MO 64012 816/679-3250

ABOUT VARIOUS PROGRAMS OFFERED

Midatlantic Tom Coblentz 1 Ash Drive Knoxville, MD 21758 301/834-7154

BY NFAA®. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENTS,

Southern Troy Wesley 2306 57th St. Lubbock, TX 79412 806/797-0546

SECTIONAL/STATE TOURNAMENTS,

Scott Bradford Director - LA 40340 Old Hickory Ave. Gonzales, LA 70737-6756 225/622-0838 NFAALADirector@aol.com

Southeast Diane Watson 11815 Lakewood Drive Hudson, FL 34669 727/856-6841 DianeN2Archery@aol.com

INDOOR/OUTDOOR

David Blockcolski Director - OK 202 S. Orphan St. Pryor, OK 74361 918/825-3149

Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 801/323-3704

PROGRAMS, WHICH

LEAGUES, JUNIOR BOWHUNTER

INCLUDE THE ART YOUNG SMALL / BIG

Steve Coleman Director - TX 909 LCR 120 Mount Calm, TX 76673 254/993-2900 j13scoleman@yahoo.com

GAME AWARDS, AND THE BOWFISHER PROGRAM.

ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011 37

BOWHUNTER UPDATE | CONTINUED

EASTON FOUNDATIONS/NFAA JOINT SCHOLARSHIP

continued from pg. 17

continued from pg. 34

attitudes towards regulated crossbow

one-hand crossbows (less than 500mm)

some legal complications in states that

hunting.

prohibited. Denmark, Finland, Germany,

have archery only seasons. I would not

Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the

choose this method myself; I guess I am

UK prohibit crossbows for hunting game.

just too enamored with the bow and

Keep in mind these countries have very

arrow, but within reason, I can condone

strict if not prohibitive laws against any

it. If you have an opinion on crossbows

kind of hunting. Most of them classify

shoot me an e-mail at the NFAA website,

the crossbow as a firearm or “air” gun.

I want to hear what you have to say!!

Worldwide, crossbows are generally not allowed for hunting or fishing. Canada regulates the use of crossbows at the provincial level with pistol size,

The air gun they are referring to is one of incredible power and capable of bring-

cial circumstances and the Applicant’s accomplishments. RANKING SELECTION CRITERIA The following criteria will be used by the NFAA Scholarship Committee to assign the applications to the appropriate scholarship level and to rank the applicants. 1.

Good luck and good hunting! ■

ing down deer sized animals. For the record, I do not see any

2.

problem with allowing restricted use of crossbows for hunting. It seems to

3.

make sense to use a crossbow as another

4.

efficient method of game management. I do believe it should be controlled with special season dates, the same as rifles,

The applicant’s prior year end USAT Ranking, and their current year ranking at the time the application was submitted. a. Senior Mens’ & Senior Womens’ Recurve or Compound b. Junior Boys’ & Junior Girls’ Recurve or Compound Is (was) the applicant a Resident Athlete at the Olympic Training Center. Is (was) applicant a member of the US Olympic, Pan Am or other International Team? Is (was) the applicant a JOAD Olympian or Junior World Team member? a. Did applicant compete at the JOAD National

Championships? Did the applicant participate at the USIAC in the prior year? 6. Did the applicant participate in the NAA or NFAA Sectional Tournaments in the prior year? 7. Did the applicant participate in the NFAA Indoor, Outdoor, or 3-D Nationals in the prior year? 8. Did the applicant participate in the World Archery Festival’s 3-Star Tour in the prior year? 9. Did the applicant participate in the NASP National Championship? 10. The applicant’s GPA, college entrance scores, and community support activities, are important Ranking Selection Criteria, and will be considered after evaluating the applicant’s archery experience and capability to improve/enhance future US Archery Teams. 5.

The Joint Scholarship Approval Committee will make the final determination of which students will receive scholarships and the amount of each scholarship. ■

because the lethality of the crossbows and their similarity to rifles can make for

STAY IN RHYTHM

DROP-DEAD FOCUS

continued from pg. 26

continued from pg. 7 white outline; on lighter animals, it’s a

Often your local archery shop or NFAA

dark line. Like hunting, when you hit

club will have them for sale. A conve-

this area you have a true chance of com-

nient resource is Lancaster Archery’s

ing home with game in the truck.

online site at www.lancasterarchery.

Added in recent years is a smaller spot

com (click the Targets and Target Faces

inside the middle area. Target archers

link, then the Target Faces link; try the

equate this to hitting an X-ring inside

3rd page of the target face listings that

the bull’s-eye. This is the center of the

appear) where you can purchase a full

center. In an NFAA Animal Round, you

group of targets or individual targets. ■

would get a bonus point for hitting it with your arrow. Hunting, this would be equal to dropping them in their tracks. The NFAA Animal Round targets are scaled to appear in perspective as they would in the field if placed at the recommended distances. The animal shapes are visible at the website of target manufacturer, Maple Leaf Press at

try to simulate excessive pin movement during practice so you can be more comfortable in a tournament situation. Try running for a while to raise your pulse rate. Then pick up your bow and pretend that the target you are shooting is the first one of an important competition. Yes, you will see more pin movement, but you are going to have to trust your form and make a strong shot. If you are fortunate, there will be a second opportunity to experience extra tension. This happens after you have been shooting successfully and begin to realize that you are in a position to win. Your attitude shifts from producing excellent form to that of winning, so you become more anxious. Such thinking needs to be reversed immediately. In your mind, begin replaying all of the good shots that you have been making. Then picture yourself repeating these on the target in front of you. Be aggressive and go for that strong shot. If you have the same routine as you did with the successful shots, you may just find yourself in the winner’s circle. ■

http://mapleleafpress.com/nfaa.htm. 38 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

August/September 2011

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August/September 2011 39


Aug/Sept 11