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FEATURES ARTICLES August/September 2005 BOWHUNTERS SHOWCASE By Tim Atwood..........................................6 TEDITORIAL The Hunter’s Rallying Cry in the Culture War By Ted Nugent...........................................6

MAGNUM MINUTE Mainstay Outdoor Magazines Bore Me By Ward Parker .......................................25 TED NUGENT KAMP FOR KIDS..............26 NFAA KIDS CORNER ..............................27

FROM THE PRESIDENTS DESK By Bruce Cull .............................................8 SECTIONAL TOURN. RESULTS.............9-18 NUGEHUNTSTORY Bowhunting Africa - Zen and Now By Ted Nugent.........................................19

QUEEN OF THE FOREST How to Videotape Your Next Hunt By Shemane Nugent................................28 NFAA STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS ........29 LEGISLATURE NEWS By Tim Atwood........................................31

TNUSA Member Alerts and Events.........22 ASK UNCLE TED .....................................24

RAGSDALES STRAIGHT SHOTS Perfect Scores Are Not Automatic... By Bob Ragsdale .....................................32

Vol. 25 • No. 4 © 2005 NFAA® THE FUTURE By Tim Atwood........................................35 ATWOODS LAWS OF ARCHERY By Tim Atwood........................................35 NOSTALGIA CORNER The Jay Peak Nationals By Paul Davison.......................................36 THE SHOT DOCTOR Find Your Comfort Zone By Terry Wunderle...................................37 NFAA HEADQUARTERS REPORT ...........43 MUSEUM TOUR By Tim Atwood........................................45

EDITORIAL POLICIES Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published bi-monthly. Editorial deadlines are as follows: ISSUE DEADLINE Feb/March December 15 April/May February 15 All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on diskette and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. DO NOT include digital photos in your word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors. The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which are published. All material will be published at the discretion of the editor. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under the rules of fair chase will be considered.

ISSUE Aug/Sep Oct/Nov

DEADLINE June 15 August 15

Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to: Marihelen Rogers, Editor, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 • (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com NFAA Section and State Association News should be directed to: Paul Davison, Section and State News Editor 2787 Winston Way, Duluth, GA 30096, Fax (810) 277-0356 E-mail (preferred): stringwalker@att.net

Archery is published bimonthly by the National Field Archery Association, 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373, 909/794-2133. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with selfaddressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 3

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EDITORIAL BOARD: Bruce Cull, Brian Sheffler, Paul Davison, Doug Joyce EDITOR: Marihelen Rogers, NFAA Executive Secretary PUBLISHER: Rogers Printing Inc., 3350 Main St. PO Box 215, Ravenna MI 49451-0215 LAYOUT: Jonathan Guinn SALES MANAGER: Jim Stewart DISTRIBUTION MANAGER: Scott Robbins

ADVERTISING SALES Martin J. Rogers NFAA Headquarters 31407 Outer I-10, Redlands, CA 92373 (909) 794-2133 (909) 794-8512 FAX E-mail: nfaarchery@aol.com Linda Peterson Tedquarters 4008 W. Michigan Ave., Jackson, MI 49202 517-750-9060 E-mail: linda@tednugent.com

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Maple Leaf Press ............................................................11 Mathews, Inc. .......................................inside front cover New Archery Products .....................................................4 Ozark Real Estate............................................................43 Ragsdale & Associates....................................................33 Shot Doctor, The.............................................................37 Spirit of the Wild, Ted Nugent .....................................44

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For a copy of Easton’s Product Guide, call your Easton dealer. You may also write, Easton Technical Products, 5040 Harold Gatty Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A. 84116. Visit Easton online at www.easton.com. OCT/NOV 2004 Archery 5

BOWHUNTERS SHOWCASE 1. Frank Tolivar took this 112 lb Doe last year. Frank has taken 87 deer in the last 47 consecutive years of bowhunting. Frank took 85 deer in Missouri and two in Indiana. 2. Ronald Hanna with a Blue Wildebeest. Ron took his trophy with a PSE G-Force 80 lbs, with Easton XX78 arrows and 150 grain G5 broadheads.

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3. Travis Scott, shown with his buck taken last season. Travis is a member of Riverside Archers and the Broken Arrow Bowhunters. 4. Ronald Hanna with his Eland that scored well enough to be number 8 ranking in the SCI Club Record Book. 5. Bret Scott of Riverside CA took his Javelina while bowhunting Arizona, near Bagdad. Javelina was taken using a Hoyt bow.

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6. Wally Schwartz of Riverside, CA is shown receiving his Diamond Buck Award for his typical Blacktail Buck. Wally’s buck scored 151 0/8, a California State Record. Tim Atwood, NFAA Bowhunting Chairman is shown presenting the award.

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6 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

TEDITORiAL THE HUNTER’S RALLYING CRY IN THE CULTURE WAR by Ted Nugent

The gaggle of kids descended upon the Nugent 3D archery range like an assault force of giddy warriors. With bows and arrows in hand and glowing smiles on every face, it was more than apparent that this band of uppity American children was in for a grand day of major fun. The ultimate good, clean fun! With moms and dads providing spirited, buoyant guidance and supervision, each kid took turns flinging arrow after arrow downrange at the lifesize deer, elk, bear, hog, antelope and caribou Delta targets. Exaltations of, “oh yeah baby!”, “right on!" and various high energy youthful battlecries of joy and partytime celebration reverberated throughout the Texas Hill Country. What we had here, yet again, as we have always had over many years of super quality family outdoors excitement, was every parent’s dream of kids doing the right thing. The discipline of the shooting sports is without question, the ticket for getting kids involved in the great outdoors. Make no mistake about it. Even back in the hippie infested not-so roaring 1970’s, during the eruption of the braindead birth of political correctness, nobody at Camp Nuge showed any hesitation to enjoy projectile fun, nor was there a hint of squawking about shooting arrows into animal targets. It is important to note that the vast majority of these kids were from non, even anti hunting families! But good old Dr. Nuge steered them boldly, intensely, and cheerily, believably, into this thrilling shooting sports lifestyle. Like the kids in all those grade schools across America where I have made my DARE (Drug Awareness Resistance Education) presentations, emphasizing the riot I have enjoyed throughout my life of hunting, fishing, trapping and shooting, these young people are wide open to truth, fact, logic and reality. In fact we have proven 100% of the time, when delivered in a spirited, positive, no apology down to earth style, that kids and newcomers always embrace hunting and shooting as readily as 1+1=2. It’s beautiful. And the prognosis improves by the day. Today, thank God, I am not alone anymore reaching out to America’s future conservationists and Constitutionalists, for I am now joyfully joined by nearly every outdoor oriented sporting group and organization to the fact of life that our sacred outdoor heritage is only as secure as our promotion and resulting recruitment of new participants and voters assures. From the NFAA, Safari Club International, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the IBO, ASA, NRA, FNAWS, RMEF, NWTF, TTHA, P&Y, Boone & Crocket Club, DU, Delta Waterfowl, and nearly every national, regional and state sporter group across North America and

beyond, a new, upgraded focus has been nailed down to intentionally and intensely reach out to women and kids. Amen and pass the ammunition! This pivotal demographic will not only get turned on to these wonderful activities, but more importantly, they will become active promoters and recruiters in their own lives once they feel the excitement we’ve always known about and enjoyed ourselves. Maybe even more so. But it is universally celebrated that as great as it is to share our beloved outdoor time with our entire family and friends, their hands-on participation and consumerism increases the overall sporting industry by which conservation itself will grow. But here’s the ultimate clincher, that these new sporters have so much fun that it is contagious, and they become the penultimate public relations voice to get prohunting and pro-gun votes in the voting booth. All together now; WHEW! What a relief.

“...any American who claims to believe in freedom but does not belong to the NRA and/or a National Conservation Organization at the very least is a turncoat and no friend of Americans who truly care.” Truly, with but a modicum of deliberately increased conversation and dialog in our every day lives with family, friends, neighbors, coworkers, at church and at school, literally everywhere we go, together we can identify the fact that hunters are clearly the good guys, and more importantly, that the animal rights people and antigunners are truly the lunatic fringe. The hippies got the California condor as their symbol bird to save back when there were about 20 of them. The American hunting families got the wild turkey. Today, there are about 20 condors and about 7 million wild turkeys. Along with the fact that there are more deer, geese, black bear and cougar than in recorded history and more elk, bison, Shiras moose, grizzly bear, eagles and pronghorn antelope than in over 150 years is information we should all make certain is universally known. But herein lies the clincher. Any hunter or gun owner who is not a member of the NFAA, NRA and their state gun and or hunting organization is truly standing idle on the wall of the culture war Alamo. The enemy is charging us to destroy us every day, and anyone who claims to be on our side but is not fighting back is not only failing miserably to stand

up for what is good and right, but egregiously aiding and abetting the enemy by making their job easier and more effective. That is it in a nutshell. Sarah Brady and PETA are not anywhere near as effective against us as compared to the numbskull apathy that permeates our BloodBrotherhood. I for one feel with all my heart and soul that any American who claims to believe in freedom but does not belong to the NRA and/or a National Conservation Organization at the very least is a turncoat and no friend of Americans who truly care. Though I celebrate increased activism for our side and the progress is clear, we are still plagued by soulless bubbas who are just too ignorant and or lazy to fight the good fight with the rest of us. Only the guilty need feel guilty, but the ongoing disconnect by so many fellow sporters is unforgivable and we must all hammer them constantly to wake up and climb the Alamo wall with the dedicated warriors. It is really so simple it’s stupid to fail to do so. A brief visit to tednugent.com anytime any day will show how real American Warriors fight. With constant letters to the editors of mainstream publications in our home regions, polite yet adamant communications with our elected officials about concealed weapon reform, elimination of counterproductive bow and gun regs (ridiculous “assault weapon ban) counterproductive hunting regs (a hunting ban during primetime in TX between bow and gun season, the silly, anti-science minimum draw weight rule for bowhunters, etc etc) upgraded communications with our children’s teachers and school administrators (Hunter Ed and Archery in the Schools should be mandatory) and the simple yet effective heartfelt communication about wildlife management, private property rights, renewable resource value and the moral duty of “we the people” to monitor and improve wildlife habitat for quality air, soil and water goes a long, long way impressing our nonhunting friends to join and support us. “Evil triumphs when good people do nothing” is a timeless truism that has never been more emphatic than in the insidious culture war against the obvious self evident truths of self defense (2nd Amendment rights) and the God given right to intelligently utilize His precious renewable life giving resources. It is worth fighting for. The time to fight is always, constantly. If more of us would do so, the foolish war would be over. It is up to us. I for one do so on a daily basis. Who could possibly live with themselves if they bend over for the enemy? Remember the Alamo! August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 7

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8 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

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NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 archery@iw.net

GREAT LAKES Bob McCutcheon Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/965-5290 prairie1@royell.net

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbs@indy.net NFAA® Office 31407 Outer I-10 Redlands, CA 92373 909/794-2133 800/811-2331 NFAArchery@aol.com

Rocky Kline Director - IN 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 rlkline@insightbb.com 765/457-7086 Bill Jones Director - MI 2049 Lake St. National City, MI 48748 989/469-3939

Councilmen Great Lakes Walter “Sonny” Glisson 22900 W. Main Street Plainfield, IL 60544-7469 815/436-5803 Glissonarchery@juno.com

Dave Thewlis Director - OH 16423 Chamberlain Rd Grafton, OH 44044 440/926-2464 DThew69613@aol.com

Mid-Atlantic Mike LePera 34 Kentwood Road Succasunna, NJ 07876 973/584-0637 brtesite@optonline.net

Bruce Timble Director - WI 650 17th St. N Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494 715/421-9277 bruce@stringworks.net

Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 intrudersx2@msn.com

MID ATLANTIC Ron West Director - MD 190 54th Street SE Washington, DC 20019 WestArrowsWest@aol.com 202/584-8015

New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore15@comcast.net

John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net

Northwest Bill Tiddy 3355 Pinecrest Drive Helena, MT 5960-2 tiddyw@aol.com 406/475-3569

Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com

Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 Flarchery@earthlink.net 352/332-1969

William Sterling Director - DE 389 Thorn Town Rd. Middleton, DE 19709 302/834-8112

Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 lee@dlprint.com 512/863-8296 Southwest Elaine Holmes 1090 Pennsylvania Canon City, CO 81212 719/275-6054 holmes@ris.net

Dave Hryn Director - NY PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224 716/481-4699 Archery1@localnet.com Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@excite.com Terry Howell Director - WV WV Archery Assn. Rt. 1 Box 294 Salem, WV 25426 WVAATerry@aol.com 304/782-3138 MIDWEST Rodney “Zeke” Ogden Director - IA 718 N. 8th St. Osage, IA 50461 641/732-5797 ogdpeep@osage.net John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net

Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 wehjkh@concentric.net 612/462-1916

LeRoy Dukes Director - OR 7015 SE Mall Portland, OR 97206-3469 503/775-8463

Earl Foster Director - MO 8709 Booth Kansas City, MO 64138 816/763-2699

T.C. Parker Director - WA P.O. Box 613 Hoquiam, WA 98550 360/533-4698 wa_nfaa@olynet.com

Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com

Daniel J. Kolb Director - WY 3571 Teton Casper, WY 82609 307/265-4418 bhfsdjk@bresnan.net

Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) marct@uffdaonline.net

SOUTHEAST Howard Beeson Director - AL 111 Eagle Circle Enterprise, AL 30824 334/347-4990 Beeline@alaweb.com

Jackie Meisenheimer Director - SD 48088 259th St. Brandon, SD 57005 605/582-7179 justablu@aol.com NEW ENGLAND Volker Pense Director - AAE Carl-Ulrich-Strasse 2B 64297 Darmstadt, Germany 0615-653085 nfaadirector@aae-archery.org Mark Couture Director - VT P.O. Box 162 Irasburg, VT 05845 802/754-9403 Tom Schaub Director - CT 35 Benson Rd. Ridgegfield, CT 06877 203/748-3771 Dave Cousins Director - ME 354 River Rd. Standish, ME 04084 207/642-4530 Alvie Carpenter Director - MA 7 Central Peterborough, NH 03458 603/924-3941 alviec@earthlink.net Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/876-4249 barebownh@aol.com Bruce Mulneix, Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401-885-5684 NORTHWEST Leo “Sam” Weatherford Director - AK 19836 S. Birchwood Loop Chugiak, AK 99567 swc@mtaonline.net 907/688-9528 Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 hmsarchery@email.com 208/476-5377 Doug Tate Director - MT 3499 Blacktail Loop Rd. Butte, MT 5970d1 406/494-4393 DOUG.TATE@northwestern.com

Tim Austin Director - FL 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 352/332-1969 Flarchery@earthlink.net Earl Watts Director - GA 3672 Larkin Road SE Dearing, GA 30808 706/556-6145 ewatts@standardtextile.com Jerry Barr Director - KY 919 Manor Dr. Henderson, KY 42420 270/827-4570 barebow@henderson.net Jim Skipper Director - NC 7608 Circle Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 skipsarchery@aol.com 704/882-1844 S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com Gordon Oland Director - TN 8851 Highland View Lane Knoxville, TN 37938 865/925-0138 goland@staffingtech.com

Monty Heishmann Director - TX 10149 Heritage Pkwy. West, TX 76691 254-826-5788 barebow@att.net SOUTHWEST Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 Tom Daley Director - CA 11 Colton Ct. Redwood City, CA 94062 650/364-6730 daleyplbg@aol.com Kenneth Buck Director - CO 1923 Shoshone Dr. Canon City, CO 81212 719/382-8919 George Kong, Jr. Director - HI 1255 14th Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816-3838 808/734-5402 Ray Clark Director - NM PO Box 5 Espanola, MN 87532 505/753-8601 penray@newmexico.com Jim Marshall Director - NV 195 Ridge Crossing Henderson, NV 89015 702/566-0819 marshalls01@earthlink.net Ray Shephard Director - UT 41 E. 100 S, Box 906 Santaquin, UT 84655 NFAA@utahbowmen.org 801/754-5418

Administrative Chairman Tim Atwood 3175 Racine Riverside, CA 92503 909/354-9968 Atwoodhome@aol.com Celebrity Chairman Ted Nugent Promotion Chairman Fred Eichler

THE NFAA® HAS 50 CHARTERED STATE ASSOCIATIONS AND OVER 1,000 AFFILIATED CLUBS IN THE UNITED STATES AND ABROAD. THE SPORT OF ARCHERY IS A HEALTHY AND EXCITING SPORT PROVIDING AN ACTIVITY IN WHICH THE ENTIRE FAMILY CAN

Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 (608) 839-5137 Midwest Sharon Henneman 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 68601-4447 (402) 563-3504 Midatlantic Doug Williams 31 Gaylord St. Apt. A Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 258-9269 dwilliams @copperjohn.com

Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 501/855-6066 andr_ds@cox-internet.com

Northwest Carolyn Elder 2319 Pe Ell McDonald Rd. Chehalis, WA 98532 (360) 245-3261

Robert Wood Director - OK 75377 S. 280 Rd Wagoner, OK 74467 robertw@osaa.us 918/485-6552

Pro Chairman Michael Braden 336 Lawana Dr. Bedford, TX 76022 817/285-9787 prorookie1@aol.com

Professional Representatives

SOUTHERN Garry Randall Director - MS 5301 Barron Rd. Summit, MS 39666 601/249-2988 Garryche@bellsouth.net

Scott Bradford Director - LA 40340 Old Hickory Ave. Gonzales, LA 70737-6756 225/622-0838 NFAALADirector@aol.com

Committee Chairmen

Southern Troy Wesley 2306 57th St. Lubbock, TX 79412 (806) 797-0546 Southeast Jim Pruitte 6717 Green Plantation Rd. Harlem, GA 30814 (706) 556-0738 JPruitte@mcg.edu Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 (801) 323-3704

PARTICIPATE.

WRITE US ON HOW TO OBTAIN INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS PROGRAMS OFFERED BY NFAA®. NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENTS, SECTIONAL/STATE TOURNAMENTS, INDOOR/OUTDOOR LEAGUES, JUNIOR BOWHUNTER PROGRAMS, WHICH INCLUDE THE ART YOUNG SMALL / BIG GAME AWARDS, AND THE BOWFISHER PROGRAM.

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 9

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inking yone to start th er ev r fo e m ti It is ting seasons. upcoming hun a great 60th e d th ha t d ou an ab d ye range and take e enjo nmarked 3-D t out on a field I hope everyon U ge d to an re t su en e B am d show Tourn field archery an full in the to in is Annual Outdoor ew th n e on n rt eo som involved . I will repo ks. Get them Championship them how it wor eir State lp them join th next issue. ith a club and he w glad you did. held in everyone will be e , er A w FA es N e am th G d an season is not at Outdoor re the hunting Vice fo f, el be ys g The ESPN Gre n M lo g 6. n ti -1 skills for Shoo a on July 14 g Joyce, e your shooting n ou D ho , s er lp fl he ef Orlando, Florid t Sh bu e only fun ves! Sheffler, Lorain Gregory and ent of truth arri President Brian ee om L m e, e lin th K n he ky w rd, Roc nt. It Same Weatherfo worked the Eve d an d your State de n te at l y u all to contact ent. M yo am e rn ag ou Dave Thewlis al ur T co d en ce I would ng and fast pa plain the NFAA was a very exciti Announcer and d have them ex t or an r Sp to e ec th ir g D in ar we award as be ram. Every ye his was an og T responsibility w Pr . p ls ia hi ic rs ff la O ho A members Sc orked as ps to young NFA NFAA hi e rs th everyone else w la e ho ot sc om e pl pr ti his is a great rtunity to r education. T ly needed mul ei al th re g ve n incredible oppo di ha n e w pa g ex ot only that are ion, somethin h involved in n ial ut ec yo sp r d ou ha through Televis ls ep ia ke ic Program to All of the Off education. ith our NFAA w for a long time. e ad m ts g but also their n ir ti sh ) oo te sh hi w & referee (black were specifically Pittsburg e back. These th on go e 3-Star Tour in ew when lo th vi p of n g ai le pl Stum al in n fi en hing but This years o could be se ess! I heard not cc su an r d he di ot made so the Log e an on g venue. proved to be e rolling. Every and the shootin ty ci y e el th t em tr ou ex ab the cameras wer I was out the air good comments sional job and very pleased ab they be ch to hi incredibly profes w ed in em se er n e actual city Everyon and the man uld fly into the ewed co vi ey be th ill ct w proud of them fa t n e ve th service and tractions and NFAA. This E t. After hour at name will be represented the en A am FA cated. N rn e ou th T e d of th ople an nt and easily lo pe da of un is s ab th n io rs be ill ie to if m al ed by e qu e 3-Star Tour restaurants seem them! The thre at supported th -Vegas, th ts u en yo in front of all of am of n l ur al to to s to the of our indoor r had Thanks ists and addition ie tw lif ua ew Q n w as year were at all fe eg a V e and look for ittsburg; and th There is y! Louisville and P or st hi s it 06 Tour! icipation in h the ATA 20 it w on the largest part ti lia fi af ubt that our nothing but absolutely no do t time, ames has been G or do ut has Until nex O at at th re e G n e yo th er d ev an nks to Bruce Cull oductive. Tha t! en positive and pr ev t n lle e this and exce worked to mak

10 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS 2005 SOUTHEAST OUTDOOR SECTIONAL RESULTS June 25-26, 2005 - Keowee Bowmen, Clemson, SC — As expected, the Keowee Bowmen range was absolutely beautiful. Weather was warm and humid, but plenty of water was available on the range. The Hunter Round was shot with a comfortable drizzling rain for about a quarter of the round. The host club did their usual superb job hosting the tournament. NAME

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FLD

ANL

HTR

TOTAL

PRO MALE FREESTYLE C Jim Pruitte

GA

552

289

550

1391

ADULT MALE FREESTYLE FLIGHT 1 C Ricky Burke 2 Jim Addis 3 Terry Pendley Randy Yarbrough Jimmy Renner Keith Plummer John Stone Eric Helfritz

Lynwood Bunn James Thurman Allen Hines Sherman Bailey Larry Kinslow Drew Slayton Angelo Distefano

C Tom Boots

477

1226

GA

516

277

519

1312

510 509 523 515 516 501 513 507 501

279 280 280 276 281 285 288* 277 278

524 522 506 514 506 510 492 506 505

1313 1311 1309 1305 1303 1296 1293 1290 1284

YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE

FL GA

520 505

SC NC TN TN SC TN FL FL NC GA NC GA GA FL FL SC GA

FL

479

260

487*

1226

380 377

239 252

407 336

1026 965

483 473

274 263

479 488

1236 1224

283

501

1287

182 101

144 113

135 121

461 335

466

268

471

1205

521

284

527

1332

SENIOR MALE BAREBOW C Shannon North 2 Jerry Barr

FL KY

ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER C Tim Wilson 2 Sam Stewart C Justin Hines

GA SC NC

503

YOUNG ADULT MALE BAREBOW C Steven Baldowski 2 Robert Baldowski

GA GA

YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE C Zack Hines

281 277

529 488

1330 1270

C Samantha Pruitte

NC

541 534 538 538 515 493 504

287 285 286 287 285 277 275

535 538 531 530 523 493 498

1363 1357 1355 1355 1323 1285 1277

497

263

495

1252

287 279 285 283 272 272 284 269

540 525 521 515 521 500 480 465

1369 1337 1312 1305 1304 1283 1248 1221

276 264

493 488

1266 1216

274

474

1201

542 533 506 507 511 511 484 487 497 462 453 436*

263

438

1137

519 498 512 500 490

282 281 275 270 270

502 512 499 481 465

1303 1291 1286 1251 1225

GA

CUB MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Ben DeWitt

GA TN NC KY TN SC FL NC

C Jennifer Davies

YOUTH FEMALE FREESTYLE

ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE C Hugh Johnson 2 Scott Davies 3 Mike Arndts Andy Miller Anthony Wilson

267

NC NC NC SC NC TN SC GA NC

ADULT FEMALE LIMITED FREESTYLE RECURVE/LONGBOW C Rhonda Miller

482

ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED

SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Buddy Lowman

SC

1387 1355 1352 1344 1342 1336 1335 1326

ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED C Joseph Rozmus 2 Tim Wehner

C Kitty Stewart

549 541 536 525 527 526 522 520

MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C Bob Merck 2 Melvin Morgan 3 Guy Thompson Bill McConnell Ted Lynn Sr Gordon Oland Tim Austin Bill Bishop

TOTAL

288 284 283 286 284 285 285 282

SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE C Joan Hines

HTR

550 530 533 533 531 525 528 524

SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE C 2 3 4

ANL

KY SC NC TN SC SC SC FL

ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE C Miriam Distefano 2 Mechell Pruitte

FLD

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE

FLIGHT 2 1 Dave Palmer 2 Patrick Sargeant 3 Kenneth Lingerfelt Robert Halton Chris Wilson Ronald Frame Doug Gracely Ash Miller Frank Brown

ST

NAME

ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE

GA

476

265

477

1218

Marvin Batliner (PMFS) IN Frank Degott (AMFS) IN

551 542

289 289

555 533

1395 1364

NFAA GUESTS

KWIKEE KWIVER You Can Pay More But You Can’t Buy BETTER!! KWIKEE KWIVER CO., INC. BOX 130 ACME, MI 49610

231-938-1690 August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 11

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS 2005 GREAT LAKES OUTDOOR SECTIONAL RESULTS PANTHER CREEK BOWHUNTERS CLASS AFFS AFFS AFFS AFFS AFFS

NAME RENEE POWELL LAURIE SCHUH KATHY PINDELL LORA SMITH CHRISTINE MILLER

AMBB

ANDY SHOTTS

399

230

404

1033

AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS

STEVE COOK KEITH KLEIBOEKER WALTER ERICKSON CHARLES RAWE KEN RAWE DAVE DE WOLFE

537 531 536 470 447 478

286 281 280 272 268 268

533 538 526 476 499 401

1356 1350 1342 1218 1214 1147

AMBHFSL AMBHFSL

JEFF WYLER NORM LAUER

504 454

275 250

505 466

1284 1170

AMFS FLIGHT 1 AMFS JIM BURNS AMFS JODY PLETAN AMFS JUSTIN JENSON AMFS MIKE FLIER AMFS STEVEN BINGER AMFS JOHN KANTER AMFS JEREMIAH GILLAM AMFS BRIAN THOMPSON AMFS FLIGHT 2 AMFS MARTY SINGLETARY AMFS JERROLD HOPPE AMFS JONATHAN POWELL AMFS JOE MARLEY AMFS BILL CARTWRIGHT AMFS CHRIS KARL AMFS BILL MOHN AMFS TIM BUSH

FIELD ANIMAL HUNTER TOTAL 520 287 520 1327 511 279 513 1303 498 274 509 1281 491 271 507 1269 477 274 496 1247

547 540 537 538 535 537 533 532

288 282 285 287 287 282 285 284

541 546 545 534 534 537 537 516

1376 1368 1367 1359 1356 1356 1355 1332

519 523 518 517 512 507 513 502

284 283 284 284 282 281 280 279

535 526 530 528 513 514 503 513

1338 1332 1332 1329 1307 1302 1296 1294

AMFSL

RANDY WELLINGS

492

284

521

1297

APMFS APMFS APMFS APMFS APMFS APMFS APMFS APMFS APMFS

ROD MENZER JOE KAPP JOSH MILLER SCOTT TURNER JEFF BUTTON MARVIN BATLINER BOB WOLFRAM BRUCE TRIMBLE BILL SCHUH

554 554 552 548 548 547 547 539 537

290 290 289 289 285 286 287 287 286

556 550 552 551 553 553 538 542 541

1400 1394 1393 1388 1386 1386 1372 1368 1364

CMBB

EVAN WELLS

405

206

376

987

CMFSL

JOEY MCEACHERN

406

234

428

1068

MSMFS MSMFS MSMFS MSMFS

RAY L. JONES KARL NELSON DON WILL RICHARD LINDEMAN

527 520 502 500

284 278 286 280

531 521 508 513

1342 1319 1296 1293

SFFS SFFS

KAREN CLARY PAT WHITLOCK

410 509

187 281

364 0

961 790

SMBB

BILL BERGER

368

256

407

1031

SMBHFS

RON WHITLOCK

528

284

525

1337

538

287

539

1364

SMFS FLIGHT 1 SMFS DOUG GRADE

12 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

CLASS NAME SMFS FRANK DEGOTT SMFS VINCENT BAKER SMFS JOHN SMITH SMFS BOB ZIMMERMAN SMFS SCOTT SMITH SMFS FLIGHT 2 SMFS ROBERT HOLLANDER SMFS AL CHICKERNEO SMFS EDDIE FLIER SMFS ROCKY KLINE SMFS MICHAEL CLARY SMFS DAVE THEWLIS

FIELD ANIMAL HUNTER TOTAL 538 283 537 1358 535 283 533 1351 531 280 539 1350 523 285 533 1341 525 279 524 1328 518 517 513 494 482 445

280 279 277 283 284 265

526 528 533 507 487 0

1324 1324 1323 1284 1253 710

ED LANDGRAVE

384

254

397

1035

SMTRAD

JERRY GRABMAN

335

210

367

912

SPMFS SPMFS SPMFS SPMFS

MICHAEL STRASSMAN BOB WEBB STEVE BOYLAN DAVE MOORE

541 538 534 531

285 283 285 283

550 553 528 519

1376 1374 1347 1333

SPMFSL

LARRY SMITH

501

275

508

1284

YAMFS YAMFS

GREG HOPPE CHRIS SEICH

516 444

284 268

527 443

1327 1155

YMFS

ADAM THOMPSON

420

253

381

1054

SMFSL

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS MIDWESTERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL RESULTS JUNE 25-26, 2005 — INDEPENDENCE BOWHUNTERS STYLE HUNTER ANIMAL PRO MENS FREESTYLE Jackie White 549 289 Tim Rogers 546 289 Jeffrey Quinn 544 291 Richard Potter 548 285 Joe Sutcliffe 548 284 Brian Jackson 545 283 James Nickols 528 284

TOTAL 838 835 835 833 832 828 812

FIELD TOTAL 555 553 551 551 548 543 536

1393 1388 1386 1384 1380 1371 1348

ADULT MENS FREESTYLE Jon Marquess 553 Tom Hood 547 Jeff Rollings 546 Don Robinson 548 Dave Ingram 541 Bryan Corley 549 Tyler Pierce 536 Alex Kingery 541 Steve Bridger 537 Ed Christman 534 David McGarrah 541

287 289 287 278 286 284 283 285 288 286 280

840 836 833 826 827 833 819 826 825 820 821

551 546 545 546 543 532 544 534 535 534 530

1391 1382 1378 1372 1370 1365 1363 1360 1360 1354 1351

FIRST FLIGHT Jim McFall Todd Ferguson Mike King Jay Ferguson Ron Miller Bruce Handley Mike Long Steve VanDerstelt Joe Decker Joe Nagle

287 282 285 284 279 280 283 277 260 285

814 806 800 806 798 803 793 782 713 815

522 523 527 517 525 511 512 502 454 Inc.

1336 1329 1327 1323 1323 1314 1305 1284 1167

273

772

476

1248

815 809 816 806 803 788 771 673

545 536 529 525 528 516 493 421

1360 1345 1345 1331 1331 1304 1264 1094

ADULT MENS BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED Carroll Walker 374 0 374

Inc.

ADULT MENS BOWHUNTER Greg Bouras 441

256

697

439

1136

ADULT MENS BAREBOW Randell Brimager 473

275

748

457

1205

SENIOR MENS PRO FREESTYLE Jim Bath 530 John Carlson 504

289 279

819 783

532 507

1351 1290

SENIOR MENS FREESTYLE Roger Dobias 540 Henry Houk 534 Carl Thiessen 527 John Doub 520 Lynn Umbarger 512 Terry Diefenderfer 504 Dennis Garrison 480 Larry Becraft 462 Jim Lane 511

286 284 285 280 283 279 266 275 283

826 818 812 800 795 783 746 737 794

537 540 518 524 517 508 464 469 Inc.

1363 1358 1330 1324 1312 1291 1210 1206

527 524 515 522 519 523 510 505 453 530

ADULT FREESTYLE LIMITED Faron Teague 499

ADULT MENS BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE Rick Peters 531 284 Steve Christian 535 274 Joe Zuber 531 285 Jeff Friedmann 525 281 Bill Hakl 522 281 Shawn Smith 503 285 Greg Parker 489 282 Paul Knight 428 245

SENIOR MENS FREESTYLE LIMITED Don Iverson 433 261

694

464

1158

SENIOR MENS BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE Doug Steed 519 283 Jim Borg 502 276 Ray Jones 382 0

802 778 382

532 513 Inc.

1334 1291

SENIOR MENS FSL RECURVE/LONGBOW Jim Mellinger 475 255

730

469

1199

MASTER SENIOR MENS FREESTYLE Dean Pridgen 549 288 Al Tuller 528 286 D. Edward Will 517 282 John Carder 518 279 Ron Cravens 501 282 Robert Brumback 501 280 Don Waymon 418 264 Wally Miller Sr. Inc.

837 814 799 797 783 781 682 Inc.

542 525 528 490 504 448 418

1379 1339 1327 1287 1287 1229 1100

PRO WOMENS FREESTYLE Sharon Henneman 523

281

804

514

1318

ADULT WOMENS FREESTYLE Tobi Rogers 537 Marcia Jones 506

287 280

824 786

518 493

1342 1279

ADULT WOMENS BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE Julene Hakl 525 282 807

531

1338

ADULT WOMENS BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED Linda Parker 454 236 690 427

1117

ADULT WOMENS FSL RECURVE/LONGBOW Melissa Mellinger 371 210 581

369

950

SENIOR WOMENS FREESTYLE Rosie Pridgen 528 Judy Doub 476

282 263

810 739

514 475

1324 1214

YOUNG ADULT MENS FREESTYLE Ian Duncan 481 275

756

476

1232

CUB BOYS FREESTYLE Brandon Hood 556

845

553

1398

289

NFAA® CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2005 Southeast 3-D Sectional, Aug 6-7, Gainesville, FL North American Field Archery Championship, Dec 10-11, Homestead, FL 2006 World Archery Festival Vegas Shoot, Feb 10-12, Las Vegas, NV NFAA Indoor Nationals, March 18-19, Louisville, KY WAF Atlantic Classic, April 21-23, Pittsburgh, PA August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 13

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS 2005 SOUTHERN OUTDOOR SECTIONAL RESULTS JUNE 11-12 — MCCOMB MISSISSIPPI Pro M FS Ronnie Mize Ande Rushing

Name MS TX

523 514

277 276

262 242

State

Field

Animal

Hunter

1062 1032

Cub F FS Sarah-Shae Lewis

Total

TX

449

275

222

946

LA

286

157

133

579

Pro F FSL Jennifer Gilley

OK

501

283

261

1045

Cub M FS Evan Thibodeaux

Pro F FS Monique Rains

MS

487

282

252

1021

A M BHFSL Bill Ayers

LA

429

250

219

898

1092

A M Traditional James Hawthorne

LA

129

144

54

327

Sr. F FS Betty Johnson

TX

517

281

258

1056

A M FS William Hohnmann Terry Dawsey Billy Jacobs Claude Matherne Don Dickinson Donnie Bickham

TX MS MS LA MS LA

535 531 515 456 507 INC.

284 279 284 267 280

273 253 261 267 INC.

1092 1063 1060 990

A M BHFS Brian Thibodeaux Ricky St. Upery Garry Randall Scott Bradford Nathan Taylor Mike Aicklen Lester Lewis Mike Ewing Ronnie Falgout

LA LA MS LA TX LA TX LA LA

534 530 538 535 520 511 521 510 479

282 283 282 282 278 278 277 282 272

274 269 261 263 266 264 251 244 242

1090 1082 1081 1080 1064 1053 1049 1036 1003

Pro M Sr. FS Rick Gilley

OK

538

285

269

Sr. M FS Jerry Sullivan Lee Gregory Wayne King Mackie Pearson Gene Patrick

MS TX MS MS MS

531 517 518 487 467

284 287 285 280 283

262 264 257 251 246

1077 1068 1060 1018 996

Sr. M FSL Andrew Pedalahore

LA

494

266

247

1007

Sr. M Trad. Phil Jordan

LA

211

152

95

458

Mst. Sr. M FS Bill Brown Earl Johnson

LA TX

513 484

277 275

259 248

1049 1007

A F BHFS Necie Falgout Gail Ewing Toni St. Upery

LA LA LA

510 484 455

282 279 265

257 239 240

1049 1002 960

A F FS Jacki Taylor Donna Rushing

TX TX

524 488

282 277

256 248

1062 1013

2005 SOUTWEST 3-D SECTIONAL RESULTS MAY 21-22 — LAS VEGAS ARCHERS, LAS VEGAS NEVADA STYLE AMFS AMFS AMFS AMFS

NAME Ashworth, Brian Edwards, Bill Marshall, Rick Roney, Gary

STATE NV NV NV CA

SCORE 582 551 531 490

AFFS

PLACE 1st 2nd 3rd

Roney, Debbie

CA

481

1st

SMFS SMFS SMFS SMFS

Berfield, Larry Hix, Dennis Hix, Carl Bailey, Glen

NV CA CA CO

570 569 548 532

1st 2nd 3rd

SFFS

Berfield, Sue

NV

490

MSMFS

Harris, Thomas

CA

AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS AMBHFS

Connelly, Eddie Kramer, Kevin Hacker, Carl Ashurst, Joe Porchet, Steve

AFBHFS AFBHFS

Terry, Kimberly Porchet, Kathy

STATE CA

SCORE 402

Ison, Mabel

CA

319

1st

AMBH AMBH AMBH

Mercer, Jeff Mercer, Sean Estrada, Robert

CA CA NV

419 368 331

1st 2nd 3rd

AMFSLR/L

Harrington, Ben

NV

225

1st

SMBHFS SMBHFS

Hix, Jerry Kaiser, Steve

AZ CA

450 485

1st Guest

1st

SFBHFSL

Holmes, Elaine

CO

286

1st

404

1st

SMBH

Jauregui, Harvey

CA

487

1st

NV CO AZ CO NV

567 522 473 INC INC

1st 2nd 3rd

YMFS YMFS YMFS

Hacker, Clint Conner, Kelly Gutierrez, Andrew

AZ NV NM

465 445 314

1st 2nd 3rd

NV NV

455 441

1st 2nd

CMFS CMFS CMFS

Kelly, Graeme Hacker, Jake Rauschl, John

NV AZ NV

533 521 421

1st 2nd 3rd

CMBB

Gardner, Mike

NV

368

1st

14 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

STYLE AMBHFSL

NAME Ison, Don

AFBHFSL

PLACE 1st

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS 2005 SOUTHWEST OUTDOOR SECTIONAL RESULTS NAME

STATE FIELD ANIMAL HUNTER TOTALPLACE

PRO SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE ROGER WHEATON CO 534 FRANK PEARSON AZ 459

279 289

537 542

1350 1290

1ST 2ND

PRO ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE BECKY PEARSON AZ 535

285

537

1357

1ST

PRO ADULT MALE FREESTYLE COTTY HAYES CO 540 JONATHAN PEMBERTONUT 538 MARC SMITH CO 523

289 286 271

541 522 523

1370 1346 1321

1ST 2ND 3RD

MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE MARLOW LARSON UT 547 BILL RUCKER CO 523 WAYNE DAVIDSON AZ 515 DOUG AUCKLAND NM 513 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE RUTH AUCKLAND NM 510 PENNY CLARK NM 504 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE STEVE MCKENNA UT BILL JONES CO

515 483

289 282 276 281 283 282 282 271

549 529 521 511 520 496 518 497

1385 1334 1312 1305 1313 1282 1315 1251

1ST 2ND 3RD

1ST 2ND 1ST 2ND

ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE KATHY HUDDLESTON CO BECKIE SHEPHERD UT PHYLLIS JONES CO JEANNE SWAEBY CO

518 509 512 466

282 282 271 250

520 496 503 461

1320 1287 1286 1177

1ST 2ND 3RD

ADULT MALE FREESTYLE JIM MARSHALL NV BRIAN BOWERS CO JUSTIN HOWELL CO MIKE DAURIO CO STEVE SWAEBY CO TERRY HOWELL CO ED HUDDLESTON CO TODD BAKER CO JOHN DEJONG CO

543 541 543 543 530 533 513 515 487

289 286 285 287 286 287 281 282 282

543 542 541 527 536 521 520 507 513

1375 1369 1369 1357 1352 1341 1314 1304 1282

1ST 2ND 2ND 3RD

MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED CHARLEY BARNES NM 442 251 447

1140

1ST

SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED SALLY DELANGE CO 439 276

475

1190

1ST

SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED RAYDELL CLARK NM 469 JAY DELANGE CO 466

275 266

476 484

1220 1216

1ST 2ND

FREESTYLE 508 282 487 275 443 262

505 500 478

1295 1262 1183

1ST 2ND 3RD

ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE KAREN BUTLER CO 455 257

447

1159

1ST

ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER JASON REED CO KURT GEIST CO RAY SHEPHERD UT DONALD GROETKEN CO CHRIS FESMIRE CO MARK MORGAN CO VANCE DEWBRE NM SCOTT WALTER CO D. MORGAN (GUEST) WY ALAN BONNER (GUEST) TX MIKE WINDEN (GUEST) CO

526 521 530 517 513 501 504 449 524 499 498

1338 1331 1330 1325 1312 1288 1276 1149 1330 1277 1258

1ST 2ND 3RD

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER BOB WALTERS CO GENE UNGER CO JOHNNIE SWEYGARDT CO

FREESTYLE 526 283 530 280 520 280 525 283 515 284 511 276 490 282 456 244 524 282 506 272 481 279

NAME

STATE FIELD ANIMAL HUNTER TOTALPLACE

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED KEN BUCK CO 478 267 448

1223

1ST

ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMIITED REED HILTERMAN CO 484 276 494 ROBERT ARTHUR NM 466 255 429

1254 1150

1ST 2ND

SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED RECURVE/LONGBOW SCOTT CRAGLE CO 454 272 438 1164

1ST

ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED RECURVE/LONGBOW LYNN WALTER CO 371 233 386 990

1ST

ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED RECURVE/LONGBOW TED HOLLAND CO 495 283 510 1288

1ST

MASTER SENIOR MALE BAREBOW LARRY SHOTTS CO 374

253

397

1024

1ST

ADULT FEMALE BARBOW SHIELA DENSMORE CA

365

243

309

907

1ST

ADULT MALE BARBOW RONNIE ST. CLAIR NM

459

264

480

1203

1ST

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER JERRY MILLER CA 351

250

396

997

1ST

ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER WAYNE WESTERMAN NM 256

194

278

728

1ST

ADULT FEMALE TRADITIONAL JENNIE DAHLBERG CO 123

111

137

371

1ST

ADULT MALE TRADITIONAL DON MENDEZ CO 192 KURT MILLS CO 163 IVOR HILL CO 168

180 166 154

205 198 169

577 527 491

1ST 2ND 3RD

YOUNG ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE LIMITED RECURVE/LONGBOW KATHERINE DAHLBERG CO 208 138 211

557

1ST

YOUTH MALE FREESTYLE MARTIN WARD NM ORRIN DEWBRE NM

495 463

272 277

504 457

1271 1197

1ST 2ND

CUB MALE FRESTYLE AARON DEJONG CO TREVOR ROLLINS UT

534 451

282 194

535 375

1351 1000

1ST 2ND

BOWHUNTERS IN ACTION BIG GAME Bill Bechen . . . Klamath Falls, OR .........Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Cougar Mike D Anglin ......Yucaipa, CA ...................Bobcat

SMALL GAME Tom Puccci .......Park Rapids, MN ........................9 Mike Anglin..........Yucaipa, CA ............................9 Lance Ryan.......Cherry Valley, CA........................2 Harold Anglin.......Yucaipa, CA ..........................64 August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 15

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS 2005 MID-ATLANTIC SECTIONAL RESULTS HOSTED BY MECHANICSBURG ARCHERS • JUNE 4-5, 2005 SAT. SCORE

SUN. SCORE

ADULT BAREBOW FEMALE 1 CAY MCMANUS 2 HEATHER BACH

466 428

471 403

937 831

ADULT BOWHUNTER MALE 1 JOHN MASON 2 HOWARD FARIS 3 NICKOLAS GIANNETTI 4 JOE MCMANUS

473 458 402 390

466 473 419 407

939 931 821 797

PLACE NAME

TOTAL SCORE

ZADULT BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE FEMALE 1 STACY PRUITT 517 2 KELLY ZERBE 513

525 525

1042 1038

ADULT BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE MALE 1 NELSON MENGEL 532 2 CHRIS MOSER 542 3 STEVE SINCLAIR 536 4 JIM MITCHELL 529 5 DARYL RAUGHT 515 6 TERRY ZERBE 515 7 JOHN ELINE 509 8 DONALD DENIGHT II 484 9 JERRY MAX 524

543 530 525 526 503 498 502 472 0

1075 1072 1061 1055 1018 1013 1011 956 DNF

ADULT BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED MALE 1 MYRON SWARTS 482 467 2 MARK WILLIAMS 464 450 3 MIKE MALONE 455 442

949 914 897

ADULT FREESTYLE LIMITED FEMALE 1 SUE BLICKENSTAFF 474 ADULT FREESTYLE LIMITED MALE 1 DAVE HRYN 525 2 PAUL DONAHOO 506 3 EDWARD BOWEN 493 4 STEVE TINCHER 491 5 DAVID BLICKENSTAFF 479 6 JARRET FRAME 468

471

945

524 519 501 502 479 451

1049 1025 994 993 958 919

ADULT TRADITIONAL MALE 1 MICHAEL ORLIC

351

352

703

ADULT FREESTYLE FEMALE 1 SUE WEINSTEIN 2 BERNADETTE PETRUSKI 3 HEIDI SNYDER 4 PENNY BROWN 5 HEATHER KERSHNER

535 511 502 444 510

540 524 520 457 0

1075 1035 1022 901 DNF

ADULT FREESTYLE MALE - FIRST FLIGHT 1 RANDY HINKELMAN 555 2 J.C. BRADWAY 552 3 CHRIS JOHNSON 551 4 JOE MAGROGAN 550 5 PHILIP SCHWARTZTRAUBER 544 6 JON BACH 543 7 LESTER TUCKER 545 8 BRIAN TATE 545 9 BILL LOFTEN 549 10 EDWARD SKLANEY 543

555 550 548 544 547 548 545 542 529 532

1110 1102 1099 1094 1091 1091 1090 1087 1078 1075

ADULT FREESTYLE MALE - SECOND FLIGHT 1 ROBERT WERTZ 539 2 ROGER PRUITT 538

553 535

1092 1073

16 Archery Magazine AUG/SEP 2005

SAT. SCORE

SUN. SCORE

534 536 539 535 539 533 535

536 531 527 531 526 531 524

1070 1067 1066 1066 1065 1064 1059

ADULT FREESTYLE MALE - THIRD FLIGHT 1 CASEY PARKELL 530 2 DOMINICK MANNINO 529 3 SCOTT KEARNEY 523 4 ALAN SODEN 528 5 BRIAN SHIMP 526 6 STEVE MILCOFF 521 7 CRAIG DZURKO 520 8 TIMOTHY PEIRSON 519 9 BRENNON CLEARY 520 10 RICHARD HAYES 518

534 527 529 518 515 515 511 512 507 504

1064 1056 1052 1046 1041 1036 1031 1031 1027 1022

ADULT FREESTYLE MALE - FORTH 1 WILLIAM HAYMAKER 2 MICHAEL YOTSKO 3 JOE ALLEN 4 MICHAEL BARRY 5 PHILIP NUTTALL 6 JOHN WILSON 7 DALE GROSSL 8 DALE RUCKER 9 KEITH PEW

507 506 504 499 490 498 489 0 0

1020 1015 1009 1002 996 996 990 DNF DNF

555 546

555 549

1110 1095

469

434

903

538 536 527 524 506 504 489 488

529 527 527 526 496 486 477 459

1067 1063 1054 1050 1002 990 966 947

MASTER SENIOR FREESTYLE LIMITED FEMALE 1 WINFIELD PARIS 447

438

885

MASTER SENIOR FREESTYLE LIMITED MALE 1 LARRY MOWAT 480 2 VICTOR MATTHEWS 456 3 AL TOWLER 438

466 442 426

946 898 868

SENIOR BAREBOW FEMALE 1 KATHLEEN JARVIE

230

264

494

SENIOR BAREBOW MALE 1 BILL KEEN 2 WILLIAM VRABEL 3 JIM LAIRD 4 EDWARD JARVIE

469 457 377 354

461 448 414 374

913 905 791 728

PLACE NAME 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

T. L. WILLIAMS MICHAEL CROWE JEFF PODOSEK BRANDON GIBSON JAY SUSEN BOB ROBUSTELLI BRIAN TOWNSEND

PRO. FREESTYLE MALE 1 DARRYL DIEHL 2 TONY BAINES MASTER SENIOR BAREBOW MALE 1 LARRIE EMERSON MASTER SENIOR FREESTYLE MALE 1 O.J. AVERY 2 ANDREW ROSLEWICZ 3 JOSEPH BAUERNFEIND 4 DARREL GEHMAN 5 MIKE LEPERA 6 DAVID TARRY 7 GEORGE CURDIE 8 WARREN MAGEE

FLIGHT 513 509 505 503 506 498 501 499 463

TOTAL SCORE

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS SAT. SCORE

SUN. SCORE

410

382

792

SENIOR BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE MALE 1 JERRY POWERS 538 2 RAY MAY 522 3 MIKE COLLINS 520 4 JAMES KING 519 5 GEORGE THIES 505 6 HARRY KIBLER 502 7 CHARLES BOBROWSKI 487 8 GUS BROWN 482 9 CARLES MARTENS 436

542 523 520 509 504 504 502 466 450

1080 1045 1040 1028 1009 1006 989 948 886

PLACE NAME SENIOR BOWHUNTER MALE 1 RONALD THOMPSON

TOTAL SCORE

SENIOR TRADITIONAL MALE 1 JACK THORPE

371

344

715

SENIOR FREESTYLE FEMALE 1 GWENDOLWN MCMURRAY 2 STELLA DEVORE

520 508

515 515

1035 1023

SENIOR FREESTYLE MALE - FIRST FLIGHT 1 LARRY HIX 551 2 DAVID TOWNSEND 543 3 ED REICHERT 539 4 SONNY FOOTE 541 5 ALAN HINES 536 6 JOHN HURLEY 532 7 CHARLIE MYERS 531

538 539 542 538 540 540 528

1089 1082 1081 1079 1076 1072 1059

SAT. SCORE

PLACE NAME

SUN. SCORE

TOTAL SCORE

SENIOR FREESTYLE MALE - SECOND FLIGHT 1 DOUGLAS JOYCE 530 2 CARL LUCAS 527 3 LOUIS HAVEL 523 4 R. BRUCE SMITH 515 5 STAN LENHART 515 6 LEWIS BARBERA 518 7 AL LIGUORI 516 8 KENNETH DEVORE 498

536 517 514 520 515 511 507 489

1066 1044 1037 1035 1030 1029 1023 987

SENIOR FREESTYLE LIMITED MALE 1 JOHN GROSSL 467 2 ART REIMER 437

436 444

903 881

SENIOR PRO. FREESTYLE MALE 1 TOM GOBLENTZ 2 RON WEST

550 550

555 553

1105 1103

YOUNG ADULT FREESTYLE FEMALE 1 LINDSAY LAVENHAR 506

504

1010

YOUNG ADULT FREESTYLE MALE BLAKE LOPER DONAL DENIGHT III

538 490

0 0

DNF DNF

YOUTH FREESTYLE MALE 1 ANDREW SHERIFF

354

377

731

YOUTH BAREBOW FEMALE 1 SARA LAVENHAR

323

343

666

CUB FREESTYLE MALE 1 ZACH GROSSL

430

431

861

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 17

SECTIONAL TOURNAMENT RESULTS 2005 GREAT LAKES SECTIONAL 3-D RESULTS APRIL 16-17 ADULT MALE BAREBOW Dean Thompson..............................................................................291 ADULT MALE BHFS Walter Erickson ................................................................................355 Matt Clark .......................................................................................320 Robert Sprik ....................................................................................306 Richard Evans ..................................................................................298 Josh Bodenchak ...............................................................................286 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE Dean Ashton ...................................................................................421 Bill Edmonds ...................................................................................419 Bryan Robins ...................................................................................413 Pat Mummert..................................................................................411 Mike Anderson ................................................................................387 Gim Green ......................................................................................370 SENIOR MALE TRADITIONAL Gerry Grabman ...............................................................................290 Otis Reynolds ..................................................................................229

ADULT MALE TRADITIONAL Robert Hester ..................................................................................253 Don Hanson ....................................................................................217 James Miller.....................................................................................159 ADULT FEMALE TRADITIONAL Sue Hanson .....................................................................................228 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER Jay Cottrill .......................................................................................298 Larry Browne ...................................................................................274 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LTD Scott Kelly .......................................................................................351 Larry Byrum.....................................................................................320 Mark Koch.......................................................................................316 James Mewbourne ..........................................................................298 Tim Beitler.......................................................................................280 Jack Plique.......................................................................................256 SENIOR MALE FS LIMITED Charlie Starnes ................................................................................311

SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE Jim Hasty.........................................................................................450

SENIOR PRO FS FEMALE Madonna Hasty ...............................................................................434

MASTER SR. MALE FREESTYLE James Miller Sr.................................................................................319

YOUNG ADULT BB MALE Cody MacIntyre...............................................................................140

YOUNG ADULT MALE FREESTYLE Jack Plique Jr....................................................................................327

YOUNG ADULT FS FEMALE Michelle Miller.................................................................................244

LEADING THE W ORLD IN 3D AND TA R GET AR CHER Y RGET ARCHER CHERY

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www.LancasterArchery.com Archery Techxperts Eager to Serve with Excellence 18 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

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A NugeHuntStory

BOWHUNTING AFRICA ZEN AND NOW I am on my knees, humbled at the presence of the magnificent beast before me. My hardcore dedicated years, months, weeks, days and untold hours of intensely bowhunting the wilds of Africa and all around the world have once again brought the mighty beast to ground zero and as always, my spirit to flight. I am taken aback at the inescapable metaphysical feelings that overwhelm me each and every time I connect so completely with the beast and the Good Mother Earth which we share. My lifetime of nonstop archery discipline has paid off in huge portions of perfect healthfood protein, and the thrill of the hunt and satisfaction of the kill has again deeply stirred my soul. Every sight, sound, smell and instinct broils up inside of me to create a shivering sensation that I do not believe is available through any other activity known to mankind. My silence is a prayer, and I look again to the heavens in thanks as I prepare to show my reverence by reducing this gift into respectful utility, feeding not only my family and friends, but bringing them great fuel for their souls. Somewhere near, a lion roars its approval and I move on, deeper into the wild, as it should be. If ever there were a land where a sharp stick defined life, it is indeed the wilds of Africa. Whether Year One or Winter 2004, bowhunting in Africa is bowhunting as it was originally designed. As a hardcore musician of the aboriginal primal scream rhythm and blues world of black soul, I may be the only whiteguy who truly understands why black music has so enriched the world as it has. With one hand on my bow and the other fiercely gripping my guitar, I celebrate the purest original primal scream in my music with every note I stab and rip on the strings of both primitive instruments of mass construction. Like the unleashed howling of my hollowbody, hand carved spruce arched-top Gibson Byrdland jazz guitar, I emulate and celebrate the yowl of tooth, fang and claw with wild abandon since day one, trying madly to duplicate Chuck Berry gone ballistic. Craveman liveth. I sense a strong man in a cave, jubilantly dancing naked around a fire, fresh slabs of dangerous, bloody meat hanging over glowing coals, a wet saber toothed tigerskin stretched over a makeshift framework of twisted limbs, his crude bow leaning against the wall with some fine naked babe or three lolling about grinning and slamming down huge, roasted ribs. Grand uninhibited celebration is unleashed by all the select party goers, for the night is alive with

Great Spirit. The brave warrior has just completed the trifecta of survival; he has successfully used his new fangled bow and arrows to kill an intruder who would have killed him and stolen his women, slayed a most ferocious beast to protect his clan and provide life giving protein. Spirits were running as high as spirits can get, and all at once, with total abandon, he picks up a random bone and spontaneously begins to beat on the stretched hide, creating a pounding rhythm that brings everyone to their feet, intensifying the wild dancing to a fever pitch. A drum has just been invented. As one of his females aggressively snatches the club from his flailing hands and takes over the madly pulsating drumming, our crazed warrior reaches for his bow and begins what will someday be described as “air guitar”, but in the process, gleefully plucks the bowstring, bringing a distinct twanging sound in accompaniment to the driving grind of the drum. Eyes widen, dancing becomes nearly uncontrolled and hysterical, and what we have here my friends is the first rock-n-roll rhythm and blues jam session/rock concert. God help us all. They’re all intoxicated on an overdose of adrenaline and protein. Life itself. Beautiful. I hit the dirt of the Sudan running, back in 1978, and though many were predicting the end to African hunting as we then knew it, quite the contrary has become reality in the 27 years since that amazing experience. In fact today, in 2005 and beyond, there are more Americans making their first African safari than at anytime on record. Even with dangerous unrest and social upheaval taking place in some of the more

corrupt, gangster controlled countries like Sudan, Angola, Nigeria, Niger, Somalia, and other pathetic tyrant hellholes, many other African nations have come to understand the simple reality of conservation and the vast revenues and opportunities their countries’ wildlife resources can bring when decency and goodwill prevail. Duh! Though not perfect, nonetheless, thousands of Americans enjoy safe, secure, superb quality hunting adventures in Botswana, Tanzania, Mozambique, Namibia, Zimbabwe and South Africa. Even in places like Cameroon, CAR, Chad, and a few other changing countries, one can still find unique jungle hunts for bongo, lesser kudu, Roan, dwarf buffalo, forest elephant, yellow backed duiker and other limited and strange beasts. It’s wild. I for one avoid the more remote, off the map hunts. Many of my friends partake and have grand, sometimes dangerous tales of high adventure, but certainly not for the faint of heart. Most outfitters and booking agents have up to date references available in order to adequately determine conditions, so to each his own. Even in good old South Africa things can get a bit stupid and crazy with ever changing regulations and outrageous illogical gun restrictions. That being said, I just returned from a most pleasant South African bowhunting safari with friends and we had the time of our lives. Comprehensive paperwork is essential in this world of hyper bureaucracy, and detailed, intelligent advance planning is critical. Having every detail of outfitters, guides and booking agents names, addresses, phone numbers and backups is very important to have on hand and in the hands of family and friends. A coordinated continued on next page

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 19

continued from previous page

time schedule should be in writing with all parties involved so as to leave nothing to guesswork. Passport and backup ID, along with blanket communication with the booker, outfitter and everyone involved can not only make or break a dreamhunt, it can keep us from getting thrown in jail by corrupt law enforcement officials who can’t even read their own laws, to much worse. For example, when flying into Johannesburg South Africa, it would be suicide to spend the night in downtown Jo’burg or anywhere nearby. The only smart move is to load up all gear into the outfitters bakki and head straight for camp into the outback where it is good and safe. Further complicating individual security throughout Africa are the new draconian gunlaws that forbid foreigners from carrying a sidearm for self-defense. I ran into a brickwall of buffoonery on my last trip when the goofy South African government (I think that’s a government. We have gangs like that in Detroit, we just don’t call it government!) had just passed this unjust and indecent ban on selfdefense guns policy, and I went through redtape hell when they confiscated my Glock 10mm at the airport. By any account, it is irresponsible to be defenseless. No fun. Once past the quagmire that is South African customs, as always, my hunting buddies and I were met immediately upon entrance into the arrival concourse of the airport by Limcroma Safaris owner, Hannes Els and whisked expeditiously to his waiting truck for a brief hour plus ride to our first hunting destination. Near the city of Brits, Johann Hermann operates the luxurious Arrow Rest Safaris bowhunting only operation where we dined on the daily four star meals fit for a king. Sharing hunting stories around the glowing campfire in the windproof lapa under the eternal African sky, we felt the

20 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

dynamo of Africa past dancing in the night air. Retiring into our comfortable, private chalets, a hot shower and a sound sleep prepared us for the adventure of a hunter’s dreams. The night sounds of the Dark Continent lullabied us to sleep. After a lifetime of trial and error, I have learned to travel light and efficient, but never sacrificing essential gear needed for a quality prepared adventure. The comprehensive gearlist for most of my bowhunting safaris around the world, particularly as perfected for my African adventures, is the following2 fully set up bows, broken in and perfectly adjusted, appropriate repair tools & parts, pocket bowpress & spare string assembly, spare release, 2-4 dozen arrows, 2 dozen broadheads, 12 practice tips, 6 Zwickey Judo heads, bowquiver, binoculars and chest carrying strap, sunglasses, knife and broadhead sharpener, belt knife with saw, pocket folding knife with partially serrated edge, belt tool with pliers, file and scissors, 4 pair sox, 4 underwear, 2 hunting pants, 2 longsleeve hunting shirts, wool sweater or vest, warm quiet hunting jacket, face mask, gloves, shin high leather hunting boots, spare scent eliminator boot liner insoles, foot powder, rugged leather camp slippers, complete personal toiletry kit with any medicine you may need, basic 1st aid of Neosporin, gauze, bandaids, hydrogen peroxide, washcloth & spare bath towel, anti-bacterial disposable cloths, hunter scent-free soap, after-bite stick, backpack for daily bivouacs, emergency space blanket, fire starter, candle & spare lighters, quality pocket flashlight & spare batteries & bulbs, flagging tape, screw in hooks for hanging things in camp & in the blind, small writing tablet & pens, scent free bug dope, scent free sunscreen, book & magazines for long hauls in the blinds, state of

the art global cellphone & charger, RSA power adaptor for charging US gear, quality still camera with film, spare battery, & charger, video camera, tripod, plenty of tape, spare batteries & charger, passport & copy, Glock Model 20 10mm with 3-4 spare mags & ammo, but since no “self-defense” handguns can be brought into South Africa, I will merely bring a special hunting handgun with me like an 8 shot .357 mag S&W revolver with a red dot scope and a bunch of ammo. A US Customs forms for cameras, guns, bows & other personal property you wish to ID as personally owned by you is essential as well. On our recent bowhunting safari into Africa, my hunters and I once again had the time of our lives and took exceptional trophy animals. Great kudu, waterbuck, wildebeest, red hartebeest, blesbok, nyala, zebra, warthog, eland, and impala were evident in abundance. As is always the case, every meal was wonderful and the accommodations splendid. Every African trip for me has been truly great and all our hunters express zeal and excitement to return. After all these years of trial and error, we have nailed down a select list of hunting operations that fulfill all our high demands, and we can offer some superb experiences for the whole family. Our Sunrize Safaris works closely with experienced outfitters and we are constantly discovering new operations with an eye out for upgrade in every aspect of the hunt and overall experience. As they always say, once you’ve been to Africa you will always want to return. Return with Sunrize Safaris and we will show you one grand time you will never forget. Ted Nugent’s Sunrize Safaris can be contacted at 800-343-4868 or by visiting www.tednugent.com.

Ted Nugent United Sportsmen STATE DIRECTORS Check your state information for any updates. Contact us at 517-750-9060 or nugentusa@cs.com with any changes!

NATIONAL DIRECTOR LARRY POLLACK 15704 VONACHEN DR. CHILLICOTHE IL 61523 309-274-4915/309-274-9653 wolf@mtco.com

GEORGIA - DAVID KNIGHT 1901 Steele Rd. Griffin Ga. 30223 home 770-227-3586 nextel 770-294-0358 email dknight201@earthlink.net

NORTH CENTRAL REGION DIRECTOR, PAUL MILONE 20505 Gobbler Ridge Pacific Junction, IA 51561 (402) 894-2684 pmilone65@mitec.net

HAWAII - TOM BURNISON 4370 Kahili Makai St. Kilauea, HI 96754-5413 808 828-6279 tburnison@yahoo.com

SOUTH EAST REGION DIRECTOR ROBERT OWENS 423-745-0804 rgohunter@yahoo.com SOUTH WEST REGION DIRECTOR, KEVIN KELLEY 702-646-4276 kkelley@coam.net SOUTH CENTRAL REGION DIRECTOR, JOHN ROGERS 314-839-4212 johnrogers59@sbcglobal.net NATIONAL HANDICAP DIRECTOR, TODD ALBAUGH 7305 Ira Lane Howell MI 48855 517-546-6108 www.disabledhunting.net albaugh@ismi.net TNUSA CANADA DIRECTOR ANDY KOWALCZEWSKI 905-624-7551 ext. 27 akinsur@attglobal.net STATE DIRECTORS ALABAMA-CHAD HOUZE PO Box 65 Crossville AL 256-528-5183 chouze@tds.net ALASKA-DONALD GILHOUSEN 5432 Northern Lights Blvd. #313 Anchorage AK 99508 907-276-3440 SE ALASKA AREA DIRECTOR Bill Mercer Fairbanks AK 907-451-8396 texn@acsalaska.net ARIZONA- RONALD THOMPSON 4618 W Milkyway Chandler AZ 85226 480-961-0625 RBNHOOD@cox.net

IDAHO- Dean & Donna Rhoten P.O. Box 493 Star, ID 83669208-286-9101 rhotens4@spro.net ILLINOIS- SOUTH REGION: JAMIE PHELPS 1305 Townley Dr Bloomington IL 61704 309-661-6596 japhelps@gte.net INDIANA- BRAD LANDWERLEN 531 W Dwain Village Shelbyville IN 46176 317-392-8747 uncle-brad@lycos.com IOWA- CHARIE MCMAHON 410 E. Wall Street Centerville, IA 52544 (641) 895-5307 charie_ia_sd@hotmail.com IOWA REGIONAL DIRECTORS Alesia Allen (RD) P.O. Box 1073 Centerville, IA 52544 (641) 895-4704 Email: lish_ia@hotmail.com JON HOCHGESANG (RD) 1909 35th st Des Moines, IA 50310 (515)274-6484 Email: opusx1965@aol.com STACY SCHLICHER (RD) 1303 Primrose Road Donnellson, IA 52625 (319) 836-2008 Email: sschlicher@vistabakery.com JOEL FLACK (RD) 2015 Bancroft Drive Iowa City, Iowa 52240 Phone: 319-354-9219 E-Mail: burntFFg@msn.com

ARKANSAS- DAVE ROWDEN Rogers, AR 888-656-3545

KANSAS- MARTY DEVADER 419 Indiana Holton KS 66436 H 785-364-5456 C 785-383-3859 martydevader@yahoo.com

CALIFORNIA- RICK COOK p.o.box 70063 Riverside,Ca.92513 (951) 966-8134 sharkfoodr@earthlink.net

KENTUCKY- MICHAEL PHILLIPS 30 Lime Drive Murray KY 42071 bosshogg1023exar@hotmail.com (270) 279-5230

COLORADO- BRIAN BURTRAM 721 N. Dory Lakes Dr. Golden, CO 80403 303 582-0356 elkhunter69@msn.com

LOUISIANA- JOHN SIMEONE P.O. Box 464 New Llano, LA 71461 fptopgun@bellsouth.net

CONNECTICUT - AL MOLLER 7 Pleasant Street Vernon CT 06066 al.moller@comcast.net FLORIDA- NICK KELLER 3191 Bee St. E. Orange Park FL 32065 904-272-8761 spiritofwildmc@aol.com FLORIDA HANDICAP STACEY STEWART P.O. Box 1138 Indian Rocks Bch., Fl. 33785-1138 catpower1@verizon.net

MARYLAND- PETER VANDERVEGT 12432 Dancrest Dr Clarksburg MD 20871 301-515-4140 Maryland@huntingtribes.com MICHIGAN- SKIP CORYELL 6310 Greggs Crossing Nashville, MI 49073 269-838-5586 skip.coryell@smiths-aerospace.com www.skipcoryell.com

MINNESOTA- MARK DAVID PERRY 2504 Lohomme Dieu View Alexandria MN 56308 320-762-3963 zep@rea-alp.com 21 Archery Magazine APR/MAY 2005

MISSISSIPPI- STEVE HOLMES 469 Claiborne Rd Heidleburg MS 39439 601-426-3012

SOUTH DAKOTA- BRUCE CULL 2301 E Hwy 50 Yankton SD 57078 800-658-3094

MISSOURI- TOM PACHOLSKI PO Box 77 Sunrise Beach MO 65079 573-374-4794 tomandshawnee@charter.net

WEST RIVER REGIONAL DIRECTOR JAMES N. CARPENTER 4580 W. Nike Rd Rapid City S.D. 57701 James.Carpenter@ellsworth.af.mil

NEBRASKA- KEVIN MARKT 2705 N 125th Ave Omaha NE 68164 402-492-9203 kmarkt@cox.net

TENNESSEE- RICHARD BROWN 7929 Vera Louise Circle Bartlett TN 38133 901-382-2581 forty5magnum@aol.com

NEVADA- KEVIN KELLEY 4933 W. Craig Rd. #194 Las Vegas, NV 89130 702 493-4432 kkelley@coam.net

TEXAS- CHESTER MOORE JR 101 Broad St Orange TX 77630 409-882-0945 cmoorehunt@aol.com

NEW HAMPSHIREMIKE SANTOSUOSSO 225 Main Ave South Hampton NH 03827 603-394-1089 snoman@ttlc.net http://www.tnusanh.com NEW JERSEY- JOE CROUCH 235 Stanhope Sparta Rd Andover NJ 07821 tnusanj@optonline.net

UTAH- KEVIN SMART 5672 W 5960 S Kearns UT 84118 801-966-7000 KevinSmart7000@msn.com VIRGINIA — BETSY NIGHTHORSE P.O.Box 7046 Fredericksburg, VA 22404 wahtaskha@aol.com WASHINGTON - BRYAN TAYLOR Olympia, WA (360) 943-2671 betay1960@hotmail.com http://www.TnusaWA.com

NEW MEXICOBRAD BEAUCHAMP PO Box 555 Pie Town NM 87827 505-772-2661 flf.bradsart@gilanet.com NEW YORK- THOMAS DOWNEY MONTICELLO, NY (845)791-1386 pipewrench_ny@yahoo.com NORTH CAROLINA MICHAEL COX 3590 Jennifer View Dr Asheboro, NC 27205 coxmw@triad.rr.com NORTH DAKOTA- JASON ZINS 3353 15th Ave SW #306 Fargo ND 58103 702-271-0442 Jason_zins@hotmail.com OHIO- FRED ICKES 1974 Marin DR Toledo,Ohio 43613 419-474-8107 spacetruckin@buckeye-express.com OKLAHOMA- CODY CRAFT 14301 Teresa Jones Oklahoma 73049 phone 405-850-8589 e-mail lnjc@gbronline.com

WEST VIRGINIA- JIM McCULLOUGH 24 Catalpa Hts Stonewood WV 26301 304-624-7343 jimmcullough@outdrs.net WISCONSIN- ROBIN STIBB W12801 Hwy. 23 Ripon, WI 54971 920-398-2380 rstibby@hotmail.com JAMIE HEWITT MADISON AREA DIRECTOR (608) 244-5643 the4jhs@aol.com SHAWN CLARK SHEBOYGAN AREA DIRECTOR (920) 457-6934 bowhunt1@bytehead.com JOHN MABRY MARINETTE AREA DIRECTOR (715) 732-4360 johnm856@yahoo.com ROBIN STIBB WI STATE DIRECTOR (920) 229-4054 rstibby@hotmail.com

OREGON - JOANN LEATHERS Tillamook, OR 503-842-8796 joann@oregoncoast.com

KURT FLACK OSHKOSH AREA DIRECTOR (920) 235-9805 lambeau@execpc.com

NW OREGON AREA DIRECTOR Mike Potts Portland, OR hoggemin@hotmail.com

CRAIG EILBES EVENT COORDINATOR Waupun, WI (920) 533-5637

PENNSYLVANIA - TIM CASE 9095 Perry Hwy Waterford, PA 16441 Cell: 814-881-4450 Home: 814-864-2612 timpasd@earthlink.net

ROBERT BIRD WI HANDICAP DIRECTOR (920) 833-9886 bobbird4@netzero.net

SOUTH CAROLINA- JEFF HEUSINKVELD 1086 Belcher Road Boiling Springs, SC 29316 (864) 578-6856 tnusasc@yahoo.com http://www.tnusasc.com

WYOMING- GARY FALES 2768 Northfork Rt Cody WY 82414 307-587-3747 gary@rimrockranch.com

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 21

TNUSA: Ted Nugent United Sportsmen of America

&

Member Alerts Events

For all director reports and a complete state director listing, please visit www.tednugent.com/members/state_news.shtml HANDICAP I’d like to announce that Stacey Stewart is the new Florida state handicap director. She can be contacted @ 727-596-6126 or at catpower1@verizon.net. Also I’m glad to report that On May 3, 2005, the governor of West Virginia signed SB575 into law. Starting in 2006, disabled hunters in West Virginia will be allowed to hunt with a crossbow during the entire WV archery season. I’d like for all NFAA & TNUSA web hosters to drop me a line with their updated websites for I’m redoing my links section on my website. God Bless, National Handicap Director for TNUSA Todd Albaugh FLORIDA Hello Florida!!! My name is Stacey Stewart, and I’ll be taking over as State Handicap Director. I’m very honored and am looking forward to working with my Florida Bloodbrothers and Sisters! It’s a very exciting time to get involved with the recent NFAA merger. I’ll do my best to assist all hunters and handicap sportsmen. Drop me an email with any events, ideas, or questions. Hope to hear from you all soon. Meowza! Stacey Stewart National Handicap IOWA The Department of Natural Resources will seek "furbearer" status for mountain lions, in the wake of recent appearances of the big cat in Iowa over the last few years. The state's Natural Resources Commission has instructed staff of the DNR to pursue approval in the Iowa Legislature for the classification; which would allow the agency to establish regulations such as a season and limits on killing mountain lions. The same status will be sought for black bears. The re-emergence of the mountain lion, or cougar, prompted a petition to place the animal on the state's endangered species list. At the NRC's June meeting in Storm Lake, the petition was reviewed, but commissioners were told that there was little public support for "endangered list" status. "We must look at what realistically might happen, to get some protection for mountain lions A more positive approach is to get them back on the 'furbearer' list", emphasized DNR wildlife research supervisor Terry Little. DNR wildlife staff will work with conservation and agriculture advocates in the coming months to come up with acceptable wording. A key area will be to eliminate indiscriminate killing of the wild cats, yet allowing landowners to protect themselves, their family, property, pets and livestock if threatened.

22 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

Also, we are still working on the CCW issue in Iowa. Anyone interested in helping with this matter or any other issue please let me know. Charie_ia_sd@yahoo.com Charie McMahon KANSAS Greetings to all Kansas members. The annual Jackson County Sherrifs three day camp will be in August again. I will know more when we are closer to that date. I should have it the next issue. I NEED area directors. Give me a call. God Bless Marty DeVader S.D. OKLAHOMA Here are some events that might be of interest to all outdoor enthusiasts. AUGUST 1st: Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting. The 9 a.m. meeting will be held in the first floor auditorium at Department headquarters, (1801 N Lincoln, OKC, OK). 2nd: Aquatic Education Clinic at ODWC Casting Pond, Jenks ODWC office. For more information contact Mike McAllister at (918) 2299-2334. 4th: National Wild Turkey Federation fundraising banquet for the Tri State Chapter will be held at Elks Lodge, Miami. For more information contact Jeremy Radebaugh at (918) 542-6296. 6th: Aquatic Education Clinic at Metro Tech Spring Lake, OKC Parks and Rec Clinic. For more information contact Bob Martin at (405) 755-4014. 9th: Aquatic Education Clinic at ODWC Casting Pond, Jenks ODWC office. For more information contact Mike McAllister at (918) 2299-2334. 13th: Aquatic Education Clinic at Dolese Youth Park Lake, OKC Parks and Rec Clinic. For more information contact Bob Martin at (405) 755-4014. 13th: National Wild Turkey Federation fundraising banquet for the Twin Rivers Chapter will be held at CPN Reunion Hall North, Shawnee. For more information contact Aaron Capps at (405) 964-4840. 13th: Hunter Education Home Study: Norman. Pre-registration will begin July 1. 13th: Hunter Education: High School Building #6, Jenks; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; (918) 299-2334. 16th: Aquatic Education Clinic at ODWC Casting Pond, Jenks ODWC office. For more information contact Mike McAllister at (918)

2299-2334. 17th: Hunter Education: Red Castle Gun Club, Sand Springs; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 18th: Hunter Education Home Study: ODWC Office, Jenks; 6 p.m. - 10 p.m.; (918) 2992334. 19th: Tulsa Area Quail Unlimited annual Banquet and auction fundraiser will be held in Claremore, OK. For tickets and more info, please call Glen Shoulders at (918) 633-8439 or Steve Smith at (918) 625-5680. 20th: Hunter Education: Owasso Community Center; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; (918)299-2334. 20th: Hunter Education: Civic Center, Wagoner; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 20th: Hunter Education: Red Castle Gun Club, Sand Springs; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; (918)299-2334. 20th: Aquatic Education Clinic at Crystal Lake, OKC Parks and Rec Clinic. For more information contact Bob Martin at (405) 7554014. 20th: National Wild Turkey Federation fundraising banquet for the San Bois Strutters Chapter will be held at VFW, Stigler. For more information contact Greg Pound at (918) 527-7421. 26&27th: Hunter Education: Great Plains Tech Center Room 300; Aug. 26 (6 p.m.- 10 p.m.) and Aug. 27 (9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.) 27th & 28th: Oklahoma Wildlife Expo 2005 at the Lazy E Arena in Guthrie. More than 100 hands-on events for people of all ages. Aug 27 (8 a.m. - 6 p.m.) and Aug. 28 (10 a.m. - 4 p.m.). 27: First Annual Youth Coyote Calling Contest at the Oklahoma Wildlife Expo. There will be two age classes, a twelve and under class and a thirteen to seventeen class. Contestants will be judged on coyote barks, coyote bark howl and coyote distress sounds. For more contest information contact Scott Ruff at (918) 4560520. 30th: Hunter Education Home Study: H&H Gun Range, OKC; 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.; (405) 947-3888. SEPTEMBER 3rd :Aquatic Education Clinic at Cherokee Nation Pond. For more information call (918) 456-0671. 3rd: Hunter Education: Northeast Technology Center, Pryor; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 6th: Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting. The 9 a.m. meeting will be held in the first floor auditorium at Department headquarters, (1801 N Lincoln, OKC, OK).

8th: Hunter Education Home Study: ODWC Office, Jenks; 6 p.m. - 10 p.m.; (918) 2992334. 10th: Hunter Education Home Study: Midwest City Library; 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; (405) 732-4828. 10th: Hunter Education: High School Cafeteria, Heavener; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 10th: Hunter Education Home Study: Oologah High School; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; (918) 299-2334. 10th: Hunter Education: Grade School Gym, Depew; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; This course will have a live fire component. Lunch will be available for purchase. 10th: Aquatic Education Clinic at Greenleaf State Park. For more information call (918) 487-7125. 17th: Aquatic Education Clinic at Honor Heights. For more information call (918) 6834545. 17th: Hunter Education: Red Castle Gun Club, Sand Springs; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.; (918)299-2334. 17th: Hunter Education: Great Plains Technology Center, Woodward; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 22nd: Hunter Education Home Study: ODWC Office, Jenks; 6 p.m. - 10 p.m.; (918) 2992334. 24th: Hunter Education: Elks Lodge (North of Hwy 64), Sand Springs; 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.; (918) 299-2334. 24th: Hunter Education: Kiamichi Tech Center, McAlester; 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. 24th: National Wild Turkey Federation fundraising banquet for the Okfuskee County Beards and Spurs Chapter will be held at Brickstreet Cafe, Okemah. For more information contact Brandon Burnett at (918) 623-1604. 30th: Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation standardized employment examinations for those seeking employment. The exam will start at 10 a.m. at Tom Steed Development Center Auditorium, Rose State College, Midwest City. You will need to bring a photo ID. 30th and Oct 1st: Hunter Education: OKC Gun Club; Sept. 30 (5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.) and Oct. 1 (8 a.m. - 4 p.m.); This course will have a live fire component. Have a great fall season, Cody Craft SD VIRGINIA I have an update for all members interested in contacting me: I am in the process of relocating to Montross, VA, on the Northern Neck peninsula. While my new accommodations are being readied, I am staying with friends for the summer in King George, so my phone number in Fredericksburg is no longer in service. I can still be reached by mail at my PO Box, or by email. For everyone’s general information and summer reading pleasure I wanted to mention

two recent books that are well worth looking into. “Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder” by Richard Louv (Algonquin Publishers) states for the rest of the world what we have all knownhuman alienation from nature is harmful to our spiritual, mental, and physical health. The author makes some good points about reconnecting youth to the great outdoors and promotes environmental-based education. The other book is “I Remember Papa Bear” by Dick Lattimer (iHunt Communications). This is a wonderful tribute to Fred Bear. For those who never had the honor of meeting him, this book tells his story honestly and is authored by a man who worked with Fred for over 20 years. My late brother Ron, like Fred, took down big game with a recurve bow. He had the honor of meeting him many years ago and found him a great inspiration. For those of us not so lucky, this book will have to do. Be safe, be proud, be generous of your time with family and friends, and enjoy the summer! Betsy LOUISIANA Great happenings at Ft Polk Louisiana. The new Shooting Complex for Gun and Archery is now open. Our top gun youth shooters Kade Jones and Buster Carter have hit the limelight on numerous occasions for 2005. Kade made the cover of Bayou Outdoors Magazine with his youth bow kill turkey see May issue “Vision Quest.” Kade has been racking up 1st and 2nd place awards in both 3-D archery and bench rest shooting while Buster slipped in at the Extravaganza and took a clean first place in bench rest and skeet shooting. Probably see more of the same at the Top Gun Regional. Of course they have to contend with the super Pendleton Gun Team from Many Louisiana under coach JODY SKINNER the present holders of all the Junior Top Gun Records. Volunteer Awards were given out at Ft Polk recently for community service; among the recipients were James and Bret McKee of Star Gun and Archery, Mary Callaway FP Recreational Shooting Range and John Simeone TNUSA state director. You can read the last of the “Uncle John’s Outdoors” articles from the Leesville Dailey Leader at: www.leesvilledailyleader.com/articles/2005/05/ 20/sports/sports2.txt . You can always find plenty of Uncle John comments at Talk Back on the Ted Nugent websitewww.tednugent.com John Simeone MISSISSIPPI Greetings to all the BloodBrothers & Sisters of the NFAA! I am excited to announce that the National Archery In Schools program will be introduced in the Mississippi schools this fall. There will be a pilot program in 12 schools with a goal to be in 100 within 2 to 3 years. Also, there have been some changes in the ’05, ’06 hunting season. The change will be for the area South of US Hwy 84 & East of the State Hwy 35. Archery season will open October 15th instead of October 1st. IN THIS

AREA ONLY and will be extended in late archery season to February 15th. If you have any questions, you can contact the MDWFP in Jackson at 601-432-2400. Steve Holmes WISCONSIN This year's fight for a concealed carry law will be every bit as tough as last year's. Newspaper editorials are constantly distorting the facts about concealed carry. So to help raise funds to advertise in newspapers in targeted legislative districts around the state, Wolf River Artisans' Guild is putting together a raffle package consisting of two custom made handguns, a custom knife, custom holsters and a custom presentation case. You can win this package, and help in our efforts to sway the opinions of citizens in key legislative districts. Tickets are a $20 donation each with all profits going toward helping pass the Personal Protection Act. You need not be present to win. Total package value is $5,500. Photos of the raffle prizes and order information can be viewed on the Wolf River Artisans' Guild site at http://www.WolfRiverGuild.org. Robin Stibb WI TNUSA SD WI DISABLED HUNTERS We have 2 great organizations in NE Wisconsin for assisting disabled sportspersons. They assist the physically challenged with hunting and fishing throughout the year. “Challenge the Outdoors” holds a 9-day deer hunt starting the first Saturday in October. You must register by August 31, 2005. Check them out on the web at www.challengetheoutdoors.org or call 920-833-6274. “Joe's Lodge” runs similar activities and can be found on the web at www.beyondtheboundaries.org or call Ed Gritt at 920-984-3096. Do Good Anyway! Robert Bird WI State Handicap Director

TNUSA The number of physicians in the U.S. is 700,000. Accidental deaths caused by physicians per year are 120,000. Accidental deaths per physician is 0.171. Statistics courtesy of U.S. Dept of Health Human Services. The number of gun owners in the U.S. is 80,000,000. The number of accidental gun deaths per year, all age groups, is 1,500. The number of accidental deaths per gun owner is .000188. Statistics courtesy of F.B.I. Statistically, doctors are approximately 9,000 times more dangerous than gun owners.

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 23

by Ted Nugent

Q

Greetings from Wyoming! I am in a wheelchair and bow hunt from a ground blind. I would like to know where you think is the most productive place to set up a blind, food sources or runways? I have taken several good mule deer but have not yet harvested a whitetail. I have recently acquired access to some of the countries best whitetail habitat and have been doing a lot of scouting. Your #1 fan from Wyoming - Zac

A

Thanx for the nice letter Zac. You wheelchair hunters really inspire the rest of us. Godbless ya for that. I'm using and enjoying groundblinds more and more these days, and there's a bunch of great ones out there. Ameristep, GameTracker, Lucky and others perform flawlessly. We've been successfully taking all sorts of game with wheelchair hunters in our Double Bull blinds and recommend them highly. Placement is critical and you appear to have the "funnel" ambush figured out. In decent cover in the shadows a few days in advance is a good idea, downwind of expected game travel.

Q

Hey Ted. Im a 15 year old bowhunter and I have some questions for you. Do you think I'll get more flat arrow flight and more true arrow flight with hard helical feathers? Also do you think the Magnus Stingers will out perform the G5 Montecs? Thank you - Nick

A

I remember when I was a 15 year old bowhunter Nick. Huge fun huh! Enjoy every moment of it as your early start will drive your spirit I assure you. I'm a huge fan of hard helical feather fletching for both pragmantic and aesthetic reasons. A pretty, hi-profile feather with a hard twist will steer our hunting arrows much better than any other for sure. A flat arrow trajectory isn't really a property of helcal versus straight so much, and I don't believe it is a worthwhile consideration. Accurate shot placement is everything, and with stealthy bowhunting skills and accurate arrow placement, you can't go wrong with either the great Magnus Stinger or the quality G5 heads. They're both killers! Goodluck and keep me posted. Send pictures of you and your friends shooting and carry on. BloodBrothers, Ted

Q

Hey Ted. I need info on your instinctive style of shooting. How do you anchor with the Scott Grip release? I've also noticed that you use speed buttons around you nock position. Why on both top and bottom? I've tried shooting like that but I've only used 4 buttons underneath and one on top. Over the top one I secure it down with a nock. I've had some success

24 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

practicing like that but despite all the practice, I'm nowhere near as consistent as I should be. The bow I've been using is a PSE Carrera at 29'' draw, and set at 60 pounds. That and I used 30'' Easton 2312 Superslams with 100 grain Innerloc 3 blade broadheads. One problem I'm sure of is the bow is 29'' draw. I found out that I'm a 28" draw. And with the release loop, it adds even more length. I've tried shortening the loop, but it lengthens as the knots tighten. Could it be the bow? What can you recommend to help me to shoot the "Nuge" way? Now about arrows. I realize that carbons are more accurate with much better penetration, but how healthy is it to use carbon? It can't be good for the meat when and if a carbon arrow breaks off inside an animal. Also, when it comes to cutting carbon arrows, the carbon fumes and particles in the air can't be good for us. I have to wonder if it's environmentally safe. Even scraping off damaged fletchings of a carbon arrow seems to give out a nasty smell and I see tiny chips of the arrow come off with the glue. What are your thoughts? One day, I hope to get the chance to bow hunt with you at your own Sunrize Acres. Till then, good huntin' and keep up the great work on the best show on the Outdoor Channel, The Spirit of the Wild! Craig Brann

A

All archery is extreme fun for sure Craig, but I derive my most enjoyment from instinctive because it forces me to "become the arrow", which I believe emphasizes the whole archery experience. I anchor my mechanical release in the corner of my mouth as I did my index finger before switching to the release years ago. Same feel. I put numerous rubber eliminator buttons both under and above my arrow nock simply to eliminate the need for a metal nocking point, plus it allows me to more easily adjust my nock point for string stretch or whatever reason I may encounter. Your bow is killer quality, as are all bows out there these days. Draw length is critical, and even an extra inch will complicate your primary hand eye form requirements. All the pros like Randy Ulmer and the masters from NFAA agree that a little short is better than a little too long. Get it as exact as you can but never let it be too long. I believe aluminum and carbon arrows are all AOK, but I give a slight nod to the carbon for overall performance. With common sense attention to procedure, there should be no danger or harm from carbon arrow use in any way. I've built 1000s of GoldTip Nuge arrows and killed 100s of animals without a problem. Keep in touch and goodluck with all your bowhunting adventures. BloodBrothers, Ted

Game Ear Works For Me! by Ward Parker

“Mainstay Outdoor Magazines Bore Me” This is sad to write, but outdoor magazines bore me, especially the big ones that everyone knows and has read. You know which ones I’m writing about. The first magazine subscription I ever had was to one of the big outdoor magazines. That was in 1975. I had been reading this magazine for three or four years before that because my grandfather had subscribed to it since its inception and never tossed out any of the old magazines. Back in the mid-1970s I read that magazine from cover to cover. Couldn’t wait for it to arrive in the mail. I took those magazines to school, on car trips, to my deer stand where I literally sat from predawn to dark with nothing but a Wonder Bread bag full of peanut butter cookies to eat. My friends and I would often look at these magazines and stare at the pictures of the big bucks together and dream that someday we would bag a majestic whitetail deer. Instead of clinging to every word, I now leaf through them and toss them out as if they were junk mail. I rarely spend more than ten minutes paging through it. This magazine can’t keep my attention; hasn’t for years. When my subscription runs out, I’m not renewing it. I’d rather listen to Lawrence Welk. I’m not a big-time, know-it-all hunter. There is plenty I don’t know, but I realized years ago that once I learned to play the wind and not to stink, there isn’t a whole lot more I needed to know to be a successful deer hunter. I don’t need to read 432 articles telling me basically that. The same articles I see as I leaf through the magazine are largely the same ones I saw back in 1977. Only the technology has changed (and not that much) and the price of the hunts. Other than that, you

could label my new magazine as June, 1977 and you couldn’t tell the difference. I don’t really know what kind of articles I’m looking to read in a national outdoor magazine. I don’t like to complain without a solution, but I don’t have a solid one. All I know is I don’t want to read another story about hunting mountain goats or calling elk. I’ve read enough of those kind of articles to last me a lifetime. I’m inspired by the posts I read on tednugent.com of some kid bagging his first deer, information about the Endangered Species Act, information on how to wage the culture war and recruit new hunters, and countless other informative posts from great and very smart guys like onlinebiker, Tim4Trout, Jeff Christensen, Ifyakilliteatit, Dave Hardy and so many others. Maybe I’ve just outgrown these magazines. Maybe I’ve just read it all before—many, many times before. Interestingly, the “big three” mainstay outdoor/hunting that I find are the most boring magazines are the same ones that have never published an article written by Ted Nugent. I used to really look forward to Deer & Deer Hunting magazine when Pat Durkin was at the helm, and still enjoy the Spirit of the Wild op-ed piece by Ted. Pat Durkin’s op-ed pieces were always provocative and challenging, not to mention that I learned something from that magazine. I think it lost its luster when Mr. Durkin left. This magazine should be thankful it has Ted Nugent in it. His pieces continue to captivate me, make me think, inspire me. The editors of the mainstay outdoor magazines have a chore on their hands if they are going to lure me back as a dedicated reader. Again, maybe its just me. Maybe I’m the odd duck who no longer gets a charge out of reading duck hunting stories. But I doubt it.

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August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 25

w w w. t n k f k . c o m

Ted Nugent Kamp for Kids

By Skip Coryell

The Future Face of Hunting: 5-year old Collette Ferris tells it like it is! Five year old Collette Ferris just loves animals. She loves them, and she eats them! In a recent interview, I asked Collette what animals were her favorite. She tilted her head to one side, causing her long, blonde hair to fall down her right shoulder, then she smiled and said, “I like dogs and cats, but we don’t eat ‘em. We eat deer!” I smiled and questioned her further. “So, Collette, what do deer taste like? Are they good?” Collette’s big, blue eyes opened wide, catching the light, adding emphasis and excitement to her words. “Yup! They’re good. They taste kinda chickeny, or maybe a little like pork and chicken.” We were in a crowded office where I work, and I could hear the other adults trying to suppress their laughter. I pressed Collette for more details. “So where do deer come from?” Collette brought her right hand up to her chin and held her forefinger there, thinking hard as if I’d just asked her the secret to the universe. “They come from the woods. God made ‘em. He made me too!” I laughed before answering her. This little hunting chick was a pro. She had all the answers. “Yes, that’s true. God made me too, but I’m sure it was much earlier in his career. So how do you get these deer before you eat them?” Colette was quick to reply. “My mommy shoots ‘em.” “Really? How does that work?” “You have a gun, then you aim it, then you pull this little thingy and shoot it, and it’s dead!” “Really. What happens after that?” “You got to take the fur off, cuz ya can’t eat the hair. Then ya got to cut ‘em up!” I rumpled Collette’s hair and then thanked her for the interview. I found it amazing and extremely refreshing that a little 5-year old girl had figured out simple truths, basic to life, that half the ivy league and all of PETA were still getting wrong. But little Collette had it figured out - hunting is good hunting is natural. I wondered how this was possible until I interviewed her mother, then it all became clear. “So Connie, how has hunting affected your relationship with your daughter?” Connie, a working single mom with never enough time to do all the things that need doing, responded with a confident smile. “It’s definitely made it better. Collette and I enjoy doing lots of things together. I include her in everything I do, and because I enjoy hunting, I want her to experience the fun with me.” I nodded my head. It made good sense. “So how did Collette take to hunting? Was there any resistance at all? Was she squeamish at the thought of killing an animal?” “Not at all. She was quite open to it right from the first time I took her out with me. Ever since she was younger than a year old, I've been taking her for walks in the woods. She has seen my excitement over a successful hunt, and she wanted to experience it too.” I could see right away that Collette was the apple of her mother’s eye, and that the apple hadn’t fallen far from the maternal tree. After I’d finished the interview, I felt hope for America and our hunting way of life. All of us, as parents, aunts, uncles, and grandparents have to step up to the plate and pass on our hunting heritage and our way of life to the ones we love. If we don’t, it will be lost forever. And if we fail our own families, our own children, the ones that we love most in life, what hope is there? I guess it’s true what Uncle Ted always says: “Take your kids hunting so you don’t have to hunt for your kids!” As I sit and ponder Collette’s words, I can’t help but feel confident about the future. I think hunting is safe in Collette’s hands. She’s the future face of hunting! 26 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

NFAA THE FUTURE OF ARCHERY RESTS ON THE SHOULDERS OF DADS & MOMS.

Pat Brunner gave his grandson Jordan Harding archery lessons for Christmas. Grandpa decided that the kids shouldn’t have all the fun, so he took lessons as well. These photos show they enjoy shooting both target and field archery together. August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 27

SHEMANE NUGENT’S

Q U E E N

O F

T H E

F O R E S T

How To Videotape Your Next Hunt BY SHEMANE NUGENT

Along with cell phones and laptops, nearly everyone has a video camera these days. We all want to capture precious moments of our kids’ first steps, swim meets, basketball games, and, of course, Christmas, Easter and Thanksgiving holidays. Why not turn the camera on yourself and document your encounter with the beast on your next outdoor adventure to prove to skeptical fellow hunters you really did go out on Opening Day? You don’t have to have a degree to film your adventure, but you do need proper equipment and a plan. First, let’s talk about cameras. Walk into any consumer electronic shop and you can easily be overwhelmed by the choices of good video cameras. Digital video cameras, also known as camcorders, come in many sizes and can accomplish many different things. There are cameras that will actually operate underwater and cameras the size of a credit card. Decide what’s most important to you; videotaping a sperm whale, or your next hunting adventure? A crisp clear picture, extensive zoom, or special effects are some of the extras that will allow you to create a state-of-the-art production you’d be proud to show off. Oftentimes, however, you’ll have to sacrifice one option for another. Read the fine print and ask lots of questions. Look for an all-around good camera that is durable. Digital video has come a long way and every year cameras get smaller and smaller, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they’re better. Cell phones can even record video, but don’t plan on using that for your Hollywood production. You’ll sacrifice quality. If I had to pick one particular option, quality, clear footage is the most important one. Getting the best picture is vital. Why go through the trouble of videotaping a hunt if the camera you chose doesn’t operate in low light very well or won’t zoom much and the kill shot is blurry? No question, it’s much easier to tote around a small camera, maybe one that will fit in the palm of your hand, but those products usually don’t produce the best picture. Lighting is a critical consideration, too. The bewitching hour is either dawn or dusk when daylight is minimal and when the beast will usually wait to show itself. Since hunters don’t have the option of bringing a lighting crew, 28 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

it might be a good idea to get a camera with both high resolution and low-lighting video capabilities. Read the instruction booklet for tips on taping in minimal light. Use the white balance feature to maximize colors and clarity. Sure, it’s difficult to remember all these things when you have to worry about all the amazing demands and challenges of your hunt, the equipment and still remaining stealthy. It can be done. Ted videotapes his own hunts often. He’ll take the amazing Huntercam Cradle unit and film himself. Convincing someone else to get up at the crack of dawn on a day off and trudge through a swamp or snowdrift for you is obviously optimal. Be certain, however, that person knows your camera as well as you do. There’s nothing worse than being asked, “Where’s the power switch,” when you’re trying to be invisible in the woods. Audio is another major factor. A wireless microphone is only critical if you want to take your filming to the next level – beyond family viewing. Sure, it’s nice to have a mic attached to your collar that will pick up every sound you make clearly. However, some of us find it irritating when people whisper during a sacred hunt. That’s not necessary for home videos. You can always add a voice-over afterwards. Built in microphones are fine if you know how to use them. One downside is that camera mics pick up the ambient sound – everything and anything that’s near it. If you’re not careful, it will pick up the cameraman’s breathing, (and I know a couple of heavy breathers!) Plus, continued on page 40

NFAA STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS VIRGINIA JIM QUARLES, DIRECTOR jim.quarles@vfaa.org Irene Stocksdale, member of Northern Virginia Archers in Fairfax County and Archery Village Manager for the second year, notes that the Ducks Unlimited Great Outdoors Festival on June 17-19 was broadcast in the Hampton Roads, Fredericksburg, Richmond, Lynchburg and Roanoke areas. The NASP Program in Virginia is being conducted by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF). Irene Stocksdale has been asked by Karen Holson, Outdoor Education Program Development Coordinator for VDGIF, to assist in training teachers on August 6-8 at George Mason High School. VDGIF wants this program to become statewide like other States. Paul Vogel reports that the Fundamentals Archery Education Program is going strong and expanding. Some of his students are State, Mids, and National champs, and are preparing for the World Championship next year.

OKLAHOMA ROBERT WOOD, DIRECTOR robertw@osaa.us OSAA HALL OF FAME 2004 The Oklahoma State Archery Association named their first class in the newly formed Hall of Fame. Three couples were named. These three couples were pioneers in developing and maintaining the growth of archery in Oklahoma and on the National and World stage. JOE AND HELEN THORNTON You cannot. think of archery without the name of Joe Thornton coming to mind, along with Joe’s wife, Helen, the couple attained world acclaim. Listed below are their accomplishments:

HELEN THORNTON 1963 was a member of the gold medal winning ladies World Championship team. Helsinki, Finland. 1963 won the Southern Archery Championship, setting records in the American and Columbia rounds. 1965 member of the USA Ladies World Champion Archery team, taking the gold in Vasteras, Sweden. 1966 NAA Ladies National Champion. 1966 member of the USA Ambassadors Cup Team that won the North American Championships. In addition to these accomplishments, the couple found time to give demonstrations to countless schools, Boy Scout groups, and church camps. JIM AND IDA REVIS When thinking about archery in Oklahoma, whether on the local, or state level you cannot help but think about Jim and Ida Revis. This couple gave of their time for many years to further the sport of archery in this state. Both served on many committees while becoming outstanding competitors. Listed is a summary of their accomplishments: JIM REVIS Jim was a Barebow, Bowhunter, and Traditional shooter. In fact Jim was instrumental in getting the Traditional class adopted in NFAA competition. State Bowhunting Secretary. State Director, from 1974 until 1981. Southern Section Councilman from 1981 until 1996. Jim also won two NFAA Championships and over-fifty State Championships. IDA REVIS Ida also shot Barebow and Bowhunter. Ida was our state secretary for a number of years, as well as representing Oklahoma as the State Director when called on to do so. Ida won twelve NFAA Championships, and over forty State Championships. Archery was truly a way of life for Jim and Ida, and we owe a great debt to them for their dedication to our sport.

JOE THORNTON 1961 World Champion, Oslo Norway. 1962 British National Champion. Windsor, Eng1and. 1963 Silver Medalist at the World Championships, Helsinki. Finland. 1965 Silver Medalist at the World Championships,. Vasteras. Sweden. 1961-63-65 member of the USA World Champion Archery Team.

DEAN AND ROSIE PRIDGEN Without a doubt the most decorated couple in Archery has to be Dean and Rosie Pridgen. Dean and Rosie have a total of two world titles, 36 National titles, 102 Sectional titles and 121 State Championships. Listed is a summary of their accomplishments:

Joe won several State Championships in the 1960’s. Joe also served three terms on the NAA Board of Governors. 1968 to 1971, and the leader of the movement to get archery into the 1972 Olympic games.

DEAN PRIDGEN 1972 NFAA Outdoor National Champion Open Mens Freestyle (no Pro Division then). 1973-1977-1979 NFAA Outdoor National Champion Pro Freestyle. August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 29

1982-1984-1985 NFAA Indoor National Champion Pro Freestyle. 1986 Professional Archers Association (PAA) National Champion. 1985-L-K Open (Marion, Ohio) PAA Champion. 1982 Tropicana (Vegas) Open Champion. Fresno Safari Champion. Lake of the Woods (Mahomet, IL) Champion. 10,000 Lakes Shoot (MN) Champion. Won Big sky Open twice ñ Montrose, CO, and Craig, CO. Easton Points champion and five times shooter of the year (Pro Division). Served as Midwestern Pro Director for PAA three years. Dean also has 39 NFAA Pro Sectional Indoor and Outdoor wins. 17 Sectional Indoor and wins as a Senior. 43 State Indoor and Outdoor wins as a Pro. 18 State Indoor and Outdoor wins as a Senior. 8 National Outdoor Championships. 7 Indoor National Championships.

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED Hermit Gann ............................................................................424

ROSIE PRIDGEN 1984 World Champion, Sweden. 1986 World Champion, Scotland. 9 NFAA National Outdoor Championships. 5 NFAA National Indoor Championships. 18 Outdoor Sectional wins. 15 Indoor Sectional wins. 25 State Outdoor wins. 20 State Indoor wins.

PRO FEMALE FREESTYLE Diane Watson .........................................................................1341

Rosie also won Atlantic City Archery Classic once in the Women’s Open Division.

FLORIDA TIM AUSTIN, DIRECTOR flarchery@earthlink.net 2005 FLORIDA STATE FIELD CHAMPIONS

SENIOR MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE Joe Melchiore .........................................................................1300 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE James Pettitt ...........................................................................1330 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED Gene Goldacker......................................................................1262 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE LIMITED Guy Learn...............................................................................1247 SENIOR FEMALE FREESTYLE Alice Parrish ............................................................................1232 ADULT FEMALE FREESTYLE Shelly Mascaro .......................................................................1307

MASTER SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE John Sugden...........................................................................1326 SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE Kevin Bergenroth....................................................................1378 PRO SENIOR MALE FREESTYLE Myers Parrish..........................................................................1365 ADULT MALE FREESTYLE Mitch Wright..........................................................................1373

FORT KNOX

28-29 May 2005 - Gator Bowmen - Gainesville, Florida 28 Field + 15 Animal + 28 Hunter CUB MALE OLYMPIC RECURVE Gabriel Finn............................................................................1141 YOUTH FEMALE OLYMPIC RECURVE Kiley Larrick ............................................................................1141 YOUTH MALE OLYMPIC RECURVE Dillon Welsch............................................................................273 SENIOR MALE LONGBOW Tim Van Voorhis .......................................................................972 ADULT MALE LONGBOW Dana Chatoo............................................................................837 SENIOR MALE TRADITIONAL John Lackey ............................................................................1006 ADULT MALE BOWHUNTER Bob Halfmann ..........................................................................909 MASTER SENIOR MALE BAREBOW Marty Shelton.........................................................................1089 SENIOR MALE BAREBOW Shannon North ......................................................................1031 ADULT FEMALE BOWHUNTER FREESTYLE LIMITED Jennifer Davies........................................................................1227

w w w. f t k n o x . c o m

legislature news By Tim Atwood, Bowhunting and Conservation Chairman

Bowhunter Rights Coalition U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Senior Vice President Rick Story addressed representatives from major state bowhunting groups during the 2005 Pope & Young Convention in Springfield, Missouri. He explained that anti-hunters had announced intentions to target bowhunting for extinction and that the Alliance’s “Bowhunter Rights Coalition (BRC) had been formed to counter looming attacks. Many organizations responded by signing on with the BRC to protect America’s bowhunting heritage. National Members Bowhunter Magazine, Inc. Bowhunting World Magazine Bowsite.com International Bowhunting Organization National Bowhunter Education Foundation National Field Archery Association Pope & Young Club Trail of the Sportsman U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance Statewide Members Indiana Bowhunters Association Lone Star Bowhunters Association Maryland Bowhunter’s Society United Bowhunters of Kentucky Wisconsin Bowhunters Association Find out more about the BRC at www.bowhuntercoalition.org. To join, call (614) 888-4868 or email brc@ussportsmen.org.

New Jersey Bear Hunt Reinstated (Columbus) – In spite of having cancelled last year’s hunt, the head of New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection announced yesterday that the state will likely resume hunting black bears in 2005. The decision comes in the wake of months of sportsmen’s protest over the bear hunting cancellation, the airing of a documentary that showed the dangers of overabundant black bears in the state and a near attack on a three-year-old at his home in northern New Jersey.

New Jersey Sunday Hunting Bill Advances to Senate Floor A New Jersey bill to allow Sunday bowhunting has passed a Senate committee thanks to strong support from sportsmen.

New Hampshire Bill Advances to Let Wildlife Agency Promote Hunting A New Hampshire Senate bill that would allow the Fish and Game Department to promote hunting, fishing and trapping has received approval in a House of Representatives committee.

Oregon Considers Hunting with Hounds to Control Cougars An Oregon bill would allow for the reinstatement of cougar hunting with hounds on a trial basis.

National Bear Hunting Defense Task Force Sportsmen’s Groups Meet to Plan Bear Hunting Defense A coalition of sportsmen’s groups concerned about anti-hunting attacks on bear hunting met in Green Bay, Wisconsin May 1314 to discuss how best to defend their heritage. Over 40 organizations from across the country attended the National Bear Hunting Defense Task Force meeting. The coalition was formed by the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance (USSA) in 2003 to defeat federal legislation that would have banned bear hunting over bait. Founding members include the Michigan Bear Hunter’s Association, the Upper Peninsula Bear Houndsmen and the Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association (WBHA). The Task Force’s Initial success in 2003 propelled it to defeat ballot issues and court cases aimed at bear hunting ever since. “It was our coordination with the bear hunting community that made the difference at the ballot and in the courtroom in 2004,” said Rob Sexton, USSA vice president for government affairs. “They made sure we had the resources to win the fights.” The group’s victories convinced the WBHA that it was on the right track coordinating with USSA. “That is why we offered to sponsor the meeting in Green Bay,” said Hubert Malsin, WBHA president. “We need to get all bear hunters in the fold so we can continue to defeat the anti’s.” The meeting agenda included tips on how to strengthen an individual hunting organization, a seminar on how to build a strong presence in state capitols and a message on the threats that loom in the future for bear hunters. For more information about the National Bear Hunting Defense Task Force, call (614) 888-4868.

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 31

PERFECT SCORES ARE NOT AUTOMATIC ON A “MARKED” DISTANCE COURSE. WHAT BETTER PLACE IS THERE TO LEARN HOW TO BE READY FOR ANYTHING. Somewhere over the last several years a misconception was born inferring that “shooting at targets with the distance posted is easy.” I wonder who dreamed that one up? They might at least have said “EASIER” than if the faces were used at unmarked distances but saying only “easy” implies that everyone can just cruise around and end with a near perfect score with little effort. HA! Don’t forget that whatever advance information you might get, such as the distance to the target, understand that YOUR COMPETITION ALSO HAS THE SAME ADVANTAGE INFORMATION so everyone is still starting out equal. Take note that I did not say “EXACT DISTANCE INFORMATION” because, as you will find out in a few moments, sometimes the advance information you are given will cause you to fall further behind the leaders rather than to be able to stay with them. If, for example, marked courses are so much easier then why did it take so long for anyone to post the first ever perfect 560 score? There have been only two Official 560 perfect Field or Hunter scores ever posted at the NFAA Field Nationals and maybe anywhere else, since the more difficult 5-4-3 scoring face came into use in 1978. Plenty of 558’s and 559’s that were only a few thousandths of an inch from a 560, and plenty of 280 perfect half scores but those 560’s are REALLY hard to come by. Maybe the thoughts that follow will enlighten you as to the many factors involved, and why. MORE DIFFICULT TARGET FACES IN 1978. The NFAA Field faces before 1978 had a big white 5 point scoring center that contained a small black aiming reference spot. An outer black ring completed the entire target face and it scored a 3. By 1977 it had become so disproportionate and generous that even I had progressed enough to turn in scores in the 550’s out of a possible 560. But then in 1978 when the small black aiming spot was slightly enlarged to become the entire 5 ring and then basically the white area was scored as a 4 and the outer black ring area still a 3, my scores took a nosedive. Which is exactly the idea. Digging out my old 1978 handicap card I found my first score dropped me to a 494 and later on April 2, 1978 I was

32 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

down to a 489. On April 15th I recorded a 514 which was about my average for the rest of that year, including the Nationals. With the DEGREE OF DIFFICULTY NOW RAISED on the 5-4-3 Field and Hunter faces, like everyone else I had to work much harder if I wanted to earn a more respectable score. It was well into 1979 before I achieved some 530’s and occasional 540’s which of course was the whole idea of making the round harder. With the 5-4 scoring faces it had gotten to the point that so many perfects and near perfects were being posted it was becoming impossible to indisputably recognize and then acknowledge those who truly were excelling and more deserving of being called a champion. PROVING MY POINT. It was while shooting Pro at the 1977 Field Nationals using the old 5-3 face when I was struck with the fact that the scoring truly needed to be made more difficult. Jim Quarles was in my group and I still remember a 30 yard target with his 4 arrows packed tightly in the little black aiming spot in the middle of the large white 5 area. After we recorded everyone’s score, I commented on how ridiculous it was for me to have the same score as he did when my 4 shots WERE SCATTERED ALL OVER THE WHITE in about a 6 inch group. COMPROMISING CONDITIONS. To me, Field rounds have always been SO challenging and SO much fun. The way most courses are laid out they may not be as SPECTATOR ORIENTED and the SOCIAL EVENT they could be when everyone is standing on one long shooting-line but they are much more difficult, more challenging and a heck of a lot more beneficial for those preparing for hunting. As I’ve stated so many times before, I judge all my unknown distances by comparing them to one of the zillions of 10 through 80 yard targets I’ve shot over the years and I can’t imagine what could possibly make it easier than that. As I see it, a roving course Field Round is considerably more difficult that the single shooting line target games, because the LITTLE THINGS injected by the use of so many more different distances and the rough terrain. If we all stood on a level surface when shooting each Field target we’d only need to be alert to WIND conditions since all the rest is a constant. It’s not just the up-slope and down-slope angles to the target, a roving Field course is subject to all sorts of variations most people have never realized or even dreamed of. If all Field courses were shot under such conditions I’d venture to say that it would not have taken 18 years for the first ever 560 perfect to reappear on the more difficult 5-4-3 faces (Terry Ragsdale-1995) and then 9 more years before only one more by another pro (Dave Cousins-2004). My favorite example of encountering some of the things most people probably never expect during a Field or Hunter round was just after making my decision on how much to “tweak” my

actual sight for an uphill appearing 60 yard target among the mixed tall trees. I drew to aim and after “fighting my bubble” for awhile, I let down. Trying again I let down once more, stating that “my bubble must be stuck.” You guessed it, it was fine, it was my brain and my body that was crazy. Maybe exaggerating only a little to make my point, it was a case of multiple misconceptions. The target was uphill with the face pinned up with a little tilt, the bale itself setting at another angle with the trees in the background slanting a little with the profile of a nearby rise adding to the disillusion. My body did not want to believe that my bow had to be held at the angle the bubble was calling for, the bow seemed perfectly vertical where I was wanting to hold it. The bubble was not lying, I finally FORCED myself to hold it over at what seemed a crazy angle and all my shots scored well. But down at the target I decided I was just a normal slob when I noticed that virtually EVERY hole was in the right half of the paper including plenty of complete misses, obviously shot by those without a bubble level or by those who refused to believe it.

LET’S TALK ABOUT PRACTICE AREAS. By now you may be thinking you “can’t trust” anyone or anything but yourself, which is about right! Understand how vulnerable practice areas are and remember that there are NO REGULATIONS or INSPECTIONS for practice areas. Strangely enough I recently had the chance to remind myself of what I’ve been teaching and suggesting to others, of how to avoid letting an inaccurate practice area RUIN YOUR DAY. I’ve never make adjustments on practice area information before a shoot so after finding my 40 setting was impacting a few inches below dead center I also evaluated my 50 and 60 settings, finding them the same. Since they were perfect the day before it would relatively stupid to doctor them for no concrete reason, right? By not panicking as so many do at times like this, I decided to just keep that information in the back of my mind and just go to the temporary range area that had been setup only for this event. I can’t be sure why I did not match up with their practice area, but after finding my settings were perfect there I’m glad I remembered to practice what I preach.

PLUS OR MINUS 1 YARD TOLERANCE SHOULD BE EXPECTED ON EVERY ROVING FIELD COURSE. Here is where both experience and luck come into play. Between the accuracy of how well the range was originally measured and marked, the accuracy of your sight scale, the accuracy of your decision of how to compensate for uphill or downhill slopes also come into play. Miscalculating for any of these conditions on any target will always cost you points lost. So, even with PERFECT SIGHT SETTINGS and perfect shot execution there is no guarantee of total accuracy.

A few weeks later at another ranges practice area I realized another “mistake” often made when setting up practice areas. The shooting line was at about a 20 degree angle, not square with the targets but which were well marked for distance which is often missing in practice areas. But since there were no lane markers no one knew where to stand and almost everyone was crossing arrow paths with others which of course meant that some were unknowingly several feet farther away than they thought they were.

As they step up to each new target, those who have learned to know and trust their equipment are ahead of the game. But those prone to think their equipment is no longer correct just because they had to use a setting a yard or so longer or shorter than the marked distance and begin to make changes on all their marks are in for a long, bad day. I suggest you understand there is always something that could be “tweaked” a small amount to get you even closer in to dead-center and I personally couldn’t care-less whether it is caused by “me” or by “them” as long as I can make it work on the first or second try.

On anyone’s practice area, to avoid being duped into doing something that you might regret later I suggest ALWAYS setting your sight a couple of yards SHORT and then shooting only for groups. Besides avoiding what might be false information it can also serve to save your nocks and fletch when 25 or 30 more continued on next page

RAGSDALE & ASSOCIATES • INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS, • EXPERT WITNESS PROGRAM

This is where the toll is taken, you make your initial best-guess sight setting and then you have to decide whether to use it again or make a sight setting adjustment for the second shot. If you actually used the right setting but performed a bad shot and then make an unnecessary over-correction on a better performed next shot your may lose a second point that you would not have lost had you known exactly why you missed the first shot. My point here is simply that even if you are experienced enough to know how to prevent losing additional points after the fist miss, it is already too late if you were seeking a perfect score, IT WAS LOST on that first miss.

email: ArcherySleuth@wmconnect.com

On an absolutely flat field it is no problem at all to accurately measure the shooting distance to within one inch but it is a horse of a different color when laying out a 28 target roving Field course in rough terrain. Years ago when I was the NFAA Texas Director we had over 40 courses and inspecting them was an education. As you might imagine, the older the course the more inaccuracies there were. It’s hard enough trying to be accurate measuring up or downhill and over dips or a canyon or creek beds to begin with but after years of replacing butts and kicked out and washed out stakes it can get to be a terrible mess. Between sloppy measuring, butt replacements that were placed at a few inches from where they were and the arbitrary replacing of loose stakes after being washed out by rains and the like can leave grossly inaccurate distances and are commonly found.

See services listed on homepage at: www.bowhunting.net/bobragsdale/ragsdale.html

RAGSDALE & ASSOCIATES 14230 Shadow Bay Drive Willis, TX 77318-7406 888-407-3084 936-856-0928

Robert Ragsdale, A. E.

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 33

continued from previous page

arrows are later smashed into the dot with yours before that practice shooting end stops. NOTE TO CLUBS: Put up as many faces as the practice butts will hold and your practice area is best when supervised with a stop whistle every few minutes. WHAT IF ROVING COURSES WERE ALL MEASURED USING LASER RANGEFINDERS? Understand that even on a course measured perfectly with a laser device as described later herein, there will always be the possibility of inadvertent errors from misplaced target butts and haphazardly replaced stakes. As you will learn here later, a range originally marked PERFECTLY after

PROPERLY using a laser rangefinder should actually be as accurate as PLUS ONE INCH and MINUS N0 INCHES. Also, it can certainly also be beneficial anytime you could know for sure that the marked distance on all of the uphill and downhill targets is the absolute line of sight distance. But even then, due to the possibility of later butt and stake replacement errors since the job was done you are still vulnerable. Let assure you that this is the real reason there is so much confusion about how uphill and downhill shots should be made. Bottom line is that on a Field course OF ANY AGE there are no guarantees and you simply have to be on guard and then do whatever it takes to hit the center. Remember also that there are NO BONUS POINTS on your scorecard for listing YOUR EXCUSE for every miss. I suggest you keep the attitude that no one is out to get you and that whatever you suspect may be amiss, take solace in the fact that IT IS THE SAME FOR EVERYONE ON THAT DAY IN THAT COMPETITION. THERE CAN STILL BE AN ERROR UP TO 35 INCHES LONG USING A LASER. But never a shorter reading. A few years back I decided to seriously

compare a low-cost laser rangefinder set to a $3,000 borrowed pair and as it turned out, the lower priced different brand performed identically to the expensive ones in every detail. Utilizing a flat-back steel barbecue grill for the laser target with a long measuring tape and flat terrain, I quickly found you had better not drive the 40 yard stake the first time a “40” appears on the readout. Because it only means you are merely SOMEWHERE BETWEEN 40 YARDS AND 40 YARDS 35 INCHES. So, without a concentrated effort to know PRECISELY where you are, EVERY TARGET could be INCORRECTLY LONG anywhere from 1 inch to 2 feet 11 inches. Therefore, if I were writing specifications on how to properly place stake positions using a laser rangefinder it would read: USING A SUITABLE LARGE SOLID PLATE RESTING PRECISELY WHERE THE TARGET FACE WILL BE PINNED, MOVE THE LASER RANGEFINDER AWAY UNTIL IT READS 1 YARD LESS THAN THE DESIRED DISTANCE. THEN SLOWLY BACK AWAY AND STAKE IT IN THAT FIRST 1 INCH INCREMENT WHERE THE CORRECT YARDAGE READING APPEARS SINCE IT WILL STILL READ THE SAME FOR THE NEXT 2 FEET & 11 INCHES.

Figure 1. Just because you had to use this setting instead of exactly on your 50 mark there is no need to panic into thinking this one or any other of your marks are “wrong.” Those who blow these things out of proportion are less likely to be recognized during the awards ceremonies. That is, what if I told you that your sight setting was ABSOLUTELY PERFECT and the reason you had to set it at 49 3/4 yards was because either: A. The stake was actually that much closer in error. Or, B. The target was correct but was uphill just enough to require the reduced distance setting. Or, 34 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

C. The distance actually was 50, but on every shot for some reason YOU were centering the front sight above the centerpoint of your peep causing you to impact high.

THE FUTURE B Y T I M AT W O O D

A D M I N I S T R AT I V E CHAIRMAN

The wildlife conservation community no longer consists of hunters, anglers and our allies in the state and federal wildlife agencies. Outsiders are at the gates demanding that the principles of conservation enunciated by the Roosevelts and Pinchots be shunted aside and replaced by ill-defined mandates for biodiversity, ecosystem management and political correctness. What do bowhunters and wildlife agencies do to meet these threats? They unify, or coalesce. Organized bowhunters have represented the mainstay of the programs of state and federally based wildlife management for most of this century. We represent the strongest and most dedicated ally of wildlife management. Agencies need to utilize the bowhunters’ clout and bowhunters need to stand up on behalf of the agencies. But, that doesn’t happen by itself. It takes communication and hard work on behalf of everyone involved. Some states have achieved outstanding relationships with bowhunters. Others, at least informally, seem to see the bowhunters as more of a liability than an asset ant that’s tragic. You don’t have to look too deeply to get a picture of the political clout bowhunters can provide on the agency’s behalf. Certain eastern states, which are home to most of the animal rights movement in the nation, have been able to stand up and maintain the integrity of their programs due to the large numbers of organized bowhunters who have come to the fore on the agencies behalf. Bowhunting will endure in America if we prioritize our efforts on its behalf. It must be defended first. That takes organization and teamwork, and while its being defended, the non-hunting public must be conditioned that bowhunting is OK; that it is a beneficial activity and nor harmful. Finally, as several bowhunters have said, bowhunting must grow. New bowhunters must be brought into our ranks or we will die a slow death of attrition. All of these things can be accomplished if agencies and organized bowhunters will work together to product the funding, wield the clout and perform the task of delivering our message to the nonhunting public. Throughout this century, bowhunters and wildlife managers have worked hand in hand to ensure wildlife abundance in America. The wondrous result has been thriving wildlife populations throughout the continent and wildlife management programs that are the envy of the world. We take a back seat to no nation when it comes to the result, nor the commitment bowhunters have made to wildlife. If we will continue to work together, we will ensure wildlife abundance and a legacy of the outdoors for ours and future generations.

ATWOOD’S LAW OF PROVOCATION Real archers, whatever the provocation, never strike another shooter with his or her arrows. The bow is far more effective. ATWOOD’S LAW OF PRO ARCHERS If you watch target archery, it’s fun. If you play at it, it’s recreation. If you work at it, it’s archery. WIFE’S LAW OF OBSERVATION A wife always knows when her husband has had a bad 3-D round. He has weeds in his socks. ATWOOD’S LAW OF HANDICAP A handicapped archer is one who is shooting with his wife. ATWOOD’S LAW OF CONSIDERATION Normally, that’s a good shot, but considering the fact that you shot it, it’s a brilliant shot. ATWOOD’S LAW OF NEW FANGLED BOWS A bow guaranteed to add five points to your round, will invariably loose five.

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 35

by Paul Davison

THE JAY PEAK NATIONALS F I R S T

T R U E

“ V A C A T I O N

There was a lot of skepticism when it was announced that the 30th NFAA Outdoor Nationals would be held at the Jay Peak Ski Resort. Jay Peak is sandwiched between the very small towns of Jay and Montgomery, only about six miles from the Canadian border in far north-central Vermont. After all, the nearest big airport is at Montreal, about 85 miles away. The nearest, limited, commercial air service is at Burlington, VT, which is more than 60 miles distant. The obvious questions, “How do I get there, where do I eat and sleep once I get there, and will I be shooting on top of a mountain again?” were easily answered. The real skepticism was whether the 1975 Nationals would be a repeat of 1974’s “Great Rocky Mountain Rip-Off.” Moreover, the IFAA World Field Archery Championships were being held concurrently with the NFAA Outdoor Nationals, and we certainly could not afford an international embarrassment. [See related articles in Dec04/Jan05 and Jun/Jul05 issues of Archery.] What made the 1975 Nationals unique was that the tournament was hosted by the Jay Peak Lodging Association... a combination of Visitors Bureau and Chamber of Commerce. In the four issues of Archery magazine preceding the tournament, every possible Q&A was addressed. But their efforts didn’t stop with pretournament publicity — they also constructed the tournament venue. No less than nine, 28-target ranges were bulldozed out of dense forest in the Jay Peak foothills. Using lessons learned from the previous year, there were no ranges “on top of the mountain,” and all butts were made with excelsior (not straw) bales. Also, all nine ranges were within walking distance of tournament headquarters. Unlike the 1974 Nationals in Colorado, there was hardly a single complaint among the nearly 900 participants at Jay Peak. Although Jay Peak wasn’t the first National Outdoor venue located in a vacation area, it was probably the first collocated with an unrelated winter sport. Watkins Glen is 36 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

V E N U E ”

well known for motor sports, but we don’t share the same venue. Other Nationals have been successfully held in parks and recreational areas, but also where the archers must compete with the hikers, campers, anglers, et al, for the same accommodations and services. Because of the terrain and available accommodations, ski resorts make excellent venues for large outdoor archery tournaments. Later, in 1979 and 1998, the Nationals were held at a ski resort near Detroit Lakes, MN. Then in 1992 and 1995, we were at Rib Mountain, outside Wausau, WI, which was the winter venue for snowmobiling and crosscountry skiing. Ski areas like Jay Peak, Detroit Lakes and Wausau are typically great places for an “archery” family vacation, as long as you don’t mind mosquitoes and the smell of fish. Note: Any previous Nostalgia Corner article may be viewed at www.stringwalker.net.

FIND YOUR COMFORT ZONE By Terry Wunderle Have you ever gotten a new bow and said, “It doesn’t feel right?” Maybe you have said the same thing about the bow you are presently shooting. What happens when you buy a pair of new shoes and they do not feel comfortable? Do they sit in the closet? When you do wear them, do you have negative thoughts every time that you put them on? The same thing is true about a bow that doesn’t feel comfortable. You will probably have negative thoughts, which will not be advantageous to the upcoming shot. It must feel comfortable in order for you to stay focused on executing a shot with perfect form. It is almost impossible to make those shoes fit properly, but you can “tailor fit” that bow to your comfort zone. It is very important when you draw and shoot your bow that it is comfortable. It should feel like that old pair of shoes you wouldn’t quit wearing. Most equipment can feel good, if you work at setting it up to fit your comfort zone. There are several things that can cause the bow to not feel correct. First, check the draw length of your comfortable bow. Measure the draw length to the pivot point on the handle. That is, the most forward spot on the handle where your hand is seated. Mark the spot straight up from the handle on the rest or riser, so when you draw an arrow, you can place a piece of tape on the arrow at that location. Now take the new bow and do the same thing. If the draw lengths are identical, the tape on the arrow should line up with the pivot point on the new bow. If not, “tweak” the draw length until it does.

adjustments. The time you spend making sure your bow feels comfortable will pay huge dividends in your score. You will be surprised how much more stable and solid you will be able to hold on target when your muscles are not straining against a too short or too long of a bowstring. The way the bow allows the pin to settle in on target or the way the bow reacts when the arrow is released can also be a major distraction. At one time, I had a very fast 3-D bow with a very reflexed riser. I loved the feel of the bow, but I couldn’t get the pin to settle in on target. After several days of working with different lengths of stabilizers and weight combinations, I ended up with a bow with which I won a couple of national championships. It finally felt comfortable, held on target, and had the proper forward roll on the shot explosion. When you finally get the bow set-up where it is what you wanted, record and save the measurements. Save the arrow with the tape on it that marks your draw length. Strings and cables have been known to stretch. By saving the arrow, it can quickly aid you in correcting the problem. You should also record and keep the exact distance the peep is located from the nocking point. Peeps can move, or you may want to replace a bowstring and get everything set up exactly as it was on the old string. One of the keys to mental control is comfortable equipment. Unless everything feels correct and comfortable, it will be very difficult to maintain your focus. When your equipment feels good, you feel good. Your mind will be in a positive state and you will get positive results.

Next, check your peep location. Measure the distance from the nocking point to the center of the peep. Both bows should be the same if the axle-to-axle length is the same. If they aren’t the same axle length, you might have a little variation in their location to find your comfort zone. The best fit for peep location can vary according to what kind of tournament that you are shooting. If you are shooting a 20-yard indoor tournament, you should set your sight for 20-yards and make sure the pin lines up in the middle of the peep when anchored. If you are shooting 3-D, set the sight for about 35 yards. That way you will only have a little head movement to align the pin for the 20-yard or 50-yard shot. If you leave the setting for the 20-yard peep alignment, you would have to raise your head a lot more to get the pin centered for the 50-yard shot. Now check the draw weight and the holding weight. A few pounds of variation can make a lot of difference. Once the draw length, peep and poundage feel comfortable, stand ten feet from a target butt and shoot a couple dozen shots. Shoot some with your eyes closed and some with them open. If it feels good, leave it; if not, continue “tweaking” your August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 37

38 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

PRESS RELEASES BOW-MAX™ LINE GETS A FEW NEW ADDITIONS

February 2005, Plano, IL – Plano Molding Company entered the archery storage industry with patented PillarLock™ Protection on the Protector Series™ Bow Case. Within a short time, we introduced the BOW-Max™ line, which has become the hottest product line in archery storage. The year is 2005 and Plano is proud to once again, add to the BOW-Max™ product line with the introduction of 1143 BOW-Max™ XT Single Bow Case and 1243 BOW-Max™ Double Bow cases. The thought process behind the two new cases was to provide maximum storage and protection while keeping within the same economical range that you have come to expect with all Plano products. The results were the 1143 BOW-Max™ XT Single Bow Case and the 1243 BOW-Max™ Double Bow Case. Both cases feature 7 Patented PillarLock™ points, making these cases practically indestructible. Included with each case is the 3715 accessory box, perfect for release aids and other accessories. Measuring in at 43”L x 23”W x 9”H, these airline approved cases hold longer axel-to-axel bows and drastic parallel limb bows with ease. The 1143 BOW-Max™ XT Single Bow Case is designed to be a high-end single bow case and in most cases the quiver is able to stay attached to most bows. Plano’s Sur-Lok™ arrow storage will hold up to 12 carbon or aluminum arrows. A separate, full-length storage in the base of the case is great for additional arrows, target stabilizers. The 1143 has a suggested retail price of $59.99.

BCY NOW MANUFACTURES AND DISTRIBUTES SERVING SAVER. SERVING SAVER IS THE SOLUTION TO BUSS CABLE SERVING SEPARATION PROBLEMS. SERVING SAVER IS A SPECIALLY FORMULATED MATERIAL USED TO REPLACE THE BUSS CABLE SERVING ON ALL BOWS BUT PARTICULARLY ON ONE CAM BOWS. BECAUSE OF ITS FLAT DESIGN AND WEAR RESISTANCE, SERVING SAVER REALLY WORKS. SERVING SAVER WILL NOW BE SOLD ON STANDARD JIG SPOOLS WHICH FIT IN ALL STANDARD SERVERS. AS A RESULT OF IMPROVED MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUES, THE PRICE OF SERVING SAVER HAS BEEN SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCED. SERVING SAVER MAY ALSO BE USED ON CENTER SERVINGS WHERE THE RELEASE SOMETIMES WEARS THE SERVING. JUST APPLY AN INCH OR TWO OF SERVING SAVER OVER THE TOP OF THE EXISTING SERVING BELOW THE NOCK SET. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT: BCY INC 697 MIDDLE STREET MIDDLETOWN CT. 06457. USA PHONE 860 632 7115 FAX 860 632 5775 E-MAIL: BCYRAY@MSN.COM WEB SITE: WWW.BCYFIBERS.COM

The 1243 BOW-Max™ Double Bow Case securely holds two bows, even bows with longer parallel limbs. A full size divider separates and protects the bows from each other, or any extra material you are carrying. A solid wall separates the specially designed arrow holders, allowing for broadheads to be stored with the bow, while keeping the strings secure. The 1243 will retail for $79.99. For more information about the BOW-Max™ or any of Plano’s quality products please contact Tanja Washburn at 630-5529404 or twashburn@planomolding.com. View our entire line at www.planomolding.com. August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 39

continued from page 28

the camera has to be close to the subject if you really want optimal sound. If you can afford it, invest in a boom mic that will mount to the top of your camera. It’s an extra expense, but worthwhile. If you’re going out in nasty weather conditions you might want to grab a plastic bag to cover the camera, or better yet, get a custom fit camera cover. It’s important to protect your investment and extreme temperatures can wreak havoc on a camera. In severely cold weather we’ll leave the camera in the gear bag in a garage that’s not heated, but warmer than the outside. Bringing your camera in a warm house after you’ve had it below freezing outdoors can cause moisture on the lens and potentially ruin your camera. Follow directions in your manual about temperature changes. Just because you have the right equipment doesn’t necessarily mean you know how to use it. (A-hem. We’re talking about hunting here!) Getting the right shot is really the foundation for making your home hunting video perfect. Think of what happens when you walk into a room. First, you notice the things that are farthest away. This is called a Long Shot (LS). Walk further into the room and you’ll begin to notice a few more details, centering the subject. That’s a Medium Shot (MS). Once you’re in the room you hone in on something, the food on the table, the television, a woman in a red dress. Whatever. That’s your Close-Up (CU). Have all three of those angles in your home hunting video and you’ve got gold, Jerry! What image do you see when you first look at your hunting spot? A wide expanse of prairie land? Mountains? A rainbow? Get a Long Shot of the landscape. Don’t zoom in. Follow the terrain. See a sunrise or a sunset? Get it! Anything that can capture the essence of your trip, your thoughts about the hunt, the environment and setting, should be captured. Next, have your camera operator film you getting your equipment ready and walking. That will add much needed details. Have them tape you getting into the treestand 40 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

or blind and getting settled in. Then change the point of view to see what you see when you look toward your hunting area. Get a Medium Shot of the area. Next, you need details, details, and more details. Close-up shots of the arrow on the rest, your trigger finger, or an extreme close-up of your eyes scanning are wonderful. Close-ups of the draw are critical. I love getting Cut-Aways, or close-up shots of something in the area, like cactus or birds, everything wild, and then panning (moving the camera right or left) toward Ted. THE MOST IMPORTANT THING is to keep the camera steady. Use SLOW movements. And that’s not just to help the hunter, it’s a lot easier for your audience to watch smooth video. Remember to frame the subjects properly. Don’t leave too much head room above the subject. Keep them in the center or to one side so they’re at an angle looking into the shot. Now, you’re ready for the fun part. If you’re filming yourself and using a tripod or the Huntercam Cradle unit, you won’t have to worry about flinching. But be prepared. The moment of truth is intense. Beginning videographers almost always have difficulty keeping the camera still, especially during a gun shot. Remind

them to STAY ON THE ANIMAL. Viewing the shot in slow motion afterwards will be easier to see the exact placement of the shot. Once the animal has completely left sight, have the new videographer SLOWLY and on the widest setting turn the camera to you for your exciting reaction. And if you’re taping yourself, here’s where you get creative. Look right into the camera and describe everything that happened, then begin tracking. It’s important to capture blood trails, and then, of course, your natural response to the wild game you’ve just taken. Remember to speak loud and clear. Look directly into the camera as if it’s your best friend and you’re telling a story. Next time, I’ll discuss home editing options, and a technique to edit right in your camera as you film. Good luck and good huntin’! Ted Nugent Spirit of the Wild is currently accepting footage to air during Roc ‘N Outdoors, and Queen of the Forest. Go to www.tednugent.com for submission details.

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August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 41

42 Archery Magazine APR/MAY 2005

nfaa

HEADQUARTERS

report

Yo u r N F A A i s ALIVE and WELL

Congratulations to the following young NFAA members. Each will receive a $500 scholarship to further their education. The Scholarship committee had a hard time choosing from the many fine applicants this year. Our thanks go to the committee, Chairman Ray Jones, Raydell Clark, Doug Joyce. Please look for the Scholarship application in the October/November issue of Archery Magazine or on line at www.fieldarchery.com Brent Taft, Sandia Park, New Mexico. Brent plans to attend New Mexico State University and major in Mechanical Engineering. His hobbies are hunting, fishing, camping and rock climbing as well as competitive archery. He has won 18 state, 4 sectional and NAFAC championships. Nathan Kline, Madison, VA will attend Virginia Tech to major in Business. He enjoys weight lifting, hunting and target archery. Nathan has won several state championships and had excelled at the Prince William Archers Black Bear Shoot. Kurtis Kramer of Mason City, IA plans to attend James Madison University or Claremont McKenna. He plays baseball, football, the guitar and shoots archery. Kurtis has won 3 state championships, the Atlantic City Classic, NFAA Indoor Nationals and Sectionals. Stephen Schwade, Monroe, NY also plans to attend James Madison University to study Business. He was a silver medalist as a member of the Sr USAT Team, also a member of the 2004 Jr. World Team, competing in the NY Championships. Bailey Cooper of Derby, KS will attend Wichita State University to study Aerospace Engineering. She plays softball and enjoys competitive archery, winning state championships, the 2000 Indoor Nationals and IFAA competition as well as the 2001 Indoor and The Ozarks’ largest real estate catalog. Outdoor Championships. Casaundra Dotts, Minden, NV will attend the University of Nevada, Reno. Her plans are to major in Veterinary Medicine. She enjoys hunting, fishing and horseback riding, is a member of 4H, FFA and the National Honor Society.

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August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 43

The National Field Archery Association and the World Archery Festival would like to thank our 2005 Sponsors. The support of these fine companies is what has made the Three Star Tournaments possible.

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NEW DAYS AND TIMES: MON - 10:30am EST THUR - 8:30pm EST • SAT - 2:00am EST 44 Archery Magazine August/September ‘05

By Tim Atwood

This months “Pictorial Tour” shows two NFAA volunteers, Stefan Olsen and Steve Smith of Riverside, CA, identifying over 230 broadheads. This collection was donated by the late Jesse “Joe” Smith. Jesseís wife Pauline and daughter Nancy Humphreys forwarded this priceless collection of artifacts to the NFAA Museum. Thanks for the hard work of these two NFAA volunteers.

CORRECTION 2004 Diamond Buck Winner, 1st place Typical Whitetail was reported in the April/May issue of Archery as Mark Irlbacher, N. Tonawanda, NY, however, we published the wrong picture. We apologize to Mark, longtime NFAA member and former NY State NFAA Director.

August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 45

Any bow can shoot an arrow... The Genesis bow changes lives!

The Genesis bow... ® ®

®

The Genesis bow is the bow schools use in the National Archery in the Schools Program. Over 200,000 students have been introduced to archery through NASP. More importantly, archery has proven to have a profound impact on students and educators alike... “It is such a joy to see kids learning, developing skills, getting involved, and having fun. There is absolutely no downside to this program. Any school not offering this to their children is missing a golden opportunity.” Rich Prewitt – principal Whitley County Middle School

“I’ve never had so much fun coaching a sport in an educational setting in my 20-plus years of teaching. I feel we reach the students academically, socially, emotionally, mentally and physically.”

Supporter of

Tina Davis – athletic director and teacher Trigg County Middle School

“For the kids who are not ‘traditional’ athletes, you can witness their self-esteem drastically improve when they experience a little success with a Genesis bow.”

“The best thing to happen to archery since the invention of the compound bow.” The Genesis® bow was designed to introduce beginners to archery. Thanks to Genesis® Technology, it fits virtually everyone • No specific draw length (fits 15" to 30")

• All the advantages of single-cam technology

Genesis Technology ®

“Kids bug me all the time wanting to shoot the Genesis bows.” Scott Ricks Middle School P.E. Teacher

Crazy Horse Archery

TM

• Set at 20 lbs., it performs like a 35 lb. recurve

Kyle McKune Middle School P.E. Teacher

Everyone can shoot the same bow Genesis Technology™ eliminates let-off, thereby eliminating specific draw length, so that anyone can shoot the same bow. • Kids can’t outgrow it – because there is no specific draw length • It’s simple to buy – no need to measure or fit for draw length • It’s easy to shoot – beginners won’t develop bad habits because the draw length is always right

“Schools are discovering [another] big benefit of the [National Archery in the Schools] program. Attendance is higher on archery days.” Central Kentucky News Journal

Want to help get archery in your schools?

Visit www.genesisbow.com

For the next generation! 2035 Riley Road, Sparta, Wisconsin 54656 (608) 269-1779

TED NUGENT SPIRIT OF THE WILD TV HAS WON BEST HUNTING SHOW ON THE OUTDOOR CHANNEL 3 TIMES AND CONTINUALLY WINS TOP RATINGS AND RAVES ON CBS IN CENTRAL TEXAS. THE NUGENT FAMILIES' DOWN TO EARTH, TOTALLY HONEST APPROACH TO DELIVERING RAW, GENUINE NO HOLDS BARRED TOOTH, FANG AND CLAW HUNTING REALITY IS SECOND TO NONE AND DEEPLY CONNECTS WITH AMERICA'S HUNTING COMMUNITY. THE SAME NO BS APPROACH THAT HAS MADE TED NUGENT A MUSICAL LEGEND AND AMERICAN ICON IS WHY SPIRIT OF THE WILD IS SUCH A PART OF AMERICANA. FOR THIS DVD, TED HAND PICKED THE MOST EXCITING HUNTING ADVENTURES FROM THE 2005 SEASON OF TED NUGENT SPIRIT OF THE WILD TV. INCLUDING NEVER BEFORE SEEN FOOTAGE & ROCK'N ROLL BOMBASTS FOR OVER 1 HOUR OF FULL BLUNTAL NUGITY!

MEMBER ONLY OFFER - $19.99 POST PAID WWW.TEDNUGENT.COM 800-343-HUNT or mail payment to: Nugent USA, 4008 W Michigan Ave, Jackson MI 49202

Join the Nugent Tribe for Ted's private birthday celebration at the amazing Y.O. ranch this December! Magical historic facilities & game species galore at special Nuge pricing! Whether you choose a family vacation, a romantic get away, father & son hunt, or good times with your hunting buddies, this is the perfect hunt adventure for all. The Y.O. Ranch accommodates the hunting experience of your choice. For a listing of all Ted Nugent Sunrize Safaris visit www.tednugent.com

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August/September ‘05 Archery Magazine 47

Just B-Cuz

So, why did we make the just cuz

even better? Just B-Cuz Our original Just Cuz, designed by Jerry Carter and World Champion, Dave Cousins, is one of the most winning releases in the world. So why improve it? Just B-Cuz we could. • NEW! Interchangeable Tension System allows you to change trigger tension springs without opening the cases. • Larger finger hole than the Just Cuz for more comfort. • Rounded cocking lever with smoother action. • Included attached release rope for shooting off the string. The Just B-Cuz is possibly the sweetest, most comfortable and adjustable release we have ever designed. Wrap your fingers around this one and watch Xs get crushed. And if anyone asks why you are shooting so well, smile and tell them -- Just B-Cuz. Carter Enterprises • P.O. Box 19 • 487 North 2300 East Saint Anthony, ID 83445 • (208) 624-3467 • www.carterenterprises.com

The Quickie

PUT YOUR HUNTING IN

the fast lane GET A QUICKIE OR QUICKIE 2 If you’ve got the need-for-speed, you need the new Quickie or Quickie 2 from Carter Enterprises. The self-closing jaw immediately relocks following each shot, allowing for easier and faster loading on either a D-loop or serving. Other features include: QUICKIE 2 - Silent loading, Silent shooting - Torque resistant wrist strap design - Adjustable travel with set screw - Available in black or camo - High quality 440 stainless steel parts with smooth contours for comfortable grip. Chose from either the open-jaw of the Quickie or the reverse open-jaw of the Quickie 2. Both are fast enough for speed rounds and accurate enough for spot shooting. To purchase a Quickie, contact your local dealer or Carter Enterprises.

QUICKIE

Carter Enterprises • P.O. Box 19 • 487 North 2300 East Saint Anthony, ID 83445 • (208) 624-3467 • www.carterenterprises.com


August/September 2005