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Archery Magazine 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078

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U.S. & International Archery Magazine

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The voice of field archery, the NFAA®, Ted Nugent United Sportsmen, the IFAA and bowhunting.

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EDITORIAL BOARD Bruce Cull Natalie Vollmer Brian Sheffler Brittany Salonen John Pawlowski Emily Robinson Ken Moore PUBLISHER

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EDITORIAL POLICIES Archery is the official publication of National Field Archery Association and is published quarterly. Editorial Deadlines are as follows: First Quarter Deadline: December 15 delivers February

Second Quarter Deadline: March 15 delivers May

All material should be sent by mail or e-mail. Mailed contributions should be submitted on an electronic disk (CD) and typewritten. Microsoft Word is preferred. **DO NOT include digital photos in your Word document. No material will be returned. Submissions should be no more than 2,000 words. Previously published material will not be considered unless accompanied by a release or permission from the first publisher. Material appearing in this magazine does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NFAA or its Board of Directors. The NFAA can not reimburse for cost incurred in the preparation of material submitted, nor compensate contributors for items which

Third Quarter Deadline: June 15 delivers August

Fourth Quarter Deadline: September 15 delivers November

are published. All material will be published at the discretion of the editorial board. Photos of animals harvested should be in good taste. Only animals taken under the rules of fair chase will be considered. Correspondence concerning the NFAA’s policies and operations should be directed to the NFAA Headquarters, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078. Contributions and correspondence pertaining to this magazine should be directed to: Editor, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279 ■ E-mail: nvollmer@nfaausa.com

Letters policy: Letters printed in Archery Magazine will be at the discretion of the editor. The following guidelines for letters will apply: Clearly state your point. Stick to one item, or one point of view. Be accurate. Use words that are respectful and avoid personal attacks. Submit your letter oline at https://www.nfaausa.com/magazine-submissions-0. All letters must contain a name, address, phone number and email address.

Archery is published quarterly by the National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279. Advertising rate cards available for display and classified advertising. All feature and editorial requests should be made in writing to NFAA® at the address above. Editorial contributions must be submitted with self-addressed envelopes with sufficient return postage. All materials considered, but the publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts. Deadline for copy is eight weeks prior to the month of publication. All statements are those of the writers and do not necessarily conform to the magazine’s editorial policies. Copyright 1984 by the National Field Archery Association®. All rights reserved. Change of address – allow eight weeks for change to become effective. Contact NFAA® headquarters. 2 Archery Magazine

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FIRST QUARTER 2014 Vol. 34 • No. 1 © 2014 NFAA®

NFAA 1939

iowa pro am sets attendance record

The NFAA was founded. By the end of the year there were state organizations in Washington, Oregon, New Jersey, Arizona and California with individual members scattered through Illinois, Ohio, Virginia, Michigan, New York, Minnesota, Kansas, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Missouri and Texas. Today the NFAA has 49-chartered state organizations.

WALK THROUGH TIME WITH NFAA

1946

First NFAA National Championship (now National Outdoor) was held in Allegan, MI.

PAGE 8

way of mail-in scorecards. E. Hill Turnock of Wilkinsburg, PA won the men’s division with an average score of 356 for 28 targets. The winning female was Naomi Baker of Inglewood, CA with an average of 196 for 28 targets. 

NFAA Celebrates 75 Years!

The first Las Vegas Open, or “Vegas Shoot,” held in Las Vegas, NV.

1947 Compton Medal of Honor and NFAA Hall of Fame Established

Then and now.

1945

1957 Pope & Young Club is started by NFAA Bowhunter Chairman Glenn St. Charles as a part of the NFAAs Hunting Activities Committee.

1959

Order of the Bone Adopted. See page 31.

The NFAA acquired its own office building and headquarters in Redland, CA. Original headquarters

24 ARCHERY MAGAZINE

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New Youth Division provided for competitive NFAA Youth Members.

First ever Las Vegas Open winners.

1954

1973

The NFAA Professional Division was set up. 62 NFAA Professional Archers made their first appearance at the Outdoor Nationals to compete for a total purse of $2,800.

Sectional tournaments standardized throughout the eight sections of the NFAA.

1964 Service pins for continued membership in the NFAA were adopted.

Dean Pridgen won the first ever NFAA Pro division at the 1973 Outdoor Nationals.

1974 The NFAA introduced the flight system at the National Outdoor for the first time.

1976

1969

1963 The NFAA Stump Emblem was created by Dick Schroeder, a national known artist and an NFAA archer. Nearly the same logo is used today.

Paige Pearce receives her 2013 scholarship from Bruce Cull, NFAA President and Bob Romero, Easton Foundations.

1968 Las Vegas Convention Center, site of the Sahara-Colts Las Vegas Open.

Chartering of clubs began. Today the NFAA has nearly 1,000 affiliated clubs.

Hand sketch of a 1944 NFAA field course.

1941

1967

Youth Scholarship Program founded. Today, in partnership with Easton Foundations, the NFAA Foundation awards over $20,000 in scholarships per year to student athletes.

1962

A.J. Michelson of Flint, Michigan becomes the first NFAA President.

1940 The first NFAA Outdoor Field Tournament was held by

1959

Fellowship of the Robin Hood was established for NFAA members.

The NFAA becomes a National member of the International Field Archery Association.

1971 The compound bow was allowed in all divisions.

Service pins available for every 5 consecutive membership years.

Bill Wadsworth, NFAA Bowhunter Chairman, and the NFAA conservation and bowhunting committee helped start the International Bowhunter Education Program (IBEP) which later became a separate non-profit organization known today as the National Bowhunter Education Foundation (NBEF).

24 1977

NFAA Indoor Championship face and round established.

The history of the organization since its founding

The NFAA 5 Spot was adopted from the Championship 4 spot face.

1972 NFAA Certified Instructor School was started.

1979 NFAA suffers a financial crisis and temporarily suspends the publication of Archery Magazine.

First Quarter 2014

page

Can you guess the archers from their vintage photos?

walk through time with nfaa

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31

dubious Awards bestowed upon those who survived to tell of their unfortunate experiences.

PG 14

5 » The President’s Report by Bruce Cull

6 » Instinctive Bowhunter | frank mosser

11 » NFAA Calendar of Events

20 » Councilman Corner: Dan Kolb & Ken Moore

EXCERPTS OF Archery’s Most Asked Questions

22 » Trust Your Form | Terry Wunderle

26 » Preseason Tournaments | ryan fitzgerald

27 » From the Archives

34 » Section and State Association News

38 » The Pro Line | Randall Wellings, NFAA Pro Chair

43 » NFAA Council and Board of Directors Directory AND MORE! scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 3

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SHOOT CONFIDENT. 4 Archery Magazine

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www.eastonarchery.com

SHOOT EASTON. ©2014

bruce cull

d the President’s and Steve Coleman. Bruce presente son, NFAA President Bruce Cull, award in the NFAA. d ione miss com est high the Left to right: Frank and Becky Pear It’s A. tireless contributions to the NFA Award to the volunteers for their

Wow! What an incredible way for us to celebrate our 75th anniversary! Not only are we hosting the 69th National Field and the IFAA World Field—at our own headquarters—if that’s not enough, it will be the grand opening of the NFAA Museum!! July 30 through August 9 will be the highlight of everything NFAA and everything field archery in Yankton, SD. The complete schedule of events is shown in the chart on page 40. If you haven’t made plans to attend, please do so now. This will be an incredible gathering of field archers from all over the world. We are very pleased and proud

to showcase our state-of-the-art NFAA HeadquartersNFAA Easton Yankton Archery Center (NEYAC). The center consists of a 50,000 sq. ft. building, which has a 90-meter indoor range that converts to two, 25-lane 20yard ranges with a 40-yard 3-D range; two classrooms; a training room; workout studio; multi-use room; conference room; warehouse and storage; several offices; and, of course, the NFAA corporate offices. Outside, the building is located on approximately 90 acres of land, which consists of three NFAA field ranges, two Olympic continued on page 40 scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 5

ter n u h w o B e v cti n Insti n o i t i n g o c Re

Frank Mosser

Overdue

I was asked—or should say begged—to shoot in a safari tournament known as the World Bowhunter Team Championship held in Fresno, California. I’m a man of moderate income, so I was reluctant to part with the amount of money it would take for a plane trip, motel and food but I was assured by Roy McFarland, the NFAA director for Kentucky, that we would win the team event which paid one thousand dollars plus contingency awards. But, as we all know in archery, a lot of things can happen beyond our control and could cause us to lose. He also gave me assurance that we would be given lodging in a motor home by long time friends from California, Ben Rodgers and Ed Welch, who we were acquainted with while attending other NFAA national tournaments. Well, it sounded too good to be true but I had never been to California, so I made the decision to enjoy the trip and the tournament, even if all our luck turned out bad. This article would be extremely long if I described 6 Archery Magazine

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to you how much I enjoyed the scenery, weather and the friends I met, plus the hospitality I received while there, so on to the point of my story. It was a beautiful morning and the targets were assigned with the teams together. In scoring, whichever team member scores the highest that score counts toward the team event and for individual scoring a separate card is kept. From where we started on the range, I believe we had shot about five targets. Roy and I were five points down behind the first place team. Between targets, Roy was so shook up he would pace back and forth like a caged lion while waiting his turn to shoot. We had agreed that I would go first, and then he could buckle down if my score wasn’t up to par. On our next target, an elephant at ninety-three yards down hill, the body area counted eight points for each arrow. The kill area, eighteen inches in diameter, counted ten points for each arrow and the red dot in the center which is six inches in diameter counted eleven points for each arrow. We shot two arrows at each targets. Roy decided to shoot first and I agreed to spot for him with the binoculars. I couldn’t believe his first shot, seven o’clock in the red dot! I relayed this to Roy and with excitement in his voice he said” I believe I know where to hold for the dot.” As he prepared for his second shot, I was thinking, if he could just get a kill, we would a twenty-one for our team score and we could pick up a few points to get us in a competitive position with our competition. We were shooting against the best instinctive bowhunters in the nation, Tom Daley, David Rudder,

Ben Rodgers, Bob Nation, Jim Brown, Ed Welch, Louie Rangel Dave Lewis and Cal Vogt, just to mention a few. TWANG! Roy’s second arrow was on its way. THUMP! “Center of the red dot!” I shouted. He looked at me in disbelief and with a silly grin, grabbed his binoculars and looked at the target and yelled “ALL RIGHT!” That shot gave us a score of twenty-two points and we were now five points on top in the team event. From the elephant shot until the fortyfifth target we didn’t look back, finishing thirteen points over the next highest team and tying the highest score ever shot. We checked with those running the Safari World Bowhunter Championship and they said as far as they knew, not one bowhunter had ever scored twenty-two points on that target in the thirty years this shoot had been held and in 1986 there were close to seven hundred shooters. We received the privilege of engraving our names on the perpetual elephant trophies under the 1985 winners, Dave Lewis and Bob Nation. We were the proud 1986 Safari World Bowhunter Champions. Our pictures were published in The Western Bowhunter magazine under the heading of “The Best in the Nation”. This was a tournament which Roy and I would never forget. Think about it. Shooting two arrows in a six inch dot at ninety-three yards. That’s 279 feet and instinctive shooting without sights. All I can say is “Fantastic, Roy!” And in my book you are now recognized among the best. I sincerely hope this article will give Roy (Hoggie) McFarland, from Lexington, Kentucky, the recognition overdue. n —Tommy Doerr • Louisville, Kentucky

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Congratulations, NFAA,

U

sually when the NFAA hits a mile marker like this, I stop and reminisce about where I was when I started archery in relationship to where I am now. Like most of you, I got involved in archery through hunting, and thanks to my brother-in-law and my wife’s Christmas present, I was introduced to hunting with a bow. Little did I know it would

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start me on a road that has lasted matter, though, because it shot like more than 35 years and something a champ (in the hands of the right that my family still enjoys today. archer). Like a 12-year-old-on In fact, we are starting Christmas morning who our third generation of got a pony, I couldn’t archers and hunters with wait to shoot it. The my son’s daughter. week before Christmas, I can remember my my wife, Lorraine first bow, a Bear White took me to Sutphin’s Tail. It had tear drop Archery to pick out the cables to attach the bow bow I wanted. With brian sheffler NFAA Vice President string, fiberglass limbs my brother-in-law’s and a flipper rest. I never advice we got the Bear could figure out if it was a 4 wheel White Tail at 45 lbs. At that time I bow or a 2 wheel bow. It didn’t thought that was a lot of poundage

on 75 years of archery! to pull, but the law in Indiana said you couldn’t hunt with anything less than 45 pounds. Little did I know I would be shooting 60 pound bows from then on. Lorraine’s mom and dad bought me my first dozen arrows, 2117s with 125gr. field points. Man, I was ready for anything moving. That weekend I took my bow and arrows to Sutphin’s Archery range to shoot this dream machine. Paid my $3.00 and put my target up. Nocked up my first arrow, took aim and shot my first arrow. At this point let’s just say I hit something other than a target or the target mat. I hit the target stand below the bales. I now owned an archer’s dozen (11 arrows). I can still hear Charlie Sutphin laughing at my poor shot. Not to be discouraged, I nocked up my second arrow. This time I aimed harder and held a little higher to make sure the arrow would make a hit on the target. At this time I think I would like to discuss the hazards from broken glass after shooting a florescent light fixture with an arrow. That’s right, I took out a whole light fixture. Charlie wasn’t laughing now and I was down to 10 arrows, a bad archer’s dozen. Needless to say, Charlie picked up a broom and on his way to the targets told me I was done for the evening unless I had a truck load

of florescent lights to replace any more I might shoot out. Hanging my head low and remembering the lesson my

mother taught me about cleaning up my own messes (especially when you get caught). I grabbed a continued on page 12

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 9

WORLD FIELD ARCHERY

Championships 速

4-8, 2014 T S U G U A

1939

2014 速

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NFAA® Calendar of Events DATE/TOURNAMENT...................................................................................................... VENUE

2014 —MARCH— March 14 nfaa indoor pro-am..............................................................................................Louisville, KY March 15-16 Indoor National Championships......................................................................Louisville, KY March 22-23 classic 600 target tournament...................................................................... Bismarck, ND —APRIL— April 5-6 National Unmarked 3D Championships................................................... Ft. Lauderdale, FL April 12-13 First Dakota Classic................................................................................................ Yankton, SD —MAY— May 2-4 National Marked 3D Championships................................................................ Redding, CA —JUNE— June 13-15 big sky open..................................................................................................Grand Junction, CO —JULY/AUGUST— July 30-August 3 NFAA National Field Championships................................................................. Yankton, SD August 4-8 IFAA World Field Championships....................................................................... Yankton, SD

Please visit www.nfaausa.com for complete details and tournament information.

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 11

75th INDOOR NATIONAL | continued from page 9

trash can and went down to help clean up. After we cleaned up the mess and I helped Charlie fix the lights we sat at the counter and had a long talk. Not about me or my stupid shooting but on archery in general. I learned a lot that evening about the history of the NFAA and the game of archery. He told me funny stories about friends he had made and now I had made my first archery friend that day. He was until the day he passed away. If it wasn’t for Charlie I would not have been as involved in the NFAA as I am today. The first thing that Charlie had me purchase was a sight. He said that would help my aiming a whole lot. He was right. I never took out a set of florescent lights again. But what he did at no cost was to teach me the basic of shooting a bow. I still go back to those early lessons he taught me and I’m glad to say my kids carry those same lessons with them today. Again, congratulations to the NFAA on 75 years. I hope those that read this article will look back and remember your first bow, your first missed arrow and your archery friends who have passed away and those who are still with us that helped you realize how great this sport is. Just as we are now the new NFAA, may we do as well as they did in teaching the next generation about our sport and the history of the NFAA. See you on the shooting line somewhere! n 12 Archery Magazine

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HOYT DOMINATES

THE 2014 NFAA

VEGAS SHOOT

AGA IN

Most Perfect 300’s Most Perfect 900’s

Highest Individual Daily X-Count

Complete Podium Sweep

*

*Men’s Compound Freestyle Unlimited Division

THE BOWS OF CHAMPIONS.

THE BOWS OF CHAMPIONS. scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 13

Take a fun look back at these archers in their earlier days! Can you guess who’s who? Take your best guess! This highly decorated Male Pro Archer resides in his home state of Idaho.

This Female Pro Archer is currently the State Director of New York.

This Male Pro Archer, when not shooting, can be found at the Specialty Archery booth.

This Male Pro Archer won the 2013 3-Star Car Shoot Off in Yankton, SD.

This Senior Pro Archer is the reigning Outdoor National Champion.

This archer is the NFAA Councilman for the Northwest section.

Check your accuracy—answer key on page 45. 14 Archery Magazine

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Make checks payable toStraight Arrow Bowhunters, Inc. Mail Pre-Registration form to: Rita Waters More information at 328 Woodcliff Drive www.straightarrowbowhunters.com Redding, CA 96003 scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 15

Coach’s Corner © bernie pellerite

The following are excerpts from Idiot Proof Answers to Archery’s Most Asked Questions by Bernie Pellerite. From the author: “When I decided to write this second book, I felt that it should be completely different from the first. To determine what most people wanted to hear, we took questions for over a year from the internet and from past seminars and shooter’s schools. Then we selected the top 275 from over 500 questions we had compiled. In this follow-up book to Idiot Proof Archery, we tried not to duplicate the material covered in the first book. So, most of Idiot Proof Answers is brand new material with new pictures and there is much more technical information in this book than in the first. The chapters include the following: Equipment, which includes bows, tuning, strings, peep sights, sights, rests, stabilizers, releases and arrows. Also Form, Aiming, Mental, Target Panic, Back Tension, Practice, Tournaments and Hunting. This article is a selection of questions and answers from the Bow Equipment chapter. I keep reading about finding the balance between the holding weight and the mass weight on a bow. Is there an easy way to determine this or a good starting point to work from? There is a balance between the holding weight and the mass weight of a bow, but it is very individual and fairly esoteric (only understood by a few individuals with a specialized knowledge or interest). Here’s an example; you are a right-handed archer and you have a bow that has a mass weight of 8 pounds and it has 80% let-off. If you are shooting it at 60 pounds, then you are holding 12 pounds. You might find the front of the bow would feel heavy because you don’t have enough holding weight in the right hand to help “lift” or support the mass weight of the bow in the left hand. Now, here’s another scenario; you are a right-handed archer and you have a bow that has a mass weight of 9 pounds and it has 65% let-off. If you are shooting it at 50 pounds, then you are holding 17 or 18 pounds. You might then feel that the bow will feel lighter, or more balanced, because you are pulling harder than the first example, making the heavier 9 pound bow feel lighter, or more balanced. In a nutshell, the harder you pull (right hand), the more it helps “lift” the bow (left hand), making it feel lighter at full draw, therefore more balanced. I told you it was esoteric! 16 Archery Magazine

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FIG 1.14 When the holding weight and the mass weight are balanced, the bow feels lighter.

Is there an advantage to split limbs or solid limbs? Parallel or straight? Split limbs, in my opinion, are much more prone to imbalance than solid limbs. When split limbs came out years ago, part of the sales pitch was they wouldn’t split because they were already split and they were lighter because they used less fiberglass than a solid limb. Think about it; if you took fiberglass out of a 50-pound limb, it wouldn’t have the strength of a 50-pound limb anymore, would it? Split limbs are usually thicker than solid limbs for that reason. Parallel limbs do have advantage over straight limbs because of vibration. When the parallel limbs fire, the cams go up and down as opposed to back and forth, thus there is much less noticeable vibration. Other than that, there’s not any difference, as far as accuracy FIG 1.15 goes. Parallel limb bows have noticeably less vibration.

What are some of the effects if your draw length is too short? A draw length that is too short will cause one or more of the following to happen: It forces your shoulder to be in a bind. It causes you to bend your elbow to get into the draw length of the bow. You might not be able to get a solid anchor, like not locking into your jawbone or not touching your nose. It can cause you to put more weight on your front foot, causing your aiming eye to be no longer over your bellybutton. This causes you to be off-balance and causes you to not be able to relax your bow arm or bow shoulder, because it would collapse. And, when you collapse, it can make arrows to go to the right (assuming you are a right-handed archer.)

Explain the different types of torque and their effects on the bow.

FIG 1.17

There are basically 4 different types of torque; there is dynamic torque, rotational torque, pre-loaded torque, and positive torque. Dynamic torque is torque that is put on the bow after the string has Parallel limb bows are smoother, not necessarily more accurate. been released. For example, the archer sees his sight is too low when he releases and adds sudden bottom hand pressure, trying to force the arrow to come out of the bow a little higher; this is called “heeling” the bow. Rotational torque is the same as dynamic torque, except the archer does a twisting motion with the bow hand, left or right, after the string has been released. Preloaded torque is usually associated with a twisting motion, which is often caused by improper hand position in the grip. For example, a right-handed archer puts the continued on page 18

FIG 1.16

Are parallel limb bows really better technology? They are, to the extent that they make the shot much smoother. There is less recoil from the parallel limbs. They don’t really give you any more speed; that is a function of the cams. 

FIG 1.18A Preloaded torque can cause the riser to twist left or right at release. scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 17

coach’s corner | continued from page 17

FIG 1.18B

FIG 1.19

Positive torque helps with follow through.

grip too much out on the thumb. Upon release, the bow will twist suddenly in a clockwise direction, causing the string to hit his arm. Conversely, if the right-handed archer puts too much thumb in the grip, upon release, the bow will twist counter-clockwise, usually with a miss to the left. Positive torque is the torque when the bow is going straight forward after the release. This is really just inertia and the result of the dynamics of the bow being fired, the string moving forward and the limbs going toward the target, forcing the riser to jump forward.

hands have a larger range of preference than people in the middle. The 90% of us that are in the middle tend to prefer a thinner grip so we can get less hand touching the grip, which cuts down on the grip hand negatively influencing the bow during the shot sequence. Some shooters prefer to remove the grip and shoot off the riser. A small percentage of archers prefer high wrist grips that can be special ordered, but most of the shooting community prefer a low wrist, which is easier to duplicate from shot to shot.

I have read a lot about axle-to-axle length, and am wondering your take on using a 32inch axle-to-axle bow for target shooting out to 80 yards. Is bigger always better? I have a 26-inch draw length. As far as being able to shoot out to 80 yards with a 32-inch axle-to-axle bow, you can just fine, as long as you don’t make any mistakes in your form or your release. It won’t be as “forgiving” as a 38” or 40” bow. The shorter bows are too easy to torque, so any mistake you make will be magnified, especially at long distances. Now, having a 26inch draw length will give you a bit of an advantage over a longer draw length because the arrow gets off the string faster, thus there is less chance of making a mistake while the arrow is attached. (see photo, above right) How do I determine which grip style will be best for me? Grip style is an individual thing, but in general, the thinner the grip and the flatter the grip is, the better it fits most archers. Shooters with very small hands or very large 18 Archery Magazine

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My bow is making noise at the shot. How can I isolate the noise and fix it? If your string is loud, you could put “cat whiskers” or any kind of string muffler on the string. If it’s your bow, make sure everything is tightened down. The best way I’ve found is with a rubber hammer. You can tap on the bow in different places without hurting the finish. Many times it is glue that has let loose in a stabilizer, for instance, or a nut or bolt is loose on the rest. If you suspect the stabilizer, remove it and tap on the bow again. Sometimes it is the rest or cable guard. If it is an item that cannot be removed, touch it while tapping on the bow again to see if that eliminates the noise. Once you have identified where

the noise is coming from, then you can fix that item. If the noise happens only when you are shooting, get a buddy to stand close to the bow to figure out where the noise is coming from. If everything is tight, then most people add mass weight to the bow and put stabilizers on that have some sort of rubber or elastomer. This will absorb the noise. Keep in mind that the softer the rubber is, the more it will absorb the noise and shock. BowJax work well because they are a soft rubber and have several configurations to go on limbs, cable guards or stabilizers. We have a “Shock Collar” that is very low profile, made of a very soft rubber, is inexpensive and will fit on your stabilizer.

String silencers will help quiet a noisy bow.

Tap your riser with a rubber hammer to find what is loose. FIG 1.21A

Should I shoot my 60-70# bow at 70 pounds with a 350-grain arrow at 3-D shoots that use the five grains per pound rule? If you feel like you can handle 70 pounds with 350-grain arrow at the 3-D shoots, then by all means, do that. You’ll possibly only be 0 to 2 feet per second faster than if you set that bow at 60 and use a 300 grain arrow. Using a slightly heavier arrow does give you some advantage, as long as the conditions don’t change, such as wind and rain. Of course, in the wind and rain, the skinniest arrow will deflect the least. However, a light, skinny arrow in the wind could cause problems. So basically, you can shoot a 300-grain arrow at 60 pounds or a 350-grain arrow at 70 pounds and your speed will be nearly identical. The only difference is how deep it goes into the bale. n Each issue will have more questions and answers from other chapters. Stay tuned! If you can’t wait, you can purchase this hardcover book for $34.95 from Robinhood Videos at (614) 322-1038 or www.robinhoodvideos.com. NFAA members; you can get it for $29.95 if you CALL to order and mention this article.

FIG 1.21B Serving Archery Since 1941

FIG 1.21C Ultra-soft “Shock Collar” absorbs vibration very efficiently.

www.SAUSA.com scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 19

DAN KOLB Northwest Councilman

My History of the NFAA began when I was a kid growing up on a Reservation in Eastern Utah. My Dad worked as a mechanic for the BIA, and being Indian, spent a lot of time outside with my friends playing. As kids we did not play Cowboys & Indians, it was Indians versus Indians. We would make our bows out of stiff tree branch and arrows out of willows, then choose sides and have war parties. Fast forward to Boy Scouts and working for a merit badge in archery. After spending time in the Marine Corps I returned to Utah in the late 1960s to work. I was introduced to bow hunting by a fellow worker who bow hunted in the mid-west. I went into Salt Lake City, bought my first bow, a Ben Pearson Pony, and six cedar arrows (which I still have. Five are in my passion, and the sixth is imbedded in a tree in the Book Cliffs area of Eastern Utah after it sailed over the back of a nice four point Mulley). In the early 70’s we were transferred to Wyoming, and one evening while visiting with some friends, they told me about the local archery club and invited me to go with them. When I did boy was I in for a big surprise! It seemed like everyone in the club was shooting compound bows, and I had never seen one. I jumped into archery with both 20 Archery Magazine

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feet and pulled my wife and kids in with me. We all enjoyed shooting except our oldest daughter who got the job of babysitting the youngest daughter, who turned out to be an archery Champion in her own right, with some help from dad and her own talent. One son worked for Hoyt, another one still hunts, and our oldest son found other interests. Over the years of competing I have won over sixty State Championships, fourteen Sectional Championships, five National Championships, and two International Championships, also winning twice at the Vegas Shoot. In 1991 I represented the United States at the first World Indoor Championship in Oulu, Finland and the American Men Compound team swept the medals with me winning the Silver (a proud time in my archery history). I was elected Wyoming State Director for 21 years, and for the last 6 years Northwest Section Councilman. And that is my history with the NFAA for now (more to follow).

KEN MOORE new england Section Councilman

Well here it is a year later, and I’m writing to you again. This is just so cool! In 1951, we started having the New England Shoot in our section. Unfortunately I don’t have the records from back then, but

what a tradition. The New England shoot takes place each year on Labor Day weekend. It’s an end-of-summer tradition, and for many of us the end of shooting outdoors until the next spring. Today, we shoot a Field Round on Saturday, followed by half of an Animal round. On Sunday we shoot a Hunter round. This leaves Monday as family time. In the past we shot all three days. Many of the shooters are the same folks that come to our Outdoor Sectional Tournament (held in June) and it’s one last time to shoot together before Old Man Winter sets in. Back in 2001 (I was the state Director for Rhode Island at the time), we wanted to do something special for our 50th anniversary, so we decided to have steak fry. I volunteered to be the cook for the event. We were able to put on quite a feed for $10: We served a nice barbecued steak, corn on the cob, baked potatoes and a salad. I can’t take all the credit here. That year, Ruby, the president of the host club, obtained the steak and the corn. Gary (Vermont state President and Director), along with his wife Darleen, picked up all the other food items. I drafted help with the food preparations. This turned out so well, we’ve been doing the steak fry every year of the shoot since. Fortunately we’ve also been able to keep the price at $10. This past year, the weather, food and friends were wonderful. We had 43 shooters. For 2014, we have some big plans.

We want to make this shoot a sanctioned pro round. We also want to have an indoor flavor of this in November. Once again this will be a sanctioned pro round. For the indoor tournament we plan on having a Vegas round. We still working out the details on all of this, so keep your eyes glued to an upcoming issue of Archery Magazine for our ad. We use the money raised at the tournament to help fund sending our New England Directors to the annual meetings. This has been especially helpful as the meetings tend to be in the west, and some of our states are pretty small. If you enjoy traveling, by all means make it a point to join us Labor Day weekend. I’ve already requested good weather. This year the tournament will be at the Lunenburg Sportsmen’s Club. I like to pitch a tent; however, we have lots of nice hotels nearby. One other piece of information (maybe the most important), is on Saturday after the shooting is done, everyone’s fed, the kitchen is cleaned up and the tent is set up, I lead an excursion to Cherry Hill farms for ice cream. Contact me or checkout our website www.nesfaa.org for the details. Remember—shoot well, be safe and be nice to the other people you encounter on the roads. n

See Spot... Hit Spot... Home of the Original True Spot & Double Vision Lenses

With True Spot!

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technical@specialtyarch.com scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 21

TRUST YOUR FORM and shoot terry wunderle

When he was younger, Braden Gellenthien was shooting the first end of 70 meters at the beginning of the Junior World Trials. As he finished his six arrows, he came off the line and shook his head in disgust, even though he had made a perfect score of 60. Then he approached me and said, “I know. I’m aiming too much and it will stop.” I responded with a firm warning, “Trust your form and shoot.” Braden quit aiming and went on to set a new world record at 70 meters. Why were we both upset by his over-aiming? This practice is what had gotten him into trouble in the past. When he had over-aimed, his scores had plummeted. The best piece of advice that I can give any archer is to trust your form and shoot.

One of the biggest problems most archers face is overaiming. Why do they develop this habit? They believe or have been lead to believe that the pin has to stay on the dot for the arrow to hit its mark. This is not true. Archers who rely on this practice put all of their emphasis and concentration on keeping the pin on the dot. This is the process of over-aiming. When the pin drifts off the dot, muscles are tightened in order to guide or force the pin back onto the bullseye. These extra-tense muscles then affect the reaction of the bow arm when the arrow is released, resulting in a different impact point. How do you keep the sight pin on the mark? You center it and let it float, staying relaxed but keeping strong back pressure. The pin will remain on or close to the dot. If you execute a shot with perfect form, it will be successful. Trust your form and release the arrow. If you tighten muscles in an attempt to guide the pin, the extra muscle tension will produce additional pin movement. Over-aiming not only causes muscle tension, it also adds extra time to the shot sequence. As seconds are added, the form begins to break down and the entire shot process goes awry. Picture yourself looking forward to a major tournament where you want to do well or even win. During practice, you have been shooting great competition scores and now you are faced with the moment of truth. Since you want to succeed, you start over-aiming and attempt to hold the pin on the mark. In the end, your tournament score is not even close to your practice scores. Does this sound familiar? Most shots are missed because there was a breakdown in form. Very few shots are missed because the pin was not on or near the mark. Place your emphasis where it counts. Concentrate and execute a shot with perfect form. n

Terry Wunderle’s new book, Archery: Think and Shoot Like a Champion, is now available at wunderlearchery.com 22 Archery Magazine

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FIRST DAKOTA CLASSIC

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION FORM NFAA Easton Yankton Archery Complex April 12-13, 2014 Yankton, SD

First Name

Last Name

Middle Initial

Phone

Address City

Zip Code

State

Email

DOB CHAMPIONSHIP

/

FLIGHTS

/ JUNIOR

Early Registration Fee (on or before 03/31/2014)

$200

$100

$60

Registration Fee (on or after 04/01/2014)

$250

Circle Preference

$150

10:00 am

$110

1:00 pm

ADULT DIVISIONS

4:30 pm

JUNIOR DIVISIONS Divisions Based on the Following: Female Male

Championship Barebow (BB)* Championship Female Freestyle (CUF) Championship Male Freestyle (CUM) Championship Female Freestyle Limited Recurve (RLF) Championship Male Freestyle Limited Recurve (RLM) Championship Senior Freestyle (SCU)* Bowhunter Freestyle Flights (BUX)* Freestyle Flights (CUX)* Crossbow Flights (CXB)* Freestyle Limited Compound Flights (FLX)* Freestyle Limited Recurve Flights (RLX)*

Cub (Under 12 years) Youth (12-14 years) Young Adult (15-17 years) Freestyle Freestyle Limited Compound Freestyle Limited Recurve Check for Wheelchair Accommodations

*Denotes Men and Women Combined FOR REGISTRATION BY MAIL OR FAX, PLEASE SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: World Archery Festival, 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 Fax: (605) 260-9280

Credit Card #

Exp. Date

Security Code

Check#

All registrations are subject to a $25 cancellation fee. All cancellation requests must be received in writing on or before 3/31/2014. No refunds will be considered on or after 4/1/2014. Payments made to the WAF that are insufficient or invalid will incur a fee up to $50. For registration confirmation, visit the Registered Archers link at www.nfaausa.com.

For Online Payment and Registration, Please Visit www.nfaausa.com.

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 23

WALK THROUGH

NFAA 1939

1946

1959

1967

1973

The NFAA was founded. By the end of the year there were state organizations in Washington, Oregon, New Jersey, Arizona and California with individual members scattered through Illinois, Ohio, Virginia, Michigan, New York, Minnesota, Kansas, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Missouri and Texas. Today the NFAA has 49-chartered state organizations.

First NFAA National Championship (now National Outdoor) was held in Allegan, MI.

Fellowship of the Robin Hood was established for NFAA members.

Youth Scholarship Program founded. Today, in partnership with Easton Foundations, the NFAA Foundation awards over $20,000 in scholarships per year to student athletes.

The NFAA Professional Division was set up. 62 NFAA Professional Archers made their first appearance at the Outdoor Nationals to compete for a total purse of $2,800.

1962

A.J. Michelson of Flint, Michigan becomes the first NFAA President.

1940 The first NFAA Outdoor Field Tournament was held by way of mail-in scorecards. E. Hill Turnock of Wilkinsburg, PA won the men’s division with an average score of 356 for 28 targets. The winning female was Naomi Baker of Inglewood, CA with an average of 196 for 28 targets. 

The first Las Vegas Open, or “Vegas Shoot,” held in Las Vegas, NV.

1947 Compton Medal of Honor and NFAA Hall of Fame Established

1968 Las Vegas Convention Center, site of the Sahara-Colts Las Vegas Open.

1954

Then and now.

1957 Pope & Young Club is started by NFAA Bowhunter Chairman Glenn St. Charles as a part of the NFAAs Hunting Activities Committee.

1945

1959

Order of the Bone Adopted. See page 31.

The NFAA acquired its own office building and headquarters in Redland, CA. Original headquarters

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1964 Service pins for continued membership in the NFAA were adopted.

1974 The NFAA introduced the flight system at the National Outdoor for the first time.

1976

The NFAA becomes a National member of the International Field Archery Association.

1971

1977

1969

Sectional tournaments standardized throughout the eight sections of the NFAA.

Dean Pridgen won the first ever NFAA Pro division at the 1973 Outdoor Nationals.

Bill Wadsworth, NFAA Bowhunter Chairman, and the NFAA conservation and bowhunting committee helped start the International Bowhunter Education Program (IBEP) which later became a separate non-profit organization known today as the National Bowhunter Education Foundation (NBEF).

Chartering of clubs began. Today the NFAA has nearly 1,000 affiliated clubs.

Hand sketch of a 1944 NFAA field course.

The NFAA Stump Emblem was created by Dick Schroeder, a national known artist and an NFAA archer. Nearly the same logo is used today.

New Youth Division provided for competitive NFAA Youth Members.

First ever Las Vegas Open winners.

1963 1941

Paige Pearce receives her 2013 scholarship from Bruce Cull, NFAA President and Bob Romero, Easton Foundations.

The compound bow was allowed in all divisions.

Service pins available for every 5 consecutive membership years.

NFAA Indoor Championship face and round established.

The NFAA 5 Spot was adopted from the Championship 4 spot face.

1972 NFAA Certified Instructor School was started.

1979 NFAA suffers a financial crisis and temporarily suspends the publication of Archery Magazine.

TIME WITH NFAA 1980

1993

1999

2008

The first Indoor National Tournament is held in Omaha, NE with 524 shooters.

The Indoor National Tournament was held in Louisville, KY with a record number of 1436 archers.

The NFAA purchases the World Archery Festival (The Vegas Shoot). The WAF becomes a separate corporation.

NFAA Headquarters moved from Redlands, CA to 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD.

Bruce Cull is elected first President of the WAF.

The Classic is renamed the First Dakota Classic and moved to Yankton, SD.

Jim Despart wins the 1993 Men’s Pro Division with a perfect score of 600/120 x’s.

1994

1984 New NFAA Headquarters is completed in Redlands, CA.

1990

The NFAA challenged the NAA as the National Governing Body for archery in the United States. The challenge was withdrawn in 1994 and both organizations signed an agreement with the U.S. Olympic Committee facilitating reciprocal membership, and program agreements were initiated between the two organizations.

2001 The World Archery Festival purchases the Atlantic City Classic.

2002 The NFAA and World Archery Festival begin the 3 Star Tour, including The Vegas Shoot, NFAA Indoor Nationals and the Classic.

The Western Classic Trail shoot in Redding, CA becomes home to the NFAA Marked 3D National Tournament.

1991 The first Unmarked 3D National Tournament is held in Hickory, NC.

1996 The first NFAA website was implemented.

The money class winners at the 1991 3D Nationals.

NFAA Foundations initiates search for building a museum and headquarters, centrally located in the Midwest.

­—Mark Markwort referring to the las vegas open in the february

1962

issue of archery.

2013 NFAA launched a new website at www.nfaausa. com.

2010 NFAA partnered with local businesses to break ground on a new KOA campground next to NFAA Headquarters.

1995

The NFAA Foundation established.

2008 NFAA Foundation is awarded Easton Foundation Grant to become the first Easton Archery Center of Excellence as part of the NFAA archery center in Yankton, SD.

2013 NFAA Foundation receives National Guard Summer Camp Project to build new field and Olympic archery ranges at Headquarters.

2006 The WAF Classic is moved to Pittsburgh and renamed the Stanislawski Open.

2011 NFAA Foundation is awarded Easton Foundation Grant to add a 90-meter indoor archery range and warehouse. The official name of Headquarters becomes the NFAA Easton Yankton Archery Complex. The building is nearly 50,000 square feet and sits on over 90 acres of field, 3D and Olympic ranges.

2014 The Vegas Shoot hit record number of attendees with over 2,150 registered archers.

Photo by Jeff Sanchez. www.BowDoc.com

Indoor tournaments have been becoming more popular. To an old timer, such as myself, this seemed at first glance like a pantywaist invasion of what used to be a footslogging, sweaty field sport. However, let us bow to progress and enjoy the new soft life. At least we old timers will admit this makes for a better spectator sport and is attracting more newcomers. You old-time field archers will now have to wear shirts, clean slacks and sneakers at tournaments. No longer will you be allowed to display your hairy chests, beat up hunting boots and faded jeans. There is an ugly rumor circulating to the effect that you will even have to SHAVE!

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 25

Ryan Fitzgerald

Preseason Tournaments The hunting bows were put away

and the camouflage was hung up as 2013 drew to a close. Target bows were dusted off in anticipation of the New Year. But before the 2014 NFAA tournament season kicked off, archers competed in a few preseason sanctioned tournaments.

Presley’s Midwest Open in Peoria, IL has become a favorite among archers eagerly awaiting the new season to start. Regularly held the first weekend in December, the Midwest Open sells out quickly as archers get ready to dust off the cobwebs and maybe try out some new equipment. NFAA pro shooter Scott Starnes was the winner for the men’s money class and fellow NFAA pros Richard Potter and Sam Wolthuis finished in second and third respectively. Sarah Lance took the win for the women’s money class and was followed by Cheryl Keith and Nancy Zorn on the podium. NFAA “rookie” senior pro Duane Price won his first tournament shooting in the senior class and Jackie White and Robert Wolfram finished in 2nd and 3rd behind Duane. The Iowa Pro Am in Des Moines, IA was the second stop of the preseason. This year the tournament had over 600 archers making it the largest in the Midwest. The best archers in the country routinely attend this shoot and this year they put on a show. After a shoot off, Jesse Broadwater defeated Reo Wilde for first place in the men’s money class after both archers only dropped one point all weekend. Rounding out the podium for the men was Braden Gellenthien who only dropped two points for the tournament and earned third place. Erika Jones took the top prize for the women’s money class and Presley’s Midwest Open winner Sarah Lance finished in second after a shoot off with third place finisher Crystal Gauvin.

Jackie White won his third consecutive Iowa Pro Am in the senior money class and was joined by Ed Horn in second and Don Ward in third on the podium. The Kansas City Shootout was the third and final preseason tournament for the NFAA archers. This was the final indoor tournament for most shooters before Vegas as the look to fine tune their game one more time. After a shoot off for the men’s money class Nshan Thompson defended his title and defeated Scott Starnes and Dan Jasa took third place. Debi Reed shooting in her first tournament in the money class won for the women and was followed by Renee Arndt and Dee Starnes. Robert Wolfram won for the senior money class as he defeated Jackie White who took second and Chris Berry finished in third. The national NFAA schedule got underway with the World Archery Festival in Las Vegas, NV in February and concludes with Outdoor Nationals at the end of July. Can Jesse Broadwater continue his impressive winning streak and win a third Vegas title? How many men’s pros will make the shoot off at Indoor Nationals? Now that the mark of 1539 has been set at Redding can someone clean that tournament? Will Ben English repeat as Outdoor Nationals champion? Can Erika Jones win all of the NFAA shooter of the year tournaments? Can someone stop Jamie Van Natta’s impressive silver bowl run at Outdoor Nationals? Will the new rookie senior pros shake up that class? I’m sure it will be an exciting season to follow full of records broken and milestones achieved. With archery’s growth continuing to skyrocket it’s gearing up to be a memorable season. n

How many men’s pros will make the shoot off at Indoor Nationals? Now that the mark of 1539 has been set at Redding, can someone clean that tournament? Will the new rookie senior pros shake up that class?

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scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 27

UNMARKED 3D NATIONALS

N FA A 3-D

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION FORM A p r i l 5 -6 , 2014 Ft. Lauderdale, FL

Last Name

First Name

Phone

Address

City

State

Email Member ID#

Expiration

Zip Code

Male

Female

NFAA Member

USA Archery Member

EARLY REGISTRATION FEE (ON OR BEFORE MARCH 24, 2014)

Pro Divisions

Adult & Senior Divisions

Junior Divisions

$150

$50

$40

REGISTRATION FEE (ON OR AFTER MARCH 25, 2014)

Pro Divisions

Adult & Senior Divisions

Junior Divisions

$200

$75

$65

Please select Age Category and Shooting Style: Pro Adult

Young Adult (age 15-17)

Adult

Pro Senior (50 and over)

Senior (50 and over)

Youth (age 12-14)

Silver Senior (60 and over)

Adult, Senior, Silver Senior & Master Senior Divisions Barebow Bowhunter Bowhunter Freestyle Bowhunter Freestyle Limited Traditional Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve Longbow Crossbow (Adult Only)

Cub (under 12) Master Senior (70 and over)

Pro Adult/Pro Senior Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve

Junior Divisions Barebow Bowhunter Freestyle Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve

FOR REGISTRATION BY MAIL OR FAX, PLEASE SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 Fax: (605) 260-9280

Credit Card #

Exp. Date

Security Code

Check #

All registrations are subject to a $25 cancellation fee. All cancellation requests must be received in writing on or before 3/24/2014. No refunds will be considered on or after 3/25/2014. Payments made to the NFAA that are insufficient or invalid will incur a fee up to $50. For registration confirmation, visit the Registered Archers link at www.nfaausa.com.

For Online Registration & Payment, Please Visit www.nfaausa.com 28 Archery Magazine

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Membership Application Form Membership Includes One-Year Subscription to Archery Magazine and $5,000 Liability Insurance Coverage for Bowhunters. Check with your state organization to enjoy additional benefits at a club or range near you. Complete the application and join today!

Last Name

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State

New

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Renewal

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DOB

Additional Family Member

DOB

Additional Family Member

DOB

Additional Family Member

DOB

Membership Type

Adult/HOH

1st Add.

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3rd Add.

4th Add.

Date of Birth

Youth

/

/

Professional

Total

Amount Due*

Account Holder Name Exp. Date

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Cash

Professional Membership NFAA Professional Membership runs from January through December of each year. Pro members must maintain current regular membership with the NFAA and their affiliated state association. Applicant must be 18 years of age or older or submit a parental consent form. Fee is $75 per year.

New*

Male

Adult

Freestyle

Renewal

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Freestyle Limited

*Professional Sponsor

All new Professional Members must be able to provide reference from a current NFAA Pro Member upon request during their first year of NFAA Pro Membership.

Freestyle Limited Recurve

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 29

Archery Princesses were chosen by the NFAA to represent and promote various tournaments.

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The Order of the Bone Award falls upon those who, through outstanding lack of poise and earth prowess, made our dubious order mainly because they survived to tell their experiences. While experience may well be the best teacher, hopefully we can all learn from these unfortunates in the second best way—second-hand. Thus, we present these tales both to delight and to instruct. Here’s hoping the old bone never falls on you. L. Dee Burgess Southport, Indiana | December 1971 On Sunday I packed all my bowhunting gear and organized all my equipment for my second day-long hunt for Indiana whitetail. All my gear was placed in the trunk of my car with the exception of my bow which I left in my bow rack. On Monday morning, I rolled out at 4am, put on my hunting clothes and was on my way to Camp Atterbury, a military reservation which is said to have some of the best whitetail in the state. The trip from my home to the camp was approximately 40 miles and as I was coming in to Edinburg, Indiana, a small town on the outskirts of Atterbury, I mentally ran over all my gear to make sure I hadn’t forgotten anything. At that moment, my mind went in to a complete frenzy. I had left my bow at home! I quickly turned around and beat a straight path home to pick it up. I made it back to Atterbury with very little time to spare. Although I didn’t get my deer that day, I learned one important lesson. Bowhunting without a bow just doesn’t make it!

Verniel “Ledge” Ledgerwood March 1972 On a pre-season scouting trip, Ledge, Mike Jewell, Jack Marcias and Bill Booker (all members of the Broken Arrow Bow Hunters) topped a ridge while walking along a dirt road. Ahead and down the trail about 75 yards sat a cottontail. Ledge took aim and released, his shaft landed 10 feet short and ricocheted out of sight into some nearby bushes. Unfortunately for the bunny, he jumped and disappeared into the same bushes. Ledge and the others thought it was a clear miss until the shaft started dancing above the bush. When they reached the shaft they found the rabbit on the other end of it, quite dead.

Ron Browning | May 1972 I received a call from Charley Hilliard to go hunting. I hastily gathered my equipment together and 45 minutes later Charley and I were walking into our stands. We separated about half-way into the woods and agreed to meet at dark. I hurried toward my stand and found myself hopelessly entangled in a very thorny saw briar plant. I immediately reached for the eightinch buffalo skinner at my side, drew it swiftly and swung a mighty blow at my captor. I succeeded in clearly severing the saw briar, my bowstring and cut a one inch nick through two layers of a brand new hunting bow. The type of action does not become a veteran bow hunter. In fact, it makes a person feel very foolish. Especially

since I had no extra string or bow in the car. When Charley and I met at dark he asked me if I had taken a shot at the fork horn who passed my stand shortly after we got there. The egg on my face was still very visible when he told this story throughout the following tournament season. Bring a scholarly type; I can only say I have learned from this experience: 1. Don’t get in a hurry. 2. Knives are skinning tools. 3. Always carry a spare string. 4. It costs a lot to repair damaged bows. 5. Don’t ever tell a close friend. 6. Even veterans make drastic mistakes.

Chris Nelson | February 1977 Eureka! I had found it at last. I was bowhunting for whitetail near my home in south-central Arkansas and had spent over 20 hours actual hunting time in the search firm in my convictions that my efforts would be well rewarded. And I discovered what I had sought almost by accident as I sat 20 feet up in a beech tree overlooking a fresh buck scrape that Monday morning last November. The four of them were huddled closely together, each over a hundred feet tall. White oak trees, loaded with acorns—a rare sight last fall because the mast had been very poor with few varieties of oaks having any fruit. But continued on page 45

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 31

69th ANNUAL OUTDOOR NATIONAL FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS OFFICIAL REGISTRATION FORM July 30-August 3, 2014 Yankton, SD

1939

2014 速

Last Name

First Name

Phone

Address

City

State Male

Email

Zip Code

Female

Pro Divisions

Adult & Senior Divisions

Junior Divisions

Family*

Family w/ Professional*

$225

$85

$70

$250

$325

*Family Rate is defined as 2 adults and 2 children under the age of 18.

A Late Registration Fee of $50 will be charged after July 21, 2014.

Please select Age Category and Shooting Style: Pro Adult

Young Adult (age 15-17)

Adult

Pro Senior (50 and over)

Senior (50 and over)

Adult, Senior, Silver Senior & Master Senior Divisions Barebow Bowhunter Bowhunter Freestyle Bowhunter Freestyle Limited Traditional Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve Longbow Crossbow (Adult Only)

Cub (under 12)

Youth (age 12-14)

Silver Senior (60 and over)

Master Senior (70 and over)

Pro Adult/Pro Senior Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve

Junior Divisions Barebow Bowhunter Freestyle Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve

FOR REGISTRATION BY MAIL OR FAX, PLEASE SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 Fax: (605) 260-9280

Credit Card #:

Exp. Date

Security Code

Payee Name

Check #

Money Order #

Make checks payable to NFAA. All participants must be current NFAA or USA Archery Members. All registrations are subject to a $25 cancellation fee. All cancellations must be received in writing before July 21, 2014. No refunds will be considered on or after 7/22/2014. Payments made to the NFAA that are insufficient or invalid will incur a fee up to $50.

For Online Registration, Please Visit: www.nfaausa.com

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IFAA WORLD FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS OFFICIAL REGISTRATION FORM August 4-8, 2014 NFAA Easton Yankton Archery Complex Yankton, SD

WORLD FIELD ARCHERY

Championships 速

4-8, 2014 AUGUST

Last Name

Middle Initial

First Name

Address

City

State

Email

Phone

Country

NFAA Member

IFAA (Please List National Organization)

USA Archery Member

Male

Expiration

Member ID#

Zip Code

Female

DOB (MM/DD/YY)

Pro Adult

Adult/Veteran

Junior/Cub

Late Fee Begins July 1

$250 USD

$150 USD

$75 USD

$25 USD

Pro Adult Pro Adult/Adult Barebow-Recurve Barebow-Compound Freestyle Limited Recurve Freestyle Limited Compound Freestyle Unlimited Bowhunter Recurve Bowhunter Compound Bowhunter Unlimited Bowhunter Limited Longbow Historical Bow Professional Unlimited Professional Limited

Adult

Junior (13-16)

Veteran

Cub (Under 13)

Veteran/Junior Barebow-Recurve Barebow-Compound Freestyle Limited Recurve Freestyle Limited Compound Freestyle Unlimited Bowhunter Recurve Bowhunter Compound Bowhunter Unlimited Bowhunter Limited Longbow

Cub Barebow-Recurve Barebow-Compound Freestyle Limited Recurve Freestyle Limited Compound Freestyle Unlimited Longbow Please check here to request wheelchair accommodations.

TO REGISTER, PLEASE SEND COMPLETED FORM TO: National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 (605) 260-9279 Fax: (605) 260-9280 info@nfaausa.com

Name on Account Expiration Date

Credit Card # Security Code

Check#

Money Order #

All registrations are subject to a $25 cancellation fee. All cancellation requests must be received in writing on or before 7/20/2014. No refunds will be considered on or after 7/21/2014. Payments made to the NFAA that are insufficient or invalid will incur a fee up to $50. For registration confirmation, please view the Registered Archers list at: www.WorldFieldArchery.com

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 33

SECTION & STATE ASSOCIATION NEWS Edited by NFAA Headquarters

Complete results of the Indoor Sectional Tournaments are available online at www.nfaausa.com/results

SOUTHEAST SECTION Tim Austin, Councilman flarchery@earthlink.net

Southeast Indoor Sectional March 7, 8 & 9, 2014 HOSTING CLUB: Bowed Up Archery Bowed Up Archery, 1370 Soco Rd., Maggie Valley, Range Location: NC 28751 Directions to Range: North Carolina exit 20 off of I-40. Take Jonathan Creek Road to red light, turn right at light onto Soco Road, ½ mile to Bowed Up Archery on the right. Send Registration To: (include phone no.) Allen Setzer, 58 Lum Boone Circle, Waynesville, NC 28786 • 828-734-6993 Pre-Registration Deadline: March 1, 2014 Late Registration: On site, space permitting, call to verify open lanes. Friday 7:00 pm Schedule: Saturday 10:00 am & 2:00 pm, Sunday at 2:00 pm. Motels: LAUREL PARK INN • 800-451-4424 or 828-926-1700 www.laurelparkinn.com The range is located in Maggie Valley North Carolina and is minutes away from Waynesville. There are a multitude of hotels, campgrounds and cabins available in the area. Campgrounds: On site, Cool Breeze Campground Misc Info: Located in the Great Smoky Mountains, our area offers many activities to enjoy after shooting such as shopping, skiing, and just over the mountain is Cherokee’s Harrah’s Casino. There are also many restaurants to enjoy! Add’l Info/Contacts: Allen Setzer • akasetzer@gmail.com Hosting Club: Pleasant Valley Archery Club Range Location: 7907 Hwy. 293 South, Providence KY Send Registration To: David Cartwright, 445 Pride Ave., Madisonville, KY 42431 • 270/584-5739

Southeast Indoor Sectional March 8 & 9, 2014 Hosting Club: Elite Archery of Augusta Range Location: 1040 Newmantown Rd Grovetown GA 30813 Directions to Range: I-20 exit 190 coming from Atlanta turn right or coming from Columbia turn left, drive 2 miles on Lewiston Rd at stop light turn right onto Wrightsboro Rd, Drive .8 of a mile to next stop light and turn left on W. Robinson Ave and go .5 of a mile, turn right onto Newmantown Rd and go 173 feet and bear left and stay on Newmantown Rd; drive .8 mile and arrive at destination on right. 33 26’ 10.82 N 82 12’ 26.11 W Send Registration To: Tim Wehner, 2022 Bridgewater Dr., Augusta GA 34 Archery Magazine

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First Quarter 2014

Pre-Registration Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule: Motels:

30907 • 706/855-7164

March 5, 2014 1040 Newmantown Rd., Grovetown GA 30813 Saturday, March 8 • 9am & 1pm Sunday, March 9 • 9am & 1pm Wingate Inn & Suites | 706/860-8223 • $79.00/nt. 4087 Jimmie Dyes Pkwy off exit 194 I-20, Augusta GA 30907 Comfort Inn & Suites | 706/496-3579 • $74.99/nt. 4071 Jimmie Dyes Pkwy., Augusta GA 30907 elitearcheryofaugusta@facebook Misc. Info.: Add’l. Info/Contacts: Tim Wehner • 706/855-7164 JASON POWELL • 706/799-4503 CHUCK CUMBER • 706/690-1103 THOMAS BOOTS • 706/799-8457 Host/Location:

Grovetown, GA

Hosting Club: Boss Archery Range Location: Concord, NC Contact: Clyde Hartsell • 704/784-4365

NEW ENGLAND SECTION Ken Moore, Councilman kmoore151@verizon.net

New England INDOOR Sectional April 4th, April 5th and April 6th, 2014 Hosting Club: Lunenburg Sportsmens Club, Inc. Range Location: 250 Reservoir Road, Lunenburg, Ma. 01462 Directions to Range: From Route 2A: Take Lancaster Avenue, turn right onto Reservoir Road; turn right into the club. From Route 2: Take Lunenburg Road, exit 35; turn right onto Leominster-Shirley Road, then turn left onto Reservoir Road, go through P. J. Keating gravel area and through underpass; continue to Reservoir Road; turn left into Club. Send Registration To: (include phone no) Ruby Shannon, 2 Corey Road, Ashburnham, MA 01430 • 978/827-5217 E-mail | LSC70@netzero.net *Checks payable to Lunenburg Sportsmens Club Pre-Registration March 31, 2014 Deadline: Late Registration: On site, space permitting, call to verify open lanes. Late Fee: None Schedule: Friday, April 4 | 7:00pm Saturday, April 5 | 10:00am • 1:00pm • 4:00pm • 7:00pm Sunday, April 6 | 8:30am • 11:30am Motels: Super 8 Motel | 978/537-2800 482 N. Main, Leominster

Campgrounds:

Double Tree | 978/534-9000 99 Erdman, Leominster Fitchburg–Hotel & Water Park | 978/342-7100 150 Royal Plaza Drive, Fitchburg Club grounds

New England Indoor Sectional April 5 & 6, 2014 HOSTING CLUB: Tangy’s Archery Range Location: 200 Bald Hill Rd, Warwick, RI 02886 Directions to Range: From the south; take 95 N to 295, to exit 2, to Rt 2 N. Take right @ traffic light and first left, to Pella Drive. Lanes are on the right above Gold’s Gym. From the north; take 95 S to exit 12B to 295 N. Take exit 2, to Rt. 2 N. Take right @ traffic light and first left, to Pella drive. Lanes are on the right above Gold’s Gym. From the west; take Rt 6 to 295 S. to Rt 2 to East Ave. Take a U turn on Rt 2N. Take right @ traffic light and first left, to Pella Drive. Lanes are on the right above Gold’s Gym. Send Registration To: (include phone no.): Tangy’s Archery, Attn: James Dean, 200 Bald Hill Rd., Warwick, RI 02886 • 401/737-2697 Pre-Registration March 31, 2014 Deadline: Late Registration: No Late Registration Saturday, April | 1 PM, 4 PM, 7 PM Schedule: Sunday, April 6 | 10 AM, 1 PM Motels: La Quinta Inn & Suites, 36 Jefferson Blvd., Warwick, RI • 401/941-6600 Motel 6, 20 Jefferson Blvd., Warwick, RI • 401/467-9800 NYLO (walking distance to shoot) • 400 Knight St., Warwick, RI • 401/734-4460 Sheraton Providence Airport Hotel, 1850 Post Rd., Warwick, RI • 401/738-4000

Palomo Archery | 4022 Transport St. Palo Alto, CA  650/391-9968 All Sports and More | Marysville CA, POC Don or Tyson • 530/743-7575

SOUTHERN SECTION Lee Gregory, Councilman lee@dlprint.com 2014 Indoor Southern Sectionals March 8 – 9, 2014 Hosting Club: Clyde’s Archery Lanes Location: 5564 Ayers St, Corpus Christi, TX Contact: Clyde 361/855-3116 Hosting Club: Cinnamon Creek Ranch Location: 13794 Old Denton Rd., Roanoke, TX Contact: Kylie/Charles • 817/984-5828 Hosting Club: Location: Contact:

Archery Country 8121 Research Blvd., Austin, TX Mike Luckie • 512/452-1222

Hosting Club: Location: Contact:

Archery On Fire 18500 Trails End Rd., Conroe, TX Cam Cope • 832/585-0671

Hosting Club: Bayou Bowmen Location: 4900 South Lewis St., New Liberia, LA Contact: Ricky St. Uppery • 337/380-0082 Hosting Club: Oklahoma State Association Dates: TBD in December Contact: Oklahomaarchery.org

2014 Outdoor Southern Sectionals June 14-15, 2014

SOUTHWEST SECTION Bob Borges, Councilman nmarcher505@gmail.com

Southwest Indoor Sectional This is once again a multi-location tournament that will be shot the entire month of January (1 -31) 2014, we will shoot 2-300 Vegas Rounds on the 3 spot or the single spot Vegas Target. If you do not see your local area shoot information below then contact your NFAA Director for dates, times and exact location.   Nevada: John Thayer | 702 222-9878 Utah: Jim Jensen | 801 360-1911 Hawaii: Mark Kato | 808 386-9771 Colorado: Sheri Stine-Trujillo | 303 427-4430  Arizona: January 11, 2014 at the Arizona Archery Club, 1115 W. Deer Valley Rd., Suite 1, Phoenix, AZ • POC Becky Pearson @ 520/720-9532 New Mexico: Organ Mountain Bowmen • January 11, 2014 POC Michelle Corella | 575/ 527-4520 San Juan Archers @ Kirtland Indoor Range • January 19, 2014 • POC Jay Boushee 505/801-1240 NMBA at the Archery Shoppe, Albuquerque | January 25, 2014 • POC Charley Barnes • charleybarnes@msn. com California: Archery Only The Archery Shop (Bakersfield) The Bow Rack (Redding) Fat Shafts Archery Front Line Archery Hi Tech Archery Northwood Bowmen Performance Archery Predator Archery TLC Archery Willow Creek Archery Farm Supply | Arroyo Grande, CA  POC Heath or Joel • 805/489-5514

Hosting Club: Red River Bowmen Archery Club, Inc. Range Location: 4099 Ratcliff Rd., Shreveport, LA 71109 Directions to Range: Check out website for maps: www.redriverbowmenarcheryclub.com Send Registration To: (include phone no. & email): Red River Bowmen, Emma Brown, 8018 Dogwood Trl., Haughton, LA continued on page 30

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 35

section & state association news | continued from page 29

Pre-registration Deadline: Late Registration: Schedule: Motels:

71037 • Ph. 318/949.4200 or 318/572.6102

June 9, 2014 Sat. morning June 14, 7:00 am – 8:00 am Sat., June 14, 9:00 am. – 28 Field Sunday, June 15, 8:00 am. – 14 Hunter, 14 Animal See website www.redriverbowmenarcheryclub.com or www.shreveport-bossier.org • or contact Emma Brown, 318/949.4200 or 318/572.6102 Campgrounds: See website www.redriverbowarcheryclub. com or contact Emma Brown 318/949.4200 or 318/572.6102 Miscellanous: Email: emma1937@bellsouth.net Add’l. Info./Contacts: www.redriverbowmenarcheryclub.com

NORTHWEST SECTION Dan Kolb, Councilman bhfsdjk@gmail.com

Northwest Indoor Sectional March 7, 8 & 9, 2014 Hosting Club: Archers Afield Range Location: 11945 SW Pacific Hwy., Ste. 121, Tigard, OR 97223 Directions to Range: Tigard Plaza Shopping Center, corner of Hall & Hwy. 99 Send Registration To: (include phone no.) Archers Afield, 11945 SW Pacific Hwy., Ste. 121, Tigard, OR 97223 • 503/639-3553

Pre-Registration Deadline: Schedule:

March 6, 2014 Friday @ 7:00pm • Saturday @ 9:00am • Sunday @ 9:00am Motels: Quality Inn | 503/245-6421 Phoenix Inn | 503/624-9000 Add’l. Info/Contacts: 503/639-3553

Northwest Indoor Sectional March 8 & 9, 2014

Hosting Club: PRONGHORN ARCHERY CLUB Range Location: ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPORTS, GILLETTE, WY Directions to Range: 4706 S DOUGLAS HWY. Send Registration To: (include phone no.) WSAA, 91 MARQUETTE DR., CODY, WY 82414 • 307/899-9280 Pre-Registration Deadline: March 8, 2014 Schedule: 9:00AM • 11:30AM • 2:00PM Add’l. Info./Contacts: LYNELL PRESTON • FOR MORE INFO 307/8999280 Hosting Club: Bear Paw Archery Range Location: 1251 Melanie Ave, Wasilla, AK 99654 Directions to Range: From Parks Hwy., right on Lucas Rd., left on Melanie Ave., fifth building Pre-Registration Deadline: March 1, 2014 Late Registration: March 8, 2014 Schedule: Shoot times 10:00AM • 1:00PM • 4:00PM Hosting Club: Juneau Archery Club Range Location: Juneau, AK Add’l. Info./Contacts: Kirk McBride • 907/321-4032

The largest FREE archer y classifieds on the internet!

The Worlds Largest Archery Community New Pocket Field Log Field Log

Better chance at femoral than from side.

Carotid arteries (jugulars) Lungs are about two inches above lower body line to about 6 inches from top of body. Aim close to center of animal.

Rear shot can cut aortic artery, other veins puncture heart or lungs

Heart lies between and slightly ahead of lungs, very low in body Femoral artery is slightly inside leg bone. Spine hits drop animal immediately. Hits between kidney and spine sever aortic artery.

Carotids lie on both sides of windpipe just below spine. Lungs nearly protected by shoulder, extend behind it slightly. Lung shot deer runs fast at first.

Heart is low and usually protected by leg.

Kidney shot bleeds heavily and usually right away. Animal may make a few jumps then walk away.

Liver is just behind diaphragm on right side and angles toward body cavity.

4

49 Pages filled with •Full grids for tracking or scout outings •Check list for the trip •Vital kill area •Information for Land Owner records See more at Archerytalk.com 36 Archery Magazine

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First Quarter 2014

•Over 20 Million Hits a Month •Archery News & Articles •Free Printable Targets •Post Your Hunting Photos •Free Online Archery Game •Enter To Win Free Prizes •Sponsored By Over 200 Manufacturers •Talk To Fellow Archers, Pros, And Bowhunters Worldwide

Get Answers Free at ArcheryTalk.com

NFAA SECTIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

OFFICIAL REGISTRATION FORM

Last Name

First Name

Phone

Address

City

State

Email Member ID#

Expiration

Zip Code

Male

Female

NFAA Member

USA Archery Member

PRE-REGISTRATION FEE

Pro Divisions

Adult & Senior Divisions

Junior Divisions

Family

$85

$35

$25

$95

LATE REGISTRATION FEE

Pro Divisions

Adult & Senior Divisions

Junior Divisions

Family

$100

$50

$40

$110

Please select Age Category and Shooting Style: Pro Adult

Adult

Pro Senior (50 and over)

Young Adult (age 15-17) Senior (50 and over)

Adult, Senior, Silver Senior & Master Senior Divisions Barebow Bowhunter Bowhunter Freestyle Bowhunter Freestyle Limited Traditional Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve Longbow Crossbow (Adult Only)

Youth (age 12-14)

Silver Senior (60 and over)

Cub (under 12) Master Senior (70 and over)

Pro Adult/Pro Senior Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve

Junior Divisions Barebow Bowhunter Freestyle Freestyle Freestyle Limited Freestyle Limited Recurve

MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO THE TOURNAMENT HOST. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.NFAAUSA.COM

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 37

The Pro Line

Randall Wellings | NFAA Pro Chair randallwellings@gmail.com

It’s time again for my second Pro Line article…

In the previous edition of Archery Magazine, I drew attention to what I believe are some of the shortcomings of the Pro Division, notably the key elements missing on our decision-making front. I must say I am extremely encouraged by those conscientious archers who have reached out, offering their assistance to rectify this problem. I have been contacted by many asking about the appropriate procedure to follow in filling the vacancies in the Sectional Representation areas; this is excellent— thank you. I included a form in the last edition and asked people to fill it out in an attempt to build a profile of the NFAA professional archer. There has been a reasonable response to my request for information. However, some people did point out that the form was a little unclear as to how to fill the check boxes. Here it is again with some slight changes, hopefully a little easier to understand. The rationale is to identify where the majority of our NFAA pro membership spend their competition time. Once again there appears a need to address the

“renewal of membership” shambles. I am of the understanding that between Vegas and the Indoor Nationals, the NFAA administration staff processes approximately 100 membership renewals each day. Admittedly, the pro division is not entirely responsible. However, as NFAA professional archers, I believe we owe the administration staff a little more respect. At the present time (one week out from Vegas) we have 165 fully paid pro memberships. Considering our numbers were approximately 300 members at the end of last year, 165 puts us at a little over 50%. I am sure we can do better. Please go online and check out the new NFAA Professional Archers website. A big thank you to Austin Lucas of Buzzworthy Consulting. Austin is a new pro and is also responsible for the design and layout of the website. In pro members, you have the opportunity to display your bio and photograph. It’s a place where sponsors and fans can learn a little more about the NFAA Professional archer: www.professionalarchers.com Shoot well, enjoy life.

2014 NFAA Professional Archer Information Sheet Name

Format of Competition Please rate the % of your participation in each

Email Address State Association Years as Professional Archer National Affiliations Please check all boxes that apply

NFAA USARCHERY ASA IBO

• LOCAL

Field

3D

Indoor

FITA  = Total 100%

• STATE

Field

3D

Indoor

FITA  = Total 100%

• NATIONAL

Field

3D

Indoor

FITA  = Total 100%

• VEGAS

Field

3D

Indoor

FITA  = Total 100%

all information supplied will be used for evaluation purposes only. 38 Archery Magazine

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First Quarter 2014

January 3-5, 2014 • Des Moines, IA

584 ARCHERS

SET NEW ATTENDANCE RECORD at the 20th Anniversary of

the Iowa Pro AM

The 20th Anniversary of the Iowa Pro Am saw a new attendance record being set as this popular event continues to show growth despite grounded planes and bad weather in the eastern part of the US. All participating archers

iowa PRO-Am 2014 received a 20th anniversary pin. Once again the Hy-Vee Center in Des Moines provided a roomy, fantastic facility for the Pro Am that features a 360 round shot on the NFAA face the first day of competition, and a 330 round shot on a Vegas face the second day. Attendance records were not the only records broken as top pros Rio Wilde and Jesse Broadwater both shot a perfect 360 the first day and missed only one baby X the second day, to tie at 689 out of a possible 690. The shoot off for first place went to Jessie Broadwater, who

collected $5,000 for the top award. Reo Wilde took home $2,000 for second, and third went to Braden Gellenthien, who won $1,000 and was just one point behind Reo and Jessie. Fantastic shooting for sure! Erika Jones continued with her winning ways, collecting $1,000 for first place with her great score of 682 in the Female Freestyle Division. The Iowa State Archery Association would like to thank all participants, sponsors and vendors for making this a successful event! For full results, visit us online at www.isaaproam.com.

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 39

from the president’s desk | continued from page 5

2014 NFAA SCHEDULE OF EVENTS DATE

ionals on hay target bales Scoring at the 1946 Outdoor Nat

ranges, two 30-target 3-D ranges, a bowhunter elevated platform, a trap range and a fishing pond. Contiguous to the property is a KOA campground (Yankton Missouri River KOA). This 60-site, full-service campground has all the amenities, including; convenience store, playground, heated pool, laundromat, cabins, lodges, full electric, WIFI and cable TV. The KOA is owned in part

     

 

 

 

US  Collegiate     Archery  Association  

Join  College  Archery  

  College  students  can  become  a  member  of  USCA  and  begin   competing  in  collegiate  events  by  going  to   www.uscollegiatearchery.org                      

  Start  a  Club  at  Your  School  

Attending  a  college  that  doesn’t  have  a  club?  USCA  can  help   students  start  clubs  on  their  campuses.  USCA  provides  support  for   new  and  small  clubs  including,  but  not  limited  to  applying  for   grants,  building  and  maintaining  a  website,  and  getting   recruitment  help.  For  more  information,  contact   membership@uscollegiatearchery.org  or  visit  our  website  at   uscollegiatearchery.org      

40 Archery Magazine

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First Quarter 2014

EVENT

FORMAT

Wednesday July 30, 2014

NFAA National Outdoor

28-Field Targets

Thursday July 31, 2014

NFAA National Outdoor

28-Hunter Targets

Friday Aug 1, 2014

NFAA National Outdoor

28-Field Targets

Saturday Aug 2, 2014

NFAA National Outdoor

28-Hunter Targets

Sunday Aug 3, 2014

NFAA National Outdoor

28-Animal Targets

Sunday Aug 3, 2014

NFAA National Outdoor Awards

Sunday Aug 3, 2014

NFAA Foundation

Sunday Aug 3, 2014

IFAA Opening Ceremony

Sunday Aug 3, 2014

Archers Appreciation BBQ

Easton Field

Monday Aug 4, 2014

IFAA World Field

28-Field

Tuesday Aug 5, 2014

IFAA World Field

28-Hunter

Wednesday Aug 6, 2014

IFAA World Field

28-Animal

Thursday Aug 7, 2014

IFAA World Field

28-Field

Friday Aug 8, 2014

IFAA World Field

28-Hunter

Friday Aug 8, 2014

IFAA Banquet/Dinner

Museum Grand Opening

by the NFAA and is open year-round. In 2011 we experienced a devastating 500-year flood of the Missouri River, which flowed directly through our field ranges. Since that time we have been working diligently to rebuild the property and the ranges. In 2013, several soldiers from the National Guard spent a month engineering, moving dirt, and building archery-specific topography to enhance our ranges. Assisting with this were several volunteers, including Steve Coleman of Texas and Frank and Becky Pearson of Arizona. They spent weeks assisting with the layout of the new ranges. This past February in Las Vegas at the NFAA annual meeting, I presented them with the Presidents Award for their tireless contribution to the NFAA through their work on these ranges. The Presidents Award is the highest commissioned award in the NFAA. The range reconstruction project will be complete by this summer’s tournaments, and has been $1.3 million project. On behalf of the NFAA, I would like to thank all those that volunteered, especially the National Guard and those that provided grant funding; the state of South continued on page 40

National Field Archery Association Scholarship Program 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078

®

1.

How can you become eligible for the NFAA Scholarships? a) All applicants must be at least a senior in high school or enrolled in an institution of higher education. b) All applicants must be current members of NFAA and have been a member for at least two (2) years.

2.

How many scholarships will be given each year? The number of scholarships to be given each year will be determined by the Scholarship Committee, based on funds available and number of qualified nominees.

3.

Will the scholarships be given to the person finishing high school with the best grade point average? Scholastic achievements are not the main requirement, but will be weighed in their proper balance during the selection process.

4.

How much will the scholarship amount per winner be? The minimum amount will be $100, but the actual amount will be determined by the Committee.

5.

How can you apply for the NFAA Scholarships? If you meet the qualifications above, please complete the application below. The completed application must be mailed to National Field Archery Association, 800 Archery Lane, Yankton, SD 57078. All applications are due (postmarked) by December 31 to be considered for the following year.

6.

If I am selected to receive the NFAA Scholarship, when and how will I receive it? The NFAA will send the award in the form of a check to the cashier of the school of the recipient’s choice for deposit to the student’s financial account to be used as the student sees fit. If the student decides not to attend an institution of higher learning, the amount will be returned to the NFAA Scholarship Fund.

continued on page 48 scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 41

NFAA Scholarship Application

Please type or print and submit application to address above Please Select the Scholarship(s) you wish to apply for: NFAA Memorial Dave Gordon NAME __________________________________________ AGE _________________________ ADDRESS ______________________________________________________________________ CITY ________________________________ STATE _________________ ZIP ______________ 1.

Male

Female

2. Social Security Number ______ - ______ - ______

3.

Current grade ___________________ Year of graduation ___________

4.

GPA ___________ ACT score ___________ Class position __________

5. College/University expected to attend _______________________________________________ 6. Has student been accepted to college/university yet?

Yes

No

7. Year and month studies expected to start____________________________ 8. Major intended to pursue _________________________________________________________ 9. Extra-curricular activities (clubs and organizations you belong to; use reverse side if necessary) _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ 10. Hobbies/interests _______________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ 11. Archery activities (hunting, tournaments, awards, etc.) _________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ High School or Higher Educational Institution, Currently Attending. Name and Address ________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________ State _________________ Zip __________________ Please attach or include any information you would like the Scholarship Committee to consider. Please include a picture. Application must be postmarked by December 31. 42 Archery Magazine

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First Quarter 2014

NFAA® Council & Board of Directors NFAA® Council

NFAA® Board of Directors

Officers President—Bruce Cull 2305 E. Hwy. 50 Yankton, SD 57078 605/665-8340 bcull@nfaausa.com

Great Lakes Judy McCutcheon-Adams Director - IL 23358 Virden Rd. Virden, IL 62690 217/652-5836 jlynnmac@royell.org

Vice President—Brian Sheffler 7006 Beargrass Ct. Indianapolis, IN 46241 317/244-7585 lbsheff@comcast.net NFAA® Office 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078 605/260-9279 605/260-9280 fax nvollmer@nfaausa.com Great Lakes Rocky Kline 1108 N. Korby St. Kokomo, IN 46901 765/438-6413 rlkline1@comcast.net Mid-Atlantic Dave Hryn PO Box 341 West Seneca, NY 14224-0341 716/481-4699 midatlcouncilman@hotmail.com Midwest Ray Jones 704 West South Winterset, IA 50273 515/462-6788 IowaArchery@hotmail.com New England Kenneth Moore 730 Newman Avenue Seekonk, MA 02771 508/761-5415 kmoore151@verizon.net Northwest Dan Kolb 9106 E Cactus Ln. N. Sun Lakes, AZ 85248 307/262-7598 bhfsdjk@gmail.com Southeast Tim Austin 1710 SW 76th Terrace Gainesville, FL 32607 352/332-1969 Flarchery@earthlink.net Southern Lee Gregory 112 Ridge Oak Drive Georgetown, TX 78628-7613 512/966-2799 lee@dlprint.com Southwest Bob Borges 5332 River Ridge Ave NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 505/890-4665 nmarcher505@gmail.com

Archery Magazine Editorial Board Bruce Cull Brian Sheffler John Pawlowski Ken Moore Natalie Vollmer Brittany Salonen Emily Robinson

Bill Hakl Director - MN 5656 317th St. Stacy, MN 55079 651/462-1916 wehjkh@gmail.com

Mike Thomas Director - OR 4122 Jana Dr. Klamath Falls, OR 97603 541/891-2264 foothillsdental@hotmail.com

Steve Coleman Director - TX 909 LCR 120 Mount Calm, TX 76673 254/993-2900 j13scoleman@yahoo.com

Kathy Potter Director - MO 1401 County Rd 1225 Huntsville, MO 65259 660/651-3175 potter.mbh@cvalley.net

Matt Anderson Director - WA 4099 Jones Rd Oak Harbor, WA 98277 360/929-4330 mpa4matt@aol.com

Ed Christman Director - NE 3818 34th St. Columbus, NE 69601 402/563-3504 eChristman@neb.rr.com

Jeff Meyer Director - WY 2211 Omaha Tr. Bar Nunn, WY 82601 307/262-6202 jmbowhuntingnut@gmail.com

Southwest Frank Pearson Director - AZ P.O. Box 308. St. David, AZ 85630 520/647-7847 frank@frankpearson.com

Marc Tebelius Director - ND 5292 8th Ave. North Grand Forks, ND 58203 701/792-3582 (home) 218/230-3258 (cell) tebelius@gra.midco.net

Southeast Mike Albertson Director - AL 531 Laura Ln. Newton, AL 36352 334/324-9322 JMAlbertson@aol.com

Reginald “Shorty” Faber Director - SD P.O. Box 66 Carthage, SD 57349 605/772-4468 shortyfaber@gmail.com

Oliver Austin Director - FL 1620 Yearling Trail Tallahassee, FL 32317 850/309-1918 oaustin@admin.fsu.edu

Mid Atlantic Tom Coblentz Director - MD 1 Ash Dr. Knoxville, MD 21758 301/834-7154 tomproarcher@aol.com

New England Gary Marrier Director - VT 1525 Gibou Rd. Montgomery Ctr., VT 05471 802/326-4797 bowdoctor@pivot.net

Tom Boots Director - GA 6530 Robert Dr. Harlem, GA 30814-5360 706/556-3240 boots_thomas@yahoo.com

John Pawlowski Director - PA 360 Madison St. Coatesville, PA 19320 610/384-5483 bpjp@ccis.net

Jim Lamoin Director - CT 138 Albrecht Rd. Torrington, CT 06790 860/489-9452 CTArchery@snet.net

Douglas Joyce Director - NJ 30 Willow Ave. Somerset, NJ 08873 732/247-3892 jdjarcher@aol.com

Pam Gallant Director - ME 26 Windsor Place Poland, ME 04230 207/988-2793 psgallant@fairpoint.net

Samantha Neal Director - NY 1584 Master St. North Tonawanda, NY 14120 716/930-0098 Sjneal300@gmail.com

Paul Lewkowicz Director - MA 3 Davis Road Southborough, MA 01772 luke84@charter.net

Michael Clary Director - IN 10139 N. State St. Elwood, IN 46036 765/552-7451 elwoodgambler@comcast.net Mike Spence Director - MI 11263 Connell Dr. Dexter, MI 48130 734/649-6375 grysbok1mike@aol.com Norm Newman Director - OH 103 Silver Gate Kenton, OH 43326 419/673-0021 Mike Strassman Director - WI 2402 W. Camerson Eau Claire, WI 54703 715/834-9975 mstrassman9975@charter.net

Jim Quarles Director - VA 7911 Cherokee Rd Richmond, VA 23225 804/272-6512 jim.quarles@vfaa.org Steve Tincher Director - WV 214 Seneca Valley Estates Charleston, WV 25320 304/984-0090 jstincher@cebridge.net Midwest Norm Swank Director - IA 403 Main Street P.O. Box 31 Reasnor, IA 50232 563/578-8534 nswank@netins.net John Doub Director - KS 1125 E. 59th St. Wichita, KS 67216 316/524-0963 archnutz@cox.net

Michael Wright Director - NH PO box 237 Marlboro, NH 03455 603/209-8007 barebownh@aol.com Bruce Mulneix Director - RI 6101 Post Rd. Trlr 73, N. Kingstown, RI 02852 401/269-9181 Northwest Hubert Sims Director - ID PO Box 1713 Orofino, ID 83544 208/476-5377 hmsarchery@email.com

James Malone Director - KY 4897 Griggstown Rd. Calvert City, KY 42029 270/217-0910 jrbj617@yahoo.com Pat Sargeant Director - NC 3901 Melco Ct. High Point, NC 27265 336/841-1638 psargeant@rfmd.com S. Dale Smith Director - SC 149 Low Road Six Mile, SC 29682 864/868-9422 sdalesmith@yahoo.com Clinton Berry Director - TN 1802 Porter Road Nashville, TN 37206 615/943-1919 Caberry3@att.net Southern Garry Randall Director - MS 5301 Baron Rd. Summit, MS 39666 601/249-2988 garryche@bellsouth.net Dick Andrews Director - AR 11 Tuxford Circle Bellavista, AR 72714 479/855-6066 andr-ds@cox.net

Tom Daley Director - CA 21840 Golden Pines Ct. Auburn, CA 95602 650/722-2713 nfaadir@cbhsaa@org Sheri Stine-Trujillo Director - CO 7723 Raritan Street Denver, CO 80221 303/427-4430 sherist1000@msn.com Mark Kato Director - HI PO Box 62252 Honolulu, HI 96839 808/386-9771

Jim Metzger Director - LA 2019 Lovers Lane Shreveport, LA 71105 318/402-3381 GreyTrad@aol.com

Dwight Coppock Director - AK 7362 W. Parks Hwy. PMB 303 Wasilla, AK 99654 907/357-4063

Fred Hockett Director - OK 727 Kingsgate Rd. Yukon, OK 73099 405/202-7851

Pro Chairperson Randall Wellings 1705 Ash St. Ishpeming, MI 49849 906/486-6845 randall@straightlinearchery.com Certified Instructor Committee vacant Bowhunting Chairman Tom Vollmer 800 Archery Lane Yankton, SD 57078-4174 605/260-9279 nvollmer@nfaausa.com

The NFAA® has 50 chartered state associations and over 1,000

Carl Jamison Director - NM 6763 Forest Hills Dr. NE Albuquerque, NM 87109 505/857-0815 carl_jamison@msn.com

affiliated clubs in

John Thayer Director - NV 7215 W. Tara Ave. Las Vegas, NV 89117 702/222-9878 mdthayer@cox.net

sport of archery

Jim Jensen Director - UT 9284 South 3550 West Payson, UT 84651 801/360-1911 jimjensen.archer@gmail.com

Professional Representatives Great Lakes Jeff Button 2889 Busston Rd. Cottage Grove, WI 53527 608/839-5137 New England Chris Deston 74 Springbrook Dr. Glastonbury, CT 06033 860/8171177 Midwest vacant Midatlantic Kendall Woody 194 Arrowhead Dr. Madison Heights, VA 24572 434/929-0223 Southern vacant

Joel McNeese Director - MT 4205 Lewis Ave. Great Falls, MT 59405 406/727-2997 jrmcneese@bresnan.net

Committee Chairmen

Southeast Diane Watson 11815 Lakewood Drive Hudson, FL 34669 727/856-6841 DianeN2Archery@aol.com Southwest Jonathan Pemberton 1652 N. 2100 W. Provo, UT 85604 801/323-3704

the United States and abroad. The

is a healthy and exciting sport providing an activity in which the entire family can participate.

Write us on how to obtain information about various programs offered by NFAA®. National Championship Tournaments, Sectional/State Tournaments, Indoor/Outdoor Leagues, Junior Bowhunter Programs, which include the Art Young Small / Big Game Awards, and the Bowfisher Program.

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 43

from the president’s desk | continued from page 40

Junior Archers at the 1946 Outdoor Nationals

Dakota; the Easton Foundation; the City of Yankton; Yankton County; and the South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks through the Pittman Robertson Program. I hope you will come and see for yourself and enjoy this incredible facility! Incidentally, NFAA headquarters will be the only facility in the world that has been host to all three IFAA

44 Archery Magazine

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world tournaments: The World Bowhunter Tournament in 2009, World Indoor in 2013 and the World Field in 2014! Please be sure to go online now and register for these tournaments at www.nfaausa.com. See you in July!! n

the order of the bone | continued from pagE 31 these oaks were different as I soon learned from the movements of a deer herd which was drawn to the trees as if by a magnet. There were out of bow range, but I could see them clearly, several groups of four or five cleaning up under those trees about a hundred yards away from my stand. I planned to hunt that hot spot the following Saturday and in great expectation I invited a bowhunting buddy along to share in the harvest.

We arrived in the area well before daylight and moved into the woods carrying our portable stands and trying to walk quietly while I searched out the trail to the oaks I had marked previously. We had gone several hundred yards when I lost my way and began to look around for anything recognizable. But everything seemed strange and out of place—not at all as I remembered it from five days earlier. As I switched on my flashlight

and looked around, the awful truth leapt out at me from the darkness. For where the oaks had stood, only stumps remained; they had been cut and hauled to the stave mill during the week. In a short while, the sounds of chain saws and old skidders again broke the silence and filled the woods with the sounds of “progress.” n

Have an Order of the Bone moment? Submit your story to info@nfaausa.com.

NFAA PUZZLER: name the archer | continued from pagE 14

The early days of these archers are revealed! Compare your guesses to our answer key!

1 Reo Wilde 2 Samantha Neal 3 Hugo Barrientos

4 Michael Anderson 5 Mike Leiter 6 Dan Kolb scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 45

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Visit us on our NEW site—www.nfaausa.com! As we celebrate our 75th anniversary, we are excited to introduce a brand new website that focuses on providing upto-date information regarding NFAA tournaments, news, rules & regulations. As a part of our commitment to better serve our members; our developers and marketing team have been working hard to deliver a better online experience. Make sure to check out our updated online store, news

New membership application and NFAA store pages make it easy to get everything you need in one convenient place! 46 Archery Magazine

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First Quarter 2014

section, calendar, social media links, Archery magazine archive, membership signup and several other new or improved features. Feel free to browse all website content, as a user login is only required when purchasing online NFAA memberships, tournament applications and merchandise. Your login will allow instant access to your recent NFAA online transactions. Not computer savvy? Feel free to give us a call at 605-260-

9279 for assistance or to process a transaction over the phone. We will continue to keep you updated on our progress, as we complete several more exciting website projects over the next year. We would like to thank all of our members and participants for your continued support and patience as we work out any kinks in our new system. Please email us at info@nfaausa.com with any issues, questions or suggestions.

scores, tournament info and more at www.nfaausa.com 47

R AFFL

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ION FOUNDAT

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®

N FOUNDATIO

1.

2.

MARRAKECH

NIMES

SINGAPORE

LAS VEGAS

TRIP FOR ONE TO ANY 2 OF THE 2015 INDOOR WORLD CUPS

RA

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CHO ICE O 3P RIZ F ES

3.

BAREFOOT SAFARIS & ADVENTURE TOURS

E

PLAINS GAME

CASH PRIZE VALUE $5,000

SOUTH AFRICA

TICKETS $10 EACH

BOOK OF 12 FOR $100

7-DAY TRIP FOR ONE ON A SOUTH AFRICAN SAFARI

• Round Trip Coach Airfare • Tournament Entry Fees • Accommodations • $1,000 Spending Cash

• Round Trip Coach Airfare • Lodging, Transporation, Guide Fees & Meals • Trophy Fees for 3 Plains Game Animals • Hunt with Choice of Bow, Rifle or Camera

VALUE $7,500

VALUE $7,500

A L L P RO C E E D THE SCHOL A S GO TO & MUSEUM FRSHIP UNDS

Drawing to be held August 9, 2014 at the IFAA WFAC. Purchase your tickets at www.neyac.org. For more information, call us at 605-260-9282. 48 Archery Magazine

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