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AFN

Convention OCT. 24-26

2013

Fairbanks CARLSON CENTER

Elders & Youth Conference OCT. 21-23 PAGE 22

Keynote speaker Nelson Angapak PAGE 9

Customary Art Show PAGE 32

Traditional dance troupes PAGE 34

Military Service Award created to honor Richard Frank PAGE 28

2013 Theme: ‘Traditional Alaska Native Family Values’ PAGE 7

Public safety PAGE 18

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome to AFN .............. 6 Family values ................. 7 Keynote address ................ 9 About resolutions .......... 10 Get coverage ................. 11 AFN history ............... 12 Native peoples .............. 14 Language map ............... 15 Volunteers ..................... 17 Convention safety ......... 18 Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center .......... 20 Elders and Youth Conference ....................... 22 City map ................ 24-25

Katie John .................... 26 Military service award ...... 28 KUAC programming ..... 31 Customary arts show ......... 32 Quyana ...................... 34 Cross-cultural training ...... 38 AFN villages ............... 40 Native phrases ................. 41 Economic impact ................ 42 Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center ................................ 44 Elders & Youth Conference and AFN Convention schedules ........................ 46-47

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We are proud to welcome the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention to our community. We hope you enjoy your stay in the Golden Heart City!

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HONOR • RESPECT • TRADITION • WELLNESS • TEACHING • HERITAGE

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lders Shape Our Lives ALMA AND ANTON TROSETH Shared their Finnish heritage as they cared for us in Chatanika in the 1950's. Alma (far left), Anton (middle right).

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Hello

Dzaanh nezoonh, wa.é ák.wé?, cama’i, aang... Fairbanks is in for a treat. The annual Alaska Federation of Natives convention returns to Fairbanks this month after a threeyear absence, and that means a few thousand of our fellow Alaskans from across the land will be in the Golden Heart City. To AFN delegates making their first convention visit to the city, we at the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner say “Welcome.” And to those delegates who attended previous AFN conventions in Fairbanks, we say “Welcome back.”

Alaska Federation of Natives convention this year is a testament to the hard work of those who believe in Fairbanks. It’s also an indicator that AFN leaders have become pleased with how the city has hosted the convention in recent years. AFN brought its convention back to Fairbanks in 2005 after a decades-long hiatus, and came back again in 2007 and 2010. We wish AFN leaders and delegates a productive and enjoyable convention.

living in the Fairbanks area who want to know what’s going on. It’ll be hard to not notice that a major event is under way in the city, and curious readers will want to know what it’s all about. For delegates, this guide includes such helpful material as the schedule of events for the Elders & Youth Conference and the main convention, information about related activities scheduled for convention week, a look at some must-see local facilities, and a helpful list of important telephone numbers.

Our coverage

About this publication

For non-Natives, this guide includes general information about the Alaska Federation of Natives convention, which is the largest annual gathering of Alaska Natives, as well as an overview of the many Alaska Native peoples in the state and a look at the many cultural events that will be happening during convention week.

• On Twitter: @newsminer. Also look for the Twitter accounts of our individual writers. All accounts begin with “@ FDNM.”

The Daily News-Miner has put together this 2013 guide to convention week, which begins with the annual Elders & Youth Conference and concludes with the main AFN convention, to help not The return to the Interior of the annual only convention delegates but also those

JOIN US AFTER THE AFN ELDERS AND YOUTH CONFERENCE FOR

DISCOVER OCT. 23, 1 – 3:30 p.m. Experience the University of Alaska Fairbanks — from the inside out. • Meet admissions counselors and financial aid representatives • Meet with Rural Student Services advisors • Learn about the Rural Alaska Honors Institute • Tour campus to get a feel for campus life and student activities • Learn about housing options • Enjoy lunch on us!

Register by emailing alwald@alaska.edu

UAF is an AA/EO employer and educational institution. UAF photo by Todd Paris. 10/2013

The News-Miner will have a team of reporters and photographers covering convention week. You’ll be able to see and read our coverage in a variety places online: • On the web: newsminer.com. • On Facebook: www.facebook.com/ fairbanksDNM

And be sure to pick up a copy of the printed edition of the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner each day through convention week.

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Traditional family values Convention theme focuses on culture By Matt Buxton MBUXTON@NEWSMINER.COM

“Traditional Alaska Native Family Values,” the theme of this year’s Alaska Federation of Natives Convention, can mean different things to the many different tribes in Alaska. But at its heart, the theme recognizes generations of hard work to preserve and maintain Native culture and traditions. The theme was selected by the AFN Board of Directors in February. “This year’s convention theme recognizes our rich culture as Alaska Natives and the importance of family” AFN President Julie Kitka said of the

Members of the Nunamiut Dancers perform Oct. 27, 2007, during the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention at the Carlson Center. NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO announcement in March. Elaborating on the theme, Ben Mallott, a special assistant

to the AFN president, said the theme is aimed at highlighting not only the work that has been

done to maintain Native culture but also the work that has yet to be done. “The theme is intended to represent the resurgence of our culture and the work to maintain our values,” he said. “This is to celebrate what we’ve done and what we have to do.” Those traditions, whether it be language, dance, food or countless other events, will be represented at AFN in performances or during one of the many daily discussions. Mallott added that family is also critical in maintaining traditions from generation to generation and that many facets of the convention will reflect two generations: the current leader-

ship and future leaders. “The one thing about Alaska Native values is that they’re passed down,” he said. “It’s one thing that we should honor and celebrate.” With a large transition of Alaska Natives from rural villages to urban areas like Fairbanks and Anchorage, Mallott added that challenges remain for Alaska Natives to maintain their traditions and culture. “With the influx to rural to urban, maintaining our traditional values in an urban setting is very important and is challenging,” he said. Contact staff writer Matt Buxton at 459-7544 and follow him on Twitter: @FDNMpolitics.

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Resolutions Committee chairman Trefon Angasan is projected on an overhead screen while conducting the debate and action part of his committee’s report during the final day of the 40th annual Alaska Federation of Natives Convention, Oct. 22, 2005, at the Carlson Center. ERIC ENGMAN/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Keynote speaker Nelson Angapak: Witness to Native growth By Jeff Richardson JRICHARDSON@NEWSMINER.COM

Nelson Angapak has witnessed 40 years of Alaska Federation of Natives conventions. But this year, the newly retired AFN board member, chairman and executive finds himself in a surprising role — the spotlight. Angapak, will deliver the keynote address at the 2013 convention, about four months after his departure as AFN’s senior vice president. For a man who considers himself a lowkey team player rather than a

high-profile executive, it’ll be an unusual perch. “I’ve never looked at myself as a leader in the Native community,” he said. “I’ve always looked at myself as someone who was concerned with getting the job done.” But Angapak shouldn’t have any trouble finding something to tell the Carlson Center crowd. He’s testified before Congress and given numerous speeches during his long career, and he expects some of the themes of his address will touch on familiar ideas — the wisdom of elders, value of a subsistence lifestyle and the importance of unity among Natives. They’re ideas he knows well. Since first joining AFN as a

board member in the mid1970s, Angapak has had a good view of the surprising era that followed the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. During that time, AFN became recognized as the dominant voice of the Angapak Alaska Native community and Native corporations gained unprecedented business clout. “Those things that we take for granted today, I saw that happening,” he said. It began in the tiny Southwest Alaska village of Tuntutuliak. Angapak grew up speaking only

Yupik in the town of 200, and didn’t know any English when he started school. It delayed his entrance into high school until age 17, and even then, he said, “I think they made me graduate not because I deserved it but because I was old.” A family emphasis on education served Angapak well when he left home for Mount Edgecumbe High School in Sitka. After graduating at 21, he headed off to Fort Lewis College to study math, a subject that didn’t present a problem for his developing English skills. He followed with a master’s degree in land and natural resources from Antioch University, as well as a theology degree from Golden Gate Theological Seminary.

After a stint in the Army, Angapak began a long career with roles in AFN and the state’s fledgling Alaska Native corporations. Since the 1970s, his career has included stretches as president of the Bethelbased Calista Corporation and as AFN chairman, before retiring in June. Angapak may be done working, but he doesn’t plan to stop focusing on Native issues. “My hope is that I’m going to be able to contribute to the well-being of the Native community even after my retirement,” he said. “I look at my retirement as the beginning of new life.” Contact staff writer Jeff Richardson at 459-7518.

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

One voice

Convention resolutions help set AFN policy By Matt Buxton MBUXTON@NEWSMINER.COM

The Alaska Federation of Natives Convention is an opportunity for Alaska Natives to speak with one loud, powerful voice. That voice comes in the form of the policy priorities resolutions that are set each year through a mass vote of the delegates that each community sends to the convention, the largest gathering of Alaska Natives. The votes dictate the voice and mission for AFN and touch on such topics as special recognitions and taking stances on federal law. Each community has one delegate for every 25 Alaska Native residents. Aurora Lehr, a special assistant to the president for federal Indian policy at the Alaska

They’ll cover pretty much anything from a special recognition to health care or support on other issues.”

Aurora Lehr, special assistant to the president for Federal Indian Policy at Alaska Federation of Natives Federation of Natives, said between 1,200 and 2,000 people will participate during the floor vote on Saturday. The proposed resolutions are still in committee, Lehr explained, and will be available on Thursday of convention

week. In the past, resolutions have covered a wide swath of issues, Lehr said. “They’ll cover pretty much anything from a special recognition to health care or support on other issues,” she said. “There are much broader resolutions like an exemption for cuts from sequestration for our federally funded programs and supporting specific legislation.” A list of policy priority resolutions from prior years can be found online at nativefederation.org. Last year’s resolutions focused on the presidential and congressional transition and included topics such as security, subsistence, energy in rural Alaska, economic and foreign policy, education and health and wellness. Resolutions from that year included

the following: • Urging the president to appoint an Alaska Native to serve in the office of the secretary of the Interior; • Develop a more complete and transparent federal subsistence budget for managing subsistence on federal lands. • Support energy transmission projects to interconnect rural Alaska communities. • Provide funding for suicide prevention, noting that Alaska leads the nation in deaths by suicides, with Alaska Natives being particularly vulnerable. • Create greater opportunities for schools and tribal programs to access funding for indigenous language instruction for school-age students. Contact staff writer Matt Buxton at 459-7544 and follow him on Twitter: @FDNMpolitics.

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Convention coverage Shane Charlie, 18, dances to the beat of the drum as he sings with the Minto Dancers during the final day of the Alaska Federation of Natives convention in Anchorage on Oct. 28, 2006.

Stay tuned in » www.nativefederation.org » www.facebook.com/nativefederation » Twitter: #AFN2013 »www.newsminer.com If you can’t make it to Fairbanks or to the any of the many events of the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention, don’t worry because there are plenty of ways to tune in. The convention will be broadcast live statewide by GCI, broadcast on radio, and carried online through a live video stream on AFN’s website, www.nativefederation.org. There’s also plenty of ways to participate in the convention, with Facebook, www.facebook.com/nativefederation, where regular updates will be posted and on Twitter using the hashtag #AFN2013. Also, check the Fairbanks Daily NewsMiner website, newsminer.com, for convention coverage and follow our team on Twitter through @newsminer.

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

AFN history Land claims led to founding in 1966 By Weston Morrow WMORROW@NEWSMINER.COM

The Alaska Federation of Natives is the largest Native organization in Alaska. Its membership comprises 178 villages, 13 regional Native corporations and 12 regional nonprofit and tribal consortiums. The federation has existed since October 1966. That year, several hundred Alaska Natives gathered for a multi-day conference, much like those that still take place each October, albeit on a larger scale.

The impetus for that first meeting in 1966 was the issue of Native land rights and working to achieve a just land settlement with state and federal governments. As the territory of Alaska moved toward and into statehood through the 1950s, land claims from government and settlers became a significant worry for Alaska’s Native peoples. The Alaska Statehood Act had provided for the newly formed state to select 108 million of Alaska’s 375 million acres. Much of the land selected overlapped or directly cut through Native lands. As that first AFN meeting took place, eight years after Alaska was officially inducted into the Union as a state, the federation became the first Native group

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to actively campaign for the land rights of Alaska’s Native peoples. When oil was discovered on the North Slope in 1968, the issue of land ownership became more important and more fervent than ever. Years later, on Dec. 18, 1971, such an act came into existence in the form of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act — ANCSA. ANCSA allotted nearly $1 billion and 44 million acres to the regional corporations and 200 village groups. Alaska Natives alive during the disbursement in 1971 were given stock in their local corporations or groups and are considered shareholders in the act. For much of the time following the

passing of ANCSA, the Alaska Federation of Natives worked to create a number of the Native corporations that would help implement the land claims act. It also provided much-needed assistance to the many Native tribes and organizations that were working to establish and enforce ANCSA policy. In addition to ANCSA, the federation has been deeply involved in the creation of federal legislation such as the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 and the 1991 legislation that made several significant amendments to ANCSA. Contact staff writer Weston Morrow at 4597520. Follow him on Twitter: @FDNMschools.

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Alaska Native peoples

Convention a chance for non-Natives to learn

WMORROW@NEWSMINER.COM

The return of the Alaska Federation of Natives convention to Fairbanks this year will expose the city’s residents to peoples whom they likely seldom see. That’s how it is in a state as large and as culturally diverse as Alaska. The state has many peoples who fall under the single heading of “Alaska Native.” The arrival of the annual AFN convention is an opportunity for nonNatives to learn more about their fellow Alaskans than just that single term. Groups like the Alutiiq, also known as the Sugpiaq, as well as the Yupiit and

»

Alaska Native groups each typically occupy their own geographic locations. Those locations have helped shape many of the cultural differences between groups, from hunting practices to housing to social practices and family organization. Inupiat are often identified by outsiders as Pacific Eskimos, Bering Sea Eskimos and Northern Eskimos. Their self-identified names, however, delineate the myriad differences between the groups. Other Native groups in Alaska include the Unangan, known more recently as the Aleut; the Athabascans; the Tlingit and the Haida. Alaska Native groups each occupy their own geographic locations. Those locations have helped shape many of the

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cultural differences between groups, from hunting practices to housing to social practices and family organization. The following sections are a brief introduction to the practices and history of Alaska Native groups and are intended only as a cursory introduction for those unfamiliar with the peoples. Much of the information for this report was gathered from the work of Steve Langdon, an anthropology professor at the Universit of Alaska Anchorage.

ALASK

By Weston Morrow

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Alaska Native Languages

Athabascan-Eyak-Tlingit: Inupiaq Gwich’in

Siberian Yupik

Bering Sea Eskimo-Aleut:

Holikachuk Upper Deg Hit’an Kuskokwim Central Yup’ik

Upper Ahtna Tanana

Tanaina

Haida Eyak

Alutiiq

G

Aleut Alutiiq Central Yup’ik Naukanski Yupik Siberian Yupik Sirenikski Inupiaq

Han Tanana Tanacross

Koyukon

Tlingit Eyak Ahtna Tanaina Deg Hit’an Holikachuck Upper Kuskokwim Koyukon Tanana Tanacross Upper Tanana Han Gwich’in

f ul

o

as f Al

ka

Tsimshian Tlingit

Haida

Aleut Source: UAF Alaska Native Language Center

Tsimshian

For more information go to http://www.uaf.edu/anlc/languages.html

DeeDee Hammond/News-Miner

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

PEOPLES Continued from 14 reduced from an estimated 15,00018,000 to more like 3,000. The Unangan were the first Native group in Alaska to witness European intrusion, and they felt the full impact.

Alutiiq and Sugpiaq The Alutiiq and Sugpiaq occupy the area along the Alaska Peninsula, Kodiak Island and Prince William Sound. The Alutiiq name is a recent addition, meant to distinguish the group from other Yup’ik-speaking groups. The Alutiiq and Suqpiaq can be divided roughly into three groups — the Koniag occupying the Kodiak Island area, the Chugach occupying Prince William Sound and the Unergkur occupying the coast along the Kenai Peninsula. While pre-European contact population estimates vary widely, more than 15,000 Alutiiq may have populated the coastal areas of Central Alaska, with the vast majority likely concentrated around the Kodiak area.

Yupiit The Yupiit occupy the Bering Sea coast of Alaska as well as St. Lawrence and Nunivak islands. Historians estimate the

Yupiit population in the Bering coastal region prior to European contact was near 20,000. Most of those Yupiit resided in the Yukon-Kuskokwim river delta. Because of the geographic differences among Yupiit groups living along the Bering Sea, hunting and diet varied from group to group. On St. Lawrence Island, for example, the Yupiit subsisted largely on large marine mammals. Massive numbers of walrus and bowhead whales traveled past the island each spring and fall. Central Yupiit groups residing in the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta subsisted through a diet of salmon, supplemented with seals and marine mammals by the those along the coast and moose and caribou by those living further inland.

Inupiat Just north of the Yupiit lands, from the Bering Strait and Seward Peninsula all the way up the Arctic coast past Barrow, the Inupiat reside. The Inupiat are part of a cultural and linguistic heritage that extends across the Arctic coast of North America from Alaska to Greenland. Often associated with the typical Outside misconception of Alaska Native peoples and “Eskimo” culture, the Inupiat have long fascinated anthropologists for their ability to survive the harsh environment of the North Slope. One of the last Native groups in Alaska

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to witness European contact, Inupiat populations were estimated at around 10,000 when contact occurred during the 1800s. The inupiat diet traditionally consisted largely of whale and walrus for groups in the Bering Strait. Those on the mainland supplemented this marine diet with caribou and moose. The hunting of whales by the Inupiat was accomplished through both teamwork and competition, with multiple boats attempting to be the first to strike the whale and the others coming in to assist.

Athabascan The Athabascan Indians reside all around the Alaska Interior and can be sub-divided into regional groups. Only one of those groups, the Dena’ina, resided along the coast, on the Kenai Peninsula and the west side of Cook Inlet. Other groups include the Ahtna, Upper Tanana, Tancross, Tanana, Han, Gwich’in, Koyukon, Upper Kuskokwim, Deghitan and Holikachuk. Athabascan groups speak a similar language and are related to Athabascan groups throughout western Canada as well as to the Apache and Navajo of the Southwest United States. The living and hunting styles of Athabascan groups in Alaska varied from area to area, ranging from semi-nomadic to more stable dwelling.

Athabascan pre-European contact populations are estimated to have been around 11,000. Interior Athabascans subsisted mostly through the catching of fish and the hunting of large mammals.

Tlingit and Haida The Tlingit and Haida groups inhabited the coastline that today makes up Southeast Alaska and parts of the coast of British Columbia, Canada. The two groups had many cultural similarities but differed in language. At the time of European contact, the Tlingit and Haida populations are estimated to have been about 15,000 and 1,800 respectively. As with other Alaska Natives who lived on the Pacific coasts further north, the Tlingit and Haidi hunting patterns differed depending on whether their residence was island-based or on the mainland. Those on the mainland were able to take advantage of large salmon runs as well as land mammal herds. Those on the islands of Southeast Alaska relied on smaller runs supplemented with seals, island deer, halibut and herring eggs. The Tlingit and Haida are the only Alaska Native groups to create totem poles. Contact staff writer Weston Morrow at 459-7520. Follow him on Twitter: @FDNMschools.

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

17

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Volunteers

People donate time for thousands of visitors By Sam Friedman SFRIEDMAN@NEWSMINER.COM

In 2010, the last time the Alaska Federation of Natives convention came to Fairbanks, it took 52 volunteers working a total of 709 hours to greet, feed and answer questions for the several thousand visitors. This year, the Fairbanks Convention and Visitors Bureau is putting together an even larger group of volunteers to handle the 26 categories of jobs that have been laid out for this year’s convention, according to volunteer wrangler Charity Gadapee, director of visitor services and membership at the FCVB. Jobs are as simple as helping stuff 1,000 gift bags for AFN delegates

or as involved as being a trained greeter at Fairbanks International Airport or the Carlson Center. The latter volunteer gig requires a one-hour cross-cultural communication class that teaches about Alaska Native people, body language, different communication styles and avoiding misunderstandings based on biases and stereotypes. Also essential are knowledgeable locals to provide information about local restaurants and other services delegates might need in Fairbanks. One of the most ambitious AFN events relies heavily on volunteers. The community potlatch this year will serve an estimated 3,500 people. About 60 volunteers will be used alone for preparing, serving food and cleaning up this event. Contact staff writer Sam Friedman at 4597545.

ConocoPhillips Plans New Work on the North Slope With the recent improvements to Alaska’s severance tax system, ConocoPhillips has announced new work on the North Slope, including: • Bringing an additional rig to the Kuparuk field that supports 95 direct jobs and will generate approximately 700 indirect jobs. • Initiating engineering and design for new Drill Site 2S at Kuparuk. ConocoPhillips already filed permit applications for this project and plans to seek project approval in the third quarter of 2014. • Entering the regulatory/permitting activities phase and engineering for GMT1, a drill site in the Greater Moose’s Tooth Unit in NPR-A. ConocoPhillips filed permit applications for this project on July 23, 2013, and plans to seek project approval of GMT1 in late 2014. These are examples of the activities ConocoPhillips has kicked off to help bring new investments and produce more oil from legacy and satellite fields.

We are looking at additional opportunities in the near future. ConocoPhillips is here for the long term. The new oil tax bill makes the North Slope a more attractive business environment and should lead to more investment in oil-producing projects than has been seen in recent years.

Luke Titus, of Minto, serves moose to, from right, Amy of Ruby, Elsie of Rampart, Jeannie, of Bettles, and Georgianna Lincoln, of Anchorage, during the Community Welcoming Potlatch on Oct. 20, 2010, at the Big Dipper Ice Arena. SAM HARREL/NEWSMINER FILE PHOTO

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Public safety

Law enforcement in charge of keeping event secure By Sam Friedman SFRIEDMAN@NEWSMINER.COM

Delegates who attended the 2010 Alaska Federation of Natives convention in Fairbanks can expect a similar level of police presence at this year’s event — all in the name of ensuring a safe gathering. Like the last time around, guests can expect added patrols, with the largest presence targeted toward the largest events, said Fairbanks Police Chief Laren Zager. “Everything worked well last time. We're getting good at this,” he said. Also part of the added enforcement are three-member safety teams that consist of Fairbanks police, probation staff and staff members of the Interior Alaska

Center for Non-violent Living. The teams will go to local bars to distribute information about domestic violence. As a resource to guests, a committee that has been preparing for this year’s conference created a list of local emergency phone numbers for police, fire and medical services. However, “never hesitate to dial 911 if the matter is urgent,” Zager said. “But if there is time to think, you may be able to save time by calling the appropriate number.” Another resource is the 24-hour AFN hotline number created for the conference to answer questions from guests and other delegates. The number this year is 459-1453. Contact staff writer Sam Friedman at 459-7545. Follow him on Twitter: @FDNMcrime.

Need help during the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention? The AFN safety committee provided the following list of phone numbers to assist AFN guests. ALL EMERGENCIES 911 NONEMERGENCY BUSINESS LINES: 24-Hour Sevice Center 459-1453 Fairbanks Police 450-6500 Fairbanks Fire 450-6601 Alaska State Troopers 451-5100 OTHER NONEMERGENCY CALLS: FCVB Carlson Center (Oct. 18-23) 451-1804 Elders and Youth Info Desk (Oct. 18-20) 451-1801 AFN information desk (Oct. 21-23) 451-1801 Fairbanks Convention and Visitors Bureau (Open: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., 7 days per week) 456-5774 FCVB AFN Liaison Helen Renfrew 322-8145 FCVB’s Charity Gadapee 322-9082 FCVB Lodging and Car Vacancies 456-5774

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Carlson Center 451-7800 Pioneer Park 459-1087 Doyon 459-2000 Tanana Chiefs Conference 452-8251 Fairbanks Native Association 452-1648 University of Alaska Fairbanks Information 474-7211 Fairbanks city mayor’s office 459-6793 Fairbanks borough mayor’s office 459-1300 North Pole mayor’s office 488-8584 SERVICES IN FAIRBANKS/INTERIOR: Fairbanks Memorial Hospital 452-8181 Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center 451-6682 Interior Alaska Center for Non-violent Living 800-478-7273 or 452-7273 Community Service Patrol (Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.; Sun. 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.) 9786100/347-6847 Resource Center for Parents & Children (Stevie’s Place) 456-2866 Careline Crisis Intervention 452-4357

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Morris Thompson Center Visitor, cultural building full of activity By Tim Mowry

The Tanana Traditional Dancers open the dedication and blessing of the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center on Aug. 12, 2008, along the Chena River.

TMOWRY@NEWSMINER.COM

The Carlson Center may be where most of the action will take place during the annual Alaska Federation of Natives Convention but the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center on Dunkel Street will also be hopping. “Every space is booked all week long with meetings,” center director Cindy Schumaker said. The center will kick off the convention Tuesday night by hosting a reception for the AFN Board of Directors on the eve of the convention followed by a Gwich ‘in old-time Athabascan fiddle dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Morris Thompson center will host fiddle dances the next four nights, also, from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. Admission to the fiddle dances is $10, and any money raised will go to support Tanana Chiefs Conference Cultural Progams.

SAM HARREL/ NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

MORRIS THOMPSON » 21

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

MORRIS THOMPSON Continued from 20 The center has been holding fiddle dances in October or November the past three years and this year was able to coordinate them with the AFN convention, which returns to Fairbanks for the first time since 2010. “We’re celebrating the fact AFN is in town; that’s what the fiddle dances are all about,” Schumacher said. The dances will feature legendary fiddlers such as Bill Stevens, of Fort Yukon and Pete Peter of Venetie, who will be playing each night. Other well-known fiddlers who will play include Trimble Gilbert of Arctic Village, Wilbur Jack Kennedy of Canada, and John Christian of Venetie. “They’re the best of the best,” said Dixie Alexander, cultural program director for the center. The fiddle dances have been popular at the center for the last three years, and Alexander expects an even bigger crowd with the AFN convention in town. “Last year we had about 300 people every night,” she said. “We clear out the whole lobby.” Gwich’in old-time Athabascan fiddling is for more-traditional dances, such as two-step, double-jig, duck dancing, square dancing, rabbit An attendee of the Alaska Federation of Natives Board of Directors reception photographs the portrait of the late dance and handkerchief dancing. Athabascan leader Morris Thompson in the lobby of the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center on Oct. “It’s not so much bluegrass,” Alexander said. 19, 2010. The portrait was unveiled during the reception. SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO “Some of the square dances will last 45 minutes or an hour and there will be as many as 60 couples on the dance floor.”

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Elders & Youth Three-day conference bridges the generations Paul Gregory, tribal court judge of Bethel, speaks Oct. 18, 2005, during the morning session of the Alaska Federation of Natives/First Alaskans Institute Elders & Youth Conference in the Carlson Center. SAM HARREL/ NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

By Tim Mowry TMOWRY@NEWSMINER.CO

The Elders and Youth Conference has a come a long way since it started 30 years ago. It began in 1984 as the Alaska Federation of Natives Youth Conference. A total of 54 high school students attended the first conference. Sometime in the late 1980s or early 1990s, the decision was made to combine it with the AFN Native Elders Conference to create what is known today as the Elders and Youth Conference. This year, more than 800 youths and elders from around the state are expected to attend the threeday conference at the Carlson Center in Fairbanks

Oct. 21 to 23, before the main AFN convention. The purpose of the conference, which attracts elders and youths from the five main Alaska Native cultural groups, is to help preserve the Native culture and empower Native youths to be tomorrow’s leaders, said Lena Jacobs, leadership manager for First Alaskans Institute, which organizes the conference. “It’s to create a space for elders and youth from all over the state to come together and share with each other, whether it’s stories about growing up or culture or stories from communities, and to learn from each other,” she said. The goal, Jacobs said, is “to create a sense of empowerment to go back home with new knowledge they’ve gained and be positive change agents.” The conference is meant to connect elders and youths so they can interact and learn from each other in a fun, meaningful way while inspiring ELDERS/YOUTH » 23

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

ELDERS/YOUTH Continued from 22 pride in their Native culture and heritage, Jacobs said. Jacobs is a prime example of how the conference works. “I started attending the Elders and Youth Conference in high school; that’s where I discovered my voice and became aware of what was happening in the state with Native issues,” she said. “That was the beginning of my leadership journey, and now I’m organizing the conference 15 years later.” The theme of this year’s conference is “We Are Our Ancestors.” The conference offers motivational and educational speakers and panels. This year’s youth keynote speaker is Nelson Kanuk, from Kipnuk, who is a freshman at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The elder keynote speaker is Larry Chercasen. The conference features 14 workshops centered on four main themes:

1. Health, wellness and safety. 2. Language, culture and values. 3. Land, law and policy. 4. Leadership and education. The workshops focus on how Native youths can improve their own lives and those of people who live in their community. “One of the things we do is challenge all of our participants to take action after the conference, whether it’s going back to the classroom and sharing with peers what they learned or going to the village council and getting involved,” Jacobs said. Last year, the youngest participant at the conference was 4 years old and the oldest was 94, Jacobs said. “We get a huge range of ages, cultures and representation from all over the state, she said. Contact staff writer Tim Mowry at 459-7587. Follow him on Twitter: @FDNMoutdoors.

Sarah Martin, 6, left, and her cousin Mathew Sanford, 4, play a game on her mother’s cellphone Oct. 18, 2005, during the morning session of the Alaska Federation of Natives/First Alaskans Institute Elders and Youth Conference in the Carlson Center. The two are great grandchildren of Katie John from Mentasta. SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

THE CITY OF FAIRBANKS WELCOMES The AFN Delegates to the Golden Heart City 13414132-10-20-13AFN

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Katie John

Award will honor memory of Athabascan elder The following article appeared in the June 1 edition of the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. By Mary Beth Smetzer

Athabascan elder Katie John was known publicly for her determination and eventual success in fighting for indigenous subsistence rights, and by her large, extended family for her traditional teachings, humor, gentle spirit and loving ways. John died early May 31 with family members at her side at the Alaska Native Medical Center in Anchorage. She was 97 years old and resided at Mentasta Lake until shortly before her death. “Katie John’s example will

Hunter-Fisher award » Katie John, the Athabascan elder who successfully led the fight for recognition of Native subsistence rights, will be among those honored at the Alaska Federation of Natives convention on Oct. 26 at the Carlson Center. John died on May 31 at age 97, leaving a powerful legacy. She filed a landmark lawsuit in 1985 that eventually led to federal recognition of Alaska Native subsistence rights. John will be honored with the Hunter-Fisher award at the 2013 AFN convention, one of a dozen President’s Awards that will be given to this year. inspire generations to come,” said Alaska Federation of Native President Julie Kitka, in a statement. “Her name will be our rallying cry, to stand up for our subsistence rights, and to nurture our languages and traditions.” When the state refused to allow John and Mentasta Village elders to put up a fishwheel

at their family’s abandoned traditional fish camp, Batzulnetas, at the junction of Tanada Creek and the Copper River, they filed suit in 1985 in federal court and endured a long court battle over the landmark subsistence case. Born in 1915, John was raised in the traditional manner, living off the land under the tutelage of her mother and grandmoth-

er. In 2011, she was awarded an honorary doctorate degree by the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and at John the commencement ceremony, she spoke of that time. “We had no pencil, no paper. We don’t know how to read. We used our head,” she said. “Everything my mother told me, my grandmother told me, it’s in my head.” James Kari, a UAF linguistics professor emeritus, who worked with John on the Ahtna language, calls John “one of the great intellectuals of Native Alaska.”

“She would speak from her heart and from her memory about the Ahtna laws and traditions of her home area, the upper Copper River. Whenever she spoke in Ahtna about her language, history and beliefs, she would organize her thoughts meticulously and with great seriousness,” Kari said. U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski described John’s persistence and determination in her cause in a statement released Friday afternoon. “Katie John was an Alaska icon who devoted her life to ensuring that her Ahtna people had the opportunity to carry on traditional subsistence fishing in their ancestral homeland. JOHN » 27

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

JOHN Continued from 26 She was unafraid to challenge any bureaucrat standing between her Native people and their opportunity to fish, whether that was a State of Alaska that didn’t recognize that ANILCA’s rural preference included fishing or a National Park Ranger trying to tell her that she couldn’t fish from her ancestral village within the Wrangell-St Elias National Park. Tanana Chiefs President Jerry Isaac, who is related to John, said the respected elder was known for hearty, friendly, happy disposition. “Everybody always loved her for that,” he said. John was very knowledgeable about potlatches, considered a serious event in the upper Tanana and Copper River areas, and she always was firm and balanced as to what was to be achieved by the traditional event, Isaac said. A consummate teacher, John was always willing to share her

Poldine Carlo, left, laughs as Katie John dances after being presented with a blanket Oct. 21, 2005, at the Alaska Federation of Natives convention. AFRN honored John on her 90th birthday. NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO ancestral traditions. “She was a great teacher, very patient,” said her granddaughter, Katherine Martin. “When she started winning our rights on subsistence, I went with her, and traveled with her for five years straight around the state,” Martin said. As they traveled back and

forth to speaking engagements, John told her granddaughter many, many stories and about her own growing up in the early 20th century. “I’ve gone to college and got my bachelor’s degree and work in the white economy, but my learning from her is the best schooling I ever got in my life,”

Martin said. John’s traditional background also played into her leadership role of fighting for subsistence rights. “Katie was from a generation who believed, ‘I have the right to feed my family and that is all I’m trying to do, not break the law,’” Isaac said. “She fought for it, and she won.” U.S. Sen. Mark Begich’s remarks in a statement Friday reflect John’s contribution. “Alaska has lost a steadfast advocate for Native subsistence rights. From her fish camp on the Copper River, Katie John gave Alaska Natives across our state a voice to their longsought protection of traditional hunting and fishing rights.” John is remembered, by grandniece Tracy Charles Smith, of Fairbanks, as an “awesome loving kind woman.” Smith’s grandmother, Doris Charles, also a plaintiff with John in the subsistence legal fight, and John grew up together. “They had a really good relationship,” Smith said. “When my mother was getting ready

to pass on (2002), Katie came, and they were reminiscing about playing together in the woods and my grandma packing Katie around.” “As Alaska Natives we owe her a lot for her fight for subsistence rights,” Smith said. “She was loved and she’ll be missed.” A similar emotion was expressed by Gulkana Chief Fred Ewan Friday morning in a conversation with Kari. Ewan said, “We lost the best woman we ever had.” John and her husband, Chief Fred John, who died in 2000, raised 14 children and six foster children together. She leaves behind approximately 250 grandchildren, great-grandchildren and greatgreat-grandchildren. John Jr. describes his mother as being a giver all of her life, who loved people and gave freely of her time and care. “We’re going to miss her,” John Jr. said. “She taught us stories of our culture and history. She was a big part of our lives. Now her history belongs to the public, to the people.”

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Military service award New award honors Richard Frank By Greg Bringhurst TANANA CHIEFS CONFERENCE

In June 2013, the Alaska Federation of Natives Board of Directors, at a board meeting in Kotzebue, formally announced a new President’s Award that will debut at this year’s convention. The Gin’tith (Richard Frank) Military Service Award will recognize an Alaska Native who demonstrates a strong commitment and willingness to serve in the U.S. armed forces. Individuals nominated for this award may be involved in the armed forces on active duty, in the reserves, in the National Guard or as a

veteran who was honorably discharged from active duty or reserves. The award is in honor of the late Richard Frank, a prominent Athabascan advocate and leader, who passed away in September 2012 Frank at age 85. In the 1940s, Richard served in the Army Air Corps during World War II and served in the Pacific theater as an airplane mechanic. Richard played a significant role in the formation of the Alaska Native Veterans Association, a group dedicated to advocating on behalf of Alaska Native veterans. Richard’s service in the military is par-

tially credited for his character and philosophy of providing positive service to his people. The Alaska Federation of Natives President’s Awards recognize the best traits and accomplishments in Alaska Native individuals from communities throughout Alaska. Other awards focus on positive aspects of the arts, education, public safety, health, subsistence, youth leadership, parenthood, public service, economic development and preserving Native culture. The awards will be given on the final day of this year’s annual convention, at 2:20 p.m. Oct. 26.

»

The Gin’tith (Richard Frank) Military Service Award will recognize an Alaska Native who demonstrates a strong commitment and willingness to serve in the U. S. Armed Forces in the defense of the United States of America.

Greg Bringhurst is communications manager for Tanana Chiefs Conference

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

‘...an articulate, wise man...’ This story first appeared in the NewsMiner on Sept. 23, 2012 By Mary Beth Smetzer

By early afternoon, the home of Richard and Anna Frank at the end of a quiet Aurora Subdivision street was a bevy of activity both inside and out. Cars lined both sides of the street, with people busily unloading and carrying in stockpiles of food, some in large boxes and others in covered foil wrappings. The family garage was serving as a staging area for provisions for the nightly meals that are being held at Chief David Salmon Tribal Hall in honor of Native leader and elder Richard Frank, 85, who died (Sept. 20, 2012) at Fairbanks Memorial Hospital. Inside the home, Richard’s widow, Anna, known affectionately as “Tadge” was sitting and visiting with a continual stream of friends and relatives stopping by for “tea,” an Athabascan tradition of comforting and supporting those who lose a loved one. A large pot of moose soup warmed on the kitchen stove, and the dining room table was overflowing with food set out for all. The open dining/living room, its walls covered with family photos and mementos, was filled with elders seated in the most comfortable chairs as younger people saw to their needs and

refilled cups of tea. “That’s our Native way of encouraging each other, holding them up to show our love,” said Sarah Silas, 87, of Minto, Richard’s only surviving sibling from the original family of 10. “Traditionally, our grandparents and great-grandparents passed that down to us.” Although mourners were quietly grieving for a man they greatly respected and admired, they also took the opportunity to share stories and laughter. When Sarah arrived from Minto to visit her brother at Fairbanks Memorial Hospital two days before he died, she said the first thing Richard said to her was, “Remember when I chopped my sister’s high heels off ?” The childhood memory made them both laugh, she said. Richard was a young teen at the time and didn’t think high heels were needed for village life. A family friend greeted Anna with, “Richard just gave us a beautiful sunrise this morning,” following it with a colorful description of its beauty. Anna listened, then laughingly answered, “He was probably trying to tell me, ‘Tadge, get up and get the morning paper.’” During the two years before is passing, weakened from Parkinson’s disease and on a feeding tube, Richard kept up his favorite pastimes such as reading the daily newspaper and attending Native meetings and gatherings. He attended the Village Fast Pitch baseball games, the pow-wow and danced at WEIO with the support of good friend Reggie Joule, a former WEIO athlete and retired state legislator. Growing up in Old Minto and traveling seasonally with his family for fish

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Association, worked as an employment specialist finding jobs for Native workers, and served six years as vice president of Tanana Chief Conference, and many years as its elder adviser. In addition, Richard and the late Isaac Juneby started up the Alaska Native Veterans Association, to ensure Native veterans were getting a fair share. Following his military service in 1949, Frank returned to Alaska and Minto. Richard and Anna David were married in 1955 and were active community members in Minto for many years before moving to Fairbanks in 1975. Richard served as chief of Minto, was president of the Minto Village Corp. and was involved in and supported the Alaska Native Land Claims.The Franks raised four children, Roxanne, Robin, Parker and Darrell, and today have many grandchildren and adopted grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

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and game, Richard only attend school to the fourth grade. But his natural intelligence and work ethic kept him learning and succeeding throughout his life. “He was an articulate, wise man,” said the Rev. Scott Fisher, who has known the Frank family for many years. Richard’s memory and understanding of Athabascan genealogy also was exceptional. “He could remember and explain complex familial relationships,” Fisher said. Richard served in the Army Air Corps during World War II and served in the Pacific theater as an airplane mechanic. In Alaska, he worked on steamboats along the Tanana and Yukon rivers and was active racing sled dogs during the winter months. Richard’s many admirers assert it was his support and influence that inspired them to pursue leadership roles in the Native community or continue and extend their education, or both. In Fairbanks, Richard helped in the formation of the Fairbanks Native

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

For All Your AFN Updates, Check Out the News-Miner App! Find it in the App Store or Google Play!

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

31

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Native programming KUAC television adds ‘First Nations Experience’ By Marmian Grimes UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS

Viewers of Alaska public television now have access to a full slate of Native American programming with the addition of First Nations Experience to the KUAC lineup. The programming, known also as FNX, will run on KUAC’s Channel 9.4 and UATV, both operated by the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It offers a full range of programs, including TV series, documentaries, short films, public service announcements and movies, all highlighting the healthy, positive, and real lives and cultures of Native American and indigenous people around the world. “‘The First Nations Experience’ adds to the diverse content available to Alas-

ka viewers and supports UAF’s core mission values,” said KUAC general manager Keith Martin. UAF Vice Chancellor Mike Sfraga added, “The inclusion of FNX to our public television programming fits well with UAF’s commitment to rural Alaska and Native peoples throughout the state.” FNX, a nonprofit channel, is the result of a shared vision and values between the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and PBS/KVCR, both located in San Bernardino, Calif. A complete listing of FNX programming on UATV/KUAC can be found at,http://kuac.org/kuac-tv/tv-schedule. More information on FNX is available online at http://fnx.org. Marmian Grimes is a public information officer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

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Complete listing of FNX programming on UATV/KUAC » http://kuac.org/kuac-tv/tv-schedule More information on FNX » http://fnx.org.

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Great works

Arts, crafts — Native style By Gary Black GLBACK@NEWSMINER.COM

It’s one of the biggest attractions at the annual Alaska Federation of Natives annual convention, and this year it’s bigger and better than ever. The Alaska Native Customary Art Show is a staple of the annual event, with more than 170 vendors signed up this year to dazzle convention attendees and visitors with a patchwork of arts representing Native Alaskans and American Indians from the Lower 48. The annual fair is a tradition at AFN, not only for the range of crafts on display but also for the artisans it

2013 art show hours » 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 24 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 25 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 26 brings together. It’s a craft and arts event like no other in the state. This year’s market place is larger than ever, with a 21,000-square-foot pavilion established just west of the Carlson Center in which vendors will display their wares. Every table space has been sold and organizers are expecting a stellar year for the arts and crafts show, said Helen Renfrew, with the Fairbanks Convention and Visitors Bureau. “This is a huge event,” she said. The arts and crafts fair sees vendors and artisans from every corner

of the state display an array of wares be they jewelry, hand-sewn clothing or exquisitely handcrafted toys. The show represents a variety of styles and cultures all found within the state. The selection includes ivory carvings, fur hats and ruffs, sealskin and moose skin slippers, silver, copper and beaded jewelry, baleen baskets, dolls, woven grass and birch bark baskets, beadwork, trade beads, ceremonial masks, ceremonial regalia, Eskimo kuspuks and more, including some unusual traditional items such as bead-trimmed bags fashioned from moose bladders and moose hearts. Shoppers can expect to find the creative work of five distinct ARTS » 33

Daralynn Augustine, of Anchorage, looks at the “Guardian Angel” ornaments made by Suzan Henry, of Napakiak, at the Alaska Federation of Natives Alaska Native Customary Art Show on Oct. 21, 2010, at the Carlson Center. SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

ARTS Continued from 32 Native cultures and items not usually found in local gift shops or galleries. Don’t get in too much of a hurry though. With the more than 170 vendors and booths and the ample space, you’ll want to take some time browsing and asking questions. Often, vendors will tell you about each detailed gift or item they make, its history and its cultural significance. You can expect to see the talents of the artisans on display at the craft show, many of whom work on items while carrying on conversations with patrons. While the convention floats between Fairbanks and Anchorage, expect some differences in wares. In Anchorage, jewelry and beadwork tend be hot sellers. At the Fairbanks conventions, held here in the middle of the Interior on the cusp of winter, cold-weather gear such as clothing and outdoor items tend to be the hot items to purchase. Take your time and browse around because this will be a display of color and craft like no other. This year’s arts show lasts three days: Thursday through Saturday, Oct 24-26. Contact Features Editor Gary Black at 459-7504, by email at gblack@newsminer.com or on Twitter: @FDNMfeatures.

Juneau-based artist Doug Chilton, left, laughs with Roberta Miller as he explains the Tlingit double-eagle design on the silver braclet Miller bought from him at the 2010 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention at the Carlson Center. NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

34

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Quyana!

Traditional dance troupes will entertain By Gary Black GBLACK@NEWSMINER.COM

If the daytime is all business, bylaws, committees and meetings, then the nighttime is when the sights and sounds come alive for Fairbanks participants and visitors during this year’s Alaska Federation of Natives convention. That’s when dance troupes will gather on the floor of the Carlson Center in their traditional tribal regalia for Quyana — two nights of drumming, dancing and singing that celebrate the Native heritage of Alaska. First introduced at the 1982 convention, Quyana — which means “thank you” in Yup’ik

Eskimo — was designed to restore traditional dancing and ensure that the dances were passed onto today’s Native youth. To date, more than 200 dance groups have performed at AFN conventions. “Quyana is tradition at AFN to celebrate our official dances,” said Ben Mallott, special assistant to AFN President Julie Kitka. “If during the day it is all work and business, then night is celebrating with culture and dance.” Quyana lasts for two nights — Oct. 24 and 25 — and AFN officials try to schedule dance groups from each region of Alaska to perform. AFN takes

Eral Kingik dances with the Point Hope Eskimo Dancers during the Alaska Federation of Native Convention in Anchorage on Oct. 29, 2004. ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO

DANCE » 35

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

35

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

DANCE

2013 Quyana Lineup

Continued from 34

Thursday, Oct. 24 » 7 p.m. — Fairbanks Native Assn. JOM Potlatch Dancers 7:33 p.m. — Suurimmaanitchuat 8:06 p.m. — Ahtna Heritage Dancers 8:39 p.m. — Nanwalek Sugpiaq Dancers 9:12 p.m. — Tanana Traditional Dancers 9:45 p.m. — Chevak Kinguliaret Yurartait 10:18 p.m. — Neets’aii Gwich’in Dancers

names of groups all year that want to dance, but because so many apply to perform and time is limited, the number of groups have to be limited. The groups that do get to perform are dressed in full regalia and range in age from children to elders. As a child, Mallott danced with the Tlingits of Southeast and remembers it well. “For a small kid to be in front of a thousand people, and to be picked to do so, it really is a great honor,” he said. For Kenneth Frank, who leads the Di’haii Gwich’in Dancers, one of the troupes performing at Quyana, it’s about more than just honor; it’s also about culture, tradition and heritage. Frank started the troupe about 10 years ago as a family group to teach his children their Gwich’in heritage, but since then it’s expanded to include more than just his immediate family. He still leads the group, made up of mostly Interior Alaskans with some dancers coming from as far away as Venetie and Arctic Village, with the goal of passing on the past. “Too many kids don’t know the Gwich’in way, and that’s what these songs and dances bring back,” Frank said. “It puts the puzzle back in place with our singing and dancing. That’s what I’m doing, and that’s what our ancestors want us to do. They want us to know the knowledge of our ways and pass it on and bring it to our future, who are our kids.”

Friday, Oct. 25 » 7 p.m. — Akula Elitnaurvik 7:33 p.m. — Kuugmuit 8:06 p.m. — Di’haii Gwich’in Dancers 8:39 p.m. — Stebbens Dance Group 9:12 p.m. — Woosh.ji.een 9:45 p.m. — Tikigak Traditional Dancers 10:18 p.m. — Tanacross Traditional Dancers Left: Maggie Sharpe, 3, dances with her mother Jolene and the rest of Kicaput Dancers on Oct. 19, 2005, during the Alaska Federation of Natives presentation of Quyana Alaska in the Carlson Center. The Kicaput Dancers are made up of people from the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta who are now living in Anchorage.

Contact Features Editor Gary Black at 459-7504, by email at gblack@newsminer.com or on Twitter: @FDNMfeatures.

SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Aaron Topkok, then 9 years old, performs with the rest of the Pavva Inupiat Dancers of Fairbanks at the end of the Alaska Federation of Natives Elders and Youth Conference, Oct. 23, 2007, at the Carlson Center. ERIC ENGMAN/NEWS-MINER

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Cross-cultural training Local workers prepare for AFN visitors This story first appeared in the News-Miner on Oct. 7, 2013

By Sam Friedman SFRIEDMAN@NEWSMINER.COM

A

s this year’s Alaska Federation of Natives conference approached, Fairbanks service industry workers were in training to prepare for the visitors. In a classroom at the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center one October weeknight, instructors Liz Ross and Jennifer Jolis taught a curriculum that mixed elementary anthropology and tips from past years conferences. They told the class of about 20 people that Fairbanks’ reputation for hospitality led to AFN’s decision last year to hold its convention, the largest gathering of

Native peoples in the United States, in Fairbanks this year. “You are the faces that will make a difference to people who are here, just by being welcoming and recognizing that there are people who express themselves differently,” Jolis said. The class was held twice per week in preparation for the convention, with special sessions for local businesses. The classes are usually team-taught by one Native and one non-Native. Among the students on one night’s class were Holland America bus drivers, baristas from McCafferty’s, A Coffee House, Etc. and Sophie Station hotel employees. Volunteers also take the class. Golden Heart Greeters, Fairbanks Convention and Visitors Bureau volunteers who greet AFN delegates at the airport and the Carlson Center, are

required to take the class. Elizabeth Cook, an anthropologist who organizes the classes, used an iceberg as a model to give participants a general definition of culture. Like an iceberg, most of a peoples’ culture isn’t visible from the surface, she said. “The part that you see — the clothing, the food, the language — is only 10 percent of what your culture is,” she said. “The rest of it is stuff that’s buried so deep you don’t know where it came from. It’s stuff that’s innate and you may be aware of some of it. It might be stuff about how I relate to women who are my elders. It might be how I relate to the weather.” Eye contact is an important belowthe-surface cultural difference, the instructors said. While it’s often rude in Western cultures to not look someone in

the eye when talking to them, it’s often the opposite in Alaska Native cultures. The instructors repeatedly stressed the importance of patience when working with other cultures. One issue local hotels have encountered is working with children from rural communities who often have more freedom to run and play than urban children. When they come to a hotel they may repeatedly flush toilets or ride up and down the elevators because these experiences are new to them, Ross said. “Try to avoid judgment, and just let them experience,” she said. “Children in the village are very safe and they’re used to a lot of freedom.” Jackie Carlson, who owns the catering business Jackie of All Trades, took the TRAINING » 39

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

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ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

TRAINING Continued from 38 class because she is among 60 volunteers working to serve 3,500 at the Welcome Potlatch, the largest event for volunteers at AFN this year. Originally from Moorhead, Minn., Carlson wanted to know if there was anything special she needed to know about working a potlatch. The instructors told her to think of it as a giant Thanksgiving dinner and to be sure to serve elders first. “I just thought the potlatch sounded so interesting, so I’m excited about serving that,” Carlson said after the class. “In our culture, the elders don’t get the respect they deserve. It was nice to find out how to treat them so you don’t insult anybody.” Contact staff writer Sam Friedman at 459-7545.

Jennifer Jolis, left, and Liz Ross conduct a cross cultural communication training class Oct. 2, 2013, at the Morris Thompson Cultural and Visitors Center. Jolis and Ross are members of the Alaska Federation of Natives Cross Cultural Communication Committee who is preparing for AFN’s annual convention meeting in Fairbanks later this month. SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER

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40

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

AFN communities Afognak Akhiok Akiachak Akiak Akutan Alakanuk Alatna Aleknagik Alexander Creek Allakaket Ambler Anaktuvuk Pass Andreafski Angoon Aniak Anvik Arctic Village Atmauthluak Atqasuk Barrow Beaver Belkofski Bethel Bill Moore’s Slough Brevig Mission Buckland Cantwell Chefornak Chenega Bay Chevak Chickaloon Chignik Chignik Lagoon Chignik Lake Chistochina Chitina Chuathbaluk Clark’s Point Copper Center Crooked Creek Deering Dillingham Douglas Eek Egegik Eklutna Ekuk Ekwok Elim Emmonak English Bay Evansville Eyak False Pass Gakona Galena (Louden) Gambell Georgetown Golovin Goodnews Bay Gulkana Haines

Hamilton Healy Lake Hoonah Hooper Bay Huslia Hydaburg Illiamna Ivanof Bay Kake Kaktovik Kaguyak Kaltag Kasigluk Kenai Ketchikan Kiana King Cove King Island King Salmon Kipnuk Kivalina Klukwan Knik Kobuk Kodiak Kokhanof Koliganek Kongiganek Kotlik Kotzebue Koyuk Koyukuk Kwethluk Kwigillingok Lake Louise Larsen Bay Lower Kalskag Lower Tonsinaa Manley Hot Springs Manokotak Marshall Mary’s Igloo McGrath Mekoryuk Mentasta Metlakatla Minto Mountain Village Nagamiut (Holitna) Naknek Napaimute Napakiak Napaskiak Nebesna Nenana Newhalen New Stuyahok Newtok Nightmute Nikolai Ninilchik

Nuiqsut Noatak Nondalton Noorvik Nulato Nunapitchuk Ohogamiut Old Harbor Olsonville Oscarville Ouzinkie Paimute Pedro Bay Perryville Pilot Point Pilot Station Pitka’s Point Platinum Point Hope Port Graham Port Heiden Port Lions Portage Creek Red Devil Ruby Russian Mission Salamatoff Community Sand Point Saxman Scammon Bay Selawik Seldovia Shageluk Shaktoolik Sheldon’s Point Shishmaref Shungnak Sitka Skagway Slana Sleetmute Solomon South Naknek Stebbins St. George St. Marys St. Michael St. Paul Stony River Takotna Tanacross Tanana Tatitlek Tazlina Telida Teller Tetlin Togiak Toksook Bay Tuluksak Tuntutuliak

Tununak Twin Hills Twin Lakes Tyonek

Ugashik Umkumute Unalakleet Unalaska

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Unga Upper Kalskag Wainwright Wales

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

41

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Native phrases 101 P

eople in Fairbanks might be hearing some different languages this week as the Elders and Youth Conference and Alaska Federation of Natives open in town. Here are just a few phrases in the various Alaska Native tongues, put together by the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, to give you a small sampling of the diversity within the 49th state: ALEUT Hello — aang Goodbye — ukudigada Thank you — qagaasakung Happy holiday — Kamgan Ukudigaa

CENTRAL YUP’IK Hello (good to see you) — cama-ihi! What’s up? — waqaa Goodbye — piura Thank you — quyana Merry Christmas — Alussistuaqegcikici How are you? — cangacit?

TSIMSHIAN Thank you — way dankoo

SIBERIAN YUPIK How are you? — natesiin? Goodbye (I’ll see you) — esghaghlleqamken Thank you — igamsiqanaghhalek Welcome (thank you all for coming) — quyanaghhalek tagilusi Merry Christmas — Quyanaghhalek Kuusmemi

TLINGIT Hello (how are you?) — wa.é ák.wé? Thank you — gunalchéesh Merry Christmas — Xristos Khuwdziti

INUPIAQ Goodbye — tautugniaqmigikpin Thank you — quyanaq Welcome — qaimarutin Merry Christmas — Nayaangamik piqagin Hello, how are you? — qanuq itpich?

EYAK Thank you —’awa’ahdah AHTNA ATHABASCAN Thank you — tsin’aen Merry Christmas — c’ehwggelnen Dzaen My friend — slatsiin DEG HIT’AN ATHABASCAN Thank you — dogedinh My friend — sits’ida’on

ALUTIIQ Hello — cama’i Thank you — quyanaa

GWICH’IN ATHABASCAN Hello (how are you?) — neenjit dôonch’yàa? Thank you — mahsi’

HAIDA Hello (how are you?) — sán uu dáng giidang? Thank you — háw’aa

Welcome — nakhwal’in shoo ih?Ii My friend — shijyaa HÄN ATHABASCAN Thank you — mahsi’ Our friends — nijaa KOYUKON ATHABASCAN Hello — dzaanh nezoonh Thank you — baasee’ Welcome — enaa neenyo Good luck friend — gganaa’ TANANA ATHABASCAN Hello (how are you?) — do’eent’aa? Thank you — maasee’ His friend — betlanh TANAINA ATHABASCAN Thank you — chin’an My friend — shida TANACROSS ATHABASCAN Thank you — tsin’e e

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42

Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

Economic power Study examined financial importance of Native groups This story first appeared in the News-Miner on June 12, 2012

By Matt Buxton MBUXTON@NEWSMINER.COM

Interior-based Alaska Native organizations make up a large chunk of the local economy, according to a 2012 study of 2010 numbers, and the organizations are hoping those numbers will help establish the economic importance of the Native community. According to the study released jointly by several Interior Native organizations, the more than 70 Interior-based Native organizations provided an economic impact exceeding $300 million in 2010

2010 by the numbers » • 2,725 people were employed by Native organizations for $100.7 million in wages. 1,238 in Fairbanks and 1,487 in Interior villages. • Native organizations spent $178 million in the region. Indirect spending added $129 million. • Statewide, Interior Native organizations employed 5,161 people and spent $497 million. • The Fairbanks North Star Borough saw the most spending at $62.2 million. through the wages of more than 2,725 jobs and direct spending at other businesses. Aaron Schutt, the CEO and President of Doyon, Limited, a for-profit Native corporation that employs thousands of people, said it’s a concrete recognition of the significant role Native organizations — both for-profit and nonprofit — play

in the Interior. “If you combine our spending, it’s quite significant here in Fairbanks,” he said at a press conference at Doyon’s headquarters in downtown Fairbanks. “We are rooted here and we have a commitment to Alaska.” Doyon, Tanana Chiefs Conference, Denakkanagga, Fairbanks Native Asso-

ciation and Interior Regional Housing Authority paid for the study, which was conducted by Fairbanks-based Information Insights. The report shows that, when combined, the region’s Native organizations are the fifth-largest employer in the Interior, after the U.S. military, the federal government, the University of Alaska and the Fairbanks North Star Borough School District. With about 2,750 employees, wages are estimated to make up about 7 percent of all civilian wages in the Interior, according to the report. While many of those employed by the organizations are Native, which is especially the case in smaller, rural organizations, many jobs go to nonNative employees, Schutt said. He said ECONOMY » 43

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

43

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

ECONOMY Continued from 42 it’s a misconception that Native organizations hire only Native. At Doyon, which is made up of multiple companies with work in the oil and gas industry, just 500 of the companies nearly 3,000 employees are Native shareholders and, in all, 75 percent of the corporation’s employees are non-Native. At a news conference presenting the study, Fairbanks Native Association Executive Director Steve Ginnis said the report should be a wake-up call for politicians and government officials that the Native community is a key part of the community and should be treated fairly. “My whole hope in this study is to reach out to the community and the people of the community to recognize the significance of our contribution to this economy,” he said. “The thing that I really want to point out to all of you is that despite this our villages are hurting and my hope is that our political leaders will begin to pay attention to people in our villages.” Ginnis and the others agreed things are getting incrementally better but that there are still plenty of disparities remaining. They recognized that federal money and policy helped many Native organizations weather the economic downturn, but they would like to see Native communities treated more fairly. “We’re looking for respect,” Tanana Chiefs Conference President Jerry Isaac said. The report is the first to specifically look at the economic impact of Native corporations and villages based in the Interior, Doyon spokeswoman Sharon McConnell said.

Doyon, Limited CEO and President Aaron Schutt talks about the economic contribution of Interior-based Native organizations with, from left, Fairbanks Native Association Executive Director Steve Ginnis, Tanana Chiefs Conference President Jerry Isaac and Interior Regional Housing Authority CEO Irene Catalone. MATT BUXTON/NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

For your health New clinic has unique design, full services The entrance of the new Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center is seen Sept. 6, 2012. The more than 96,000square-foot facility will feature stateof-the-art medical equipment and facilities systems. It is designed to accommodate family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics, women’s health, pediatrics, pharmacy, lab, radiology, optical, dental and other support services under one roof for the Tanana Chiefs Conference region. SAM HARREL/

This story first appeared in the News-Miner on Sept. 7, 2012, and has been updated.

By Tim Mowry TMOWRY@NEWSMINER.COM

Walking into the new Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center is almost like walking into a village on the Koyukuk, Tanana or Yukon rivers. What appears to be a stream gravel bed greets visitors in the main entrance. The birch wood paneling on the walls of the atrium in the reception area, a round, spacious, light-filled room, resembles a woven Athabascan birch basket. An upright gas fireplace sits off to the right side, its inviting flames licking up over a bed of rocks.

NEWS-MINER FILE PHOTO

A tile “seasonal round” is built into the middle of the floor, with the 12 months spelled out in different Native dialects

and with different Native activities, such as moose hunting, whaling season, trapping and berry picking, listed under their respective months. The front face of the main reception desk, as well as the desks in each department in the health center, have the appearance of a stacked wood pile. Birch logs — treated so they won’t dry or rot — are stacked neatly below each desk. It’s one of many uniquely Alaskan — and Native — touches you will find in the new $68 million facility being built on Cowles Street in Fairbanks. “When you walk into this place, we want you to walk into a nice, spacious, open place that’s welcoming,” said Victor Joseph, health director for the Tanana Chiefs Conference, during a media tour of the nearly completed health center. “There’s nothing like walking up to a

fireplace. How can you not feel welcome?” TCC, a nonprofit organization based in Fairbanks that represents 42 Interior villages, took ownership of the new $68 million facility Thursday and signed a 20-year lease with U.S. Indian Health Service, which will provide funding for additional staffing for up to 100 at the health center. TCC president and CEO Jerry Isaac called the ownership transfer a “monumental occasion and milestone in the history of Tanana Chiefs Conference.” The contractor, Ghemm Company Inc., put the finishing touches on the 96,410-square-foot facility, which will serve about 14,000 patients per year, in summer 2012. HEALTH CENTER » 45

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We are deeply grateful for your dedication and hard work toward the issues that face the people of our great state.

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

45

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

HEALTH CENTER Continued from 44 The facility will have family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics, women’s health, pediatrics, pharmacy, lab, radiology, optical, dental and other support services all under one roof. Most of the health center previously was located on the fourth floor of Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, with the eye and dental clinics located in the Chief Peter John Tribal Hall on First Avenue. The new health center is more than four times the size of the one it replaces and offers more services, Joseph said. The dental clinic, for example, has 25 chairs and room for as many as 30, which would be double the previous total. That should help cut down on the year-and-a-half waiting list to get dental care, he said. “The idea is when people need services, they get services,” he said. The state-of-the-art clinic, designed by Bettisworth North Architects and Planners of Fairbanks and NBBJ of Seattle, was built using energy-efficient and environmentally friendly techniques. The facility is on track to become the first in Alaska to receive gold certification status under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design process developed by the U.S. Green Building Council. Contact staff writer Tim Mowry at 459-7587.

The atrium of the new Chief Andrew Isaac Health Center resembles a woven birch basket. The Tanana Chiefs Conference is accepting ownership of the health center from the building contractor GHEMM Company, Inc., marking the end of construction. SAM HARREL/NEWS-MINER

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Sunday, October 20, 2013

Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION

ELDERS & YOUTH CONFERENCE SCHEDULE Schedule is subject to change

Sunday, Oct. 20 3-5 p.m. early registration, Carlson Center, first floor

Monday, Oct. 21 7:30 a.m. Onsite Registration Opens 8 a.m. Arts & Opps Showcase opens in the Pavilion 8:30 a.m. Opening Cultural Presentation: Troth Yeddha’ Dancers. Statewide Broadcast begins on GCI Channel 1 and online at www.firstalaskans.org 9 a.m. Welcome and Blessing from the People of the Land, Rev. Anna Frank (Athabascan) 9:10 a.m. Welcome from First Alaskans Institute: Liz Medicine Crow (Tlingit/Haida), president/CEO; Willie Iggiagruk Hensley (Inupiaq), board chair 9:20 a.m. Posting the Colors 9:30 a.m. We Are Our Ancestors Tribute 9:40 a.m. Conference Overview and Call for Young MCs /Ambassadors

9:55 a.m. Making Connections: Elder and Youth Interviews 10:25 a.m. Elder Keynote Address: Larry Chercasen (Unangax) 10:45 a.m. Why Should I Vote? Daisy Stevens (Gwich’in) 10:50 a.m. Get Your Vote On! Participant elections on issues of importance 11:20 a.m. Basketball: A Social and Cultural Experience: Mick Durham 11:35 a.m. Aggravated Organizms: Drew Michael (Yup’ik/Inupiaq) and Elizabeth Ellis (Alutiiq) 11:45 a.m. Lunch. On your own. 1:15 p.m. Door prize drawing 1:25 p.m. Storytelling with Nora Dauenhauer (Tlingit) 1:55 p.m. Release for workshops: 2:05-3:25 p.m.: Workshop Session 1 3:25-3:40 p.m.: Move to next workshop session 3:40-5 p.m.: Workshop Session 2 5 p.m. Recess 7-9 p.m.: Chin’an: A Night of Cultural Celebration. Tickets on sale in registration area. Broadcast available on GCI Channel 1 and online at www.firstalaskans.org

Tuesday, Oct. 22 8 a.m. Onsite Registration Opens 8 a.m. Arts & Opps Showcase opens in the Pavilion 8:30 a.m. Welcome back. Door prize draw-

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ing 8:40 a.m. Cultural Presentation: Inu Yupiaq Dancers 9:10 a.m. Hello from AFN! A Message from the president and co-chairs of the Alaska Federation of Natives 9:15 a.m. Youth Keynote Address: Nelson Kanuk (Yup’ik) 9:35 a.m. WE ARE the Elders in Our Schools: Kotzebue and Tanana Youth 9:50 a.m. Fighting for Rural Education: Elizabeth Willis (Ingalik/Yup’ik) 10 a.m. Empowerment: Rooted in Awareness and Safety: Josh Louwerse 10:20 a.m. Finding Your Strength, Finding Your Voice: Devon Hilts (Tlingit) 10:35 a.m. Regional Breakout: Elections for the Statewide Elders & Youth Council 11:45 a.m. Lunch. On your own 1:15 p.m. Cultural Presentation: Mt. Saint Elias Dancers 1:45 p.m. Preserving Alaska Native Language through Place Name: Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell 1:50 p.m. Alaska Native Language Circles 3:40 p.m. Community Collaboration for Healthy, Happy Youth: George Attla (Athabascan) 4 p.m. Elder Circle & Youth Circle. Elder Circle: Main Arena; Youth Circle: Art Buswell Room 5 p.m. Recess 6:30-9:30 p.m. Teen Dance at Pioneer Park Civic Center. Chaperones must accompany

youths who attend this event.

Wednesday, Oct. 23 8:30 a.m. Cultural Presentation: Nunagiaq Dancers 9 a.m. Men’s House & Women’s House: Go to the house you feel most comfortable in. Men’s House: Art Buswell/North Star Room. Women’s House: Main Arena 11 a.m. Closing Ceremony. Woosh.Ji.Een Dance Group. Announcement of New Statewide Elders & Youth Council. Grand doorprize drawing. 11:30 a.m. Adjourn

AFN CONVENTION SCHEDULE Thursday, Oct. 24 8 a.m. Welcome dance performance: Tanana Traditional Dancers 8:30 a.m. Call to order: AFN Co-Chairs Albert Kookesh and Ralph Andersen Recognition of major sponsors Invocation: Trimbel Gilbert, Arctic Village Introduction of parliamentarian: Patrick Anderson Introduction of sergeant at arms 8:35 a.m. Posting of colors honor guard: Benno Cleveland, Alaska Native Veterans

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Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

Sunday, October 20, 2013

47

ALASKA FEDERATION OF NATIVES CONVENTION Association. Entrance March of Alaska Native veterans and service members. 8:50 a.m. Welcome from the Interior Community: Jerry Isaac, Tanana Chiefs Conference; Aaron Schutt, Doyon, Limited; First Traditional Chief, Don Honea Sr., Ruby. Welcome remarks by local mayors 9:15 a.m. Governor’s address: Gov. Sean Parnell 9:35 a.m. AFN president’s report: Julie Kitka 9:50 a.m. Presentation of Citizen of the Year and Denali awards 10 a.m. Keynote Address: Nelson Angapak, Alaska Native distinguished leader 10:30 a.m. AFN leadership response to keynote 10:40 a.m. AFN/NCAI Tribal Conference report: Ed Thomas, president, Tlingit & Haida Central Council 11 a.m. Elders & Youth Conference report: representative, First Alaskans Institute 11:15 a.m. Report from the National Congress of American Indians: Jackie JohnsonPata, executive director 11:30 a.m. Recess for lunch 1 p.m. Nunagiaq Dancers 1:30 p.m. Call to order. Announcements. 1:35 p.m. Preliminary credentials report: chair of AFN Credentials Committee 1:40 p.m. AFN co-chair nominations 1:45 p.m. Guest speaker: representative, National Council of La Raza, Clarissa Martinez de Castro. Video message: U.S. Congressman Luis V. Gutierrez, D-Ill., chairman of the Immigration Task Force of the Congressional

Hispanic Caucus 2 p.m. Guest speaker: John Echohawk, executive director, Native American Rights Fund 2:15 p.m. Current Issues in tribal-federal relations: Greg Smith, partner, Hobbs Strauss Dean & Walker 3:15 p.m. Guest speaker: Byron I. Mallott, senior Native leader 3:35 p.m. Theme speakers: Jerry Isaac, president, Tanana Chiefs Conference 4:10 p.m. Traditional Native Family Values, Today: Co-hosts Maija Lukin and Sam Towarak, featuring Rico Worl, Annette EvansSmith, Denali Whiting, Sven Haakanson, Moses and Mike Wassilie, Pete and Darlene Lind 5 p.m. Recess for the day

Friday, Oct. 25 8 a.m. Woosh.ji.een 8:30 a.m. Call to order. Announcements. 8:40 a.m. Candidate speeches for AFN cochairs 9 a.m. Alaska congressional delegation: U.S. Rep. Don Young (video) 9:10 a.m. AFN Citizen of the Year, AFN Denali Award, AFN Elder of the Year 9:25 a.m. Federal recognition efforts on behalf of Native Hawaiians: Colette Machado, chairperson, Office of Hawaiian Affairs 9:35 a.m. Reforming justice for Alaska Natives: Presentation of the report of the Indian Law and Order Commission: Troy Eid,

chair, and Carole Goldberg, commissioner 9:45 a.m. Report from the Bush Caucus of the Alaska Legislature: Rep. Bryce Edgmon, chair 10:10 a.m. Health care reform opportunities: Valerie Davidson, senior director of legal and inter-governmental affairs, ANTHC 10:30 a.m. ANTHC update: Roald Helgesen, CEO, ANTHC 10:40 a.m. Report from the Alaska Arctic Policy Commission: Nikoosh Carlo, executive director 10:50 a.m. Get Out the Native Vote report and activity 11:30 a.m. Recess for lunch 1:30 p.m. Call to order. Announcements. 1:35 p.m. Final credentials report 1:40 p.m. Special convention report: William Martin, chair; Rep. Ben Nageak, member, state Suicide Prevention Council; Katherine Gottlieb, president, SouthCentral Foundation 2:10 p.m. Alaska congressional delegation: U.S. Sen. Mark Begich 2:30 p.m. Subsistence report and dialogue: • Rosita Worl, chair, AFN Subsistence Committee • Priority demonstration project: Co-management on Native lands. Michelle Anderson, accompanied by Roy Ewan, Eleanor Dementi, and Nick Jackson • Priority demonstration project: Intertribal Fish Commission. Myron Naneng and Jerry Isaac • Members of the AFN Subsistence Com-

mittee: Denise May, Joe Chythlook, Taqulik Hepa, Mary Ann Mills • Open microphone. 5 p.m. Recess for the day

Saturday, Oct. 26 8 a.m. Mt. Edgecumbe High School Inupiaq Dancers 8:30 a.m. Call to order. Announcements. 8:35 a.m. Guest Speaker: Thomas Barrett, president, Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. 8:45 a.m. AFN election of co-chairs 9:15 a.m. Consideration of the 2013 convention resolutions: Greg Razo, chair, members of the Resolutions Committee. Debate and voting on resolutions. 12 p.m. Alaska congressional delegation: U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski 12:30 p.m. Recess for lunch 2 p.m. Call to order. Announcements. 2:05 p.m. Presentation on Troth Yedda Park and Building: John Paul Jones, UAF 2:10 p.m. Presentation of thanks on behalf of the community of Galena 2:15 p.m. Presentation on Dr. Walter Soboleff Cultural Center: Rosita Worl, president, Sealaska Heritage Institute 2:20 p.m. AFN President’s Awards: Julie Kitka, Maude Blair, Aurora Lehr, and Ben Mallott. 3:30 p.m. Closing remarks: Lance Twitchell, assistant professor of Alaska Native languages, University of Alaska Southeast 3:45 p.m. Benediction 4 p.m. Convention adjournment

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