Issuu on Google+

Reaching EVERYbody!

Presorted Standard U.S. Postage Paid St. Joseph Newsleader St. Joseph, MN 56374 Permit No. 21 ECRWSS Postal Customer

Newsleader St. Joseph

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 Volume 23, Issue 48 Est. 1989

Town Crier

Tree lighting, caroling event tonight

The annual tree-lighting and caroling festivites, including a visit from Santa and Mrs. Claus, will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. tonight, Dec. 7 in Downtown St. Joseph. The evening will include the lighting of a 17-foot Christmas tree on the outdoor plaza of Bello Cucina (the corner of Minnesota Street and College Avenue); caroling by Kennedy Community Middle School Singers, Benedictine Sisters Schola Choir and members of the St. Joseph Church adult choir; and indoor festivities, including refreshments and gift bags, at the LaPlayette. Participants are encouraged to bring a nonperishable food item for the St. Joseph Food Shelf. For more information, call Margy Hughes at 320-249-6779.

Wacosa recycles holiday lights

Don’t throw those old holiday light sets in the garbage. Recycle them instead. WACOSA, in collaboration with the Recycling Association of Minnesota, is collecting unwanted light strings, electrical, telephone and appliance cords this holiday season. Several area businesses have collection boxes for these items that can be brought in during their regular business hours. These locations include the following: Brenny Transportation and Lee’s Ace Hardware in St. Joseph, Sentry Bank in St. Cloud and St. Joseph. For more information about the holiday light recycling program or if you would like collection bins for your business location, please call Beth at WACOSA 320-257-5182.

Photo contest promotes safe winter practices

Minnesota Department of Public Safety Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management wants to make sure Minnesotans are prepared for both outdoor and indoor hazards. HSEM sponsors an annual photo contest. Amateur photographers, adult and youth, are encouraged to take good-quality digital photos of winter nature scenes, holiday gatherings, outdoor sports and kids enjoying winter. The contest runs from now to March 1. Prizes will be given away in each category at the end of the contest. Minnesotans must remember to assemble a winter-weather-survival kit. It should include: a blanket, hat, boots, gloves, flashlight with good batteries, snacks, matches, a tin cup to melt snow for drinking water and a bright ribbon to tie on the vehicle’s antenna to alert authorities help is needed. Visit www.hsem.dps.mn.gov for more information.

Postal Patron

Cold Spring officer’s murder stuns area by Dennis Dalman news@thenewsleaders.com

Memorialized as a “brother, uncle and friend to many,” Cold Spring-Richmond police officer Thomas Decker was Decker buried with full police honors Wednesday after a funeral at St. John’s Abbey, Collegeville. Decker, 31, is the father of four children: Kelly, 8; Jade, 7; Justin, 6; and Devon, 5. Decker was murdered at 11 p.m. Nov. 29 in Cold Spring photos by Janelle Von Pinnon while attempting to check on the St. Joseph Police Officer Joel Klein diwell-being of a man who was rects traffic during the funeral procesreported to be suicidal. While sion Dec. 5 for slain Cold Spring-Richgetting out of his squad car in a mond Police Officer Thomas Decker, parking lot behind Winner’s bar, who was killed in the line of duty Nov. Decker was struck by at least 29. More than 2,300 vehicles from agencies throughout Minnesota and even from neighboring one bullet fired from a secondstates participated in the procession to show solidarity and support. The vehicles traveled side- story window above the bar. The by-side in the procession, which lasted 30 minutes. alleged shooter lived in an apartment above the bar. Decker was pronounced dead at the scene. The alleged shooter, Ryan Michael Larson, 34, was apprehended after a search in the St. Cloud Area School Dis- would like to see in the next board members, school staff, heart of the city. He remains trict 742 will hold two com- superintendent. Current Super- parents, students and commu- in Stearns County Jail and is munity input sessions Tuesday, intendent Bruce Watkins has nity members individually and expected to be charged with at Dec. 18 to help select a new served his resignation and will in focus groups in the next least one count of murder. Larsuperintendent. The first at 10 step down June 30, 2013. couple of weeks. Community son had been a student at St. a.m. at Whitney Senior Center; The input sessions are open members will also have the op- Cloud Technical College. the second at 7 p.m. at the to all staff and community mem- portunity to give confidential Officer Decker’s tragic death Apollo High School Resource bers. The District 742 Board of written feedback to the consul- shook the Cold Spring comCenter. Education has contracted with tants via the school’s website. munity and sent shock waves Community members are School Exec Connect, a super- Using this information, a profile throughout Minnesota. Flags asked to help determine chal- intendent search firm to as- of the desired skills and characwere flown at half-mast, and lenges, strengths and goals for sist with the search. A select teristics in the next superintenGov. Mark Dayton issued a statethe district as well as what group of consultants along with dent will be developed. Paper Decker • page 4 School • page 3 characteristics and skills they the search firm will meet with

Community input sessions set to select new superintendent

Caregivers share journeys during local event by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

There is no universal recipe to be a good caregiver. Everyone has his or her own flavor and style. Whether caring for a spouse, parent or friend, one of the main ingredients is remembering each is not alone. About 15 caregivers gathered Nov. 29 at the St. Joseph Community Fire Hall to learn about area resources and networking as they shared their journeys. There were tears, there was laughter and there was unity among the group. Some had taken care of loved ones for years, some had lost loved and others were there to learn

what’s needed to be a caregiver. Marjorie Henkemeyer, health and wellness minister at the Church of St. Joseph, said the presentation and gathering had three main purposes. The goal of the event was to celebrate the caregiver, provide a means to network and to share information about being a caregiver. The networking component of the day is where attendees thrived. “I think it went well,” Henkemeyer said. “They’re sharing their stories and networking. It helps to share.” St. Joseph resident Peg Walsh appreciated the information she received from the event. She is preparing to care

for her 82-year-old mother. Her mother lives in the Twin Cities so Walsh came Nov. 29 to get more information about the transition process for her mother and herself. “It was very interesting,” Walsh said. “I feel ready to get started.” In addition to the sharing of resources by organizations including the Central Minnesota Council on Aging, the Assumption Community in Cold Spring and Arise Home Health Care, nursing students from the College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University moderated a panel of caregivers. Panelists spoke about role Caregiver • page 8

www.thenewsleaders.com

photo by TaLeiza Calloway

Marjorie Henkemeyer, health and wellness minister at the Church of St. Joseph, talks about the materials included in a caregiver guide she created.

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

2

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

Local members of chorale to perform ‘A Child’s Christmas’ by Cori Hilsgen news@thenewsleaders.com

“A Child’s Christmas,” a holiday concert recalling the innocence and wonder of Christmas as seen through a child’s eyes and ears, will be performed Dec. 15 and 16 by the Great River Chorale and its musical guests at the Bethlehem Lutheran Church in St. Cloud. The concert will include traditional Christmas carols, new music and familiar songs for audiences of all ages to sing along to. The performance is centered around a musical fable featuring Brother Heinrich, a 14th century monk, and Sigismund, a donkey that ‘sings’ in the abbey choir. The Chorale’s musical guests include the Youth Chorale of Central Minnesota’s Mixed Chorale and the Con-

cert Choir of the St. Cloud State University Cantabile Girls’ Choir Program. A total of 152 people are performing in the concert, including two guest instrumentalists, a narrator, three accompanists and three ensembles. The ensembles include 42 GRC, 68 YCCM and 36 Cantabile performers. The cast of the Chorale’s 12th annual holiday concert includes Brother Paul-Vincent Niebauer of St. John’s Abbey as the narrator. Niebauer has undergraduate and graduate degrees in theater and is the theater director at St. John’s Preparatory School. Among the many performers of the GRC are Sartell residents Joe Hill, Maureen Fox-Meyer, Lori Satterness and Holli Zieske. Also performing are St. Joseph residents Nina Lasceski, Courtney Kroska

and Ethan Wittrock. Sartell resident Joe Hill said he feels privileged to be singing with GRC. “It has been a rekindled joy to be able to sing with a wonderfully talented community of musicians,” Hill said. “My children have been involved in YCCM, Cantabile and the choral program at Sartell High School. They nudged me to try out for GRC after being away from music performance for many years. The Christmas concert is a remarkable event as it showcases the voices of choirs representing multiple generations celebrating the amazing story of Christmas. I was inspired after attending the GRC Christmas concert in 2010 and (am) greatly privileged to now be a part of the experience.” Holli Zieske, another Sartell resident, is in her second year

of singing with the GRC. “Upon moving to Sartell from out of state, I was thrilled to find and then be a part of such a fine chorale group right in my own community,” Zieske said. “During the Christmas season, I’m especially excited about singing with the GRC because in my opinion, music brings the season of Christmas to life. I have no doubt members of this community will be blessed by experiencing “A Child’s Christmas” as I am in being able to sing in this concert.” St. Joseph resident Ethan Wittrock has been a member of the GRC for three years. Wittrock said he believes music helps communities to grow. “We are very fortunate in central Minnesota that our community has such a diverse range of ages and experiences among its many music en-

sembles,” Wittrock said. “I am especially grateful to be part of our Choir as it is an inter-generational blend of dedicated musicians and loyal enthusiasts. Our collaborative holiday concert brings musical groups together to renew our choral traditions and celebrate the season in a timeless way.” Founded in 2000, the GRC holds annual auditions which draw members from as far away as the Twin Cities. Members are selected based on the outcome of their individual auditions. The GRC is a community choir with the purpose of enriching the community and enhancing the cultural life of people of all ages in central Minnesota and beyond. The Cantabile Choir is in its 16th year and has 36 members. Fourth- through sixth-grade Choir • page 5

Riverbluff Christmas Tree Farm G BRINMILY FA THE FREE FOR AND R CIDE KIES! COO

HORS FREE E-D HAY RAWN SATU RIDES AND RDAYS SUND AYS!

FR TO EVEE E EVEN RY T

DOOR PRIZES!

Take I-94 to St. Augusta Exit 171, turn right on Hwy. 75, take immediate right on 255th Street. Go one mile west.

Choose and Cut Any Tree Handmade Balsam Wreaths and Swags Made Fresh Daily!

ERY Y A N EV OPE Y-SUNDsk A u FRIDa.m. - D c. 16 De 9 23 Nov.

FREE Hay Rides to see the Buffalo!

Joe Styles, DDS • 253-3146 (Home) • 363-7729 (Work)

Now Hiring! Bus Driver (Part-Time)

BEAUTY

DENTISTRY

Mary Kay Cosmetics Joyce Barnes St. Joseph 320-251-8989

Michael F. Contardo D.D.S. 26 2nd Ave. NW St. Joseph 320-363-4468

CHIROPRACTOR Dr. Jerry Wetterling 103 N. College Ave. St. Joseph 320-363-4573

Drs. Styles, Cotton & Milbert 1514 E. Minnesota St., Box 607 St. Joseph 320-363-7729

CHURCHES

DESKTOP PUBLISHING

Gateway Church

Worship: 10 a.m. Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday, 6 p.m. Saturday

Hiring a part-time bus driver to work three hours every Tuesday afternoon and also as a relief/substitute driver year round out of our Waite Park base. Relief routes are weekdays and usually for nine hours. Some routes are fixed while others are based on a dial-a-ride request. Drivers must have good driving record, Commercial Driver’s License with passenger endorsement, current medical examiner card, able to lift up to 75 pounds & pass drug/alcohol test. Tri-CAP will assist qualified candidates who have CDL Permit with road test and passenger endorsement. Complete & return Tri-CAP employment application ASAP to:

106 2nd Ave. NW St. Joseph (next to the Post Office) 320-282-2262

Tri-CAP

EYECARE

Russell Eyecare & Associates 15 E. Minnesota St., Ste. 107 Resurrection Lutheran, ELCA St. Joseph 320-433-4326 Gateway Church St. Joseph

Sunday Worship 8:30 & 11 a.m. WoW! (Worship on Wednesday) 6:30 p.m.

610 N. CR 2 St. Joseph 320-363-4232 www.rlcstjo.org St. Joseph Catholic Church Masses: Tuesday-Friday 8 a.m. Saturday 5 p.m. Sunday 8 and 10 a.m.

1210 23rd Ave. S., P.O. Box 683, Waite Park, MN 56387

Von Meyer Publishing 32 1st Ave. NW St. Joseph 320-363-7741

PLUMBING & HEATING Metro Plumbing & Heating 545 8th Ave. NE St. Joseph 320-363-7761

320-363-7505 St. Joseph www.churchstjoseph.org

Call 320-251-1612 or toll free 1-888-765-5597 or visit www.tricap.org for application. EOE/AA

Published each Friday by Von Meyer Publishing Inc.

Newstands BP Gas Station Casey’s General Store Holiday Gas Station Kay’s Kitchen

The Local Blend St. Joseph Meat Market St. Joseph Newsleader Office

Publisher/Owner Janelle Von Pinnon Editor Dennis Dalman

Contributing Writers TaLeiza Calloway Cori Hilsgen Amber Roerick

Administrative/Layout Assistant Christian Gilman

Design/Layout Tara Wiese

Advertising Sales Assistant Kathryn Bjorke

Delivery Glen Lauer

P.O. Box 324 • 32 1st Ave. N.W. • St. Joseph, Minn. 56374 Phone (320) 363-7741 • Fax (320) 363-4195 • E-mail address: news@thenewsleaders.com POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ST. JOSEPH NEWSLEADER, P.O. Box 324, St. Joseph, MN 56374.

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

C i t y s e e k s a p p l i c a n t s School for open board posts from front page

by TaLeiza Calloway news@thenewsleaders.com

Applications are now available to fill several open seats on the St. Joseph Planning Commission, Park Board and Economic Development Authority. Residents who are interested in applying can download the application on the city’s website, www.cityofstjoseph.com. The deadline to apply is Dec. 21. There are three open seats on the city’s planning commission. These seats are held by commission chairwoman Sister Kathleen Kalinowski and member Ross Rieke, whose terms expire in January; and one additional open seat, according to the city’s website. Planning

commission members serve for three years. The planning commission meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of the month at city hall. It’s an advisory board that manages city growth through implementation of the city’s comprehensive plan and zoning ordinance, according to the city’s website. The St. Joseph Park Board will also have two vacancies come January. Sharon Young and Lonnie Abbot’s terms expire next year. The five-member board is charged with helping the city provide well-maintained parks, open space and trail systems to the community. Park board members serve three-year terms and meet the fourth Monday of the month at 6:30 p.m.

MURDER

Gift Certificates!

REPORTED AT SPICER CASTLE B&B Inn in state papers. Guest suspects solve crimes during banquet often interrupted by fits of laughter.

1-800-821-6675

www.spicercastle.com $40 Friday Murder Mystery Package Discount!

"JUST KIDDING" FUN PAGE IS SPONSORED BY...

32 1st Ave. NW • P.O. Box 324 St. Joseph • 363-7741 news@thenewsleaders.com • www.thenewsleaders.com Contact Janelle for all your advertising needs!

! All new Melissa & Doug products. % OvalidFFonly 25Offer at Waite Park location. Not valid with any other offers. Expires Dec. 24, 2012.

Meetings are held at city hall. There is one opening on the EDA. The EDA is a five-member board appointed by the mayor and city council. Members meet at 5 p.m. every fourth Wednesday of the month at city hall. Board members serve for seven years. The areas of focus for the EDA include infrastructure development, business recruitment, workforce development and market development. The city contracts with Municipal Development Group for administrative services and the consultant serves as EDA director. Questions about the application process can be directed to City Administrator Judy Weyrens at 320-363-7201.

surveys are also available at any District 742 school. The position will be advertised and candidates will be recruited nationally now through Feb. 12. On Feb. 19, the Board and consultants will meet to review and select candidates to be initially interviewed. The Board will interview five or six recommended candidates on Feb. 20 and 21. On Feb. 21, the Board will narrow the field to two or three finalists. The next round of individual interviews will occur Feb. 25, 26 and 27 (if needed). Each candidate will be invited for an all-day interview process including open forums that will be available to staff, students and community members, and a final formal Board

3 interview. The Board is asking staff, students and community to provide input into the selection. You will be able to do this by participating in an open question-and-answer session with each candidate and then filling in a feedback sheet to be shared with the Board which plans to act on the new superintendent’s contract in March. Confidential feedback may be given through the St. Cloud Area School District 742 website at www.isd742.org. Select “Superintendent Search” at the bottom of the webpage to complete the online form. All replies will be confidential. Please submit feedback by Jan. 4. Please feel free to contact Toni Johns (612-309-1511), Ken Dragseth (952-210-2790), Bob Ostlund (612-308-8997), or Charlie Kyte (651-247-6505) if you have any questions regarding the search.

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

4

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

photos by Janelle Von Pinnon

At left: St. Joseph resident Darol Studer pays his respects during Cold Spring-Richmond Police Officer Thomas Decker’s funeral procession Dec. 5 at the intersection of CR 2 and I-94. Studer served in the U.S. Marine Corps for three years during the Korean Conflict. At right: Some of the more than 2,300 vehicles that participated in Decker’s funeral procession. Two police squad cars from St. Jo- from front page seph were among ment: “On behalf of the people the vehicles in the of Minnesota,” Dayton said, “I motorcade. extend my deepest sympathies to his family and to the Cold Spring Police Department for their tragic loss of an outstanding officer, father and friend.” Decker’s death brought back bad memories of two other deaths in Cold Spring – the shooting deaths of two students by a fellow student in 2003 at Rocori High School in Cold Spring. Decker graduated from that school in 2000. He had grown up on a dairy farm near St. Nicholas. Decker’s death also was a sad reminder of another police officer death – that of Brian Klinefelter, who was shot to death on Jan. 29, 1996 while making a roadside stop on Hwy. 27 in St. Joseph. His shooter was later shot to death by a police officer

Decker

in St. Cloud when the man tried to kidnap people from a house. His two companions in the car served 13 years in prison. They had previously that night robbed a liquor store in Albany. Last year, 72 police officers were shot to death in the United States. Decker’s death was the first police officer to be slain by gunfire in 2012 in Minnesota. From 1996, when Klinefelter was killed, there have been 10 Minnesota law-enforcement officers shot to death in the line of duty. A visitation was held Dec. 5 for Decker at St. Boniface Catholic Church in Cold Spring. After the St. John’s Abbey service, he was buried in the St. Nicholas Catholic Cemetery in the town where he was raised. Thousands of people, including law-enforcement officers from throughout the state, attended Decker’s funeral and the procession to the St. Nicholas Cemetery. Decker was born in St. Cloud to John and Rosella Decker. He studied law enforcement, includ-

ing at the Alexandria Vocational College law-enforcement program, then served as a police officer in Isle, Kimball and – for the last six years – for the Cold Spring-Richmond Police Department. He loved his police work, and his colleagues said he went always above and beyond the call of duty, eager to help anybody in a crisis. He liked to collect police badges and even designed some of them himself. His hobbies were fishing, hunting, traveling and playing games. When he was younger, he taught religion classes in St. Nicholas. During his police service years, he was a firearms instructor. As an officer, he received five letters of appreciation and a special commendation award for heroism. Survivors include his wife, Alicia; his four children; his parents, siblings Eddie, Larry, Terry, Billy, Shelly and Joey. He was preceded in death by a sister, Susie; and four grandparents.

Suspect in Decker slaying released Just the day before the funeral of slain police officer Thomas Decker, the man who had been arrested in connection with his murder was released from the Stearns County Jail. The news stunned everyone, including many supporters of Decker’s who were gathered outside the jail to find out if Ryan Michael Larson, 34, would remain in custody or be released. On Monday, Stearns County Attorney Janelle Kendall had asked and received permission from a judge to hold Larson in jail another day beyond the time limit. That limit passed Tuesday, and Larson was released at about noon. According to the county attorney, there was not enough evidence to continue a jail hold on Larson. Although he was released, that does not mean Larson is no longer a suspect. The investigation by many agencies is continuing. A shotgun allegedly used in the slaying has yet to be located, and police have requested all Cold Spring residents to keep an eye out for such a weapon. Larson has maintained since his arrest that he is innocent of the crime. Roofing • Siding • Gutters • Windows • Metal Roofs HAAG™ Certified Roof Inspectors for hail/wind

Don’t Miss This Opportunity!

Family Owned and Operated

COMPETITIVE WAGES & BENEFITS!

Start the New Year off RIGHT! WELDERS

Please apply at:

1131 W. Sinclair Lewis Ave. • Sauk Centre, MN 56378

320-352-6525

Or apply online at: www.std-iron.com EOE

320-257-0100

CALL FOR A FREE HOME INSPECTION OR ESTIMATE

www.jnsbuilders.com Check us out on facebook!

All shifts. Three years experience and/or Technical College Required! Looking for Mig welders, Robotic Welders and Aluminum Welders! We need experienced welders with a production welding background.

Preferred Skills: Previous manufacturing experience, strong math skills and ability to read prints.

Lic. #20594693

$

1550/mo.

Water Softener Rental Expires: 12/31/12

685-8762 | 252-1358 | www.erkenswater.com

We install hail impact-resitant shingles.

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

Choir from page 2 girls perform in the Choristers Choir and sixth- through ninth-grade girls perform in the Concert Choir. The season runs from September to May. Choristers have about four local and regional performances each year and the Concert Choir has about eight annual local, regional and national performances. Grace Jorud, a member of Cantabile, is an eighth-grade Sartell resident who is in her third year of singing with the Concert Choir. “Throughout the years of Cantabile, this particular concert has just gotten better year by year,” Jorud said. “Singing with the GRC brings energy and excitement. (It) makes me feel Christmas is getting closer and closer. The songs we sing in this concert get me even more in the Christmas spirit. The concert has become an important part – my favorite part – of my Cantabile experience. I’m really excited to see how this concert turns out.” Cantabile’s mission includes providing a rich and varied choral experience for talented young women that will challenge and help them grow musically, socially and academically. For the concert, Cantabile performers will be singing favorite pieces that

bring people together. YCCM’s director Garrett Lathe is also the choir director at Sartell High School. Lathe has been teaching in Sartell for 12 years and estimates more than 100 students from Sartell and St. Stephen have sung in YCCM, with about 20 students performing each year. In the early years, Sartell High School singers served as the core of the group. Lathe said YCCM has been practicing since Oct. 28 and will capture the imagination of the audience with a rousing Noel processional from Africa. “This is always a highlight of the YCCM Mixed Chorale’s season,” Lathe said. “Every year I’m struck by the beauty of this concert. This is something truly amazing that happens when you put 150-plus voices together spanning such a wide age range. I don’t think it’s possible to attend this concert and not be deeply affected by it.” All three choirs draw members from St. Joseph, Sartell,

5

St. Cloud and surrounding towns in central Minnesota. The GRC, directed by Mary Kay Geston, rehearses twoand-a-half hours every other week with extra rehearsals before the concert. YCCM, directed by Lathe, and Cantabile, directed by Sarah Ludwig Cohen, rehearse every week for two hours. “A Child’s Christmas” will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15 and 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16. Tickets range in price from $5 for students to $15 for adults, with a $40 total price for a family of four, and can be obtained by emailing GreatRiverChorale@gmail. com or calling (320) 515-4472. contributed photo

At right: Area choirs, including the Great River Chorale, Cantabile Girls’ Choir and Youth Chorale of Central Minnesota will perform “A Child’s Christmas” concert Dec. 15 and 16 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, St. Cloud. Performers include several Sartell and St. Joseph residents.

Mattress Outlet Twin Sets from $99 Full Pillowtop Sets from $160 Queen Pillowtop Sets from $195 King Pillowtop Sets from $350

Sofa and Sectional Sets at Unbeatable Prices!

320-348-9003

LOST CAT “Winky”

Male, neutered, white paws, white neck. Lost near our home by St. John’s University. Call 320-293-7395. JKlein1031@aol.com

w w w. j l wc h i ro. co m

Holiday Shopping Expo & Craft Fair

St. Joseph Family Chiropractic

Get back into the swing of life

Saturday, Dec. 15, 2012 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Joseph’s • 311 Blattner Drive, Avon

Lots of Crafters and Vendors! Great way to finish your holiday shopping with great stocking stuffers. Don’t forget that gift for yourself.

Walk-ins Welcome

Dr. Jerry Wetterling 363-4573 103 n. College Ave St. Joseph

6

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

Opinion Our View Use your voice, participate in community survey The quality of city services is what shapes a community. For many residents, that can be a determining factor in whether they stay in a city or move to another one. Improvement of city services is not the sole responsibility of city officials. Residents have to speak up about what works, what doesn’t and make suggestions so change can occur. After all, the services are for them. An opportunity for residents to help the city gauge city services and their efficiency is underway. The city is participating in an online survey offered by the League of Minnesota Cities to see how satisfied residents are with city services in St. Joseph. A link to the survey can be found on the city’s website, www.cityofstjoseph.com. The deadline to complete the survey is Monday, Dec. 10. The survey consists of 12 questions and covers areas that range from the condition of city streets and the appearance of the city to feeling safe in the community and the quality of trash and refuse service. This is the second time the city has participated in the survey. In 2010, the Minnesota Legislature created the “Council on Local Results and Innovation” and charged it with developing 10 performance measures for cities. Part of the legislation was for the state auditor to administer the “Performance Measurement Program” by which cities meeting the eligibility requirements would receive funding of 14 cents per capita, up to $25,000, and be exempt from levy limits if they are in effect. In order to receive the 2013 incentive payment, cities have to file a signed resolution to adopt the 10 measures with the auditor. Participating cities also need to administer the online survey that asks 12 questions. While the funding component of the survey requirement is important, it’s not what the survey is all about. Yes, in these economic times, cities need all the help they can get. However, this survey not only helps cities but allows residents to express concerns or praise for services provided to them. Some might hear the word “survey” and think, “Oh, my responses won’t matter.” Others might think, “Officials aren’t going to make changes.” Those are the wrong attitudes to have. Change can’t happen if nobody speaks up. There is also the argument that time and busy schedules won’t allow for participation in the survey. Again, change can’t happen if officials are not informed by those whom they are supposed to serve. Residents are who comprise a neighborhood or community. Officials are in office to serve the residents. Let them know how you feel about the delivery of city services – good or bad. Your voice does matter.

Fairness and ethics

Newsleader staff members have the responsibility to report news fairly and accurately and are accountable to the public. Readers who feel we’ve fallen short of these standards are urged to call the Newsleader office at 363-7741. If matters cannot be resolved locally, readers are encouraged to take complaints to the Minnesota News Council, an independent agency designed to improve relationships between the public and the media and resolve conflicts. The council office may be reached at 612-341-9357.

Respect for caregivers deepened by assignment Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter once said, “There are four kinds of people in this world: those who have been caregivers, those who currently are caregivers, those who will be caregivers and those who will need caregivers.” I learned of this quote while covering a local presentation for caregivers in St. Joseph. The event was hosted by the Church of St. Joseph in partnership with other community organizations. Caregivers are needed for family members of all ages, according to the National Family Caregivers Association. With the appropriate information and support, they can help loved ones across their lifespan. As I sat and listened to the men and women who are caring for loved ones and those who have done so previously, I thought about the caregivers in my life who I didn’t place in this category before. To me, they were doing what they had to for their loved one. Mama Burke is like a second grandmother for me and my younger sister Beverly. She lives in Ohio and was our maternal grandmother’s best friend. She is 92 years old and still lives in her home. What a blessing! She has a home health aide come in to assist her every day. She also has my aunt, who comes and

TaLeiza Calloway Reporter sits with her, prepares some of her meals and even takes her to some of her appointments. I never thought of my aunt as a caregiver. She does it because Mama Burke is family and she loves her. She, like many caregivers, didn’t take a formal class on how to care for a loved one. I’m sure these classes exist but this comes naturally for my aunt. She had to learn along the way – something many caregivers have to do. As I listened to the journeys of caregivers during the presentation, I thought about if I’d ever be strong enough to watch a loved one’s health deteriorate or stand by and witness someone losing their memory due to dementia or Alzheimer’s. One of the attendees said something I’ll never forget. She told other caregivers in the room, “People feel sorry for me,” she said. “I feel sorry for him. He’s losing himself.” The woman was speaking in reference to her husband who is living with dementia. I appreciated her perspective. This is where the learning kicked

in for me. Caregivers don’t do what they do for recognition or sympathy. They act out of love for the person they are caring for. I also learned being a caregiver can be emotionally draining on an individual and their relationships. It’s vital for caregivers to take care of themselves as they care for others. They need care too. I got a glimpse of this with a family friend in Ohio. H.J. is the middle child out of five children. He was one of three children that lived in the same state as his mother. As she aged, he stayed close by and even moved in with her when she could no longer live alone. H.J. did a lot on his own with very little and distant help. To me, he was just being a great son. Who wouldn’t care for an aging parent? He was more than a son. He was a caregiver and is the best I’ve ever seen. Personally, I gained a lot from attending the local caregiver presentation thanks to my assignment for the day as a reporter. I learned caregivers come in many forms. From daughters and sons to cousins and neighbors, they are everywhere. If I ever become a caregiver I hope I can be as strong and as dedicated as the men and women who gathered recently to share their experiences – experiences for which I learned there is no magic recipe.

Decker’s murder should remind us to be grateful for law enforcement The tragic, disturbing murder of Cold Spring-Richmond police officer Tom Decker is yet another reminder of how dangerous are the jobs of law-enforcement personnel. In Minnesota, 124 officers have been killed by gunfire since 1881, according to the “Officer Down Memorial” webpage. The cold-blooded killing of Decker was, for those who remember, a traumatic flashback to the murder of officer Brian Klinefelter, who was shot to death by a suspect he stopped on Hwy. 75 in St. Joseph. That murder occurred on Jan. 29, 1996. Since then, 10 law-enforcement officers have been killed by gunfire in Minnesota, including a woman – Melissa Jayne Schmidt, a Minneapolis officer shot to death on Aug. 1, 2002. Throughout the nation, 72 officers were shot and killed in 2011. These awful murders should remind us to appreciate and to thank the law-enforcement servants who protect us. It’s often said law enforcement is the “thin blue line” that separates public safety and security from chaos and danger. These good people truly do serve on that thin blue line. They are constantly put-

Dennis Dalman Editor ting themselves in danger, and that danger can come from the most unexpected places, such as an officer checking on the well-being of someone threatening suicide, as happened in the case of Decker’s murder. What a tragic irony it was – a police officer killed in the attempt to do a good deed, a possible intervention to get the man the help he needed. And, lest we forget, it’s not just ambush murders that happen to officers. It’s every conceivable kind of death that can happen in zones of crises and emergency situations – the very places where law officers tend to be. Law-enforcement personnel have been killed in accidents, by being struck while directing traffic, crushed in structural collapses, in accidental electrocutions and in falls from high heights. The very nature of their jobs subjects law officers to those ever-present dangers. Serious injuries and deaths, in-

cluding murders, as we know all too well, can happen anywhere – big cities and small towns and in the most remote rural areas. Every day, our police and sheriff’s officers put their lives on the line. Imagine the stress their families endure, knowing every day when daddies or mommies leave for their law-enforcement jobs, they may never see them again. And imagine the family’s horror and grief when that “knock on the door” arrives, as it did for the loved ones of Tom Decker, the 31-year-old father of four young children. We want to help honor the memory of Decker for his 10 years of service in Isle, Kimball, Richmond and Cold Spring. The kudos keep coming in about what a great officer Decker was. He always went the extra mile to help somebody in need. We also want to extend our sympathies to Decker’s family and to his many friends who will miss him so much. Decker is a good example of why we should be constantly grateful for those who put their lives on the line to protect the rest of us. They are true heroes. Let’s never forget them.

Send your opinions to: The Newsleaders • P.O. Box 324 • St. Joseph, MN 56374 or email us at news@thenewsleaders.com

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

Community Calendar

Friday, Dec. 7 “Everyday Moving and Lifting: the Powerful Way,” for seniors 55 or better, 10-11 a.m., Whitney Senior Center, St. Cloud.

Saturday, Dec. 8 Cookie Walk, 10 a.m., First United Methodist Church, 302 5th Ave. S., St. Cloud. 320-251-0804. www.fumc-stcloud.org. Firefleyes Holiday Market Place, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Boy Scout Building, 1191 Scout Drive, Sartell. There will be 40+ vendors. www.firefleyes.org. Sartell Farmers’ Market Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Sartell City Hall, 125 Pinecone Road N. Monday, Dec. 10 St. Cloud Municipal Band performs traditional favorites as well as new pieces, 7 p.m., Whitney Senior Center, St. Cloud. Tuesday, Dec. 11 Holistic Moms Network,

AUTO CASH FOR CARS. All cars/ trucks wanted. Running or not! Top dollar paid. We come to you! Any make/model. Call for instant offer. 1-800-8719134. (MFPA)

MISCELLANEOUS

7-8:30 p.m., Good Earth Co-op, St. Cloud. 320-252-2489. Wednesday, Dec. 12 St. Joseph Area Chamber of Commerce, 11:30 a.m., St. Joseph Community Fire Hall. www. stjosephchamber.com. Thursday, Dec. 13 St. Joseph Action Group, 7 p.m., American Legion, St. Joseph. 363-7666. Friday, Dec. 14 St. Joseph Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m., Resurrection Lutheran Church, Fellowship Hall, 610 North County Road 2, St. Joseph. www.stjosephfarmersmarket.com

MISCELLANEOUS Highspeed Internet EVERYWHERE by Satellite! Speeds up to 12 mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.) Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW & GO FAST! 1-866-796-2843 (MFPA)

MISCELLANEOUS GOLD AND SILVER CAN PROTECT YOUR HARD EARNED DOLLARS. Learn how by calling Freedom Gold Group for your free educational guide. 877-371-2354. (MFPA)

HEALTH

WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001-present? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (MFPA)

ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP replacement supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all; prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888859-7796. (MFPA)

TELEVISION

MISCELLANEOUS

DIRECTV for $29.99/mo. for 24 months. Over 140 channels. FREE HD DVR Upgrade! FREE NFL Sunday Ticket w/ CHOICE Package! Call TODAY for details 888-709-7533 (MFPA)

EVER CONSIDER a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & increase cash flow! Safe & effective! Call now for your FREE dvd! Call now 888-562-4751 (MFPA)

HEALTH

GENERAL HELP WANTED

CANADA DRUG CENTER is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail-order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90% on all your medication needs. Call today. 888-485-1568 for $25 off your first prescription and free shipping. (MFPA)

HELP WANTED! Make up to $1,000 a week mailing brochures from home! Free supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001. Genuine opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately. www.themailing-usa.com. (VOID IN SD) (MFPA)

LEGAL NOTICE CASE TYPE: MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE BY ACTION

LINE OF SAID TWENTY-TWO, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN AND EIGHT TENTHS FEET TO A POINT ON THE SHORELINE OF LAKE AUGUSTA; THENCE, ALONG SHORELINE SOUTH 78 DEGREES 37 MINUTES EAST FIFTY FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES WEST TWO HUNDRED NINE AND TWO TENTHS FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH LINES OF SAID LOT TWENTY-TWO; THENCE, ALONG SAID NORTH LINE, NORTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST THIRTY-TWO AND FIVE TENTHS FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING EASTERLY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LINE; BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT WW, SAID POINT BEING SOUTH 67 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST THIRTYTWO AND FIVE TENTHS (32.5) FEET FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT; THENCE SOUTH FOUR DEGREES 39 MINUTES 10 FEET WEST TO THE SHORT OF LAKE AUGUSTA AND SAID LINE THERE TERMINATING. (“Property”)

USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIONS, AND ARE ABANDONED.

The time allowed by law for redemption by the mortgagor or mortgagor’s personal representatives or assigns is six (6) months after the date of sale.

John Sanner Sheriff of Stearns County, Minn.

REAL PROPERTY IN STEARNS COUNTY, MINN., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THAT PART OF LOT TWENTY-TWO OF COE’S AUGUSTA SHORES, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION ELEVEN TOWNSHIP ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE NORTH, RANGE TWENTYEIGHT WEST, STEARNS COUNTY, MINN., DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE NORTH

THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY

REEP LAW OFFICE, PLLC John D. Reep, Attorney Attorney Registration #0197385 Attorney for Plaintiff 919 W. St. Germain St., Suite 2000 St. Cloud, Minn. 56301 (320) 255-8845

AUTO

ADVERTISING

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT! Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-day vacation. Tax deductible. Free towing. All paperwork taken care of. 888-472-9219. (MFPA)

TO INVESTIGATE OTHER ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES Call PaperChain at 931922-0484 or e-mail info@ paperchain.com. (MFPA)

STATE OF MINNESOTA COUNTY OF STEARNS DISTRICT COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT FILE NO. 73-CV-122949 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE UNDER JUDGMENT AND DECREE State Farm Bank, FSB, Plaintiff, vs, Unknown heirs of Ida A. Hawkins, deceased; Pamela C. Washington, Bertram P. Hawkins, Lynn M. Hawkins, also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, estate, interest or lien in the real estate described in the complaint herein, Defendant. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of a Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order for Judgment entered in the above entitled action on Oct. 22, 2012, a certified copy of which has been delivered to me directing the sale of the premises hereinafter described to satisfy the amount found and adjudged due to said Plaintiff in the above entitled action from Defendant, as prescribed in the Order, the undersigned Sheriff of Stearns County, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, on Dec. 19, 2012, at 10 a.m., at the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office, Law Enforcement Center, 807 Courthouse Square, St. Cloud, Minn. 56301, said county and state, the premises and real estate, lying and being in the County Stearns, State of Minnesota, described in said of Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order for Judgment, to-wit:

TELEVISION

Are you looking for a lap cat who can also entertain himself? Momo is a 4-year-old neutered white cat with patches of brown tabby here and there. His interests include lap warming, playing with toy mice and investigating the great mystery of sink faucets. In his past environment, Momo happily befriended his owner’s new baby as well as the resident dog. Momo qualifies for the “Name your own price” cat sale and would also be a candidate for the “Free cat for seniors” promotion. “Helping one animal won’t change the world … but it will change the world for that one animal!” Dogs - 18 Puppies - 2 Rabbit - 1

Cats - 27 Kittens - 19

Parakeets - 12 Fancy Mice - 8

Tri-County Humane Society 735 8th St. NE • PO Box 701 St. Cloud, MN 56302

252-0896

www.tricountyhumanesociety.org

Hours: Monday-Thursday Noon-6 p.m., Friday Noon-8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. & Sunday Noon-5 p.m.

7

DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 premium movie channels FREE for 3 months! SAVE! & ask about SAME DAY installation! Call - 888-379-7065. (MFPA)

MISCELLANEOUS WRAP UP YOUR HOLIDAY SHOPPING with 100 percent guaranteed delivered-to-thedoor Omaha steaks! SAVE 68 percent plus two FREE gifts - 26 Gourmet Favorites ONLY $49.99. ORDER Today 1-877356-2704 use code 45069SQM or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ fvc70 (MFPA)

REAL ESTATE PLAT BOOKS with 911 addresses, legal descriptions. Stearns County. Other counties available by order. Available at the Newsleaders, 32 1st Ave. NW, St. Joseph. Regular price $40; $30 spiral bound. NO REFUNDS. tfn-f

CLASSES MUSIC LESSONS FOR ALL AGES! Find a music teacher! TakeLessons offers affordable, safe, guaranteed music lessons with teachers in your area. Our pre-screened teachers specialize in singing, guitar, piano, drums, violin and more. Call 1- 888-687-0047! (MFPA)

IF PART OF THE PROPERTY TO BE SOLD CONTAINS YOUR HOUSE, YOU MAY DESIGNATE AN AREA AS A HOMESTEAD TO BE SOLD AND REDEEMED SEPARATELY. YOU MAY DESIGNATE THE HOUSE YOU OCCUPY AND ANY AMOUNT OF THE PROPERTY AS A HOMESTEAD. THE DESIGNATED HOMESTEAD PROPERTY MUST CONFORM TO THE LOCAL ZONING ORDINANCES AND BE COMPACT SO THAT IT DOES NOT UNREASONABLY REDUCE THE VALUE OF THE REMAINING PROPERTY. YOU MUST PROVIDE THE PERSON FORECLOSING ON THE PROPERTY, THE SHERIFF, AND THE COUNTY RECORDER WITH A COPY OF THE LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF THE HOMESTEAD YOU HAVE DESIGNATED BY TEN BUSINESS DAYS BEFORE THE DATE THE PROPERTY IS TO BE SOLD. Property Address: 2575 Arrowwood Road, South Haven, Minn. 55382. Dated: Oct. 25, 2012

By Scott Romstad Deputy Sheriff

THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published: Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 and Dec. 7

WANTED TO BUY WANTED: ALL MOTORCYCLES & MEMORABILIA PRE1980. Running or not. Top cash paid. 845-389-3239 (MFPA)

MISCELLANEOUS MASSIVE CASH. Returning phone calls, No Selling. TAXFREE, for proof leave message. Great telephone support and training daily. 641-7153900, ext. 45510# (MFPA) REACH NEARLY 1 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS! Do you have a product, service, or business that would be helped by reaching nearly 1 million households throughout Minnesota? The Minnesota Classified Network will allow you to reach these potential customers quickly and inexpensively. For more information concerning a creative classified ad call this publication or Minnesota Classified Network at 800-866-0668. (MFPA)

St. Joseph Newsleader • www.thenewsleaders.com

8

Caregiver from front page reversal, relinquishing care of a loved one and the grieving process. Dianne DeVargas spoke about the reversing of roles when her father’s health began to fail. While she was growing up, her father led the household. She eventually took on a leadership role to aide her mother. “My mother did the cooking and the cleaning,” DeVargas said. “It was a male-dominated household. (All of a sudden) I had to explain what was happening to my father to my mother. She was used to him telling her things.” Vince DeVargas said when someone devotes his or her life to the emotional care of another person, adaptability is essential. The best advice, he said, is to read all documentation pertaining to your loved one, talk to your loved one, doctors and other family members and learn as much as you can about what being a caregiver means. Vince and Dianne helped care for Vince’s mother. He said he is grateful for his wife’s

of eyeglasses

$

199!

support and vice versa. “If you’re independent and become a caregiver, it changes your life,” DeVargas said. “Caring for a parent is difficult. Your parent is your parent. Even if you’re 70 years old, your mother is your mother and you’re the kid.” St. Joseph resident Sheila Dodge shared her struggle with allowing others to care for her mother. It was a transition for both she and her mother, she told attendees. “I thought I was the only one who could take care of my mom,” Dodge said. “I had to convince her that it’s OK to ask for help.” Dodge’s mother happily lives in Arlington Place in St. Joseph. It can be hard to share personal stories about one’s family, especially about those who have passed on. One thing attendees walked away with from the event was a feeling of knowing each is not alone. Henkemeyer closed the gathering by sharing a holiday caregiver recipe. Main ingredients include an apple a day for health, supportive friends and family and a rubber-band to stay flexible.

St. Joseph Plumbing, Heating and Irrigation We Specialize in Service & Sales • • • • •

Underground Sprinkler Systems Water Softeners Water Heaters Heating Systems Central Air

Nick Froehle, Owner 320-363-7224

(Out of Area) 888-303-7224

Attention Educators!

25%

Receive OFF your frames and lenses

ea We ar Tots or Toys f-off site! drop

through December!

End of the year is near, don’t forget to use your flex benefits! “Like” us on Facebook for exclusive deals and updates!

Russell Eyecare & Associates

15 E. Minnesota St., Suite 107, St. Joseph (320) 433-4326 www.russelleyecare.com

Christie Russell-Villnow, O.D.

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012

photo by TaLeiza Calloway

Caregivers gather Nov. 29 at the St. Joseph Community Fire Hall to share their experiences caring for loved ones. St. Joseph residents Sheila Dodge, Lori Pfannenstein and Dianne and Vince DeVargas served as panelists during the event.


St. Joseph V23 I48