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Midtown’s

worst

nightmare see Editor’s Note, page 28

futurE of sacramento’s river-party scene is more than just bros and babes gone wild. It’s an industry, a brand—and a nightmare for law enforcement.

health care see frontlines, page 5

sac’s busiEst new restaurant see Dish, page 33

the Ol’ “lOSt cellPhONe leaDS tO SteaMY aFFaIr trIcK,” eh? see ask Joey, page 37

vote now! s e e pa g e 2 8 Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 24, iSSue 19

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thurSday, auguSt 23, 2012

OR O TD ER U O NT U LE S CE B NT ENT O M EV

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B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

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Midtown’s worst nightmare

When I wrote the headline “Battle for Midtown continues” on a news report from last Thursday’s issue, I never imagined that, days later, I’d be reading about an actual gang shootout on the same block featured in my story. But now, the “battle” is more than just a feud between residents and the city’s late-night bars and clubs. Now, there’s a victim: Joseph A. Long, who found himself early Saturday morning at the wrong place, a parking lot near 28th and J streets, at the wrong time, 12:35 a.m. The deadly crossfire of two idiot crews playing gangbanger killed the 32 year old. A Midtowner’s worst nightmare. Long’s shooting, of course, elicits memories of Second Saturday in September 2010: I was on another popular Midtown street corner, 20th and J, just after midnight, when gunshots silenced the block. I sprinted toward cop cars’ flashing lights, then saw Victor Hugo Perez Zavala lying motionless on the sidewalk. (By chance, just weeks before Zavala’s murder, I’d written my original “Battle for Midtown” SN&R story.) So, Midtown, where do we go from here? I won’t jump into the blame-game fray. But city police and the Sutter Business Improvement Area—which works with the bars, restaurants and clubs on J Street’s 2700 block and already spends a whopping 40 percent of its annual budget on security— need to try something new. Whether patrons are to blame or not for this shooting, the strip has seen too many brawls and fights this summer. Residents, meanwhile, are using Long’s death as occasion to push even harder for disbanding the block’s boozy party scene. But they should be wary of pinning the shootout on the bars. It’s the guns. It’s the guns. It’s the guns. I have no solutions. But, as a Midtowner who was walking home late Saturday night, I’m worried. —Nick Miller

n ic kam@ n ews r ev i ew . com

HAY Y N B O I RAT T S U ILL

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August 23, 2012 | Vol. 24, Issue 19

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07 09 12 17 19 20 26 30 34 37 38 40 43 59

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NEWS GREEN DAYS OPINION FEATuRE STORY ARTS&CuLTuRE NIGHT&DAY DISH ASK JOEY STAGE FILM MuSIC 15 MINuTES bites will be on vacation the rest of august. sound advice is taking the week off.

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writer Raheem F. Hosseini Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Kel Munger Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Editorial Interns Kate Paloy, Sarah Vorn, Amy Wong Contributors Sasha Abramsky, Christopher Arns, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Becky Grunewald,

Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Kiefer, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello

Director of First Impressions Jeff Chinn Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert

Website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Brennan Collins, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Art Directors-at-large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn

Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Rosemary Babich, Josh Burke, Vince Garcia, Dusty Hamilton, April Houser, Cathy Kleckner, Dave Nettles, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinator Melissa Bernard Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Managing Editor Kendall Fields Client Publications Writer/Copy Editor Michael Blount Sales Coordinators Shawn Barnum, Rachel Rosin

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

FRONTLINES

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F E AT U R E

STORY

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Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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LETTERS

cover illustration by John malta

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Copyright © UC Regents, Davis campus, 2012. All Rights Reserved.

WHAT DO YOU SEE? We see a child who deserves the best medical care. You see world leaders in children’s emergency medicine. With the region’s only level 1 pediatric trauma center and emergency department dedicated to children, UC Davis is the place for children needing emergency medical care. Here, experts specially trained in pediatric emergency medicine understand the nuances of caring for critically ill or injured children and are setting new standards for pediatric emergency care worldwide. If it’s your child, UC Davis is where you want to be. To learn more, visit YouSeeTheFuture.UCDavis.edu. For more information, call 800-2-UCDAVIS.

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6   |   SN&R   |   08.23.12

STREETALK

“My sister won a free wedding from a bridal fair … and it is a flash-mob wedding.”

Asked at Westfield Galleria at Roseville:

Describe your party from hell:

Nicole Frieholz

Emily Robles

retail worker

The worst party I ever had was actually my 29th birthday. ... I had invited some friends of mine over and everything. My downstairs neighbors complained. We didn’t have any music going, but they have it against us, because I have a child that stomps around upstairs, so we canceled it. Everyone had to leave.

student

[I’m] anticipating a party from hell. My sister won a free wedding from a bridal fair, and she agreed to all of these different terms, and it is a flash-mob wedding. She is concerned that she is [not] going to have enough people in the flash mob to make it really great.

student and river guide

I went to a sleepover party where I didn’t know the girl real well. ... Her brother ... was kicking us and pushing us. ... There was a creepy guest there who was someone’s boyfriend who told us if we weren’t quiet, he would kick our heads in. … I ended up calling my mom to come pick me up. It was probably the worst party ever.

Kelvin Fountano

Chelsea Lewallen

Brian Dansereau

Ellie Casey

stay-at-home mom

hairdresser

My party from hell would [be to] have to spend the evening with a bunch of liberals doing a fundraiser. The conversation would be no fun.

sales associate

A party from hell is having a good time and people coming from out of town starting a huge riot in the entire party, and SWAT is in the front yard knocking on the door. Everyone is trying to calm everyone down, and it’s not working. So that is my party from hell.

My party from hell was my 20th class reunion. I think it was because of the great expectations of a great friendly environment of people who hadn’t seen each other in 20 years. It turned out to be one of the most boring events I had ever been to in my life.

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T1600-12-148

LETTERS

Visit us at www.newsreview.com or email sactoletters @ newsreview.com

Midtowner speaks up about booze

FIRST SHOT SN&R photo of the week PHOTO BY SALVADOR OCHOA

Re “Battle for Midtown continues” by Nick Miller (SN&R Frontlines, August 16): So what, exactly, are BarWest and its patrons doing for Midtown? Miller says “a few things,” then only mentions hiring private security. [The California Department of] Alcoholic Beverage Control notes that our census area has an undue concentration of alcohol licenses. There is clear evidence relating undue concentration to community costs. Undue concentration effects community safety and stability. That is unarguable. Miller also repeats the allegation that opposition to undue conLETTER OF centration of alcohol venues in Midtown is a small but vocal group THE WEEK and implies that the “cranky neighbors” either have no right to complain or are unrepresentative. He—and others—have cited no data for the assertion that “thousands of others” are in support of undue concentration. He goes on to assert that BarWest’s owner may be “the future [face] of Midtown,” implying that those opposed need to step aside. With all that said, let me ask whether Miller came to tell a story, or to sell a readymade opinion rebuking opposition to the vision of Midtown as an alcohol-based “adultentertainment” district where those opposed to that vision—and those who live with its negative consequences—need to step aside or be silent? Thomas Wendel Sacramento

Chick-fil-A tolerance—or McDonald’s Re “Chick-fil-A change from within” by Ben Phillips-Leseñana (SN&R Guest Comment, August 16): Ben Phillips-Leseñana seems to be for tolerance when it comes to his beliefs, but not for others and their beliefs. The CEO of Chick-fil-A stated that it was his personal religious belief that marriage is between one man and one woman. The First Amendment guarantees that right. If Phillips-Leseñana does not like his beliefs and just cannot get past it, he should go to McDonald’s. But trying to force someone to change their personal religious beliefs because you do not agree is wrong. Phillips-Leseñana should try a little harder to be the righteous, tolerant person that he seems to think he is. But if he cannot, McDonald’s is awaiting him. Dennis Johnson Woodland

Juvenile BDSM experiment Re “50 shades of Sacramento” by Josh Fernandez (SN&R Feature Story, August 9): I can’t believe this article not only made the cover, but was even published in SN&R. One, the author couldn’t have been more juvenile in his “experiment” with the dom-sub culture. Second, I don’t feel like enough “research” was done on the author’s part. In attempting to make comparisons with a wildly popular “erotic” trilogy, it may have been wiser to have it come from a female’s perspective. I’ve talked to a lot more people in this subculture and have gotten a completely different perspective

BEFORE

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from what was portrayed in this article, and I have had very little dom-sub experiences. As someone who is actually curious about this subculture of society, it would have been nice to read a serious article about how a true dom-sub relationship is. If it was meant to be a funny piece, it definitely fell flat.

Beau Sisemore, Travis Spear, and Mike Spear enjoy a less wild American River this past weekend. Read Raheem F. Hosseini’s “Rage over trouble water” for a closer look at the river’s party scene.

D.W. Fair Oaks

Here’s a new proposal for you. The day that Bethlehem and Ashkelon declare each other “sister cities” and bury that hatchet we’re all sick and tired of, then Sacramento can proudly become the American leg of the three-legged stool! Your silly and cynical contention that we can’t—we can!— easily find another city in the world that is admired for embracing all its citizens is easily swept aside. We can even find one whose members will not try to draw us into their interminable, unacceptable and sordid embrace of intolerance for the other.

Less cool-guy snark Re “50 shades of Sacramento” by Josh Fernandez (SN&R Feature Story, August 9): It would have been nice to skip the cool-guy snark and have a serious discussion of the emotional and psychological elements involved in [bondage, discipline and sadomasochism] and the people who practice it. I suspect that Josh Fernandez, having allowed himself to be spanked until it obviously hurt, could have gone a little deeper into what motivates such an act, rather than just playing games with words.

Sports do us all good Re “Zen of sports” by Todd Walton (SN&R Essay, August 9): It sounds as if Walton’s neighbor doesn’t understand the role that sports has played in human history, and that it is not mutually exclusive from social justice. As the [Olympic Games] played out in London, does he not see what athletes from the developing world mean to their countries? Does he not understand that Jesse Owens won something more than a footrace? Is he saying that Hank Greenberg, Jackie Robinson and Ichiro Suzuki meant nothing? From the ancient Olympians of Greece to Native American stickball games, sports and recreation are vital components of culture and history and provide ultimately superior ways to channel humanity’s more aggressive and competitive instincts.

No sisterhood until they act like sisters Re “No sisterly love” by Christopher Arns (SN&R Frontlines, August 9): Does Councilman Steve Cohn represent the Jewish Federation [of the Sacramento Region] or the city of Sacramento? Why did he do this to Sacramento, with his patently dumb 2009 resolution to placate one ethnic group by adding “their” sister city because they didn’t like the other group’s city? What about the Greeks, the Sikhs and the Swedes, and all the rest of us who call Sacramento (first and foremost) our home? Where does it end, Steve?

FEATURE

STORY

James May Sacramento

Greg Hill Sacramento

Jan Kline Sacramento

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I’m not saying that Mr. Walton’s neighbor isn’t right to lament some of the “bread and circuses” aspects of our modern-day corporate-sports structure, but he’s missing a chance to communicate his ideas to others using sports as a common currency that cuts across ethnic and class lines. It also sounds like Mr. Walton’s neighbor needs to get off his high horse and understand that sports are a component result of the peace and prosperity he is fighting for.

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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08.23.12     |   SN&R     |   11

PHOTO BY ANNE STOKES

FRONTLINES

Secretary Diana S. Dooley, leader of the California Health and Human Services Agency, says the Affordable Care Act is all about designing incentives to move away from a fee-for-service system and towards a “whole-team” approach to healthcare.

HERE COMES

HEALTH CARE SN&R chats with state health Secretary Diana S. Dooley about the rollout of the Affordable Care Act

by JEFF VONKAENEL

jeffv@newsreview.com

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E

arlier this month, SN&R CEO Jeff vonKaenel sat down for a wide-ranging conversation with Secretary Diana S. Dooley, leader of the California Health and Human Services Agency. The former head of the California Children’s Hospital Association is a key figure in the state’s much-anticipated installment of the Affordable Care Act, a sweeping attempt to reform and improve America’s existing health-care system. The following is an edited version of a much longer conversation.

Jeff vonKaenel: I heard you give a speech around a year ago about the rollout of the Affordable Care Act, and you said, “We first need to recognize that the current system is broken.” Do you think we’re there yet? Diana S. Dooley: I think there is recognition now that the system isn’t working. There’s agreement that health care costs too much, it isn’t accessible and that we have too many uninsured. But how you fix it on the ground is going to be a huge challenge. From a cost standpoint, every dime that is spent on

health care is in somebody’s pocket, and nobody is going to reach into their own pocket and pull out those dimes and give them to anybody. So, the change is going to be a dislocation of certain practices.

Many people have a negative reaction to the idea of managed care. I said from the day I stepped into this job that I thought one of the biggest challenges to implementing health-care reform was going to be changing the way people think about managed care. In the 1990s, managed care became HMOs—health-maintenance organizations. Even crossword puzzles put in: “Who denies your care? HMOs.” So, managed care has a very bad connotation, because it is perceived to be denying care. Actually, managing care is more like having advice nurses, having social workers come to your house to look for ways you can remodel to avoid falls, reduce injuries and illnesses. That is managing care. But the Affordable Care Act was built on a private economic model. It was built with the insurance companies and the doctors and the

Monsanto, but for kids? See GREEN DAYS

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17

See AN INCONVENIENT RUTH

On Romney’s taxes See ESSAY

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19

K.J.’s secrets

See EDITORIAL

Home sweet mall See EDITORIAL

19

BEATS

Tamale lady stays hospitals and everybody staying as they are—in a private as opposed to a singlepayer government-run program. Our current system is fundamentally a feefor-service one. … It’s all about volume. It is piecework, basically—you get paid by procedure, you get paid by office visit, you get paid by diagnostic test, you get paid by device sold. So, creating incentives to change that private economy in ways that lead to the coordination of care instead of paying for volume through the fee-for-service system is a heavy lift. But that is what we are trying to do as we prepare for 2014 [when most changes should have taken place].

I’ve heard you talk about it as a three-legged stool. One leg of the stool is coverage? Yes, the essence of the Affordable Care Act deals with coverage, ensuring the uninsured. I think it is much better understood now that those who are paying for heath insurance are also paying for those that don’t have it through the cost of their premiums. Those hidden costs are not so hidden anymore. People recognize that it is like no-fault auto insurance, where everybody has to have it. A second leg of the ACA is this issue of delivery reform and aligning incentives in ways that can reduce costs. And the third leg is prevention—all of the wellness and prevention. Those are the three big pieces of the Affordable Care Act.

Does California have a better chance of getting this going than other states, such as Texas or Florida? We are further along in a lot of ways. So, I think if it is going to succeed anywhere, California has the best chance. For one thing, health care hasn’t been as polarized here from a partisan standpoint. The previous governor was a Republican, and he proposed health-care reform that almost passed the California Legislature, and almost all of its elements are in the ACA. … So, California not being as politically polarized around health care is a significant difference. Having the exchange established in law [where individuals can purchase health insurance eligible for federal subsidies] has given us the leg up on getting it going. In the year-and-a-half that we have been in office, we have made great investments. We have received over $40 million from the federal government for the exchange; we just made another $196 million application, most of which will go to build an [information-technology] system that will integrate

BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

Walmarts and Walgreens around primary care and care management with diabetes and asthma, and some of the conditions that are expensive because they require a lot of management.

our eligibility and enrollment processes in California.

The total number of Californians who do not have health insurance is about 6 million. In crude numbers, the Affordable Care Act will wind up with about 4 million new people coming into the system, correct?

So, I guess we’re on to the second leg of the stool?

Yes, roughly, and over a five-year window, from 2014 to 2019.

We have a shortage of general practitioners. How are we going to deal with this mass increase of people coming into the system? That is where we are going to have to manage the care in a different way. We are going to look to physician “extenders”— people who are trained in the medical field but aren’t physicians, like nurses, techs, pharmacists, social workers … a wholeteam approach to care. The physician will be the captain of the team, but all of the care won’t be provided by physicians; there aren’t enough of them.

“The Affordable Care Act is designed to improve the system that we already have. It is not revolutionary. … It is designed to create incentives to move away from paying for volume to paying for value.” Diana S. Dooley But … I think we also need to seriously look at some scope-of-practice issues, since there are many professionals who have training that our licensing process doesn’t allow them to use. Pharmacy is a good example. Pharmacists are highly trained, and yet have very little opportunity under the licensing laws to actually provide advice. They do their pharmacy calculations, but there are a lot of services that I think could be provided in Rite Aids and

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FEATURE

STORY

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement will not deport Juana Reyes for selling tamales outside of a south Sacramento Walmart. Many know Reyes as “the tamale lady,” who was cited by a sheriff’s deputy with misdemeanor trespassing and taken into custody on June 28, after Walmart security asked her three times to stop selling her eats in the mega-chain’s parking lot. Yes, tamales. Reyes spent nearly two weeks in Sacramento County jail waiting on her trespass charge—without access to an attorney and with her two elementary-school-age children in foster care—before her two-day ICE hold commenced. Outrage over Reyes’ case went national: Critics argued that she shouldn’t have been cited in the first place, let alone locked up in downtown’s jail for a misdemeanor. The community rallied in Reyes’ defense, including local attorney Julia Vera, who took on Reyes’ case pro bono. Vera argued that Reyes—who has been in the country nearly 16 years, has had no prior run-ins with law enforcement and boasts strong ties to the local community—was eligible to have her case dropped. And last week, it was. (Nick Miller)

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Yes. It involves reforming the payment and delivery of care. It involves creating incentives for these elements to be aligned for the payers—both from the insurance companies and those who are paying premiums to the insurance companies. There will be changes in the structure of plans in terms of co-pays and deductibles—and getting patients to have skin in the game, as they say in the business.

I assume there are entrenched people and forces at work that are going to make all of this very difficult? Well, I think that the conditions are going to force some things that we couldn’t do in another environment. But everybody wants to protect [his or her] own. Everybody’s got a margin. As I say, this is a private-market model that we are looking at. … Everybody is making money in health care. All of your economic stories say that it’s the only growth industry; it’s the only category where employment is expanding. … Health care is an economic engine. So, I am not addressing the rightness or wrongness. I did enjoy, however, the opening ceremonies at the Olympic Games … with the emphasis on the National Health Service. I felt like it was just a tweak to America. (Laughs.)

Thanks, Mitt! Well, I mean, here they were on the world stage talking about how fabulous the National Health Service is—and it’s roundly criticized in this country. But that is sort of on the side, because it is a private-market economy in health care in this country. Managing it and creating the right incentives within a market economy is the opportunity that we have.

Let’s talk about the exorbitant amount that specialists are being paid compared to the amount general practitioners are paid. No health-care analyst thinks it makes any sense, and it is leading to incredibly dumb outcomes. How do we change it? Remember what I said at the very beginning—that every dime is in somebody’s

A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

Davis does Tahoe Earlier this month, the Tahoe Environmental Research Center at UC Davis released “Tahoe: State of the Lake Report 2012.” This annual report highlights factors impacting the lake, including its “clarity, physics, chemistry and biology.” The report’s UC Davis authors specifically discussed the unusual winter of 2010-11, noting its low temperatures and high precipitation. But the average Lake Tahoe water temperature increased by 0.6 degrees Farenheit, indicating a change in the lake’s infrastructure. Scientists then tested the lake’s stability and found that stratification—separate levels of water with different temperatures—lasted longer than usual, indicating a potential impact of climate change. In 2010, clarity improved—but then fluctuated in 2011; the report says that algae Cyclotella might be the cause. In 1968, clarity was 102.4 feet. The lowest level in 2011, the secondworse recorded, was 51.5 feet. The report also discusses present and future research projects. Scientists are investigating surrounding areas of the lake, including a study done on the impact of the 2007 Angora fire, which was shown to have no effect on the water. Others are looking at the mortality of trees in the Tahoe forests. (Ashley Hennefer)

Fire—er, no fire! Sacramento Fire Department can’t afford for people to cry wolf anymore. Which is why the city council was scheduled this past Tuesday, August 21, to hear a proposed new ordinance that would establish fines and fees for businesses and residents who repeatedly set off false fire alarms. The city staff report notes that nearly 3,000 false alarms were sounded in 2011, most of which result because of lack of maintenance on fire-alarm systems. One unnamed location even set off 38 last year. Fine and fee amounts have yet to be determined; the ordinance could save the city upward of $300,000 annually. (N.M.) |

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FRONTLINES

Encounter God & Come Alive Spiritually

“HERE COMES HEALTHCARE” continued from page 13

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pocket, and getting those dimes out of those pockets is not going to be easy?

So, how do we take that $50,000 out of the specialist’s pocket and put it over into the general practitioner’s pocket?

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We are not. We are not going to do that. I don’t see a way in the world to do that. I think what we have to do is change the trends—they talk about bending the curve. We are not going to go backward in health-care costs: They are going to continue to increase. But they can’t increase at the rate that they have been increasing in the past. … We have got to do things differently and not let the top increase at the rate that it has been increasing. And then bring it closer by actually increasing the pay and

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What about end-of-life decisions? We have 40 percent of Medicare funding going to people in the last two months of their lives. With hospice and other options, it seems there is a real possibility for better outcomes and cost savings in this area. Well, this is a very sensitive subject for government to discuss. It is very much in the academic conversation around medicine and a provision of care. But when, in the debate around the Affordable Care Act, it was suggested that there be a Medicare rate code for a 15-minute [physician] consultation on advanced illness— that turned into “death panels.” I mean, the storm in August 2009 around death panels resulted from a simple provision that would have

“We are going to look to physician ‘extenders’—people who are trained in the medical field but aren’t physicians, like nurses, techs, pharmacists, social workers … a whole-team approach to care.” Diana S. Dooley incentives of the less expensive doctors consulting with their patients providers, so that you are providing about advanced directives and what more home care, for example. You are called POLST, the Physician are creating opportunities—and we Orders for Life-Sustaining have been doing this in the MediTreatment. But there is no code in E W S &the R E V I E W B UMedicare S I N E S S for U S Ethat, O Nso L Y that time that Cal program and Nthrough DESIGNER ACCT. In-Home Supportive Services pro-ISSUE DATE they spend withEXEC. the patient having 06.18.09 REM is not billable to gram—so that we helpALpeople that conversation manage their ownFILE care NAME and stay in Medicare. REV. DATE TRINITYCATHEDRAL061809R1 02.19.09 their own home and avoid the It’s nearly impossible to have this expensive hospitalization. USP (BOLD SELECTION) conversation in the political environwe exist in today. But it is PRICE / ATMOSPHERE ment / EXPERT / UNIQUE happening in churches, in homes. … Can’t you just go, “Look, we are CAREFULLY YOUR TheREVIEW sensitivity in talking about how paying you $700,000 toPLEASE be a heart ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THEtoFOLLOWING: we want live and how we want to surgeon, but, frankly, I think you AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) stop living is always going to be can make it on $400,000.” SPELLING After there.

all, we have 40,000NUMBERS Americans who & DATES are dying, becauseCONTACT they don’t have INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, Let’s move toETC.) the third leg of the health-care insurance. AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED stool—prevention and wellness.

Right. I don’t knowAPPROVED how to doBY: that. I don’t disagree with what you’re positing. And certainly, there were strong advocates for single-payer or some other more dramatic way to reform the system. But it didn’t succeed. Our political system drives the decisions—there is no one person paying that physician the $700,000 who can say, “I will only pay you $400,000.” 14

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The governor signed an executive order in May for the “Let’s Get Healthy [California]” Task Force. I made the appointments, we had our first meeting in June, and we will finish in the middle of December. And the goal is to come up with a 10-year blueprint for how to make

California the healthiest place in the nation and what the steps are to do that. There are about 45 members of the task force and a group of expert advisers. One of the reasons I created the task force was because in the first year-and-a-half that I have been in this office, I have been absolutely overwhelmed—sometimes excited, but mostly overwhelmed—by how many good ideas there are out there. There is so much going on in schools and with employers in work places ... they are walking, they are putting better food in the cafeterias. So, part of the goal of the “Let’s Get Healthy [California]” Task Force is to set some metrics and some goals, but also to assemble these good ideas and try to put them in one place. … I mean, there are thousands of ideas of how people can be empowered to take charge.

If you had a final minute here to summarize where health-care reform is going in California, what would you say? The Affordable Care Act is designed to improve the system that we already have. It is not revolutionary—it is built on a market that is a private-sector provision of care, it is built on fairness where everybody uses health care, so everybody has to pay something for health care. And it is designed to create incentives to move away from paying for volume and toward paying for value. The elements of the act when identified separately almost always poll very high, but it is so heavily charged with the partisan political atmosphere that is difficult to get to the truth about what the provisions actually are. But covering the uninsured, letting young adults stay on their parents’ health plans, banning insurance companies from denying care to people with pre-existing conditions, requiring 85 percent of the premium to go to health care … who can’t agree with that? Ω Full disclosure: In his role as president and CEO of SN&R, Jeff vonKaenel has had conversations over the years with some individuals in the health-care field about funding opportunities for advertising publications and increased health-care reporting. Find more information about the “Let’s Get Healthy California” Task Force at www.chhs.ca.gov.

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newsreview.com

GREEN DAYS

AN INCONVENIENT

RUTH

Keeping up with Monsanto

Nu fast food Beat your swords into plough shares, they say, or

your Chicken McNuggets into a Quinoa Crunch Wrap. Either way works for Aunt Ruth, because, finally, there’s just one question: How will change come? There’s a million ways to it, but one that’s worked well is harnessing what people already do best and pointing it in a better direction—with the dual bottom lines of eco-responsibility and fiscal self-interest always in view.

Down in Palo Alto in NorCal, LYFE Kitchen opened last

Yes on 37 campaign activists up against propaganda science book that targets schoolchildren Do you know what your kids are reading? I was recently given a copy of the colorful Look Closer at Biotechnology by Christine G.K. Activity Book, which was put out by LaPado-Breglia the Council for Biotechnology Information and offered as a no-cost christinel@ newsreview.com “activity book for kids.” This is according to the organization’s website www.whybiotech.com. Amanda Bosschart, a Northern California-based leader of Yes on 37: Right to Know, a genetically modified-organism-labeling campaign for Proposition 37, is the woman I have to thank for bringing this booklet to my attention. Why do I mention this? For starters, the book is filled with a lot of disconcerting information about biotechnology, which largely has to do with genetically modified food. Yet, nowhere in the book does the term “GMO” appear. Nor are any similar terms even mentioned. Instead, the friendlier-sounding “biotechnology” is the word of choice throughout the book. Which, by the way, is a book for children. “Hi Kids,” the book begins. “Welcome to the Biotechnology Green Days is on the Basics Activity Book. This is an lookout for innovative activity book for young people like sustainable projects throughout the you about biotechnology—a really Sacramento region. neat topic.” Turn us on at The introduction goes on to explain sactonewstips@ that biotechnology is “such a neat newsreview.com. topic” because it is “helping to improve the health of the Earth and the people who call it home.” Keep reading: “You will see that biotechnology is being used to figure out how to: 1) grow more food; 2) help the environment; and 3) grow more nutritious food that improves our health.” The book, which is sprinkled with happy drawings of people discovering

BEFORE

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by AUNTIE RUTH

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See kids, genetically modified organisms are fun, no?

the joys of bioengineered foods, goes on to say that biotechnology lets scientists more closely study genes and “make improvements on them.” For instance, “scientists can now insert a specific gene into a plant that will help it adapt to its environment, make it more pest resistant, or even make it more nutritious.” And, from the section titled “How can biotechnology help the environment?”: “Thanks to biotechnology, a farmer can manage the weeds without having to plow. This saves energy as well as the soil!”

“This book is just more propaganda. Amanda Bosschart Yes on 37 campaign Tell that to those genetically modified-food-crop farmers in the Midwest and the Southeast United States, who are battling 6-foot and taller superweeds, which have developed a resistance to the Monsanto herbicide Roundup after having planted genetically engineered “Roundup Ready” seeds. (Don’t believe it? Go to www.tinyurl.com/weedattack for more information on the relationship between superweeds and GMO crops.) But these are the least frightening excerpts from Look Closer at Biotechnology. Even more scary: “In the future, bananas could be grown with medicines inside them. This means people could grow their own banana trees to provide the essential medicines to protect against illness and disease.” I know I’m not alone when I write that I do not want to eat bananas that have medicine inside. As researchers have noted, when you engineer pharmaceuticals into the food supply, there’s the possibility of cross

FEATURE

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contamination, such as the mixing of GMO crops and non-GMO organic crops, which could lead to no longer having a clean food supply. “This book is just more propaganda. And now they are trying to get it to the youth and brainwashing them,” said Yes on 37’s Bosschart. “This is going to target children and teachers … through public education.” There’s even a curriculum section at the back outlining other “agricultural biotechnology educational materials” available for schoolchildren of all ages, all the way through the 12th grade. A downloadable version of the book is available at www.whybiotech.com. It’s worth noting that the Council for Biotechnology Information is made up of the following members: BASF Plant Science, a biotech firm based in Germany; Bayer CropScience; Dow AgroSciences LLC; DuPont; Syngenta; and, no surprise, Monsanto. If you want to learn more about Proposition 37 and the labeling of GMO foods, visit www.carighttoknow.org. Ω

fall. A small cadre of former McDonald’s execs is taking the company’s penchant for assembling food quickly and is reinventing the fast-food restaurant. While a burger and fries is still on the menu, the burger is grass-fed beef, and the fries are baked sweet-potato fries. If you were looking for a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese (weighing in at a svelte 750 calories), this ain’t that. With a menu that boasts roasted root Turning McDonald’s vegetables, organic arugula, grilled barupside-down. ramundi, risotto peas and carrots, and free-range chicken pasta—and, yeah, there’s a vegan and gluten-free menu—it’s maybe too good to be true, eh? With spousal unit and nephew in tow, Aunt Ruth went off to see for herself.

The physical space was airy and light. A wall of herbs and spices split the room; the menu glowed from an electronic screen behind the register. There’s predictable literary/foodie quotes on the walls; furnishings and colors were tastefully post-Whole Foodian. The line for dinner was long, but it moved quickly, and the food was served quicker still. And, yeah—the eats were tasty, costing $10 to $12 per entree. Beer and wine (local, organic) could be had. No Coke. (Nephew handled it well.) The manager’s name was Kevin; he pointed out the coach of the Stanford University football team at a nearby table, saying he and the missus dine there often. While they’ve done the appropriate eco-curtsies, using recycled this and that in the fixtures, the key change LYFE Kitchen can promise will come if it does for natural foods what McDonald’s did for conventional farmers. Its corporate plan, according to a recent piece in Wired, is to create hundreds of these restaurants over the next several years. The impact—on natural foods, in general, and organic farms, in particular—could be game changing. You can already buy LYFE Kitchen entrees in local Costco stores; while corporate management couldn’t name a date, Sacramento is in line as LYFE Kitchen expands. Stay tuned. Ω (Come friend Aunt Ruth on Facebook and let’s hang out.)

ECO-HIT America’s greenest school

UC Davis is officially the greenest school in America. This is according to the latest issue of Sierra magazine, a Sierra Club publication. In a feature in its September/October issue, called “America’s Coolest Schools,” the magazine ranked schools’ energy consumption, water use and waste, in addition to planning efforts, green curriculum, and transportation. Sierra magazine cited UC Davis’ efforts diverting 70 percent of its trash from landfills, the 20,000 bikes that inhabit the campus, and West Village, the school’s—and the nation’s—largest planned zeronet-energy community, and ranked it higher than 95 other schools on the list. To view the full list, visit www.sierraclub.org/sierra/201209/coolschools.

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Mitt Romney’s secrecy about tax returns speaks volumes As of press time, we’re still waiting to see Mitt Romney’s tax returns. And by that, I mean more than one partial release of one single year’s return. by Kel Munger Frankly, I don’t care about the numbers on the returns. I know already that both he and his VP pick Paul k e l m@ Ryan have earned—from work, from investments and, in ne w s re v ie w.c o m Romney’s case, from inherited wealth—far more money than I’ll ever earn, and they’re paying a far lower tax rate than I’ll ever be able to nab. OK, I get it: They’re rich, I’m not. Big whoop. This is not about the numbers on the returns. It’s not even about the tax rate paid. But those tax returns are still very important. How we handle our tax burden is a measure of how we view government, how honest we are and what sort of obligation we feel we have to our fellow citizens. Talking about money in this country is far, far more verboten than talking about sex, and talking about taxes is even worse. Earlier this summer, Romney made a joke to the effect that those who fail to use every means available to avoid paying additional taxes aren’t qualified to be president, as if being willing to give a little extra is somehow an intellectual or moral failing. That tells us something about his attitude toward being a taxpayer, as does his reluctance to release his tax returns. Now, in the interest of transparency, we need to see how his behavior as a taxpayer squares up with what he’s told us. We could just trust him. But, as a famous politician— who did release his tax returns, by the way—once said, “Trust, but verify.” Here’s the bottom line: All presidential candidates— indeed, all political candidates—will be in a position to have a profound effect on how the tax Talking about burden is assigned and who benefits from the tax code. The tax policies money in this introduced will directly impact our country is far worse lives with every paycheck. Those tax returns tell us where the than talking about candidate’s money comes from and sex, and talking how the candidate deals with his tax burden. Releasing the returns goes about taxes is a long, long way toward keeping even worse. government transparent. Without knowing how much candidates make, where it comes from, and how they handle their tax obligations, we can’t possibly know what agenda is motivating their policy proposals. Perhaps the Romney tax plan—which we think would reduce his tax burden while increasing mine—isn’t being proposed just because it would save Romney, Ryan and their major supporters a lot of money. But without accurate information about Romney’s tax obligation—and how he deals with it through deductions, tax shelters and other accounting procedures—we’ll never know for certain. Shouldn’t we know not just the candidates’ attitude, but the candidates’ behavior where taxes are concerned? Here’s something I can absolutely guarantee, though: If the Romney ticket is allowed to avoid answering questions about their tax returns, we’ll never again get a look at a candidate’s tax returns. Not ever. And that would be a real loss for transparency in government. Ω

ThiS ModErn World

by tom tomorrow

Restrict pumping, save salmon The governor’s announcement on July 25 regarding his The federal agency charged with keeping the peripheral-canal proposal included some state from killing off our salmon runs introduced interesting supporting documentation released new, more restrictive Delta-pumping rules in by the state to bolster his case. Among those 2009. Of course, agricultural operators, who documents is one showing how deadly the had been getting that water, and their agents in existing Delta pumps are to salmon. the California Department of Water Resources Salmon advocates have been shouting this at sued to get the pumping restrictions thrown out. the top of their lungs for more than a decade, but They’re still in court, trying to convince anyone the state’s official position was that the decline who’ll listen that it’s those darn “ocean condiin salmon populations tions” and other adversities in over roughly the last the Delta, not the pumps, that by The state is admitting drove the salmon runs into the eight years was caused Victor Gonella by “ocean conditions,” ground. that baby salmon are president of the not the Delta pumps. But we’re finally enjoyGolden Gate Salmon siphoned out of their They also blamed ing a halfway decent salmon Association other stressors, such as natural migration season this year, and it’s invasive species and precisely because the 2009 routes by the ammonia discharges in pumping restrictions are tractor-beam suction starting to show results. The state document the Delta. referred to in this Now the state is More salmon means more of huge Delta pumps. Guest Comment is admitting that baby employment for thousands online at http://tinyurl. of workers in salmon-related com/8l9rssg. salmon are siphoned out of their natural migration routes by the tractorindustries: boat and marina operators, seafood beam suction of huge Delta pumps. They’re processors, tackle shops, charter-boat operaadmitting the pumps reverse natural flows and tors—even restaurants and hotels. Have a comment? Why is the DWR still in court? The canal Express your views make rivers run backward. They’re admitting is many years off under any scenario. The in 350 words on that when juvenile salmon are pulled off course a local topic in the Delta, 95 percent of San Joaquin River pumping restrictions in place to keep our of interest. and 60 percent of Sacramento River chinook salmon runs healthy—plus other salmon habiSend an e-mail to salmon do not survive. tat improvements—will be needed for years to editorial@ That’s what every responsible scientist has come, no matter what. Ω newsreview.com. been saying for years.

K.J.’s disclosure The problem with good intentions is that we all know where they can lead. That’s why, despite the good intentions of Mayor Kevin Johnson’s many initiatives and nonprofit organizations, the public is going to need a lot more transparency. As detailed in last week’s feature story, “K.J. Inc.” by Cosmo Garvin, the mayor has a lot of great ideas about important issues—sustainability, the arts, homelessness, education—that he’d like the city to address. To that end, he’s established a number of nonprofit groups to do—well, we’re not really clear on that, although the groups mostly seem to be about facilitating discussion and funding for groups that already exist. And he’s been collecting donations to run those groups from his supporters, including some who have business before the city. Because private nonprofits aren’t required to make the same sort of public disclosures and financial accounting that taxpayer-supported institutions do, we don’t really know all the details. What’s more, the mayor’s office has been less than forthcoming. We understand that Johnson is a big fan of publicprivate partnerships. That’s not a bad thing. But he and his colleagues need to understand that when the public’s money is “partnered” with private investment, the entire operation needs to become more transparent. That is, it needs to operate more like a public enterprise and less like a private one. So, Mayor Johnson, we call on you to keep things out in the open. Release all the records of your private initiatives and nonprofits—who works there, where the money to run them comes from, and what precisely they are doing. It’s the only way to be sure that your administration is above reproach. Ω

read Cosmo Garvin’s reporting on Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson’s nonprofits and their overlap with city government at www.newsreview.com.

Home sweet mall? When it comes to retail shopping malls, a new mantra should be: “Don’t build it. They won’t come.” This most definitely applies to downtown Sacramento. Malls across America are dying, but the Westfield Downtown Plaza has been 6-feet under for more than a decade. The area’s mall rats want to be in Roseville; let’s not pretend we have the cheese to entice them downtown. So, what should JMA Ventures and Sacramento’s city and business leaders focus on? How about housing, housing and more housing? When it comes to urban living, though, JMA’s portfolio sort of lacks; it mostly consists of skiresort-type residences. But hey, this is a step up over Westfield. Let’s be optimistic. SN&R envisions a Downtown Plaza of retail shopping and office spaces mixed with apartments and affordable housing. We want to see life after hours and on weekends along J, K, and L streets between Third and Seventh. And we urge JMA to free the mall, open it up to the surrounding centralcity milieu and Old Sacramento. JMA recently said it doesn’t have a long-term plan for revitalizing the mall. Let’s hope that whatever it ultimately decides involves moving more Sacramentans in. Ω

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T’S SUMMERTIME IN THE SUNSTEWED WATERS THAT BOTTLE DISCOVERY PARK, AND THE FIRST GIANT RIVER PARTY OF THE SUMMER IS OFF AND FLOWING.

Clusters of nuzzling motorboats form bobbing islands of youthful indiscretion. Too $hort’s “Blow the Whistle” tweet-tweets as life-jacketed cops putter around on Jet Skis through a linked flotilla of buoyed watercrafts. Law enforcement regards the scene with a kind of stone-faced ennui as partiers hump the air until it whistles, jamming their fists skyward like they’re punching away God’s disapproval. Women spin on stripper poles, which boat-owners have cleverly mounted atop their vessels. Young men guzzle from red cups and cozy up to topless babes, whose nipples are covered only by strategically placed promotional stickers. Their fever will spread as the day stretches on and additional liters of ultra-light swill are quaffed. In the meantime, a chubby deejay perched on the upper level of the black-hulled monster boat tries injects energy into the carnival. “Aw, yeah! How’s everybody doing out here today!” he demands. “Rage on the fuckin’ rivah! ... Yeah! Woo!” “Woo” is a universal term in these slippery haunts, and it has numerous meanings, none of them too profound. With this particular incantation, the sweaty mix master is imploring his captive audience to party like there’s no tomorrow. Because there may not be. A month ago, some 3,500 drifting souls were drawn to a pearl-gray stitch of the lower American River for the third annual Rafting Gone Wild, a Facebook-driven event that outmaneuvers Sacramento’s holiday-drinking prohibitions on the river. The hordes partied hard and left our watercourse choking on beer cans, broken bottles and bodily fluids. And blood: There were dozens of fights, men hurled rocks at safety crews and the event quickly devolved into what one county ranger later called “a riot.” Rafting Gone Wild in July was so bad, law enforcement stopped trying to arrest people and instead focused on simply quelling the mob. The media had a field day, crowing about the two-dozen arrests and trashy brawls that hopscotched from one shoreline berth to the next. Those charged with keeping the peace differed only on how bad the scene actually got. As chief ranger Stan Lumsden remarked: “In my 31 years of law enforcement, it was the worst thing I’ve ever seen.”

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By comparison, Discovery Park’s Rage on the River in June enjoyed a much quieter day in the sun. Hundreds congregated on expensive motorboats and chic river cruisers to drink and dance their way into viral-video notoriety. YouTubes of floozies clapping their butt cheeks soaked the Interwebs. But no drunk bros were busted for scrapping with oars and rocks. Rage organizers hope to double down on their success with a Facebook-advertised sequel this Saturday, August 25, again at Discovery Park. But the flap over July’s Rafting Gone Wild—which recently led to the county board of supervisors expanding its alcohol-ban policy on the American River— means a higher profile and more derision for youth-centric events such as these. This was Lumsden’s first foray into the river-party scene, and he was appalled. Deputy Jason Ramos of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department was around for two previously troublesome Rafting Gone Wild bashes, and expects the next one to present similar headaches, even with the county taking a more restrictive approach to allowing booze on the river. “Where there’s a will, there’s a way,” Ramos said. “We’ll do what we can, but alcohol will make it out there, and there’s nothing you can do about it.” Like Captain Willard in Apocalypse Now, SN&R is on a downriver crawl to confront the madness of war. But this is a war of generations and class, bros and babes, commerce and temperament, and a whole lot of beer—rather than of bullets and napalm. The horror.

between Sunrise Boulevard and Watt Avenue. By system assigned eight sworn rangers to the slowthe end of the day, 23 Rafting Gone Wild attencooking operation. They were joined by 18 dees had been arrested and a dozen more sheriff’s deputies, who also provided a couple of detained. boats and units from the Rancho Cordova Police There were also 58 parking citations, 15 water Department, Sacramento Metropolitan Fire rescues and one fractured cop-car windshield: A District, and Sacramento Drowning and Accident handcuffed and clearly wasted 21-year-old cataRescue Team. It was a good-sized detail—but, pulted himself onto the patrol cruiser like he was obviously, not enough. trying to qualify for the men’s long jump. Most rangers patrolled the slop-caked lips of But the numbers don’t tell the full story. This the river, from Sunrise Boulevard to the confluis one of the few things law enforcement and ence at Discovery Park. One of the scuffles chief Rafting Gone Wild apologists acturanger Lumsden personally witnessed ally agree on—but for vastly involved “fairly intoxicated” individudifferent reasons. als throwing up The river float gang signs. But he couldn’t say didn’t begin in what, exactly, had caused the absolute mayhem. fight. Such answers are hard Far from it, actuto come by. ally. For a good “Who could say what chunk of that precipitated that?” he said. sun-kissed “You’re talking the end of Saturday, it was the day, when the sun is Stan Lumsden hippie-dippy hot, and people are dehySacramento County chief ranger, on July 14’s heaven, with drated because they’ve Rafting Gone Wild event mellow strangers been drinking all day.” exchanging good Law enforcement vibes and cold received a few distress calls, brewskis. Oh, and genand most interventions began erously flashing their with skirmishes they themselves ta-tas. witnessed, the worst being chaotic “[Beer] and tits—those were the brawls featuring dozens of rock-throwing, oarcurrencies exchanged on the river,” laughed first- swinging participants at the roped-off Gilligan’s time Rafting Gone Wild attendee Amy Geiger. Island sandbar near Ancil Hoffman Park. Shortly before 4 p.m., however, things went “We’re talking basically a riot,” Lumsden pear-shaped. asserted. What tells the story better than anything else At one point, medical and fire personnel were is an operational log updated in real time forced to retreat when the mob turned its hostility throughout the day by the boots on the ground. toward them. The log—made available by the Sacramento “They actually couldn’t render aid,” Ramos County Sheriff’s Department and analyzed by explained. “You’re talking just lawlessness.” SN&R—depicts a 12-hour period in which strugLumsden said the few deputies that were on gling swimmers and rafters cutting their feet on the ground at the time began “screaming for broken glass earlier that day gave way to wild help, as you can imagine,” and every available brawls and violent assaults that continued to unit surged toward the battle royale, including a spark well into the night. The pandemonium folblack rescue DART 8 jet boat boarded by four lowed the southwest trajectory of the river and heavyset mean muggers from the sheriff’s grew more uncontrollable as the day wore on. department, cops on Jet Skis and rangers armed The Sacramento County regional-parks with pepperball guns.

“IN MY 31 YEARS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, IT WAS THE WORST THING I’VE EVER SEEN.”

BROS, BOOBS, BEER— AND A ‘RIOT’ By now, most people know the unflattering stats. On July 14, thousands of pumped young hellions set sail for a meandering booze cruise along an 11-mile stretch of the lower American River

Two-dozen hooligans were detained while a couple others sat along the shore in handcuffs. Even after the main scrum was quelled, smaller altercations continued to break out the rest of the day. By 5:30 p.m., approximately 2,000 people started their exodus toward River Bend Park, the operation log shows. Multiple scraps broke out at shuttle and bus pickup areas, and continued to pop off at the park well into the evening. At 7:28 p.m., officers responded to Goethe Park, where a 20-something male reportedly slugged a woman in the face. Law-enforcement officials said they could have easily cuffed up to 50 people if the operation was more about law and less about order, and if the main jail wasn’t turning away people who were too blitzed to even sit down. “It was what you’d call a target-rich environment,” said Ramos. “But this was a safety-driven event, not a sweep.” An “overwhelming” number of that day’s busts were for public intoxication, and there could have been a lot more, Ramos noted. “There was no shortage of people who were guilty of that.” Maintaining order became a balancing act for officers, who had to make real-time decisions about whether they were doing more good taking a couple hours to remove a drunk from the field of play, or by sticking close to assist their outnumbered colleagues. When officers did make the call to put the cuffs on and go through the process of transporting and booking their catch, members of the main jail’s triage unit sometimes concluded the intakes were “so far blasted,” that they wanted hospital clearance before agreeing to take them in, Ramos said. That’s why a number of people never made it through the booking process, because officers had to get back to the scene of the still-devolving bacchanal.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF RAGE ON THE RIVER’S FACEBOOK PAGE

Boats link together into a giant party island during “Rage on the River” events at Discovery Park. The next one goes down this Saturday, August 25— and, yes, it’s the calmer, more sophisticated of Sacramento’s summer river parties.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF RAGE ON THE RIVER’S FACEBOOK PAGE

Rage on the River promoters have design concepts for apparel and also recruit sponsors for the event. It’s partying— but it’s also an industry.

Well past nightfall, the operation log shows several drunks being denied at the jail and released to “someone.” Back at the river, meanwhile, the party refused to die.

SELLING THE RAGE Sean Ruiz looks like the lord of Pizza Rock. Draped in an ebon club T-shirt with beefy forearm tats and a trim beard, Ruiz sits with his back to the wall at a small table in the dark K Street eatery to discuss all things ragey and rivery. The former nightclub promoter wears a perpetual grin, which gives his youthful features a mischievous baby affectation. 22 | SN&R | 08. 23.12

A modern-day carnival barker for a trio of K Street restaurants, including Pizza Rock, Ruiz also moonlights as one of the wizards behind the curtain of the twice-annual Rage on the River bash that is growing in popularity and bro-ness— and quickly losing hold of its low profile. Ruiz—who helps coordinate Rage independently and without any connection to his day job—is keenly aware of the encroaching spotlight threatening to take away his good times on the river. Each year since 2010, there have been more boats, more babes, more sponsor swag— and more cops. This Saturday, area law enforcement will have up to six trawling watercraft with two- to three-person crews, according

to Sacramento Police Department officials. The beefed-up presence is a direct result of last month’s Rafting Gone Wild fiasco. Sgt. Jason Bassett of the police department’s marine detail said that because of Rafting Gone Wild, Saturday’s Rage on the River “will be staffed with as many or more officers and there will be zero tolerance for violations so that the event does not get out of hand.” Ruiz has good reason to worry about getting lumped in with the rock-throwing hooligans and catching some of the alcohol-prohibition heat. “That’ll put a big damper on us if they say the day before” that people can’t drink, Ruiz said of the recently expanded alcohol ban. “I think that’s a little excessive. People have to be responsible, of course, but there has to be a limit.” Past Rages have so far toed that line. Sure, there’s a lot of behavior that fathers of collegeage daughters wouldn’t approve of. But from a law-enforcement standpoint, Rage on the River is Ashton Kutcher to Rafting Gone Wild’s Charlie Sheen. At the June Rage, for instance, only 25 citations were doled out for a variety of boating-safety infractions, and one person was hospitalized for over-intoxication. But there were no busts for boating under the influence, zero arrests and no drunk assholes chucking rocks at paramedics. “The good [thing] is that each vessel that was contacted had a sober operator designated,” said Bassett. Organizers point to self-policing that happens with boaters looking to shun crafts that don’t come prepared with the proper safety gear—anchors, tie-ups, buoys and life jackets for everyone onboard. Ruiz also notes that his event doesn’t promote drinking as overtly as Rafting Gone Wild, instead choosing to focus on the three-girls-to-one-guy attendance ratio, dance-party atmosphere, and the free apparel provided by sponsors like Rockstar and Monster energy drinks, and Two in the Shirt—or TITS—whose acronymic pasties can be seen on many fleshy surfaces. There are also socioeconomic differences. Law-enforcement officials to party planners to event attendees remark that one of the reasons Rage is the calmer affair is because only people who can afford boats end up attending, whereas Rafting Gone Wild appeals to the greater 99 percent of the river culture. In other words, Mitt Romney’s sons would never be caught dead going Wild in a rented rubber raft. But they might Rage. “It’s probably a different type of clientele,” police spokesman Sgt. Andrew Pettit surmised. “People who rent rafts aren’t necessarily the ones who can [purchase] boats.” That exclusivity—along with provocative promotional dance videos posted to Vimeo and YouTube—has helped cultivate Rage’s debauched spring-break mystique. “Hot girls in bikinis,” Ruiz smirked. “And it’s free.” As long as you can afford to be on a boat, that is.

THE FACEBOOK FACTOR Getting someone to speak on behalf of the biggest aquatic meltdown since Kevin Costner wore latex gills is more difficult than explaining that analogy to Mom. But it makes sense. After all, Rafting Gone Wild was absolutely savaged by the media in the days following the July river float. Time magazine, Yahoo! and national newswire service Reuters all reported the story, as did hundreds other media outlets that usually don’t give an inky fart about what occurs in our local tributaries. Ironically, much of the resulting public-relations damage was self-inflicted, as attendees of the hugely popular event uploaded dozens of unflattering videos and took to the event’s Facebook page to defend—or decry—the behavior they saw on display that eventful Saturday. As sheriff spokesman Ramos said, people weren’t using their phones at Rafting Gone Wild to call 911 for help. “They were using their cellphones to videotape this to put on YouTube,” he said. Rafting Gone Wild attendee Athonia Cappelli uploaded nearly 20 photos of the scene from Ancil Hoffman Park, where law enforcement used nonlethal artillery to quell a massive brawl around 5 p.m. “It was a frenzy, but most of the kids kept partying, as though they were completely oblivious,” the Rancho Cordova woman told SN&R. “Totally surreal.” That same social-media compulsion helped public-safety officials plan for the event in the fist place, and is allowing them to organize for what comes next. “Social media is huge. It’s an open door. It’s a revolving door,” said Pettit, whose intelligence unit monitors Facebook and other social-media websites for potential leads. Those leads will be more crucial after the county’s latest decision. Earlier this month, the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors approved an ordinance that enhances officials’ ability to ban summer imbibing on the river. It’s a targeted ban that won’t collaterally affect events like Eppie’s Great Race, but the 2013 Rafting Gone Wild will definitely be festival non grata. “I think it’s absolutely ridiculous,” contended Wild attendee Geiger, who witnessed none of the ballyhooed drama at last month’s Rafting Gone Wild. “There was a unity that was created at this event that far surpasses the fights that happened.” While plenty of other attendees agree, they’re sharing that message exclusively online. A dozen critical gray hairs got up to speak on the day the board of supervisors considered the alcohol ban, but the youth vote was notable only in absentia. Retired Cordova High School teacher John Barris pushed for a year-round alcohol ban and fumed like Chris Farley’s vein-popping motivational-speaker character about kids hatching evil chat-room plans on “the social media.” “They’ve declared war on you,” he thundered. “I hope you understand the consequences,

A 20-SOMETHING MALE REPORTEDLY SLUGGED A WOMAN IN THE FACE. AND A HANDCUFFED AND CLEARLY WASTED 21-YEAR-OLD CATAPULTED HIMSELF ONTO A PATROL CRUISER’S GLASS WINDSHIELD.

because they’re serious about this.” If it’s war, then only one side is stressing. No one under 30 showed up to the board meeting on August 7. The youthful hordes have consistently proven their devotion to the river party scene but have shown little interest in attending to the fallout. The day after Rafting Gone Wild, for instance, only a handful of the previous day’s rafters showed up to pick up their trash, despite appeals from organizers. This makes all the online carping about overreacting politicians and out-of-town ruffians ring hollow. Everyone wants to offer an opinion, just not on the record. One of the shy types is the 25-year-old Carmichael woman who operates a Rafting Gone Wild Facebook page and is one of the event’s purported organizers. After multiple interview requests, she finally cut and pasted a wall post, which she’d sent to other media outlets as well, but never replied to follow-up questions or identified herself. After the county board’s unanimous decision to ban alcohol on the river more often in 2013 and beyond, she posted on her Facebook wall: “Sad day. Don’t worry. We’ll figure this out for you guys before next summer’s trip.” As of August 14, the post had seven likes and 29 comments, including this guy’s salient point: “KCRA and people who voted for this—go sit on a dildo—we still Rafting Gone Wild—you can’t stop us!” The voice of his generation, ladies and gentlemen. But he’s right in at least one way: When the county enacted summer-holiday alcohol bans in 2006 and 2007, those displaced by the decision took their beer coolers northeast, where the upper American River’s waters are more treacherously swift, but no alcohol bans yet exist. That’s according to Tobias Gautschi, a veteran rafting guide and Coloma resident who’s worried about the obvious dangers associated with this tipsy exodus. “We’re seeing an influx of people not trained for our Class III rivers,” said Gautschi, who’s counted more imbibing nonlocals and at least one near-drowning on the American River’s upper and lower forks. “On the bigger holidays, we don’t even go down to our local parks anymore. It’s crazy.” And poised to get crazier. There’s already been online chatter about how to outmaneuver the county’s expanded ban. Gautschi’s past experience suggests it’ll mean more drunks and drownings in El Dorado County, but that doesn’t mean the local river scene is dead just yet.

across in pink, bubbly font; T-shirts proclaiming “R.A.G.E. to keep your kids off drugs” in the recognizable DARE type; and additional Rage hats that look like they’ve borrowed typeface settings from the RVCA clothing brand. “I like to get [inspiration] from other brands,” Ruiz said. “I think it’s smart.” Ruiz fully admits this is the kind of apparel that appeals most to the bro culture, a noisome mishmash of Jersey Shore fist pumpers soaked in Axe body spray who want to defile your daughters and never call them. Ruiz doesn’t self-identify with that tribe, but he knows they have enough disposable cash to keep themselves fat with piss-yellow energy drinks and Tapout tees, so why not a spin-off brand that built its rep throwing mad ragers on Sacto’s rivers? “That’s what my intent was, and I think if you talk to [co-organizer] Patrick [Fretwell], he’d say the same thing. We wanted to make it a brand,” Ruiz nodded. And a brand it is becoming, for better or worse. Partying is now an industry. Only time will tell whether events such as Rage on the River or Rafting Gone Wild do more harm than good to the local river scene. Plenty of river enthusiasts have blasted Rafting for endangering their ability to get sauced and drift responsibly. “It’s sad what the event has become,” Rafting attendee Brandon Bowman told SN&R via Facebook. He and his fellow late-20-something buddies went for some communal fun that Saturday in July, but ended up dispirited by the mass littering and fights. “Most of the people that rafted that day are not even from the local area and have no idea of the dangers. They ruin it for all of us who respect the river,” he argued. Whether respect has any place in the evolving river scene is up for a lengthy debate. Everyone is making money off the lower American’s promise of kickback fun, from those renting rafts on the sidelines to those issuing their open-container citations to those of us reporting on the fallout. Why not the party starters themselves? Rage organizers envision their budding franchise as an MTV spring break for Sacramento—and possibly beyond—but any talk of future ambitions is quickly skirted as mere daydreaming, a what-if scenario if Rage continues its exponential rise. “We didn’t really plan on it blowing up that much,” Ruiz said of the self-described nonprofit operation. “This is big, bigger than us. It’s way bigger than us.” And bigger than the river. It may be a trite truism that youth is wasted on the young. But in the quick-current grasp of the Sacramento river scene, the youth is mostly just wasted. Some feel nauseous and nostalgic for the days when being tramp stamped, Muscle Milked and possibly soul raped were the bizarre exceptions, not the rule. But if you do want to dip your toe in the party water, what should a first-time Rage on the River attendee do to prepare for such a wet and wild soiree? Ruiz grinned his perpetual grin: “If you were to go, well—I’d say you’re not ready for this.” Ω

RAGE ON THE RIVER IS THE CALMER AFFAIR, WHEREAS RAFTING GONE WILD APPEALS TO THE GREATER 99 PERCENT. IN OTHER WORDS, MITT ROMNEY’S SONS WOULDN’T BE CAUGHT DEAD GOING WILD IN A RUBBER RAFT. BUT THEY MIGHT RAGE.

PARTY INC. River raging has gone commercial. Back at Pizza Rock, Ruiz scrolls through the photos on his iPhone to show concept designs for Rage on the River apparel, including straight-billed black ball caps with the motto “Don’t judge me” kissed BEFORE

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ARTS&CULTURE I

N 1986

BURNING MAN ORGANIZERS CONFRONT GROWING PAINS FOR THE ‘MOST AMAZING PART Y ON THE PL ANET’ by ELIZABTH LIMBACH photos by PHILIPPE GL ADE Want to burn? For more information on Burning Man and a schedule of events, visit www.burningman.org.

This year, more than 60,000 people are expected to attend the 26th annual Burning Man festival in Nevada.

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, a small group of friends gathered at Baker Beach in San Francisco to celebrate the summer solstice by lighting an 8-foottall wooden man on fire. Back then, the group, led by Larry Harvey, could not have known the magnitude of what they had set in motion. Fast-forward to almost 10 years later, to 1995—the first year that Marian Goodell attended what was by then known as Burning Man. By that time, the weeklong annual gathering had situated on a parched lake bed in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. The Man, as he came to be called, now loomed approximately 40-feettall, and was burned toward the end of the festival in a cathartic marvel of fire. Tickets were $35, and the ephemeral city—which was on its way to becoming “Black Rock City”—held 4,000 people. “When I was there with 4,000 people, I knew there was something very significant about my experience,” says Goodell, who had heard about the festival in a photography class. “But I definitely didn’t imagine it would grow to the proportions it is now and become such a worldwide phenomenon.” In the years since, of course, Burning Man’s evolved into just that; in 2011, more than 53,000 people showed up, prompting the organization to request a population-capacity increase from the Bureau of Land Management for this year’s event, which runs Monday, August 27, to Monday, September 3. Along with growth comes growing pains. What started as a bonfire at the beach is now

facing the exciting, if uncertain, consequences of outgrowing itself with ticketing headaches, among other issues, leading the community to contemplate some fundamental questions about what’s next. Just as the festival’s grown, so has Goodell’s involvement. By the end of 1996, she was one of six “owners” of Black Rock City LLC, and has since also become the director of business and communications, among taking on other duties. She and the rest of the year-round Burning Man staff have overseen an evolution in the event’s structure as a result of its perpetual growth. In the ’90s, as more people journeyed to BRC, increasing regulations befell the city—guns and free-for-all driving were replaced by

“I REMEMBER SOMEONE SAYING, ‘WOW, SOMEDAY 50,000 PEOPLE COULD BE OUT HERE. I ALMOST FELL OVER LAUGHING.” Andie Grace former Burning Man communications manager a meticulously planned city grid, a driving ban and safety rules. Still, the event remained stripped of the trappings of “the default world,” and came to be guided, instead, by 10 core principles (including “Radical Self-reliance,” “Radical Self-expression,” “Decommodification,” “Leaving No Trace”). As thousands more people joined the colorful tribe each year, the breadth of experience flourished in the participant-driven city, fostering an unstoppable kaleidoscope of creative visions that manifest as art installations, theme camps, performances, decorated bicycles, elaborate costumes, “mutant” vehicles and a strong sense of community.

Andie Grace worked as Burning Man’s communications manager for 13 years until stepping down earlier this summer. She recalls her visit to “the playa” in 1998, when the population was 15,000. “I remember someone saying, ‘Wow, someday 50,000 people could be out here,’” Grace recalls. “I almost fell over laughing—that was the most ridiculous thing I’d ever heard. So be careful what you say.” Photographer Kyer Wiltshire, who’s taken photographs at Burning Man for 11 years, says the days are gone when most people he met—even people in nearby Reno—had never heard of what he calls “arguably the most amazing party on the planet.” “When you hear about … Fox News talking about the freaks out at Burning Man, you know that Burning Man has reached that point of being known across America,” says Wiltshire, who documented Burning Man and other festivals in his photography book, Tribal Revival. The 2011 event sold out (a first), reached record attendance (initially prompting the BLM, which owns the land, to put Burning Man on temporary probation) and passed by without any major dust storms—a natural and, in other years, frequent occurrence that whips Black Rock City into momentary blindness. Such dust storms are the most unforgiving of the temperamental elements BRC citizens deal with, which also include blazing-hot days, frigid nights, an excruciatingly dry and alkaline environment, and sometimes rain. The droves who populated the 2011 event were greeted by very few of these problems—most notably, no major dust storms. This year’s dry weather, however, has lead many to project that this year’s event will be much dustier. “Last year created the perfect storm for the event to grow: There were a lot of newbies, and there were

Power to the puppies! See NIGHT&DAY

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Solid pub grub See DISH

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Crickets, yum See COOLHUNTING

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Words + guitars See MUSIC

Burning Man isn’t just about partying in the desert— its core principles also emphasize self-reliance, community participation and civic responsibility.

no dust storms,” Wiltshire says. “The dust storms always kept a certain amount of people away. Last year, they thought it was the greatest thing, and it is—but they didn’t realize how harsh it can be.” But members of BMOrg, as the Burning Man organization is nicknamed, suspected they were “in for a different kind of ride in 2012,” even before the weather proved too good to be true in 2011. “The moment in 2011 that we saw tickets were going to sell out, we knew it would have a major impact on 2012 ticket sales, and we started planning,” Grace wrote in a February 9 newsletter to the Burner community. In what has since come to be seen as an unsuccessful, if well-intentioned, attempt to address this growing interest, they created a new system for ticketing for this year’s event: a lottery in which 40,000 tickets were available in three tiers, priced from $240 to $390 (presale tickets were also available at

$420 a pop). The result: Three times as many people entered the lottery as there were tickets available, according to Grace— many of them new to the event. In a survey of lottery applicants, 40 percent of respondents reported that this would be their first year going to Burning Man. However, Grace says that the organizers “aren’t putting a lot of credence” in this figure. “My sense is that every year we have about one-third newbies,” she says. Still, this news added a fresh layer of indignation to the already fuming faction of Burners who didn’t get a ticket, the concern being that “newbies” tend to bring less to the table, or that, given the event’s catapult into the mainstream zeitgeist, more people were coming out to Black Rock City just to party (a notion that’s considered sacrilege in a participant-driven city). Recognizing this, the organization designated the remaining 10,000 tickets—which were meant to go up for open sale after the lottery—for key theme camps, artists, mutant-vehicle creators, musicians and other key contributors to the sensory playground that is Black Rock City. Following the BLM’s June approval

of Burning Man’s one-year Special Recreation Permit for the 2012 event, which caps attendance at a record 60,900, organizers were able to sell additional tickets in July and August. Now, BMOrg is already in talks about 2013, drawing on input from game theorists, statisticians, sociologists, ticketing companies, software folks and the Burner community. But the reality, says Grace, is that no matter how they go about selling tickets, there won’t be enough for everyone who wants one. Ticketing isn’t the only issue. There are several more existential matters to contemplate as well. Among them: Will Burning Man have to move? Where and what would that be like? How big can it get and still retain its flavor? Might it someday end altogether? In a February 15 newsletter, Goodell posited that the culture’s survival might someday be entrusted to the broader community, one embodied by regional chapters in 19 countries across the globe. “This moment is an inflection point,” says Grace. “We have hit through the capacity here, and it doesn’t mean nobody else will get to come in, but maybe it means we won’t all go to the same place together every year. It could be that Black Rock City is where we go every few years, or take turns going, but there will be manifold other ways to access what we mean when we say ‘Burning Man.’” Ω

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Tequila, sunrise to sunset See 15 MINUTES

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Tea party rules The barista at Insight Coffee Roasters meets my gaze evenly as I loudly declare that tea is neglected in this town, while coffee is worshipped. After the indignation of being asked if I wanted a second bag in my cup at a coffee chain known for the strength of its joe, I’ve vowed to expose the farce that is coffee shop tea—an exposé that’s been a long time coming. Second bag? No. No! Criminy, this is tea, there are rules! As the writer Douglas Adams once instructed, the water should be boiling, not boiled. Also: The leaves should be steeped three minutes (of course, this rule applies only to black tea). The water should be allowed to cool prior to pouring over green and white tea to avoid scalding the leaves, and the product should be hot enough to be a bit scary. Tea has no business in a paper cup. Tea is best made in small quantities and served from a teapot into a mug. It should be sipped while sitting and pondering a great problem or reading a difficult book. Once the cup has been consumed the world will look brighter. And, as with coffee, small changes in the preparation makes vast improvements to the flavor. As such, it’s hardly surprising that This water should Americans haven’t be boiling—not embraced tea when it’s boiled. commonly served in a bag next to a lukewarm mug of water. My search starts at the Fox & Goose and, as expected, it made a fine strong cup, served in a teapot with a strainer. Of course, it’s not a cafe, per se, and besides, it’s not surprising that a British pub makes nice tea. The coffee shops, I’m sure, won’t appreciate tea this way. Too poncy! Next, I head to Temple Coffee to see how it treats the leaves. The black tea choices are sparse, but I sit down with an iron teapot full of rich Yunnan golden needle. The server informs me how long the tea should steep and how many times. Hmm, my plan to bring down the coffee shops is not working out so well. They only make slight errors. The water is not boiling, nor is the cup preheated, but the tea is respected. My last hope is Old Soul Co., where I find no tea in sight. I ask if they even sell it and, by way of answer, the server reaches under the counter. As I braced myself for the inevitable basket filled with tea bags, she pulls out, instead a tea menu the size of a novella. Foiled! The brew is delivered properly prepared, hot and delicious. I don’t want to concede, but I have to admit that this town gives tea the attention it deserves, even though most still prefer bean juice. I can’t wait to see what cuppa Insight will serve when I am brave enough to show my face there again. —Guphy Gustafson

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VOTE US BEST PLACE TO GET PAMPERED

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Tsakopoulos Library Galleria · www.librarygalleria.com

28   |   SN&R   |   08.23.12

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Best place for a damn good Beer

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B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

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NIGHT&DAY 23THURS 24FRI DON’T MISS! MADELEINE PEYROUX WITH REBECCA PIDGEON: The first

thing to be noticed is her voice. Madeleine Peyroux was quickly crowned with the neo-Billie Holiday label, but her earliest influence was Bessie Smith. Neither a show-off stylist nor a laid back crooner, Peyroux takes the stage at Three Stages. Opening is Rebecca Pidgeon, a singer-songwriter whose dual career as an actor includes several featured roles in husband David Mamet’s movies. Th, 8/23, 7:30pm. $12-$35. Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888.

List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events BUSINESS TO COMMUNITY EXPO: The Rancho Cordova Chamber of Commerce Business-toCommunity Expo is an opportunity for area businesses and organizations to showcase goods and services to the residents and businesses of Rancho Cordova and surrounding areas. The expo will feature nearly 50 exhibition booths, including some from well-known local restaurants offering food samplings. Th, 8/23, 10am-2pm. Free. Rancho Cordova City Hall, 2729 Prospect Park Dr. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 273-5688.

RADUNARE BUNGA BUNGA: As part of Midtown Cocktail Week, Hot Italian presents the “Bunga Bunga” party with Italian cocktails and affogati (gelato with Italian liqueur) and more. A prize will go to the best Silvio Berlusconi lookalike. Th, 8/23, 610pm. Free; cost of food extra. Hot Italian, 1627 16th St.; (916) 444-3000; http://midtown cocktailweek.org/archives/362.

Kids’ Stuff SACRAMENTO CELEBRATES LITERACY: Sacramento Reads presents its second annual Celebration of Literacy Fair. Enjoy free admission to Fairytale Town, catered barbecue, activities, a chance to win an eReader, and receive resources for kids and adults. Th, 8/23, 5:30-7:30pm. Free. Fairytale Town, 3901 Land Park Dr.; (916) 808-7462; www.sacramentoreads.com.

Literary Events LIBRARY BOOK CLUB: The group will discuss Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear. Th, 8/23, 7pm. Free. North Natomas Library, 4660 Via Ingoglia; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Concerts NIGHT OF MUSIC AND SPOKEN WORD: This event highlights the love of all music used in various prayers. A call to prayer by a member of the Islam faith will get it started. Choirs and readings from various scriptural references of many faiths in Sacramento round out the event. Th, 8/23, 7:30pm. Call for pricing. Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, 1017 11th St.; (916) 444-3071.

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DON’T MISS! LABYRINTH & THE LOST BOYS:

Sacramento Horror Film Festival’s Cinema By Dark presents a double feature of two beloved cult classics presented in high definition. Dress up as your favorite Labyrinth or Lost Boys characters to win prizes. F, 8/24, 8pm. $7. Colonial Theatre, 3522 Stockton Blvd.; (916) 869-8954; www.sachorrorfilmfest.com.

Special Events CAREER FAIR: This career fair features workshops for resumes and interviewing, and opportunities to meet employers looking to hire. Childcare is available during the event for $5. F, 8/24, 9am-noon. Free. Roseville Sports Center, 1545 Pleasant Grove Blvd. in Roseville; (916) 774-5990; www.placer.ca.gov/jobfair.

CHIPPING AWAY AT CHILDHOOD CANCER: Join this charity golf

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event to raise money for children with cancer. Beverages and snacks from local restaurants will keep you fueled on the course, and a reception, awards, raffle and auction will follow the golf tournament. F, 8/24, 8am-4pm. Call for pricing. Morgan Creek Golf and Country Club, 8791 Morgan Creek Ln. in Roseville; (916) 784-6786; www.morgancreekclub.com.

EARTHQUAKE STREET FESTIVAL: The festivities begin with entertainment on Main Street from 5 to 7:30 p.m., including the Inspire Street Dancers, live music with Kari King & Friends, ballet folklorico, lariat performances and mariachi music with Los Charros Los Caporales. There will also be free children’s games with prizes, coordinated by the Winters Parent Teacher Association. F, 8/24, 5-11pm. Free. Main Street in Downtown Winters.

REPEAL PROHIBITION RALLY: Grange is transforming itself into a 1920s cocktail rally, a high-style political rally full of sophisticated libations, dancing girls, and spirit-lifting sounds. It’s part of Midtown Cocktail Week. F, 8/24, 5pm-midnight. Free. Grange Restaurant, 926 J St.; (916) 492-4450; http://midtown cocktailweek.org/archives/358.

Film MOVIE NIGHT: It’s a summer blast from the past at Free Movie Night at Village Green Park. The featured flick is Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. Bring a blanket, lawn chairs and the entire family. Come hungry; food trucks will be there. F, 8/24, 8:45pm. Free. Village Green Park, 3141 Bridgeway Dr. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 273-5704; www.cordovacouncil.org.

Literary Events MEET LOCAL AUTHOR OF DINOSAUR JAZZ: Michael Panush, a local author of several books, will be signing and discussing his new novel, Dinosaur Jazz, recently published by Curiosity Quills. Dinosaur Jazz is a story of a lost world in the 1920s. F, 8/24, 7:30pm. Free. Avid Reader, 617 Second Ave. in Davis;

DOGS

give us so much joy. Sometimes, just looking at one’s face can send our anxiety level plummeting (see: www.cuteoverload.com, www.icanhascheezburger.com and www.boothedog.net). We humans employ our four-legged canine friends as actors, hunters, guards, rescuers, therapists and guides. So why not give them back a little bit of the unconditional love we get from them? If you’re not already a dog lover, you might become one after this weekend’s Woofstock festival in Rocklin. The annual Woodstock-themed dog event benefiting various local canine-rescue organizations celebrates everything canine related. Bring your dog to enjoy a 3k dog walk/run, an open dog park, dog talent competitions, dog-themed art, dog races, costume competitions and dog-adoption opportunities. Additionally, there will be vendors, food (both for humans and dogs) and music from local party band Mad Dash. Sunday, August 26; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; free. Johnson-Springview Park, 5480 Fifth Street in Rocklin; (916) 768-9781; www.woofstocknorcal.com.

Here’s a rough (pun intended) schedule from the event’s website:

9 a.m.: A 3K run/walk begins (registration opens at 8:30 a.m.). 10 a.m.: Most of Woofstock’s events begin at various park locations at 10 a.m., including an art show, a costume contest, the Mr. and Mrs. Woofstock contest, an agility competition, and a calendar giveaway. Rescue Row also opens for adoptions, the dog park opens, free play on the field begins, dog-training instruction begins and That’s My Dog contest entries are accepted.

10:45 a.m.: Woofstock trivia contest begins. 11 a.m.: Dog training demonstrations and wiener dog races begin. 11:30 a.m.: That’s My Dog contest winners announced. 11:45 a.m.: Pet Idol contest winners announced. Noon: Mad Dash performs a variety of oldies and current top 40 hits.

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(916) 346-7779; www.avidreaderbooks.com/ event/dinosaur-jazz-michaelpanush.

Concerts AN EVENING OF HOT & COOL AMERICAN MUSIC: The Parkview 100th Anniversary Concert Series features guest artist, pianist Jennifer Reason performing music by George Gershwin, Eric Ewazen, Scott Joplin, Gwyneth Walker, John Williams, David Uber, Dizzy Gillespie and more. Also, hear the United States premier of “Silent Ocean” by Karen Tanaka and the California premier of “Trumpet Songs” by Jennifer Higdon. F, 8/24, 7pm. $10. Parkview Presbyterian Church, 727 T St.; (916) 835-7426; www.curvdaire.com.

JEFFREY SIEGEL: Keyboard Conversations with distinguished pianist Jeffrey Siegel promises an exciting exploration of some of the best-loved works in the classical canon. The program will include performance and commentary on works by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Grieg, Gershwin, de Falla, RimskyKorsakov and others. F, 8/24, 7:30pm. $7-$29. Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888.

SNAP JACKSON & THE KNOCK ON WOOD PLAYERS: An outdoor concert series returns with an evening of rousing Americana music. Snap Jackson’s original songs have a liveliness that zips across the sound barrier. If your feet aren’t dancing after a song or two, you might just be tied down. F, 8/24, 7:30pm. $8-$18. Hutchins Street Square, 125 S. Hutchins St. in Lodi; (209) 333-5550; www.hutchinsstreetsquare.com.

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DON’T MISS! MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL:

The City of Elk Grove is hosting the Multicultural Festival, which features ethnic foods, music, entertainment, fashion shows and activities for kids. This day-long festival is Elk Grove’s premier community-wide celebration of diversity, and is hosted by the City of Elk Grove’s Multicultural Committee. Sa, 8/25, 10am-6pm. Free. Elk Grove Regional Park, 9950 Elk Grove-Florin Rd. in Elk Grove; (916) 478-2232; www.elkgrovecity.org.

Special Events BODHISATTVA, SUPERSTAR: View a screening of Bodhisattva, Superstar, a new film by multimedia artist Michael Trigilio which confronts American popular culture’s habit of addressing the subject of religion with alternating degrees of deluded piety or flippant scorn. Popular culture’s treatment of Buddhism often is ensnared by the language of marketing, using Buddhist language or images to sell things. Sa, 8/25, 7-9pm. $5-$10. The Yoga Seed Collective; 1400 E St. B; (316) 209-3242; www.facebook.com/sacurbandharma.

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TEQUILA, MUSIC & ART EXPO: Agave52 and Alebrijes Mexican Bistro, will be taking over one block of Oak Street in front of Alebrijes Bistro in Lodi. This expo features demonstrations, classes and more than 60 types of tequila, mezcal, Mexican rum, beer, cognac, whisky and wine. Sa, 8/25, 59pm. $35-$50. Alebrijes Mexican Bistro, 10 West Oak St. in Lodi; (415) 786-3990; https://agave52lodi.eventbrite. com.

Sacramento’s first B-boy league. It’s a three-on-three tournament-style dance competition that will feature the best B-boys Northern California has to offer. There will also be a two-on-two allstyles battle open to any one and everyone of any style. Sa, 8/25, 4-10pm. $8. Collings West Sacramento Teen Center, 541 Merkley Ave. in West Sacramento; (916) 365-2269; www.freshandflyproductions .com.

A NIGHT OUT AT THE MANSION: Join a Midtown Cocktail Week celebration on the Governor’s Mansion lawn. The punch-filled evening will include libations crafted by your local chapter of the U.S. Bartenders Guild featuring fine products from House Spirits Distillery. Guests can also sample appetizers from Restaurant Thirt3en, listen to live music and tour the mansion. Sa, 8/25, 6-9pm. $20-$25. Governors Mansion State Historic Park, 1526 H St.; (916) 323-3047; http://midtown cocktailweek.org/archives/354.

SACRED SACRIFICERS VS. HOUSTON ALL STARS: See the Sacred City Derby Girls take on the allstars from Houston Roller Derby. All ages are welcome. A raffle, beer garden and other surprises await attendees. Sa, 8/25, 7pm. $5-$15. Roller King, 889 Riverside Ave. in Roseville; (916) 783-0918; www.brown papertickets.com/event/259779.

Call for Artists NUTCRACKER AUDITIONS: Placer Theatre Ballet is dedicated to the joy of storytelling through the art of dance. Dancers of all ages from throughout the region are invited to the Nutcracker’s open auditions. Visit the website for role and age requirements. Sa, 8/25, 9am-6pm. Conservatory of Dance, 4561 Pacific St. in Rocklin; (916) 630-7820; www.placertheatreballet.org.

Film REPO! THE GENETIC OPERA: In this film, the year is 2056 and organ repossession is now legal. Where will people run when the Repo Man comes? Enjoy the rising cult phenomenon as you never have before—with a live shadow cast. Sa, 8/25, 8pm. $15-$25. Colonial Theatre, 3522 Stockton Blvd.; (916) 869-8954; www.sachorrorfilmfest.com.

Kids’ Stuff PACK OF ANIMAL FUN: Pack of Animal Fun is literally a backpack filled with animal stories, puppets and activities. Check out a pack and have some fun. Sa, 8/25, 11am-1pm. $2. Placer Nature Center, 3700 Christian Valley Rd. in Auburn;

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RAINBOW FAMILY STORYTIME: All are welcome at this monthly storytime sponsored by Sacramento Rainbow Families. Storytime for little ones begins at 10 a.m. Book discussion and crafting for school-age children begins at 11 a.m. This is an opportunity for LGBT parents and families to meet, spend time together and enjoy special activities highlighting colorful Rainbow Families. Fourth Sa of

every month, 10am-noon through 9/1. Opens 8/25. Free. McKinley

KINGS OF THE SCENE DANCE BATTLE: Kings of the Scene is

FRONTLINES

cians Bitnay Pathak, Matthew Montfort, and Joe Fajen will perform raaga, the classical music of India. Created thousands of years ago and each having its own name, notes and emotional mood, raagas are fixed and timeless, yet in performance, musicians must improvise on the raaga using traditional note patterns in new ways. Sa, 8/25, 8-10pm. $15$18. North Columbia Schoolhouse Cultural Center, 179894 Tyler Foote Rd. in Nevada City; (530) 265-2826; www.northcolumbiaschool house.org.

(530) 878-6053, Ext. 608; http://placernaturecenter.org.

Library, 601 Alhambra Blvd.; (916) 498-8494; www.saclibrary.org.

singer specializing in traditional music, with particular experience in Eastern European styles. She has studied with many traditional singers and traveled extensively, living for some months in Hungary and Greece and visiting Russia, Georgia, Turkey, Albania, Bulgaria, Bosnia, Montenegro, Croatia and India. Sa, 8/25, 8pm. $13-$15. Village Homes Community Center, 2661 Portage Bay East in Davis; (530) 867-1032; www.timnatalmusic.com.

DAVIS RANCH MUD AND OBSTACLE RUN: Challenge your body, mind and endurance to test yourself in all-around strength, endurance, mental toughness, and esprit de corps. This event benefits the Sacramento Children’s Home and the Elk Grove Food Bank. Sa, 8/25, 8am3pm. Call for pricing. Davis Ranch, 13211 Jackson Rd. in Sloughhouse; (916) 806-3950; www.toughndirty.com.

LEVEL UP FOOD & LOUNGE: ArtTrivia/ArtTini, Paintings and mixed-media pieces by Sacramento artistKathy Blackburn are currently on exhibit at LevelUp Lounge. Music, artist trivia, drink and food specials are a part of the event. Su, 8/26, 6-8pm. Free. 2431 J St.; (916) 448-8768.

Stage A CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE CABARET: Graham-A-Rama presents the Choose Your Own Adventure Cabaret. In this original cabaret show based on the Choose Your Own Adventure books, the audience gets to decide what happens. Su, 8/26, 7pm. $15. The Cosmopolitan Cabaret, 1000 K St.; (916) 557-1999; www.californiamusical theatre.com.

CONCERT AT THE RANGE: Enjoy a concert with Element Of Soul. There will also be tasty grub and ice cold microbrews. Whack some range balls, enjoy adult beverages, eat some barbecue and listen to live music. Sa, 8/25, 8pm. Free. Haggin Oaks Golf Complex; 3645 Fulton Ave.; (916) 481-4653; www.hagginoaks.com.

Volunteer ADOPT-A-PARK DAY: Join neighbors and friends for a day of service at Southside Park. Up to 100 volunteers are needed to clean out the pond. Wear close-toed shoes, bring gloves and wear sunscreen and a hat. Sa, 8/25, 9am. Free. Southside Park, 2115 6th St.; (916) 808-5200.

27MON

DON’T MISS! NEIL DIAMOND: Rock and pop icon Neil Diamond, a 2011 Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame inductee and 2011 Kennedy Center honoree, will take his greatest hits on the road on a much-anticipated North American tour. The tour will feature all of Neil Diamond’s classic favorites. M, 8/27, 8pm. $55$120. Power Balance Pavilion, 1 Sports Pkwy.; (916) 649-8497; www.arcoarena.com.

26SUN

Now Playing CHILDRENS MUSICAL THEATER WORKSHOP: Musical Mayhem Productions announces its fall musical theater workshop, The Pirates of Penzance, Jr. Wacky, irreverent and as entertaining as it’s predecessor from 1879, this play is farce featuring sentimental pirates, bumbling policemen, dim-witted young lovers, dewy-eyed daughters and an eccentric Major—all morally bound to the oftenridiculous dictates of honor and duty. Sa, 8/25, 11am-noon. $299. Musical Mayhem Productions, 9299 E. Stockton 10 in Elk Grove; (916) 525-2995; www.mmpkids.com.

DON’T MISS! JAPANESE GHOST STORIES:

Community Asian Theatre of the Sierra presents monodramas performed by Brenda Wong Aoki, threetime National Endowment of the Arts Theatre Fellow. Dating back thousands of years in Japan, the Japanese people have told scary stories during the summer heat to “cool off,” because the stories send “chills up and down your spine.” Su, 8/26, 2-4pm. $18$20. Nevada Theatre, 401 Broad St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-2990; www.catsweb.org.

Concerts THREE DOG NIGHT AND AMERICA: Enjoy an evening of fun with music icons Three Dog Night and the famous EnglishAmerican folk rock band, America. Both have a deep catalog of well-known tunes you’re sure to recognize. Sa, 8/25, 8pm. $49.50-$67.50. Sunrise Market Place, 5912 Sunrise Mall in Citrus Heights; (916) 536-1195; www.sunrise marketplace.com/info/ concerts.

seersucker blazers, slip on your favorite hat and get gussied up in your Derby best. The Golden Bear and the and Midtown Cocktail Week are throwing a Southern Soiree. This event will include a local music showcase, barbecue plates, soapbox speeches, a wax-dipping station, an awards ceremony, and of course, libations. Su, 8/26, 4pm2am. Free. The Golden Bear, 2326 K St.; (916) 441-2242; http://midtowncocktailweek. org/archives/350.

concert by Brodie Stewart, who grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento. He’s branched beyond country and continues to write and produce songs for major and independent label artists. Sa, 8/25, 6-10pm. $20$25. Dingus McGees, 14500 Musso Rd. in Auburn; (530) 8781000; www.dingusmcgees.com.

CLASSICAL RAGA IN NEVADA CITY: Sohini Sangeet Academy musi-

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THE BAR MITZVAH AND THE BEAST: Five years ago, Matt

Biers-Ariel and his family set out on a cross country cycling trip to celebrate son Yonah’s 13th birthday, a physical ride of passage for a computer gameloving son who refused to have a bar mitzvah. Join Matt for a digital presentation of his family’s adventure. W, 8/29, 78:30pm. Free. REI Sacramento, 1790 Expo Pkwy.; (916) 924-8900; www.rei.com/event/42284/s ession/54141/10062012.

ONGOING

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

Art Galleries

the Blind Pig every Tuesday for three rounds of questions, where the winner is given a $25 gift certificate to the bar. Grab a beer and a bite to eat, take a quiz and have some fun. Teams must be between two and six players. Tu, 8pm through 12/18. Free. The Blind Pig, 4720 El

AFTER

DON’T MISS!

effective read-aloud techniques from Francie Dillon, a professor of children’s literature at Sacramento State University. Her simple techniques make reading and learning fun for everyone. This workshop is free, but preregistration is required. W, 8/29, 4:30pm. Free. Fairytale Town, 3901 Land Park Dr.; (916) 8087462; www.fairytaletown.org.

QUESTIONABLE TRIVIA AT THE BLIND PIG: Join Questionable Trivia at

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29WED

GIVING VOICE TO CHILDRENS LITERATURE: Learn easy and

Special Events

A RT S & C U LT U R E

wheelbarrow and join the after-work mulching party at McKinley Park. Volunteers are needed to help care for the park by applying mulch rings around the park trees. The event is supported by the City of Sacramento Parks and Recreation Department and the Sacramento Tree Foundation. Mulch is provided by the City of Sacramento Urban Forestry Service. Bring your own, or use provided wheelbarrows, gloves and rakes. Tu, 8/28, 6-8pm. Free. McKinley Park, 601 Alhambra Blvd.; (916) 974-4333; www.sactree.com.

Classes

new documentary on genetically engineered food, directed by Dr. Jeffrey Smith. Why has the government ignored repeated warnings by its own scientists and allowed untested genetically modified crops into our environment and food? Learn more about this, and Proposition 37. Tu, 8/28, 5:30 & 8pm. $7-$10. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 442-5189; www.tickets.com/browse other.cgi?minpid=7324538.

Swerving at Full Speed, a reflection by Dr. David Thompson, executive director and Chaplain of The Interfaith Experience. The Experience is

MULCH MADNESS: Grab your

of three compete in two short rounds of trivia, followed by a second contest of skill which revolves weekly. Drink and merchandise prizes are awarded to the top teams. You can sign up as a team, or as an individual and be placed on a team. W, 8:30-10:30pm through 12/19. Free. Pine Cove Tavern, 502 29th St.; (916) 446-3624; www.pinecovetavern.com.

GENETIC ROULETTE: Watch a

SWERVING AT FULL SPEED: Hear

Volunteer

ULTIMATE BAR CHALLENGE: Teams

DON’T MISS!

A SOUTHERN SOIREE: Pull out your

Camino Drive in Carmichael; (916) 482-2671; http://questionabletrivia.com/where-and-when.

Special Events

28TUES

Special Events

BRODIE STEWART: Hear a country

STORY

Art Galleries

EAST EUROPEAN FOLK MUSIC WITH LILY STORM: Lily Storm is a

Sports & Recreation

FEATURE

an interfaith community working to find common ground between people of diverse beliefs and to eliminate religiously motivated violence and poverty worldwide. Su, 8/26, 4:04pm. Free. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1430 J St.; (916) 447-2712; http://experience sacramento.org.

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LITTLE RELICS BOUTIQUE & GALLERIA: Vacation for the Soul, Jay Spooner and David Arnold take photographry enthusiasts around the world to view the most sacred places and create an exquisite exhibit. Through 8/31, 11am-6pm. Free. 908 21st St.; (916) 716-2319.

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www.EatatOpa.cOm Here are some just to name a few... Make-A-Wish Foundation of Sacramento • Firefighters Burn Institute • Jesuit High School • Saint Anthony Parish • Law Enforcement Chaplainey-Sacramento • Mercy Foundation • Neighbor Works • Easter Seals Superior CA • In Alliance • Mustard Seed School • Sacramento French Film Festival • Stanford Home for Children • American Heart Association • National Brain Tumor Society • Happy Tails Pet Sanctuary • Scooter’s Pals Dog Rescue • CSUS, New Student Orientation, Leaning Skills Center, College of Education • St. Mary Elementary School • Safetyville USA • Tiny Tots Preschool, Inc. • Christian Brothers Alumni Association • Girl Scouts Heart of Central CA • River Park Youth Baseball • Francis House • Camellia Basic Elementary School • Camellia Symphony Orchestra • American Lung Association • Empty Bowls-River City Food Bank • Courtyard School • UC Davis Regional Burn Center • American River College Respiratory Care Club • March of Dimes • Sacramento State Athletic Association • William C. Bean Jr. Memorial Foundation • Crocker/Riverside Elementary School • KVIE, Inc. • St. Anne Greek Orthodox Church • Sacramento Country Day School • Raley’s Grape Escape • Rotary Club of Laguna Sunrise • Sierra Oaks Parents/Teachers Association • Department of Health Care Services • Divine Senior Catholic Church • Youth for Christ • Nor-Cal Services for Deaf and Hard of Hearing • Leonardo da Vinci School Parent Teacher Council • St. Robert School • Central Nursery School • Foulks Ranch Elementary School • Central CA Hemophilia Foundation • Respiratory Care Club • Sacramento Children’s Chorus • Davis Waldorf School • Mariemont Elementary School • Sacramento SPCA • Sacramento City Teachers Association • Agape Villages Foster Family Agency • Del Dayo Elementary School • Camellia Waldorf School • Sacramento City Unified School District • Saint Mary’s Church • UC Davis School of Medicine • Active 20/30 Club of Greater Sacramento • St. Francis Assisi Elementary School • McGeorge Women’s Caucus • Sacramento Area Emergency Housing Center • The Sacramento Zoological Society • Getty Owl Foundation • Sacramento Area YMCA • Elk Grove High School Music Boosters • American Legion • Kibble & Bids • Easter Seals • CSUS Science Education Equity Program • Dante Club • The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society • Gamma Sigma • Faith Presbyterian • Knights of Columbus • Shriner’s Hospital for Children • Arthritis Foundation • Sierra Curtis Neighborhood Association • CA Montessori Project • OKIZU • River City Recovery Center, Inc. • Mercy General Hospital • Saint Katherine Greek Orthodox Church • Great Orthodox Ladies Society • Mission Oaks Recreation & Park District • Del Oro High School • American Heart Association • Our Lady of the Assumption School • Phoebe Apperson Hearst Elementary • American Cancer Society • United States Mission of Sacramento • Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary • CSUS Peer Mentors • Sacramento Court Appointed • Special Advocate • Pops in the Park • Florin Japanese American Citizens League • Parkinson’s Association • VetFund Foundation • St. Francis Catholic High School • West Campus Foundation for Excellence • San Juan Unified School District • Sierra Arden Unified Church of Christ • Greek American Progressive Association • Mustard Seed Spin • East Sac Chamber of Commerce • Jim Durborough Golf Tournament

32   |   SN&R   |   08.23.12

@.0?.:2;A<  1.C6@ Â&#x2018; 12C2?2@=B/0<:

THINK FREE.

BEST MEDITERRANEAN

DISH

2012

Gringo-wiches

SN & R

NOM I N E E

BEST BRUNCH

See FOOD STUFF

Close enough for jazz Firestone Public House 1132 16th Street, (916) 446-0888, www.firestonepublichouse.com Remember that heady 2007-era prerecession time and how it played out for businesses in Sacramento? by There were so many grand plans coming thick Becky and fast that some “Keep Midtown janky”-type Grunewald grid residents were worried that Sac would turn into a valet-luxury-douche-bag city. The 2009 opening of a California Pizza Kitchen in the historic Firestone building, located in the heart of downtown, epitomized this fear. But lo and behold, Sacramento’s tastes proved to be more sophisticated than the city is usually given credit for, and the downtown branch of the chain closed in July 2011. In the wake of its closing, two local prominent Rating: restaurant families, the Wongs and the DeVere ★★★ Whites, whose previous separate ventures include The Park Ultra Lounge and de Vere’s Irish Pub Dinner for one: respectively, announced a joint venture: a sports $15 - $20 bar serving pizza and sandwiches, with a focus on craft beer. Not exactly a groundbreaking concept, but these two families have proven to have their fingers on the pulse of Sacramento. Maybe some locals could thrive where a corporation withered. This seems to be the case, as there’s a 25minute wait at 11:30 a.m. for Sunday brunch at the recently opened Firestone Public House. Bottomless mimosas are flowing, and high fives are exchanged by strangers. ★ A texting young lady at the bar chirps to her POOR companion, “Did I meet her last night? Was I ★★ that stoned?” FAIR To fit in, I order the Dirty Blonde, a cocktail ★★★ made with Bombay Sapphire gin, St-Germain GOOD and citrus. The drink is strong with gin, and ★★★★ pretty soon, I’m as buzzed as everyone else. EXCELLENT The interior is industrial chic, with metal-stud★★★★★ ded walls and large hanging lamps lined with EXTRAORDINARY burlap. Metal kegs line the walls, and flat-screen high-definition TVs are everywhere—thankfully, tuned in with the sound off. Even with the tall ceilings, open floor plan and all that metal, the noise level here is tolerable, and one doesn’t have to strain to hear a companion. The bar is the centerpiece of the room, with a full stock of liquor and 60 beers on draught. The beer list mostly comprises typical stuff found elsewhere in town Still hungry? (e.g., Lagunitas IPA and Moose Drool Brown Search SN&R’s Ale) but also includes a smattering of well-known “Dining Directory” to Belgians (Chimay Brewery, Delirium Tremens, find local restaurants etc.), as well as a few seasonal and rotating taps. by name or by type of When the buzzer goes off, I’m led to a large food. Sushi, Mexican, Indian, Italian— booth and quickly receive a menu and glass of discover it all in the water. This sets the tone for the professional and “Dining” section at courteous service I’ll experience on every visit. www.newsreview.com. Transfer your card from the bar to your table? No problem. Sauce on the side? It arrives that way. I ask my server about the rotating tap from The Bruery, an excellent SoCal brewery, and not only does she know what it is, she asks, “Have you been there? It’s super fun!” Our appetizers arrive quickly; hunks of poached chicken and avocado float in the BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

tomatoey, savory tortilla soup. The menu doesn’t specify that the avocado spring rolls are deepfried, but unfortunately, they are. Hot avocado is never a good idea. The pizza emerges from the handsome yellow-tiled wood-fired pizza oven with a good char and bubble on the crust, but the thick blanket of grated mozzarella makes it taste old school, for good and for bad. The restaurant does, however, also offer a simple pizza with fresh mozzarella and tomato sauce.

Hot avocado is never a good idea. The Ahi Tuna Burger patty has a mushy texture and lacks flavor, but the quick-pickled sliced cucumbers, Sriracha-sauce mayonnaise and daikon sprouts add crunch and a slightly spicy bite. A drippy chicken salad, served between thick slices of sourdough, is made with generous chunks of chicken and tastes of celery. The Reuben sandwich would be the real deal if the too-thick bread had more than a passing acquaintance with rye flour. Still, its fatty, delightful corned beef makes it close enough for jazz. On another visit, this one on a Saturday night, the wait is 45 minutes, and the short shorts and flesh-colored platform heels are in full effect with the ladies. Firestone seems to have mastered the trick of exuding a casual, flipflop vibe during the day and serving as a dressy see-and-be-seen spot at night. The DeVere Whites and the Wongs know what Sacramento wants: good beer, solid pub grub, and a casual, unpretentious atmosphere. Ω

2968 Freeport Blvd Sacramento, CA 95818 916-447-3237 ilovedadskitchen.com

we love you. vote for us!

THE V WORD Smells like bean spirit Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love had the right idea when they middle-named their baby girl Bean, because beans are the coolest. Chock-full of nutrients, yet low in fat and calories, beans are a super food. Plus, they’re versatile, and there are hundreds of kinds: Fall in taste-bud love with kidney beans in green salads, baby limas with rice, or discover the yellowishivory mayacoba, with a taste reminiscent of the pinto. It’s available at many grocers and also at Napa’s Rancho Gordo (www.ranchogordo.com), along with other gorgeous heirloom beans such as the fetching yellow eyes: white with a sunny ochre iris. And if you fear the smells of bean spirits, read up on gas-reducing tips at http://tinyurl.com/ beansgas, and truly enjoy cool beans.

fresh seafood + raw bar + spirits

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1015 9th Street | Sac 916.498.9224 blackbird-kitchen.com

—Shoka STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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08.23.12

best new restaurant |

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DISH

Downtown

Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble tables and light wooden chairs, there’s an airy atmosphere, casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers an espresso bar and a wide assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast crowd as well as sweets, including DayGlo macarons. For the lunch-inclined, there are soups, salads, sandwiches and meat or meatless quiche. One of the authentic touches is the spare use of condiments. The smoked salmon is enlivened by dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick and richly flavored, and, in a nice touch, a puff pastry floats in the tureen as accompaniment. Everything is surprisingly reasonable. Half a sandwich and soup is $7.25. A caprese baguette is $5.25. Ham and cheese is $5.75. There’s a lot to like about Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors close at 6pm. French. 901 K St., (916) 551-1500. Meal for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 G.L.

Midtown

The Porch The Porch is light and white with a vibe that suggests the airy sweep of an antebellum Charleston eatery. One can only

The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar Resistance is futile when it comes to Red Rabbit’s desserts. The berry-infused icecream sandwich is bright and refreshing with a chewy shell that dovetails neatly with the smooth fruity interior. But there’s less effusiveness for the entrees. The Bastard Banh Mi doesn’t improve on the original. A number of items from the “Farm to Plate,” “Tasty Snacks” and “Buns” sections of the menu land high in the plus column, however. Any place that offers chimichurri rocks hard.

2 OFF $1 OFF

Sampino’s Towne Foods Sampino’s Towne Foods turns out to be a bright jewel in a drab Alkali Flat strip mall of paycheck cashers and laundromat. It’s everything an Italian deli should be and more, right down to the Louie Prima on the box and the timpano in the refrigerated display case. Several lobbyists, who elect to drive the six to seven blocks from their offices near the capitol, to pick up sandwiches or—in one instance—five meatballs, begin spewing

superlatives when asked their views on Sampino’s. Italian Deli. 1607 F St., (916) 441-2372. Dinner for one: $7-$15. ★★★★1⁄2 G.L.

ry and thyme, and the surprisingly sublime mixture of celery and pineapple. American. 1409 R St., (916) 231-9121.$10-$20. ★★★ 1⁄2 B.G.

Shady Lady Saloon

Thir13en From the start—and, lo,

So many bars try to do bar snacks, and so many fail. Shady Lady, however, nails it. The fried green tomatoes are punched up with a tarragon rémoulade and the huge charcuterie board is more like a groaning board, stocked with abundant regional meats and cheeses. The pickle plate looks like Peter Rabbit’s dream, all teeny turnips and tangy carrot chunks. Generally excellent, the saloon’s cocktail list veers from the classics with a list of bartendercreated drinks with unusual, but wisely considered flavor combinations: cilantro and tequila, blackber-

these many weeks hence—the situp-take-notice plate remains the pork tonnato sandwich. It’s the Italian peasant spread or sauce made with tonno—tuna—tonnato that empowers this open-face masterwork. Spread on a toasted half baguette, the tonnato is the foundation upon which the pork rests. Above the pork is an awning of mixed greens, with a generous overhang, sprinkled with not enough crispy onions and paperthin slices of pickled fennel. There isn’t space to wax poetic about the cordon bleu sandwich, the burger,

the designer cocktails or the fizzy water from Wales. See for yourself. Very authoritative. American. 1300 H St., (916) 594-7669. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★★1⁄2 G.L.

East Sac

Formoli’s Bistro Formoli’s is the other half of the restaurant swap on J Street that sent Vanilla Bean Bistro (formerly known as Gonul’s J Street Cafe) to Formoli’s old warren and brought Formoli’s into its current high-ceilinged, spare, dark cranberry space of black tables and chairs just six blocks away. Flavor combinations are a big part of the Formoli playbook, and the blend of the tower’s components is the payoff just as it is in the salad of beets—wafer-thin enough

BREW THE RIGHT THING Mikkeller time

vOTE US BEST INDIAN CUISINE $

Here it enlivens the Farm Animal Lollipops snack—particularly the lamb—and the mayor-ofMunchkin-City-sized lamb bocadillas. American. 2718 J St., (916) 706-2275. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★1⁄2 G.L.

MUST DRINK:

I stumbled into Pangaea Two Brews Cafe this past weekend and whoa! All kinds of Christmas Day action, including a handful of fresh bottles from Danish brewer Mikkeller. There were lambics—three in fact, including Spontantkriek, a tart, cherry-lemon brew with a pink head. Snobs on RateBeer say it’s masquerading as a Cantillon Kriek—of course it is, and I’ll drink it, anyway. With a bottle of bourbonbarrel-aged Monk’s Brew, I did the wise thing and stored it in the Miller “cellar,” a.k.a. my closet. Will sip it this winter to save on the PG&E bill. As for now, I split a Mikkeller Overall IPA with a friend— dry and piney but with a sour grapefruit punch, these 12 ounces put bitter and tannic West Coast IPAs to shame. Pangaea Two Brews Cafe, 2743 Franklin Boulevard; (916) 454-4942.

DO SH AY N BY HAYL EY

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald and Greg Lucas, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

envy the extensive on-site research conducted by chef Jon Clemens and business partners John Lopez and Jerry Mitchell, creators of Capitol Garage. The most enjoyable menu selections are salads or seafood sandwiches or entrees. Slaw on the barbecue pork sandwich elevates its status, and its pickled vegetables are sweet and tart, adding an additional dimension. The shrimp and grits dish, while laden with cheddar and gravy, is a synergistic mélange—perhaps The Porch’s trademark dish. Also in the running is the purloo, the low country’s version of jambalaya, with andouille, crunchy crawfish appendages, and the same sautéed bell peppers and onions that also appear in the grits. Southern. 1815 K St., (916) 444-2423. Dinner for one: $20-$30. ★★★ G.L.

ILLUSTR AT IO

Where to eat?

Beer: Old Numbskull (barley wine) Brewer: AleSmith Brewing Company Where: Nugget Market, 2000 Town Center Plaza

in West Sacramento; (916) 375-8700

Beer: Summer Solstice Cerveza Crema Brewer: Anderson Valley Brewing Company Where: Burgers & Brew, 1409 R Street; (916)

442-0900

Beer: Hop Notch (draft) Brewer: Uinta Brewing Company Where: The Shack, 5201 Folsom Boulevard;

(916) 457-5997

—Nick Miller

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Juno’s Kitchen & Delicatessen To quote Gov. Jerry Brown from his first iteration as California’s chief executive more than 30 years ago: “Small is beautiful.” Juno’s proves this axiom in spades. The menu is fairly compact and slanted more toward lunch than dinner. Juno’s macaroni and cheese, which comes with rock shrimp on rigatoni, a Grana Padano, Gruyère and cheddar trio and a dusting of paprika, is a creative take on a comfort-food classic. In the traditional-sandwich realm, all start out with the advantage of Juno’s homemade sour—but not sourdough—bread with its crunchy crust and soft interior. In the soppressata salami sandwich, the bread amplifies the tartness of the pepperoncini while the turkey sandwich with provolone, tomato, arugula and pesto requires several napkins as the oil in the pesto seeps inexorably through the airy bread slices. American. 3675 J St., (916) 456-4522. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★★ G.L.

Mamma Susanna’s Ristorante Italiano Most commonly referred to by its patrons as the neighborhood restaurant, there is no shortage of options on the menu with nearly a dozen or so pastas, even more types of pizzas, a smattering of salads and various entrees, including the piccata chicken or veal dish that Mamma

Susanna’s counts as one of her specialties. Of the pastas and pizzas, the norcina tastes like and looks like an orangey vodka sauce with roasted red-pepper slices and sausage rounds tossed in a bed of penne. While the menu claims spicy, some red chili flakes do the trick. Italian. 5487 Carlson Dr., (916) 452-7465. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★ G.L.

Vanilla Bean Bistro Gonul’s J Street Cafe has moved up the street and evolved into the Vanilla Bean Bistro. Its narrow, low-ceilinged coziness is consonant with its understated, whateverthe-impulse-inspires alchemy that owner/chef Gonul Blum, has shown over the past eight years. Blum hails from Turkey. That country’s culinary tradition provides a sturdy foundation, but for her, it serves more as a launching pad. A recurring feature practiced here is the inclusion of fruit—preserved and fresh—in many dishes. And the tabbouleh delivers a roundhousepunch flavor combination. Turkish. 3260-B J St., (916) 457-1155. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★1⁄2 G.L.

North Sac

Asian Café Asian Café serves both Thai and Lao food, but go for the Lao specialties, which rely on flavoring staples such as fish sauce, lime juice, galangal and lemongrass, lots of herbs, and chilies. One of the most common dishes in Lao cuisine is larb, a dish of chopped meat laced with herbs, chilies and lime. At Asian Café, it adds optional offal add-ons—various organ meats, entrails, et al—to three versions of the dish: beef

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to be used interchangeably in the carpaccio—with shaved fennel, frisée, a few orange segments and pistachios laced with a stentorian balsamic vinaigrette. Mediterranean. 3839 J St., (916) 448-5699. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★ G.L.

Vietnamese.

with tripe, chicken with gizzards, or pork with pork skin. The beef salad offers a gentle respite from aggressive flavors, consisting of medium-thick chewy slices of eye of round with red bell pepper, chopped iceberg and hot raw jalapeño. The single best dish here is the nam kao tod, a crispy entree with ground pork that’s baked on the bottom of the pan with rice, then stirred and fried up fresh the next day with dried Thai chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood Ave., (916) 641-5890. Dinner for one: $10-$15. ★★★★ B.G.

6825 Stockton Blvd., Ste. 200; (916) 428-1188. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

Pho King 2 Pho King 2 takes diners on a trip to crazy-delicious town with its salads, including one off-the-menu salad featuring cold, pink tendon smothered in pickled daikon, carrot, crunchy garlic chips and peanutss and served with sweet fish sauce dressing. A beef with lemon salad, with thin slices of eye of round “cured” in lemon juice, is coated with sesame oil, herbs and chili flakes and is meant to be piled on rice crackers studded with black sesame seeds. It’s an incredible dish, and one you won’t find on a menu very often. Vietnamese. 6830 Stockton Blvd., (916) 395-9244. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★ B.G.

South Sac

Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches With banh mi, it’s the bread that sets the tone. Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches goes against the grain with bread that’s more football shaped than submarine shaped, garlic bread, and a selection of premade grab-and-go sandwiches right by the counter. And, with its substitution of butter for mayonnaise and the emphasis on pâté, Duc Huong shows a stronger than usual French influence.These details may seem trivial, but with banh mi, such small variations make all the difference. The small menu is limited to eight sandwiches (mostly pork) and two soups: chicken curry soup and a beef stew called bo kho banh mi, which comes with bread. There’s a thick float of chili oil on top of the yellow, turmeric and lemongrass-laced curry soup, which, at first, is off-putting until you realize it can be dipped into the yeasty, crusty, fluffy bread.

Tacos & Beer This is one of the area’s best Michoacán restaurants. Of its regional dishes, the enchiladas Apatzingán are unusual, filled with only a smattering of sharp cheese and diced onion, soaked in a vinegary sauce, and smothered in very lightly pickled, shredded cabbage with raw hunks of radish and avocado slices. Another specialty is the morisqueta—the ultimate comfort dish due to the unique texture of the white rice, which is as soft as an angel’s buttock. Diners also have the option to order hand-shaped, griddled-to-order tortillas. They are warm, soft, taste like corn and barely resemble those cardboard things you get at the store. Mexican. 5701 Franklin Blvd., (916) 428-7844. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

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Cocktail Week concludes Let’s be honest: You could probably use a drink. The fifth annual Midtown Cocktail Week is already underway, but comes to an end Sunday night. There are still a few classy happenings this weekend that you definitely won’t want to miss. So get out there and celebrate cocktails at these unique events. Repeal Prohibition is a stylized 1920s-themed rally celebrates high-class drinks and features music and dancing girls on Friday, August 24, at 5 p.m. at Grange Restaurant & Bar (926 J Street). Classic Summer Cocktails is a poolside party hosted by the United Lavender Party, features some of the best cocktails for the hot summer months on Saturday, August 25, from 1 to 3 p.m. at Faces Nightclub (2000 K Street). Home Bartender 101, with instruction by local bartenders and mixologists, is where attendees will learn the mixing basics, take home a bartending kit and be able to practice at home in the kitchen. It costs $75, and it happens on Sunday, August 26, from noon to 2 p.m. at Restaurant Thir13en (1300 H Street). For more information, visit www.midtowncocktailweek.org. —Jonathan Mendick

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COOLHUNTING Eat a cricket, save the world Chapul Bars When former college roommates Pat Crowley and Dan O’Neill decided to create Chapul Bars, energy bars made of milled crickets, it wasn’t to FOOD shock people. It’s because they believed crickets were a more environmentally friendly choice: Crickets are rich in protein and, comparatively, require much less grain to produce than cows or pigs. Less grain means less water usage; eating crickets could be a viable solution for saving water and reducing our carbon footprint. And 10 percent of the company’s profits aid waterconservation efforts in the American Southwest and Thailand—the two regions that inspired the bars. The bars, only available online, are available in two flavors, Thai (coconut, lime and ginger) and Chaco (dates, chocolate and peanuts). And they actually taste good—not at all like bugs. Only a small amount of insect flour is required to meet the needed 6 grams of protein. And, hey, what’s there is ground up, anyway. www.chapul.com. —Aaron Carnes

Radical speculation The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln Stephen L. Carter moves into speculative fiction with The Impeachment of Abraham Lincoln (Knopf, $26.95), set in a history where the president survived Booth’s bullet, but his vice president Andrew Johnson died. Two years later, Lincoln’s facing impeachment by the radical wing of his party and his BOOK defending law firm includes a black female law clerk, Abigail Canner. When the firm’s senior partner is murdered, Abigail steps into a murder mystery that’s also a political thriller. Carter’s well-written historical fiction isn’t that far-fetched—Johnson was impeached in 1868—but it’s far more engaging than one might expect. —Kel Munger

The year of living awkwardly Clumsy Year zine Adolescence is tough—hormones, high-school drama and overbearing parents—but the 18th year could be the worst. Sure, you’re free of school and parental interferences, but emotionally (and financially), you’re still in the thick of trying to ZINE figure things out. In Clumsy Year, New York writer Kara Comegys chronicles her life as an 18-year-old, cut-and-paste style. The small booklet (available on Etsy for $2 plus 65 cents for shipping) is third in an ongoing series with journal entries that document a summer fraught with awkwardness, fights and unsureness—but also one of dancing, hitchhiking and sleeping out under the stars. There are also vegan recipes and myriad lists (“Reasons why yesterday sucked: Not enough sleep. L-cysteine, Dave’s panic attack, too hot.”). It was, Comegys eventually concludes, “the best year of my life (so far).” www.etsy.com/listing/84950260/clumsy-year-zine. —Rachel Leibrock

Shop, find frozen nirvana Vox Open Art Market Hosted by the Gorilla Knitting Crew and Vox Sacramento—the latter a nonprofit volunteer-run art gallery that hosts free classes for kids—this monthly flea market showcases an eclectic, regional mix of DIY goods, vintage finds and tasty foods. This month’s LOCAL event, which takes place Sunday, August 26, 11 a.m to 2:30 p.m., highlights good stuff from the likes of Adventure Hats, jewelry from Cheryl’s Dope and Haute Baubles, Yummy Goodz bath and beauty products, and frozen nirvana by way of Popcycle Creamery, whose artisanal push pops (several of which are dairy-free) come in gotta-try flavors such as crème brûlée, bourbon pecan and lavender honey apricot. 1818 11th Street, www.voxsac.com. —Rachel Leibrock

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Fireballs of exhilaration A handsome but married consultant attended a work-related meeting at my home. He and I had chatted previously and discovered amazing connections. After the meeting, he lingered. I cleaned up after he left and discovered a cellphone. Early the next morning, he called about the phone. Two minutes later, the doorbell rang. I was still in my bathrobe. I handed him the phone, but he pulled the door open and stepped in. He didn’t want to leave. I’m attracted but don’t want to cross the line. His wife is pregnant with twins. Do you think he is trying to start an affair? It’s possible that he’s just a friendly, forgetful person. Or he could be a guy with no sense of appropriate boundaries. But he is probably a man who is aching because he is no longer the center of his wife’s attention. Many people are startled to discover the selflessness that parenting demands. The transition can be particularly painful for some men. A pregnant spouse can be so wrapped up in her own health and the preparations for the baby that she temporarily neglects her partner. That’s understandable. Her partner must realize that the baby’s arrival is an invitation to grow in love. Without this awareness, emotional immaturity will prevail.

by JoEy GArcIA

Joey

escaped to Dillon Beach with her dog.

It doesn’t matter if your colleague is trying to start an affair. It’s your values that are important. It doesn’t matter if your colleague is trying to start an affair. It’s your values that are important. So far, you have been present, curious and self-disciplined. Be grateful for your integrity. Continue taking steps to avoid becoming involved. His friendship may feel special, but it just complicates his relationship with his wife and with you. He is married, he’s not separated, and he’s not headed toward divorce. If he tries to flirt, call him on it like this: “What would your wife think if she heard you say that to me?” Or, “You might be lonely now, but if we were involved, that loneliness would be replaced by guilt, regret and fear

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

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with occasional fireballs of exhilaration. Is it worth it? I don’t think so.” Show him this kind of backbone, and he will be in awe of you. Yes, that means he will either back away nervously or grow in respect. Either way, you’ve done the right thing.

NEED ATTENTION?

My 15-year-old daughter says she loves her boyfriend. I told her that she is too young to understand what love is, and that she is just feeling hormones. I want to make sure my kid does not do anything with this boy that she will regret. Any ideas? Talk to your daughter like a parent who trusts her to tell the truth about her feelings, thoughts and plans. After all, she’s right: Two teens can be in love. And, yes, you’re correct, too: The love between two teens is different than the love experienced between two adults. Or, at least it should be, but, hey, let’s be honest, some adults behave childishly at times in intimate, committed relationships. Age is not a guarantee of maturity or of the capacity to love. I also want to caution you about blaming hormones. We want teens to understand that they are capable of making self-preserving decisions. By insisting that hormones are the reason for her connection, you are, in effect, saying she has no control over the whims of her body or mind. That’s not a useful life lesson. Instead, have an openminded conversation with her. Talk about your dating mistakes and concerns for her future. Don’t accuse or act like you can predict her future. Teach her what to look for in a boyfriend by being a man who communicates with respect for her intelligence and with trust in her ability to make smart choices. Ω

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Meditation of the Week: “The invention of the teenager was a mistake. Once you identify a period of life in which people get to stay out late but don’t have to pay taxes— naturally, no one wants to live any other way,” said Judith Martin, a.k.a. Miss Manners. Which direction are you growing?

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STAGE Absurdity unchained A Christopher Durang Festival Here’s a very irreverent way to welcome a new theater company to town: Pick either—or both—of the by programs that Ovation Stage is producing in Kel Munger repertory as A Christopher Durang Festival, and laugh loudly at absurd, outrageous and slightly kelm@ newsreview.com blasphemous comedy. And those six plays would be an ambitious undertaking for Ovation’s founding artistic director, Penny Kline, even if she hadn’t included four different directors and 31 local actors in the shows. Fortunately, opening weekend included an ice-cream social to benefit the Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance, which did quite a bit to offset the heat.

A Christopher Durang Festival is a busy and wide-ranging opener for a new company, with an indication that we can expect shows based on ideas and timely topics. Try one night, or both, and strap yourself in: It’s going to be a dark and bumpy ride. Ω A Christopher Durang Festival: Evening One, “Mary”; 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday; Evening Two, “Baby”; 8 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. Saturday; $13-$15. Ovation Stage at the Three Penny Theatre in the California Stage complex, 2509 R Street; (916) 448-0312; www.ovationstage.com. Through September 9.

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PHOTO BY PENNY KLINE

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1 FOUL

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The first program, titled “Mary,” is made up of Durang’s Naomi in the Living Room, The Actor’s Nightmare and Nina in the Morning. Just when you think it can’t get any funnier— or weirder—along comes Sister Mary Ignatius Explains it All for You, featuring the incredible Georgeann Wallace in the title role. While some more conservative Catholics have been offended by the portrayal, Durang is using actual church doctrine—nothing that Sister Mary Ignatius has to say would be technically offensive to, say, Pope Benedict XVI. And, of course, it’s obnoxiously funny as, well, as hell. The second program, titled “Baby,” starts with Erin Renfree in a short, one-woman piece about theater, Mrs. Sorken. She’s quite droll, and is a wonderful setup for the main piece, Baby With the Bathwater, which makes a great case for requiring licensing of parents as Helen (Emily Kentta) and John (Brennan Villalobos) attempt to “raise” their baby. They have help— if you can call it that—from a psycho nanny, a strange neighbor, some ladies in the park, school officials and, finally, a shrink. As their offspring, Daisy, Brent Dirksen is proof that we are not computers; trash in does not necessarily equate to trash out.

4 In here, it’s so hot Cabaret The emcee is a key character in any production of a Cabaret production. He’s the master of ceremonies at Berlin’s notorious Kit Kat Klub where decadence prevails inside the seedy nightclub, as the Nazi Party’s dark presence emerges outside on the streets. He also sets the tone by addressing the audience with his dark humor, unabashed sexuality, winking asides and surprising pathos. In Green Valley Theatre Company’s current production of Cabaret, we get a truly memorable emcee with actor Joseph Boyette, whose no-holds-barred performance embodies this pivotal character and leads a talented cast as they delve into a dark, disturbing time in history. He is matched by the performance of Lindsay Grimes as Sally Bowles, the selfdestructive cabaret singer caught in her own downward spiral. Cabaret was a hit 1966 Broadway musical and subsequent 1972 movie based on a story about the rise of Hitler in Germany told through the eyes of struggling novelist Clifford Barnes (Dan Masden, who did a good job on a not very well-defined character), singer Bowles, boarding-house residents, nightclub patrons and performers. Director Christopher Cook carefully guides his cast, crew and musicians through ever-shifting emotions that range from sensual to sentimental to menacing. The small pacing problems of the first act are quickly forgotten in light of a powerful, emotionally charged second act. This is an admirable show by Green Valley, which is emerging as a real player on the local theater scene—with an impressive new 48-seat space on Stockton Boulevard, strong casting, bold choices (Spring Awakening, Bullshot Crummond, and its upcoming annual production of The Rocky Horror Show), and in this show, a tight 13-member live orchestra. —Patti Roberts

Cabaret, 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday; 8 p.m. Thursday; August 30. $15-$18. Green Valley Theatre Company at the Grange Performing Arts Center, 3823 V Street; (916) 736-2664; www.greenvalleytheatre.com. Through September 2.

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The Great American Trailer Park Musical: Let your smile be your umbrella.

5

THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER

Park Musical It’s easy to see why director Bob Irvin calls this show—back for a second year at the festival “by popular demand”—a guilty pleasure. It revels in rednecky humor, but beneath the grits and homilies lie a tale of deception, infidelity and jealousy—plus music! F, Sa, Su 7:30pm. Through 9/9. $10-$15. Fair Oaks Theatre Festival in the Veterans Memorial Amphitheatre, 7991 California Blvd., Old Fair Oaks; (916) 966-3683; www.fairoakstheatrefestival.com. J.C.

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LECTURE: NAKED VS. NUDE THURSDAY • AUG 23 • 6:30 PM

++++++++ ++ ++

THE MAJESTIC KID

This comedy-of-evolving-expectations contrasts the chivalrous singing cowboys from Hollywood serials (who never marry the “gals” they rescue) with complicated modern relationships, lampooning ranchers (keen to sell and create a toxic dump) and a Native American tribe (planning to turn their reservation into a huge resort/casino). F, Sa 8pm. Through 9/8. $12$17.50, with a $49 family pack (four seats). Main Street Theatre Works in the Kennedy Mine Amphitheatre on North Main St. in Jackson; (209) 295-4499; www.mstw.org. J.H.

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Hear Blake Stimson, Professor of Cinema and Technocultural Studies at UC Davis, and artist Dani Galietti discuss art-historical and feminist perspectives on the nudes of

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Mel Ramos. Join a conversation and Q&A following the presentation. Space is limited. Mel Ramos, Martini Miss #2 (detail), 2007. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. Courtesy of Modernism Inc., San Francisco. Art © Mel Ramos/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

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SEMINAR If writers are like feral cats, this play by Theresa Rebeck proves that the world is their litter box. An extremely well-done play about smart, funny and unpleasant people—which is, we suppose, the very definition of artists.

GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES

T 6:30pm; W 2pm & 6:30pm; Th, F 8pm; Sa 5pm and 9pm; Su 2pm. Through 9/25. $23-$35. The B Street Theatre, 2711 B Street; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. K.M.

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TRIPLE ESPRESSO Campy comedy with a meta-structure, as the cheesy lounge act Maxwell, Butternut and Bean (Bill Arnold, Michael Pearce Donley and Bob Stromberg) performs for—and involves— the audience. It’s either family-friendly fun or a strange open-mic night, depending on your point of view. W 7pm; Th 2pm & 7pm; F 8pm; Sa 2pm & 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 7/22. $20-$38; student rush available. The Cosmopolitan Cabaret, 1000 K St.; (916) 557-1999; www.calmt.com. J.M.he deliciously goofy and charming story of the Plaids, a classic 1950s all-male singing group who return from the Great Beyond to perform the show they never got to when they were alive. W 7pm; Th 2pm &

THURSDAY • SEPT 6 7:30 PM – ACTIVITIES BEGIN 8:30 PM – COURTYARD SCREENING If you love the vixens on view in the exhibition Mel Ramos: 50 Years of Superheroes, Nudes and Other Pop Delights, check out Marilyn Monroe, Pop Art’s original blonde bombshell muse, in one of her most iconic roles. Join an all-ages dance-along with the California Musical Theatre,

7pm; F 8pm; Sa 2pm & 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 9/9.

and learn how to strut your stuff like a Broadway star to

$20-$38; student rush available. The Cosmopolitan Cabaret, 1000 K St.; (916) 557-1999; www.calmt.com. J.M.

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classic numbers like “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend.” Seating will be provided, though you are welcome to bring

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

Director Charles Fee cross-weaves streamlined Shakespeare with live indie-pop and contemporary cafe culture in this smooth, hilarious and moody production. “Best friends” hotly pursue their newfound loves; the buddies nearly split due to some sneaky misbehavior. Tu, W, Th, F, Sa, Su 7:30pm. Through 8/26. $20-$80. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival at Sand Harbor State Park, 2005 Highway 28 in Incline Village, Nev.; (800) 747-4697; www.laketahoeshakespeare.com. J.H.

a lawn chair or picnic blanket to this outdoor screening.

To find out more and purchase advance tickets visit crockerartmuseum.org or call (916) 808-1182.

Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Mendick and Kel Munger. BEFORE

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Show timeS valid auguSt 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30, 2012 opening fri, AUg 24

the imposter

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AiRatedWeiWei: NeVer sorrY R

Politically unmotivated

Fri & Sun 11:30 1:45 4:45 8:10 Not Playing Sat or Tue Mon, Wed, & Thu 4:45 8:10

now plAying

FAreWeLL mY QUeeN Starring Diane Kruger Rated R Fri-Sun 12:00 2:30 5:10 7:45 Mon-Thu 5:10 7:45

The Campaign Rated R Fri-Sun 12:20 3:10 5:50 8:35 Mon-Thu 5:50 8:35

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REEL

The agenda of director Jay Roachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new movie is not to mine the finer nuances of American electoral procedures. This might come as a shock or by Jonathan Kiefer a relief, depending whether you go into The Campaign remembering Roach as the politically minded maker of HBOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Recount and Game Change, or you only know him from films about Fockers. Now, in a spirit of meeting halfway, his agenda is broad bipartisan spoofery.

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REVIEWS. EVERY THURSDAY. YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE WELCOME, FILM GEEKS

YOU AND A GUEST ARE INVITED TO ATTEND A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING OF

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m rubber, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re glue!â&#x20AC;? Yep, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real campaign.

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Hence The Campaign, in which Will Ferrell plays an entrenched North Carolina congressman challenged by an unlikely opponent in the form of Zach Galifianakis. Unlikeliness, of course, used to be the Galifianakis touch; here itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dull nudge, or whatever you want to call a weary reprise of the prissy oaf he played in Due Date. Meanwhile, Ferrell looks to have hauled out his old George W. Bush impression and, sensing the staleness, hosed it off with a splash of randy John Edwards. The promise being made is one of bloodless, been-there farce. Can it count on your vote? With strings pulled by callous sibling super-funders modeled on the Koch brothers and played by John Lithgow and Dan Aykroyd, the candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contest escalates from gaffeintensive buffoonery to the brinksmanship of outrageously dirty mud-slinging. (Opening salvo: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your mommaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a vacuum cleaner. She sucks, she blows, and gets laid in a closet.â&#x20AC;?) The escalation is imaginative inasmuch as it somehow manages to avoid implicating the fashionable raunch of American movie comedies as a factor in the current tone of American political discourse. Mostly, though, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prosaic: the familiar coming off of the gloves, spun as the rolling up of the sleeves. Plus swears. Among a clutter of real pundits tediously playing themselves, Jason Sudeikis and Dylan McDermott show up as rival campaign managers, respectively servile and shark-like. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re fine, but also vaguely disappointing in context, like a selection of shrug-worthy running mates. Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sport in that?

One result of Roachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agenda is a movie that seems to have devoted most of its energy to assembling the seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most nonthreatening ensemble. Before long itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a slog, quite like a real campaign at least in that sense but otherwise too sketchy a cartoon and too soft a satire, full of cheap shots at easy targets and many scattered bits of uninspired vulgarityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; inspired vulgarity would be fine, and maybe even useful. There is something to be said for the burlesque possibilities of sex-tape as (positive!) campaign-ad, and punching babies instead of kissing them, but not by this movie. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just not savage enough, or funny enough. Writers Chris Henchy and Shawn Harwell try to re-purpose the usual election-run-up cliches as punchlines, but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully forsake their pieties; Roach and his complacent stars take that cue to churn out a film whose sentimental-fizzle ending, its â&#x20AC;&#x153;heartâ&#x20AC;? seems as much a cynical calculation as the politically corrosive corporate profiteering it limply sends up. The wish that even our ugliest campaigns might end with reconciliation seems blameless enough, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wish that only the movies might ever be able to fulfill. But The Campaign neither takes it seriously nor seems to think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very funny. All it really does, to borrow a hollow-sounding slogan, is run out of ideas. Ultimately this sort of thing seems best fallen into on cable, and eventually channel-surfed away from. Richer parodies remain available on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report, as of course does the parody that writes itself, regularly, in current events.

Before long The Campaign is a slog, quite like a real campaign at least in that sense but otherwise too sketchy a cartoon and too soft a satire, full of cheap shots at easy targets. Speaking of which, someone somewhere in America probably will think the timing of The Campaignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s release is politically motivated. Although scarcely threatening, or at all issuedriven in any real way, it does seem to have been shoved into the expected doldrums of the August dumping-ground between peak summer blockbusters and autumnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s onset of prestige pictures. At best it offers a final vacation of sorts, some recuperative last laughs before the grim home stretch of real-life campaigning carries us into November. And if the itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s-all-a-dumb-joke mindset feels neither constructive nor cathartic, it does have the dubious virtue of staying forever unserious. Ί

by JONATHAN KIEFER & JIM LANE

3

Beasts of the Southern Wild

2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E

The debut from writer-director Benh Zeitlin, working with playwright Lucy Alibar and a New Orleans collective, rides in on a murky flood of festival hype. And what caused that, anyway? The inevitable confluence of poverty porn and indie quaintness? Newcomer Quvenzhané Wallis steals the show as a brave 6year-old who yearns for her missing mother, copes with her ailing father (Dwight Henry), and navigates the archly magical-realist realms that lurk amid the muck and grit of her doomed Louisiana bayou. It’s a flamboyant indomitablespirit demonstration, with undeniable vitality but also a sort of heavy, beastly dullness. Zeitlin has talent and guts, yes. Ultimately, though, he inspires not wonder or awe so much as our awareness of the pride he takes in his own presentation. J.K.

2

“RISES ABOVE THE ROM-COM HERD.” - Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

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F O R A D V A N C E T I C K E T S C A L L FA N D A N G O @ 1 - 8 0 0 - F A N D A N G O # 2 7 2 1

The Bourne Legacy

Matt Damon may have declined a fourth go-round as Jason Bourne, but Universal Pictures wasn’t about to let a good franchise die just because their star bailed on them. So guess what: In the script by director Tony Gilroy and his brother Dan, Jason Bourne isn’t the only product of the program that made him a hyperefficient, conscienceless assassin. Meet Aaron Cross (Jeremy Renner), who must be disposed of so the higher-ups (Edward Norton, Stacy Keach, Scott Glenn) can cover their tracks. Fans may miss Damon, but Renner makes a nicely glowering action hero, and the globe-spanning chases and fights are staged with the usual high-voltage panache. Still, the movie is all middle with no beginning—and, of course, no end, so the franchise can go on. Rachel Weisz adds some spice as, basically, the “Bond girl.” J.L.

3

The Dark Knight Rises

Its historical moment unavoidably marred by mass murder in Colorado, this grand finale to writer-director Christopher Nolan’s rebooted Batman trilogy offers Christian Bale once more as the caped crusader, challenged at length to come out of retirement, win back public trust, secure his city and his legacy, and pass his torch. Along with the familiar comforts of series regulars Gary Oldman, Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman, Nolan also makes room for a burly respiratorfaced nemesis played by Tom Hardy, a cat woman played by Anne Hathaway, and, of particular interest and appeal, a clever beat cop played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt. There’s also a pudding of topical politics, noisily and unsmilingly processed to the tune of a thundering Hans Zimmer score. Sometimes it’s fun being inside a big movie for a long time, and so this one sprawls—both visually, with the considered aesthetics of the summer-blockbuster set piece, and verbally, with Nolan and his co-writer and brother Jonathan Nolan keeping their characters rather garrulously philosophical about virtue, power and justice. J.K.

3

Farewell, My Queen

Adapting Chantal Thomas’ novel, with Gilles Taurand, French director Benoît Jacquot delves into the uneasily gradual onset of the French Revolution, as observed from Versailles. It’s hard not to read this, for better and worse, as a reclamation from Sofia Coppola and consequent restoration to the presumed dignity of sumptuous, period-accurate detail. This Marie Antoinette, played by a gleaming Diane Kruger, preens herself into a triangle with a reader servant (Léa Seydoux), from whose increasingly alert perspective the film plays out, and a very special friend (Virginie Ledoyan). After a few nonverbal raptures and some slinking, candlelit camera moves, the heat of libidinous sensuality dissipates into lukewarm suds. What’s left is Jacquot’s discretion, his delicate way with impending doom. J.K.

2

Hope Springs

An unsatisfied wife of 31 years (Meryl Streep) drags her husband (Tommy Lee Jones), grumbling all the way, to a series of sessions with a best-selling couples counselor (Steve Carell). Vanessa Taylor’s threadbare script amounts to a padded-out two-person one-act play; Streep and Jones decorate their characters with an array of actorish tics and mannerisms, like tinsel on a scruffy Christmas tree, but both remain more interesting than the people they’re playing. Others in their lives— children, co-workers, neighbors, acquaintances—are dismissed with a line or two of dialogue, wasting talents like Elisabeth Shue, Mimi Rogers

BEFORE

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China, look into the camera’s abyss.

4

www.newsreview.com

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Alison Klayman’s documentary profiles the Chinese art-star activist Ai Weiwei, whose ongoing problems with authority beget increasingly creative solutions. Klayman’s aesthetic sense is a lot less refined than her subject’s, but a more important qualification might be her receptiveness. Ai says early on that he prefers hiring helpers to implement his big ideas (which most often have to do with transparency and persistence), and the filmmaker’s access to him seems, agreeably enough, like a sort of enlistment. Looking cutely aggressive, like some post-punk Buddha, and confronting the surveillance operatives who always seem to follow him around, Ai achieves absurd camera-on-camera standoffs in which opposite tyrannies¡ªof old totalitarianism and new media¡ªstare into each other’s abysses. The essential insight in Klayman’s conscientious yet unfussy portrait is about how the contemporary Chinese Communist Party has produced a culture so desperately in need of jamming, and also the jammer it most deserves. J.K.

and Jean Smart along the way. Even Carell, who can carry worse movies than this in his sleep, is reduced to twiddling his thumbs refereeing the Oscar Derby between the two stars. J.L.

3

The Imposter

In 1997, a French-Algerian lowlife contrived to avoid prison in Spain by posing as a San Antonio teenager missing for three years, simply plucking the name from U.S. missing-children records; “returned” to Texas, he was embraced by the boy’s family as their lost son/brother, despite obvious discrepancies¡ªFrench accent, wrong hair and eye color, looking his true age of 23, etc.¡ªand an outlandish pack of lies to explain how he got from Texas to Spain. Director Bart Layton’s documentary plays like an extended true-crime segment of Dateline NBC, with the same mix of interviews and dramatic reenactments. It’s both interesting and repellent. Almost nobody comes off looking good: The imposter seems a heartless sociopath, the FBI a bunch of gullible rubes, the boy’s family pathetically deluded by optimism. J.L.

3

Three sisters (Jordin Sparks, Carmen Ejogo, Tika Sumpter) sneak out of the house at night to appear in clubs as a rising hot (in more ways than one) girl group, behind the back of their hyper-religious mother (Whitney Houston in her last screen role). The script by Mara Brock Akil and Howard Rosenman transfers the 1976 cult hit from 1950s Harlem to ’60s Detroit with faults and virtues intact. The story runs to cliché, and not every plot point rings true. But redeeming pleasures include excellent acting (especially American Idol champ Sparks in the title role), first-rate musical performances, and a glossy, high-class look courtesy of director Salim Akil and cinematographer Anastas Mikos. Akil also gets credit for (at long last) drawing a good performance from Mike Epps as Ejogo’s sleazeball boyfriend. J.L.

3

The Odd Life of Timothy Green

The Watch

Director Jonathan Demme’s third concert-film collaboration with the abiding rocker finds him back in his native Ontario, surveying old familiar landscapes— both physical and sonic—and meandering by car to Toronto’s Massey Hall to close out his 2011 solo tour. What to say? Hope you like Neil Young. With cinematographer Declan Quinn’s cameras doting at very close range (one micmounted lens even gets sprayed with spittle), Demme’s casual reverie is personal, periodically mesmerizing and unabashedly indulgent. Nonfans surely will come away more aggravated than persuaded; the rest of us luxuriate once more in Demme’s superb sound design and in Young’s tuneful sincerity. J.K.

4

Ruby Sparks

4

FEATURE

An Ohio Costco manager (Ben Stiller) forms a neighborhood watch in the wake of a grisly murder in his store, but his only volunteers (Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill and Richard Ayoade) are a pretty unfocused and none-toobright crew. Soon they find themselves in over their heads and dealing with a stealth invasion from outer space. Jared Stern, Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg’s script rings some surprising changes on its premise, and it smartly lets Vaughn loose in his trademark motormouthed middlebrow rants (here they’re so pungent, we wonder if they were scripted or ad-libbed). The four-way synergy of the boys keeps the pot bubbling, and director Akiva Schaffer wisely doesn’t interfere, confining himself to calling “action” and “cut.” The result is great fun, and one of the funniest movies of the year. J.L.

STORY

–Joshua Rothkopf

ONE OF THE MOST ENTERTAINING DOCUMENTARIES SINCE ‘ E X I T T H R O U G H T H E G I F T S H O P ’ .”

Sparkle

3

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Blessed with an improbable-but-true story that functions on many ironic levels, this clever doc ultimately conveys more about the complex American character—shifting between intimacy and criminality—than a whole shelf of fiction films.” –Jeannette Catsoulis

A childless couple (Jennifer Garner, Joel Edgerton) write down the attributes of an ideal son and bury them in their garden; the perfect boy (CJ Adams) sprouts overnight, with leaves growing from his ankles. Director Peter Hedges’ script (from Ahmet Zappa’s story) never quite finds the bullseye it’s groping for, mainly because little Timothy’s odd life doesn’t really change anybody: In the end, Garner and Edgerton remain the same nice people, Garner’s boss (Dianne Wiest) the same prissy battle-ax, Edgerton’s boss (Ron Livingston) the same oily weasel they all were at the beginning; Timothy’s only effect is to come up with a new way to make pencils. It’s rather solemn whimsy, but hard to dislike when it tries so hard. Shohreh Aghdashloo, David Morse and Rosemarie DeWitt contribute from the sidelines. J.L.

FRONTLINES

★★★★ GO AND BE STUNNED!

aging hippie mother, and Antonio Banderas as her alpha-male lover. J.L.

Neil Young Journeys

The young author of a sensational first novel (Paul Dano), paralyzed by writer’s block ever since, tries to break the curse with a simple exercise to write his ideal woman, and succeeds beyond his dreams—the woman comes to life as his new girlfriend (Zoe Kazan, who also wrote the script). But like all well-written characters, she takes on a life of her own, and his efforts to rewrite her back into line bring misery to them both. Kazan has written herself a star-making part (and a damn good one for Dano, too), and directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (Little Miss Sunshine) deploy their penchant for freewheeling quirkiness to good effect. There’s good support too from Chris Messina as Dano’s brother, Annette Bening as their

FROM THE PRODUCER OF MAN ON WIRE

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

★★★★ SPELLBINDING! /2

1

–Christy Lemire

GRADE A- A STORY SO WEIRD IT MUST BE TRUE! “

Like ‘CAPTURING THE FRIEDMANS’ or ‘TABLOID’, the documentary equivalent of a page-turner. It tells a true story that is so oh wow! unbelievable, so deeply, compellingly stranger than fiction, that YOU DON’T SO MUCH WATCH THE FILM AS GET ADDICTED TO IT.”

★★★★ SEE IT AND MARVEL! /2

1

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9/8 Rehab 9/10 Blaqk Audio 9/11 The Fresh & Onlys 9/12 Iration & The Expendables 9/13 Aesop Rock w/Rob Sonic 9/14 Anthrax/Testament 9/15 Quiet Riot 9/18 Flobots 9/20 Tomorrows Bad Seeds 9/22 The Used 9/24 Kreator 9/26 GZA 9/27 Hatebreed 9/29 Dead Rabbits 10/5 J Boog 10/6 Zion-I 10/7 Iwrestledabearonce 10/10 Steve Vai 10/11 D.R.I 10/13 Morbid Angel 10/17 The World Alive & Born of Osirus 10/23 Motion City Soundtrack 10/24 Alesana 10/27 Groundation 11/3 Colt Ford 11/6 Gwar 11/8 Miss May I 11/9 Blue October 11/14 Minus The Bear 11/18 Pierce The Veil 12/14 The English Beat

Like chocolate for peanut butter ElectroPoetic Coffee’s poetry-and-jazz   mix sparks intense jolt For Sacramento duo ElectroPoetic Coffee, mixing live music with poetry isn’t just a melding of two worlds, it’s a different way of jamming. Ross by Aaron Carnes Hammond, who plays jazz guitar and electronics, fuels NSAA the Black Root—a.k.a. Lawrence E. Dinkins Jr.—who reads poetry and sometimes sings. In turn, Dinkins’ poetry feeds the energy of Hammond’s music. “It feels almost like surfing, like I’m riding his waves of music,” Dinkins explains. “It’s interesting how the interchange gives meaning to one another. When you say that a picture is worth a thousand words, how many words does sound have? It compounds the words. When you put them together, it’s a you-put-thechocolate-in-the-peanut-butter kind of thing.” Photo By SALvAdor oChoA

Ross Hammond (left) and Lawrence E. Dinkins Jr. are like an avant-garde caffeine buzz.

Get a fix: ElectroPoetic Coffee on Monday, August 27, at 7:30 p.m. at Luna’s Café & Juice Bar, 1414 16th Street.

Separately, both are accomplished artists. Hammond has played guitar—usually of the avant-garde variety—for 20 years, and in 2008, founded the In the Flow Festival, which highlights jazz, poetry and art. Dinkins has written poetry for five years; his accomplishments include the 2009 spoken-word CD, Lightning in a Bottle: The Official Mario Ellis Hill Recordings, and the 2010 book of poetry, Sub-American. Their work together exudes a high level of emotionality and vibrancy—even though Dinkins’ poems are already written and Hammond’s avant-jazz parts are already worked out. Where the spontaneity comes in is in the subtle differences of how Dinkins delivers his poems and the nuances of Hammond’s guitar playing. “The cadence of my poems can change, which changes the emotions of it. It definitely heightens it. It’s almost unbearable,” Dinkins says. “Sometimes, when we finish a gig, I can’t really talk to anyone afterword. I have to go walk somewhere, because the emotion is so built up.” Such heightened feelings have been a major component for ElectroPoetic Coffee from the start. The first time Dinkins and Hammond performed together was at a 2009 memorial performance at the Javalounge cafe

for a mutual friend, In the Flow co-founder Byron Blackburn, who’d recently died from complications from cancer. Then, Hammond and Dinkins knew of each other but weren’t yet friends. As Hammond and some other musicians jammed, they noticed Dinkins writing a poem and invited him onstage, and he read about Blackburn as Hammond and Co. continued to play. “It was really intense. It was one of my favorite moments musically. ... It just felt like a really important thing I was involved with at that moment,” Hammond says. Hammond and Dinkins played together again a few months later at a poetry event; this time it was just the two of them and, they both say, instantly felt the chemistry. Another few months passed, and the pair recorded some pieces for what eventually became their 2010 self-titled debut. As ElectroPoetic Coffee evolved into an official project, both say it became clear that they were kindred spirits, artistically speaking. “The aesthetics of what we do might be different, but, overall, the message is basically the same. We are both progressive, sensitive, romantic people,” Hammond says. Because Dinkins expresses himself in words, Hammond says he has a particular appreciation for the different topics and emotions his partner vocalizes—aspects Hammond says he’s only been able to voice with his guitar. “Everyone can relate to what Lawrence writes about,” Hammond says. Dinkins sees all his poems—whether personal ones such as “Fallen Leaves,” which talks about what he went through when after his father’s passing, or political ones, such as “Catastrophe,” which discusses the effects of society’s complacency—as closely linked.

“The aesthetics of what we do might be different, but, overall, the message is basically the same.” Ross Hammond ElectroPoetic Coffee “I think [the poems] agree with each other, but have different personalities.” Dinkins says. Combined with Hammond’s nuanced guitar playing, the poems have a power that makes them impossible to ignore—a more emotionally rattling and engaging experience than a typical poetry reading, yet not like watching a band play songs, either. “In a way, we come together and bridge the gap between the poetry scene and the music scene,” says Hammond. Ω

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EIGHT GIGS

24FRI 24FRI 25SAT 26SUN Exquisite Corps Harlow’s, 9:45 p.m., $10

It’s tough trying to categorize Exquisite Corps. The ensemble act, fronted by Bryan Valenzuela, is at once classical and experimental, aggressive and sensitive. It’s dramatic and moody, yet not artificial nor downcast. On the band’s self-titled debut, dynamics crackle with an intensity crafted by an intricate string section, a rock foundation and soaring vocals. Tracks such as “Tyger Wine” and the theatrical “Selah” layer nearly metalesque jams with ROCK melodies wavering between huge crescendos and gossamer-fine filaments. The result is a sound that’s ghostly but inherently durable. Fierce Creatures and James Cavern open this show. 2708 J Street, www.facebook.com/excorpsmusic.

—Rachel Leibrock

World Fusion Concert

Zuhgfest

Eddie Turner

24th Street Theatre, 3 p.m., $5-$20

Rio Ramaza Marina RV & Event Park, 11 a.m., $12-$15

Torch Club, 9 p.m., $8 His nickname may be “Devilboy,” but Eddie Turner is certainly no devil. Born in Cuba and raised in Chicago, he has a style of his own. Listen close and you’ll BLUES recognize influences of psychedelic rock, jazz, R&B, and Chicago blues. His music is innovative and captivating, and his guitar work otherworldly. Before he tried his hand as a realtor, he performed in the punk-and-R&B band the Immortal Night Flames. While its flame may have burned out, Turner’s is as hot as ever. Since 2005, he’s headed his own band, and there’s no better place to hear him than at the Torch Club. 904 15th Street, www.eddiedevilboy.com.

Sacramento’s hippie-reggae collective Zuhg (pictured) seems to know no limit to its projects. It supports local arts, too. Its store, Zuhg Life, for instance, sells local music, art and clothing. Now the group is curating what it hopes to be an annual event, Zuhgfest—which features two stages for live bands from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., along with local art, food and clothing venders. A partial list of FESTIVAL the bands includes Zuhg (of course), Massive Delicious, the Diva Kings, Fish out of Water, the Old Screen Door and Autumn Sky. Music will be acoustic from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. and electric thereafter. 10000 Garden Highway, www.zuhgmusic.com.

—Aaron Carnes

If you’re wondering what world-fusion music sounds like, set aside a few hours Sunday. Pandit Binay Pathak (pictured), composer, harmonium soloist, singer, and son of legendary sitarist Pandit Balaram WORLD Pathak, will perform classical Hindustani raaga at a benefit concert dedicated to the elder Pathak’s memory. Joining him are Abbos Kosimov, master of the Uzbek drum, the doyra; Matthew Montfort, with his innovative fretboard guitar style; and IndoLatin pianist and santur player Mariah Parker. This afternoon concert is an opportunity to hear a unique collaboration. Proceeds benefit the academy’s senior-citizen charity in Koltaka. 2791 24th Street, www.sohinisangeet.org.

—Trina L. Drotar

—Trina L. Drotar

swell-productions.com presents

Saturday, Sept 1 - 7:30PM THURSDAY, AUGUST 23

PAT TRAVERS BAND

LARISA BRYSKI - THE HUNTER & THE WOLF ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE

2 for 1 with this ad August 23 – 26

thurs 8/23 at 8pm

SUNDAY, AUGUST 26

fri 8/24 - sun 8/26

LONG IN THE TOOTH - DOGFOOD SIX WEEKS SOBER STRAIGHT JACKET STRIPPERS

Key lewis featuring steph sanders

live music in the legends lounge: saturday 8/25 at 4pm Groove Deluxe Band - No cover

sunday 8/26 at 3pm Four Barrel - No cover

Tuesday 8/28 - 7pm Open Mic and Jam Night with Host Band Liquorsick. Sponsored by the Strum Shop in Roseville

TickeTs available aT: Laughsunlimited.com Call Club for showtimes, prices and reservation (916) 446-5905 • 446-8128 Two item minimum - 17 and over 1207 Front street in Old sacramento |

S N&R

|

08. 23.12

RESTRAYNED

OVERWATCH - THE ABSOLUTES ILLUSIONS ECHO - HIT AND RUN

flips & beaners comedy jam

44

FRIDAY, AUGUST 24

BOBAFLEX

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

CHIXDIGGIT

THE SECRETIONS - BOATS! FLIP THE SWITCH - THE CARBONITES

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

ARSONISTS GET ALL THE GIRLS

HIPNO5E - EXOTIC ANIMAL PETTING ZOO OF REFLECTIONS - CALISTA SKY IN THEORY - THE WAR WITHIN

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29

BLACK LIGHT BURNS THE WITCH WAS RIGHT - FARTBARF

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

HELMET & TOADIES

The Eric Bibb String Band w/Dirk Powell & Cedric Watson

Folk Blues, Americana Roots Music and a heavy dose of Louisiana Heritage!

24th Street Theatre

2791 24th St, Sacramento Tickets $27.50 at InTicketing.com

Friday, Sept 21st 7:00PM Swell Productions and Capital Public Radio present

NYC Jazz & Blues Star

Catherine Russell Quartet Harlow’s

2708 J Street, Sacramento Tickets $25 at Harlows.com

Thurs. Oct 4 - 8:00 PM

Nick Lowe

w/ Eleni Mandell

24th Street Theatre

Tickets $35 at InTicketing.com

26SUN 26SUN 30THURS 30THURS CurtisFest

Kyle Rowland

Center for the Arts, 8 p.m., $10-$28

Fremont Park, 11:30 a.m., no cover

Head to William Curtis Park this Sunday for a day of food, art and music from experimental-jazz groups such as Instagon and the Garage Jazz Architects, plus FESTIVAL Americana group, the Mike Justis Band. Make a day of it by eating food from the Wicked ’Wich and Mama Kim Cooks food trucks, and shopping for vintage jewelry, art, and clothing. Meanwhile, children will be entertained by a magic show, petting zoo and face painting. Stick around the park until 6 p.m. to catch an additional free concert—part of the Music in the Park concert series—featuring the 11-piece classic-rock cover band On Air. 3349 W. Curtis Drive, www.sierra2.org.

Harmonica prodigy Kyle Rowland isn’t 20 yet, but the way he plays sounds much older. If you haven’t heard him yet, the Sacramento native studies with Mick Martin (of Mick Martin and the Blues Rockers fame) and rips up stages all over the Northern California area. His playing exudes genuineness—as if he pains over each blues note from his harmonica, and deeply feels each lyric in his songbook. With a backing band consisting of veteran musicians, the Kyle Rowland Band brings freshness and fun to the local BLUES blues scene. Rowland and Co. celebrate the release of High Rollin’ at this show. 904 15th Street, www.kylerockinrowland.com.

Fishbone

Not an Airplane

William Curtis Park, 10 a.m., no cover

Torch Club, 8 p.m., $5

—Jonathan Mendick

Fishbone should be eligible for a pension with as much dues as it’s paid. The septet formed in a South Central REGGAE/PUNK Los Angeles juniorhigh school in ’79, and a core trio remains. With its broad ’80s underground tastes, Fishbone blends frantic reggae, funk, punk and metal rife with goofy irreverence, sociopolitical commentary, and party jams. It never received the acclaim that seemed within reach, but remains a particular pleasure live. Frontman Angelo Moore is a human whirlwind, while the band is simultaneously tight and loose. Last year’s Crazy Glue EP was great, particularly the reggae-funk closer “Weed, Beer, Cigarettes.” 314 W. Main Street in Grass Valley, http://fishbone.net.

Rock operas, math rock and quirky selfconscious songwriting are not typical ingredients for most country bands. But, Not an Airplane is not like most country bands. Make no mistake about it: It is a country band, not some offbeat indie band throwing in a little twang. Not an Airplane plays honky-tonk and old-timey country roots that it just takes to a whole new level. Its 2011 album, It COUNTRY Could Just Be This Place, is two—roughly 15 minutes apiece—tracks long. In the age of iPod shuffles and YouTube, Not an Airplane demands your full attention and a little bit of patience. But it’s worth it. 1515 Q Street, www.notanairplane.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

—Chris Parker

—Aaron Carnes

23rd ANNUAL

presents

BEER ON THE BAYOU

AN EPIC AFTERNOON OF SUN, SUDS AND FUN.

BREWS 100+ MICRO

BREWS 100+ MICRO

AUG.

25 th

featuring grammy nominee

LISA HALEY AND THE Z YDEKATS Beer geeks and aficionados, ge t ready for one of the great events of the summer. Sample over 100 hand-crafted beers from some of the best microbreweries on the planet. Party down with the one of the greatest Zydeco bands ever. Get your gastro on with lots of great food–from barbeque to burgers, sausages to sushi. Hang out at the most beautiful fairgrounds in California.

7101 Laguna Blvd Elk Grove, CA 95758 (916) 478–9010

SATURDAY, AUG. 25th

1168 Galleria Blvd Roseville, CA 95678 (916) 781–8443

• UNLIMITED TASTINGS•

A benefit for Music in the Mountains, produced by MIM Alliance.

$25 per person in advance, $30 at the gate $10 non-tasters and kids are free

Sponsored by:

BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

TICKETS AND INFO: www.MusicInTheMountains.org or call (530) 265-6124

|

FEATURE

STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

AFTER

W A R N I N G : Zydekats are known to cause Zydecosis, a highly contagious condition characterized by uncontrolled euphoria, toe tapping and booty shaking.

|

08. 23.12

|

S N&R

|

45

VOTE US FOR

VOTE US

best burger under $10

BEST GYM

gatsby's diner buy one burger get one free Of equal value. Limit 1 per table. Expires 8/30/12.

2598 AltA Arden (916) 977–0102

best place to fix your whip

Best place for something sweet

star motors BEST placE To fix your whip

EcoNo luBE N’ TuNE

BEST INDIAN

Best New Restaurant

826 J St, Sac, CA 916-444-7454

Best ean Mediterran

CONTINUED FROM PAGE

29

Nightlife & ENTErtainment Best all-ages music venue

aCe of spades Bows & arrows CluB reTro luigi’s fun garden shine sol ColleCTive The Boardwalk The refuge zuhg life sTore

Chalk iT up! fesTival de la familia launCh paCifiC rim fesTival saCramenTo Beer week saCramenTo frenCh film fesTival saCramenTo musiC fesTival saCramenTo pride fesTival saCTomofo Trash film orgy

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forD’s

HAMBURGERS

Best nighttime view

shakes fries

best burger unDer $10! 1948 sutterville rD (916)452-6979

Nominated for

Best Burger under $10!

best place to fix your whip

CiTizen hoTel meTropoliTan TerraCe railBridge Cellars’ penThouse lounge in The elks Tower rio CiTy Cafe The delTa king Top floor of The u.s. Bank Tower

Best open-mic night fox & goose luna’s Café & JuiCe Bar old ironsides shine

46   |   SN&R   |   08.23.12

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Best place for a girl’s night out Bulls resTauranT & Bar Crush 29 disTriCT 30 mix downTown Tequila museo mayahuel

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Best festival

Blue moon Cafe and karaoke hamBurger paTTies marilyn’s on k old ironsides on The y pine Cove Tavern river CiTy saloon swiss Buda The disTillery Townhouse lounge

vote us for

Best person to make you laugh

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Best place to Break up Bisla’s CapiTol park The golden Bear swaBBies on The river The hideaway Bar & grill

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vote for

Kathmandu Kitchen Best place to get pampered

Beers Books J. Crawford’s Books The avid reader The Book ColleCTor Time-TesTed Books

Blue sky day spa Body advanTage ByuTi Cezanne skin group happy day spa hoshall’s salon and spa mellow me ouT day spa salon Cuvee The pediCure lounge The spa simply skin

Best Boutique Cuffs denim spoT krazy mary’s BouTique serendipiTy BouTique sugar shaCk BouTique

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Best place to practice sun salutations arden hoT yoga asha yoga CapiTal aThleTiC CluB iT’s all yoga padme yoga CenTer saCramenTo Bikram yoga saCramenTo pipeworks The yoga seed ColleCTive yoga loka zuda yoga

guzeTTa & Co. fine Jewelers rainBow Bridge Jewelers roper’s Jewelers shane Co. sharif Jewelers

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Best record store

anCil hoffman golf CluB BarTley Cavanaugh golf Course Bing maloney golf Course haggin oaks golf Complex land park golf CluB Teal Bend golf CluB Turkey Creek golf CluB whiTney oaks golf CluB wildhawk golf CluB woodCreek golf CluB

• Buy One get 2nd 50% off on lunch buffet & dinner • Free delivery within 5 mile radius • 1728 Broadway, Sacramento

Vote us

Best Happy Hour

Best Happy Hour

Best gym ameriCan river CrossfiT BodyTriBe fiTness CapiTal aThleTiC CluB figure 8 women’s workouT flipTasTiC naTomas raCqueT CluB resulTs The 24 hour gym roCklin CrossfiT saCramenTo pipeworks ClimBing and fiTness ymCa

Best kings player demarCus Cousins isaiah Thomas Jimmer fredeTTe marCus ThornTon Tyreke evans

L GR OO EAT •C FOO ER E B D • AWESOME

Hoppy Brewing Co

votE FoR

• 6300 Folsom Blvd • www.hoppy.com

BANGKoK oN 12th AS

BEST THAI RESTAURANT

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900 12TH ST, SACRAMENTO | 443-5588 | BANGKOK12RESTAURANT.COM

VOTE US

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Best golf course

Best Indian Resturant

Vote here ➥

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armadillo musiC dimple reCords phono seleCT reCords The BeaT

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Sports & Rec

PE OP LE !!!

Best Bookstore

ameriCan CanCer soCieTy disCovery shop goodwill spCa ThrifT sTore ThrifT Town ThrifT sTores weave ThrifT

L a nd

Park

916.444.7187

2108 11 TH AVE, SACRAMENTO MON-FRI 10-8 SAT 10-5 SUN 11-5

Best sports team saC CiTy rollers saCramenTo kings saCramenTo mounTain lions saCramenTo river CaTs saCred CiTy derBy girls

Best tv sportscaster Brian may, news10 del rodgers, kCra 3 Jim Crandell, fox 40 ryan yamamoTo, news10

view The CompleTe lisT of

BesT of saCramenTo nominees and

vote online at www.newsreview.com

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

Scan Me to Vote:

08.23.12     |   SN&R     |   47

NIGHTBEAT List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THURSDAY 8/23

FRIDAY 8/24

SUNDAY 8/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/27-8/29

BLUE LAMP

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

BATTALION OF SAINTS, 13 SCARS, CAPITAL BASTARD, FLIP OFFS; 8pm, $10

LEFT HAND, COLD HEART REPRESS, TURN DOWN THE STONES, THE COMMUNITY, BAD ENDING; 8pm, $7 FAMILY BANDITS, RED LEAF; 8:30pm, $7

Songwriter Showcase, 3pm, call for cover

THE MOANS, THE AKABANE VULGARS, THE NUMBER 13; 8pm M, call for cover

THE BOARDWALK

PAT TRAVERS BAND, CALIGATOR,

RESTRAYNED, OVERWATCH, ABSOLUTES, ILLUSIONS ECHO; 7pm, $10-$12

BOBAFLEX, LONG IN THE TOOTH, THE ANDROMEDA PROJECT; 7pm, $12-$15

OUR LAST NIGHT, CASINO MADRID, FOR ALL I AM, ADESTRIA; 7pm M, $12-$14

BOWS AND ARROWS

JIA-MO CHEN, 8pm, no cover

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 LARISA BRYSKI; 8pm, call for cover 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

CUTTY RANKS, DJ Shortkut, DJ Esef, Zen Ken; 10pm, $20

THE CAVE

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 317-9999

DICK LARSON, THE TREES, THE SOMEBODYS; 9pm, $5

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

THEN AGAIN, 7:30pm, $17

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

MERRYGOLD, MELODY WALKER; 8pm, $7

DISTRICT 30

DJs Heartworm, Vincent Salas, Steele, Jurts, Dr. Freezy, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Louie Giovanni, 9pm, call for cover

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481 1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

ELKHORN SALOON

NAVIGATOR, SUBTRACT, A SIGHT FOR SORE EYES, TEMPTEST; 8pm, $5

DJ JB, 9pm W, call for cover

Deejay dancing and karaoke, 9pm, $3

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

FOX & GOOSE

CRUNK WITCH, THE MAPLETONES, MT. SINAI; 8-11pm, no cover

THE SECRET LIVES OF SQUIRRELS, BE BRAVE BOLD ROBOT, SHELLS; 9pm, $5

JAY SHANER, HORSE BODIES; 9pm, $5

DJ Smilez, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

DJ Alazzawi, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

DJ Crook One, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Whores, 10pm, no cover

DAN CURCIO, 7pm, $10; EXQUISITE CORPS, FIERCE CREATURES; 9:45pm

HAPA, 7pm, $25; RYAN LESLIE, 10pm, $20

CIVIL TWILIGHT; 6:30pm Tu, $12; BERES HAMMOND, 10pm W, $20

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

G STREET WUNDERBAR 228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

THE GOLDEN BEAR

2326 K St., (916) 441-2252

DJ Shaun Slaughter, 10pm, call for cover

HARLOW’S

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

OLLA, LOVELORN; 8pm W; Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu, no cover

Industry Night, 9pm, call for cover

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

ANCIENT ASTRONAUT, 9pm, $5

DAVID HOUSTON & STRING THEORY, 9pm, $5

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SICFUS, DRIVE THRU MYSTICS, BLUE OAKS, SPIDER HEART; 10pm, $5

JULIE AND THE JUKES, KEEP ON TRUCKIN; 8pm, $7

BARREL FEVER, 9pm W, $3

Electronic, house, dub and Top 40 deejay dancing, 10pm-2am, no cover

Reverence w/ DJs Skarkrow, Mr. Smith and Skabcat, 10pm-2am, $3-$5

Sactown Swings, swing dance lessons, 8pm-midnight Tu, $6

908 K St., (916) 446-4361

MIDTOWN BARFLY

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

WORLD’S FINEST APPLES, FREEBADGE MAJESTY, THE SPEAK LOW, SERENADERS, CRESCENT KATZ; 8:30pm JACKSON GRIFFITH; 8:30pm, $5

JOHN MALCOLM, MIKE FARRELL, MIKE JAMES; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, M; TRIKOME, Tu, $5; STREETLIGHT FIRE, 8:30pm W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

CONCRETE JUNGLE, 9pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

CAT STEVENS TRIBUTE, MARTY TATERS, ADRIAN BELEW; 7pm, $10-$15

THE NUANCE, 7:30pm M; Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 8:30pm W, no cover

1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

SOME FEAR NONE, ZEN ARCADIA, SOULVENT, TERRA FERNO; 8pm, $10-$12

BELA FLECK

ThUrSdayS

LIVE MUSIC DAILY

AND THE MARCUS ROBERTS TRIO

Vote for us

FrI 8/24

Best Place to See Live Music

SaT 8/25

AUG 25 – HARLOW’S

Best Place for 40 -and-over

NEEDTOBEATHE

OCT 30 – FREEBORN HALL, UC DAVIS

STEELIN’ DAN

AUG 28 · HARLOWS

A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF STEELY DAN OCT 20 · HARLOWS

MISSY HIGGINS

OMAR RODRIGUEZ LOPEZ

AND SPECIAL GUEST KATIE HERZIG SEPT 5 · HARLOWS

BLAME SALLY SEPT 9 · HARLOWS

K ATIE KNIPP CD RELEASE PARTY SEPT 22 · HARLOWS

GUITARIST FROM THE MARS VOLTA OCT 23 · HARLOWS

ZACH DEPUT Y OCT 24 · HARLOWS

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

OCT 25 · SACRAMENTO CITY COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

DECEPTION PAST W/ WHISKEY PILLS FIASCO 9PM / $5

FRI, AUG 24

EDDIE TURNER 9PM / $8

SAT, AUG 25

THE NIBBLERS 9PM / $12

904 15th St.

(Across from Memorial Auditorium) 44 3 - 2797 · www.torchclub.net |

08.23.12

Keep on trucKin & the juKeS julie blueS // 8pm // $7 rocK //

TUES 8/28

THUR, AUG 23

Btwn I & J Downtown Sac

SN&R

SicFuS, Spider heart drive-thru mySticS blue oaKS rocK // alternative // 8pm // $5

HAPA

CIVIL TWILIGHT

rocK on live aoKe Kar banicdrocK // 9pm // Free acouSt

SEPT 5 – THREE STAGES:STAGE ONE

|

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3

Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR 1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931

48

Geeks Who Drink pub quiz, 8:30pm W, no cover

FACES

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

Papasotes’s Karaoke Explosion, 9pm, no cover

BLEEDIN HEARTS, 7pm, no cover

18398 Old River Rd., West Sacramento; (916) 371-2277

Hey local bands!

LONELY AVENUE, WEARING IT OUT IN PUBLIC, WANNABE BARNABY; 8pm

CARSON MCWHIRTER, VINNIE GUIDERA, STUPID MAN SUIT; 8pm W, $5

CAPITOL GARAGE

1500 K St., (916) 444-3633

SATURDAY 8/25

happy hour SerieS 5:30pm // Free

mic acouStic open 8pm // Free talent ShowcaSe // wEd 8/29

rel Fever bar rocK // blueS // 9pm // $3

ticKetS now on Sale For these upcoming shows at www.marilynsonk.com $3 TallbOy Pbr

UPCOMING EVENTS:

cover me Badd “sanity not included” comedy tour chuck’s annual pirate party

908 K Street // 916.446.4361

++Free parking aFter 6pm with validation @ 10th & l garage+

THURSDAY 8/23

FRIDAY 8/24

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

RAW DAWG, CAPITAL BASTARD, MAIDENS SORROW, SYSTEM ASSAULT; 9pm

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

RORY BLOCK, 8pm, $20

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731 13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

SATURDAY 8/25

SUNDAY 8/26

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 8/27-8/29

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

LITTLE JIMI & THE SOMBRERO OF DEATH, 7pm, $5; Open-mic comedy, 9pm

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

THE IGUANAS, 8:30pm, $20

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE 1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

Life of the Party, deejay danincg, 9pm2am, $15

DJ Peeti V, 9pm, call for cover

PISTOL PETE’S

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Hip Hop Congress, 9pm, $5

THE BONEDRIVERS, 9pm, $5

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Marina, 9pm, no cover

ELEMENT OF SOUL, DOGFOOD, 9pm, $5

DJ Old Griff, 9pm, no cover

140 Harrison Ave., Auburn; (530) 885-5093 5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336

Asylum: Vampire Night, w/ DJ Bryan Hawk, 9pm-2am, $4 Karaoke, 9pm W, no cover

POWERHOUSE PUB

WHISKEY ROW, 9:30pm, call for cover

TAINTED LOVE, 10pm, $10;

DEPARTMENT OF ROCK, 10pm, $10

DENNIS JONES, 3pm, call for cover

Country Karaoke, 9pm M, call for cover; DJ Alazzawi, DJ Rigatony; 10pm Tu, $3

THE PRESS CLUB

SANS SOBRIETY, BRAIN RASH, BUM CITY SAINTS, JUDAS BUNCH; 8:30pm

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

WORK YOUR SOUL, 9pm M, no cover; KILLDEVIL, DIVERS, 8:30pm W, $5

SHINE

SHELLS, CASSANDRA HENWOOD; 8pm, $5

THE HEY NOWS, JESI NAOMI, BRADLEY RELF; 8pm, $5

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN 129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

THE PARK, LEE BOB WATSON, NATE MERCEREAU; 9pm, $5

MISS LONELY HEARTS, HOLLOW POINT STUMBLERS; 9:30pm, $5

CALLING MOROCCO, TWO SNAKES; 9:30pm, $5

STONEY INN/ROCKIN RODEO

THE CHRIS GARDNER BAND, 9:30pm, $5

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

STEELY SCAM, 6:30pm, $10

GATOR BEAT, 5pm, $8

RENEGADE, LONG TIME, 2pm, $8 Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; KYLE ROWLAND, 8pm, $5

614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586 2030 P St., (916) 444-7914 1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

SWABBIES

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

Open jazz jam, 8pm Tu; NOW! MILES, FROM THE SKY; 8pm W, $5

TORCH CLUB

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; DECEPTION PAST, WHISKEY PILLS FIASCO; 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; EDDIE TURNER, 9pm, $8

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; ELECTRIC GREASE, 9pm, $7

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Deejay dancing, 9pm, no cover

DJ XGVNR, 9pm, no cover

Pop Freq w/ DJ XGVNR, WHO CARES, YOUNG AUNDEE; 9pm, $5

1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

Cutty Ranks with DJ Shortkut, DKJ Esef and DJ Zen Ken 10pm Friday, $5. Capitol Garage Reggae

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE, 9pm Tu, $4; BUSTER BLUE, 9pm W, $5 Open-mic, 9pm M; Eyewitness Wednesdays, 9pm W, no cover

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

TRAVIS PORTER, 7pm, $28

CLUB RETRO

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

BLU HART, LOVE IS..., STEPHANIE AND THE LIZARD; 6pm, $5

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN

KAT DEVLIN, PARIE WOOD; 8:30pm, $5

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

FULL BLOWN STONE, STREET URCHINZ, EL LOMA PRIETA; 6:30pm, $10

MUSICAL CHARIS, DER SPAZM, THE KELPS, THE TREES; 8:30pm, $6

THE REFUGE

1723 L St., (916) 764-5598

TRITONES, BLACK AND WHITE, KATIE MARTINI, ADELYNNE LACKEY; 7pm, $7

ZUHG LIFE STORE

WOOSTER, 6pm, no cover

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

Kat Devlin with Parie Wood 8:30pm Thursday, $5. Luigi’s Slice and Fun Garden Acoustic Folk

SAVING ABEL, TRACK FIGHTER, OVERWATCH; 6:30pm, $12

tattoo artist go to:

THE WHEELS, 4pm, no cover

thu aug 23

17 PiECE BiG BAND

Open-mic, 6-8pm Tu, no cover

Coming Soon

wed aug 29 10pm $20

beres hammond

FEAtURiNG SOME OF tHE FiNESt JAZZ MUSCiANS iN NORtHERN CALiFORNiA WitH VOCALiSt KRiStEN MiRANDA

fri aug 24 9:45pm $8 adv

thu aug 30

sat aug 25 7pm $25

fri aug 31

Sept 2 Digital Underground Sept 5 Missy Higgins (EARLY) Sept 5 Chelsea Wolfe (LAtE) Sept 7 tainted Love Sept 8 By Sunlight / Doombird Sept 9 Blame Sally Sept 13 Growlers Sept 14 Goapele Sept 15 New Monsoon Sept 16 Mason Jennings Sept 21 Orgone/Rubblebucket Sept 21 Catherine Russell (EARLY) Sept 22 Katie Knipp Sept 24 the Features (Nashville) Sept 25 Matt Schofield Sept 28 Coyote Grace Oct 9&10 the Lumineers Oct 11 Saint Vitus/Weedeater Oct 12 Nick Gravenites & David LaFlamme Oct 17 Star F***er Oct 19 tea Leaf Green Oct 20 Steelin’ Dan Oct 23 Omar Rodriguez-Lopez Group Oct 24 Zach Deputy Oct 25 trailer Park troubadors Oct 26 Red Fang / Black tusk Oct 29 Other Lives Oct 30 Storm Large Nov 3 Robert Glasper

ExqUiSitE CORPS mustache harbor WitH GUEStS FiERCE CREAtURES

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2 1 r otat i n g ta p s

THE BIG SMALL, 2pm, call for cover

YACHt ROCK

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sat aug 25 10pm $10

sat sept 1 7pm $20

GENE LOVES CENtURY GOt BARS Cd releaSe

JEZEBEL

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Final Gravit y taproom & Bottleshop FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE STORY

A CELEBRAtiON OF SACRAMENtO 80S/90S DANCE CLUBS! EURO tECHNO, EBM, GOtHiC/iNDUStRiAL, SYNtHPOP, ELECtRO

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specializing in West Coast, northwest and Belgian beers. |

REtRO UNiON 2012

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9205 Sierra College Blvd. #100 | Roseville, CA | 916.782.1166 | www.finalgravitybeer.com BEFORE

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WE BUY GOLD & GUns GUns HI POINT 9MM PISTOL–NEW, BLACK FINISH, 1 MAg, LOCK $189.99 STEVENS-SAVAgE PuMP HOME DEFENSE SHOTguN - NEW, gHOST RINg SIgHTS, FuLL STOCK WITH PISTOL gRIP, HEAT SHIELD, MATTE BLACK FINISH, MODEL #320, 6 RND CAP, LOCK $249.99

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Mr. Spliff goes to Washington Americans for Safe Access  hopes to reclassify cannabis This fall, the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., will hear oral arguments in a 40-year-long battle to end cannabis’ by placement in Schedule I of the five-tiered Controlled David Downs Substances Act system for classifying drugs. Americans for Safe Access, representing a handful of patient-plaintiffs, hopes to get the D.C. circuit court to compel the Drug Enforcement Administration to reschedule pot to a less restrictive category—an idea the DEA has rejected twice since weed was provisionally placed in Schedule I by Congress in 1970. Under federal law, Schedule I drugs have “no currently accepted medical use” and “high potential for abuse” and include heroin, ecstasy, LSD, and methaqualone. However, cannabis has proven medical uses and a low potential for abuse, wrote Americans for Safe Access attorney Joe Elford in the appeal. Hundreds of modern medical studies testify to its medical efficacy and safety for treating cancer pain, nausea from chemotherapy, and spasticity from muscular sclerosis, among other serious medical problems. Weed can now only be removed from Schedule I by Congress, the president or the attorney general—who has delegated that power to the DEA. Citizens can also petition the DEA to reschedule a drug, and citizens promptly did in 1972—to comical effect. Americans for Safe Access thinks this third petition can do better than the others, because more scientific research exists on medical “It’s Kafkaesque in the marijuana. DEA is most excessive way.” alsoThe violating its own rules in Kris Hermes leaving pot in Americans for Safe Access Schedule I, the appeal states. The DEA uses an absurdly high double standard for pot scheduling compared to any other drug. Most drugs need medical experts to testify to a drug’s efficacy before approval for use, but pot must first unite the world in a “scientific consensus” before it’s reclassified. Oral arguments in the case will occur just weeks before the presidential election, creating another prime opportunity to educate voters on the hypocrisy that perpetuates federal marijuana policy, said ASA spokesman Kris Hermes. “I think the decades of attempts to reschedule a substance that the DEA itself has found to be medically active and not a danger to public health or a danger to patients is clearly a political issue,” Hermes said. “It’s Kafkaesque in the most excessive way.” There’s nothing to stop the DEA from holding another petition hearing, and again ignoring the recommendations of its own judges, Hermes added. But the third denial would be a net gain for the marijuana-lawreform movement, he argued. “The ability for the federal government to continue politicizing this issue and denying the medical evidence is going to become more and more difficult as the months and years progress,” Hermes said. Ω

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08.23.12     |   SN&R     |   51

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08.23.12     |   SN&R     |   53

Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

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*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

SCHOOLS AND TRAINING BARTENDERS NEEDED: Make

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Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

REACH 5 MILLION hip,forward-thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN)

MUSICIAN SERVICES Anyone Can Play Piano Studio - Natomas To find out more call Katie at 415-272-7581. Mention this ad and get 30% of your first month of lessons! GUITAR/PIANOKEYBOARD-DRUMSHARMONICA/VOCALS LESSONS. Easy (by ear) method guaranteed. Very exp./ credentialed teacher. 454-0265

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SEEKING MUSICIANS

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SUNDAY BLUES JAM SESSION 5PM TO 9PM. A Touch of Class. 4217 Stockton Blvd. For info 916-451-1786 or 209-922-1086

Guitarist looking for a band & place to play. Doug Evans 916-332-4194

Learn Sax or Clairnet from experienced professional player and CA credential teacher. Positive no-pressure method. Any age, any level. Horn rental avail. 530-889-2310.

more music online

www.newsreview.com

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more rentals online

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$35 1 hr (Sat & Sun only) $40 Chinese Full Body Massage 916-817-6508 10am-10pm daily Folsom

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Titan Insurance Sales, superhero bobblehead and design are service marks of THI Holdings (Delaware), Inc. Nationwide Insurance is a service mark of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. Price based on March 2010 analysis of available national data for liability-only policies. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review and approval.

We offer complete automotive service & repairs

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To place an adult ad, call (916)498-1234 ext.5

BULLETIN BOARD

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Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

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THERE’S ROOM TO ADVERTISE. CALL AD SERVICES.

(916) 498-1234

New Prius Are Here! 50 MPG, best warrantee, 2 year service free, call Lee McKim, Hybrid Specialist, at 530-354-7782 at Chuck Patterson Toyota.

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FOR THE WEEK OF AUGUST 23, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Do you know

what a controlled burn is? Firefighters start small, manageable fires on purpose so as to eradicate brush that has accumulated too close to wooded areas. With less fuel around, bigger fires are not as likely to ignite accidentally and turn into conflagrations. I encourage you to use this as a metaphor for your own life, Aries. How? First, identify a big potential problem that may be looming on the horizon. Then, in the coming weeks, get rid of all the small messes that might tend to feed that big problem. Make sure it’ll never happen.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Jungian sto-

ryteller Clarissa Pinkola Estés advises us to take good care of the untamed aspects of our nature. “The wild life must be kept ordered on a regular basis,” she writes. One way to do this is to keep our uncommon and unruly ideas clear and organized. It’s also important to give them respect, and understand that they’re crucial to our spiritual and psychological health. How are you doing in this regard, Taurus? What’s your relationship with the untamed aspects of your nature? According to my reading of the omens, now is prime time for you honor and nurture and cultivate them.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): By my astrological reckoning, you’re not nearly wet enough right now. I recommend that you take immediate and intensive steps to remedy the situation. There should not be anything about you that is high and dry; you need to soak up the benefits that come from being slippery and dripping. If you’re suffering from even a hint of emotional dehydration, you should submerse yourself in the nearest pool of primal feelings. For extra credit, drink deeply from the sacred cup that never empties.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the 16th

century, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor ruled over a vast swath of land that included 12 modern European nations. According to some historians, he once said, “I speak Spanish to God, Italian to women, French to men, and German to my horse.” This is the kind of attitude I recommend that you adopt in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Tailor your language to the people and creatures you’re speaking to. Address them on their own level of consciousness, respecting their limitations and appealing to their particular kind of intelligence. Of course, this is always a good policy, but it’s especially important for you to observe now. Fluency and flexibility will be rewarded in ways you can’t imagine.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Would you like to

enhance your relationship with money? If so, do you have any specific ideas about how to do it? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to identify and implement those ideas. Let me make an initial suggestion: Keep your magical thinking to a minimum, but don’t stamp it out entirely; a small amount of frisky fantasizing will actually boost the likelihood that your more practical intentions will achieve critical mass. Here’s another tip: Imagine the presents you’d get for people if you had some extra cash. Stimulating your generous urges may help motivate the universe to be generous to you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A guy I know

was invited to hang one of his paintings in a New York gallery¡ ªon one condition. It had to be a piece he created on the spot, in the gallery, on the day the show opened. That would be way too much pressure for me to handle. I need to spend a long time on the stuff I make, whether it’s music or writing. I’ve got to fuss over every little detail as I constantly edit and refine and add layers. What about you, Virgo? Could you quickly come up with some new wrinkle or fresh creation that would show the world who you really are? I’m guessing we will soon find out.

potentials that would otherwise remain dormant. Having said that, I want to make a suggestion that may seem at odds with my usual approach, even though it’s not. For the next two weeks, I encourage you to explore the necessary power of decay. Harness the archetypes of breakdown and dissolution as you put an end to things whose time is up. This work is key to your future rejuvenation and renaissance.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I’m going to

ignore the Urban Dictionary’s more modern definitions of the word yeast, and stick to the original meaning: an agent of fermentation that brews alcoholic drinks and makes bread dough rise. Metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you should be like that for your gang or crew or tribe. I urge you to stir up group morale. Provoke deeper thought and stronger feelings. Instigate some bubbly new trends and effervescent interactions. Be yeasty!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Sussex is a county in southeast England. Its official motto is “We wunt be druv,” which is Sussex dialect for “We won’t be pushed around.” It’s not bad as mottoes go, I guess. There’s power in announcing to the world that you’re not going to allow anyone to manipulate you or bully you. But I’d like to see you come up with a more robust battle cry for yourself, Sagittarius¡ ªone that doesn’t focus on what you won’t do, but rather on what you will do. It’s an ideal astrological moment to articulate your driving purpose in a pithy formula that will give you strength whenever you invoke it.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Most

people consider global warming somewhat of a mixed blessing,” wrote Aaron Sankin on The Huffington Post. “On one hand, there’s ocean acidification, deserts gobbling up wide swaths of farmland and the massive die-off of the innumerable species unable to cope with the effects of the world’s rapidly rising temperature. But, on the other hand, you’ll be able to wear shorts for literally the entire year.” Sankin is being deeply sarcastic, of course. Let’s make his satire a jumping-off point as we consider some sincerely worthwhile trade-offs you might want to implement in your own sphere. Would you be willing to sacrifice a trivial comfort for a new privilege? Would you shed a small pleasure to gain a much bigger pleasure? Might you divest yourself of a pocket of resentment if in doing so you’d attract a cleansing epiphany?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I don’t

expect your travels in the coming weeks to be like a smooth luxury cruise in a stretch limousine. Your route is not likely to be a straight shot through breathtaking scenery with expansive views. No, my dear Aquarius, your journeys will be more complicated than that, more snakey and labyrinthine. Some of the narrow passages and weedy detours you’ll need to navigate may not even resemble paths, let alone highways. And your metaphorical vehicle may resemble a funky old 1967 Chevy pickup truck or a forklift bedecked with flowers. It should be pretty fun, though. Keep in mind that your maps may only be partially useful.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In medieval

times, you didn’t need a priest to get married, nor did you have to be in a church or recite a set of vows. You didn’t even have to round up witnesses. All that was required was that the two people who wanted to be wed said “I marry you” to each other. Those three words had great power! In the coming days, Pisces, I’d love to see you draw inspiration from that lost tradition. Your assignment is to dream up three potent declarations that, while not legally binding, express the deepest and most loving intentions you promise to be faithful to in the coming years.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you’ve been

reading my horoscopes for a while, you know I’m not a decadent cynic who thinks “no pain, no gain” is the supreme formula for success. On the contrary. I think it’s quite possible to enjoy tremendous growth spurts when you’re happy and healthy. Pleasurable events can be great learning experiences. Joy and freedom may activate

BEFORE

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You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

15 MINUTES

by JONATHAN

MENDICK PHOTO BY WILLIAM LEUNG

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Do the worm? Joel York started working at Centro Cocina Mexicana (2730 J Street) when he was 21. Now, more than 12 years and many bottles of tequila later, he’s the bar manager and primary tequila buyer—and infuser—for the popular Midtown restaurant. Translated, that means he’s personally sampled all of the restaurant’s more than 200 types of tequila, and refers to himself as a “tequila snob.” York took a break from his bartending duties to discuss tequila worms, cocktail recipes and the right way to drink tequila.

So you started drinking tequila 12 years ago? I started with Jose Cuervo and thought that was the only tequila. [Then], I started working here and realized there was a lot more. Now, I’m officially a tequila snob. There are certain things that I only use in margaritas. Certain ones I’ll only sip. Certain ones I’ll only shoot. You can’t shoot an expensive tequila. I’m not gonna shoot Jose Cuervo anymore. I still use Jose Cuervo for batch margaritas—I don’t see any problem with that. There’s a place for everything.

Why does tequila have a reputation of not being a “refined” drink? Because of Jose Cuervo. Because of college-time [experiences], stuff like that. People buy that cheap stuff, and they have that bad experience. “Oh, I can’t drink tequila; I’m allergic to tequila,” is what they say, which is total BS. They just had a bad experience on it because they overdrank it. What people usually do is they shoot tequila. We try to show here that you don’t need to shoot tequila. Most of the tequilas [here] are sipping tequilas. You can taste them just like scotch or cognac. Tequila is a lot like wine. Agave can only be grown in a small part of Mexico. ... Aging processes are totally different: You’ve got silver, which is straight distilled; reposado, which is rested two to eight months normally; then you’ve got añejo, which is a year; and extra/muy añejo, which is like three to five years. And some, they take it up to 12 [years]. So you get different characteristics.

Do you have to drink it out of a proper glass? Some people do, but I’m not that snobby. I’m still just for drinking it out of the shot glass. ... A lot of people treat it as a cognac, they put it in a wine glass, they stir it. That’s the new thing now, putting everything in a wine glass, because you put more air into it, and air brings out the flavor and all. But to each his own. Some people like to sniff theirs. ... I just like to drink it.

What’s with the worm? The tequila worm: There are a lot of myths. One [explanation] is [it’s a marketing] gimmick. Another is [tequila makers] would throw it in there, and something like if the worm wiggled for a little while, it wasn’t high enough in alcohol content. So if you dropped it in and it died right away, [you’d know] OK,

STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

that’s 40 percent, 36 percent [alcohol content]. It needs to be something like 36 to 38. So that was their way instead of testing it.

What’s your favorite recipe for any drink with tequila?

Have you eaten the worm?

I saw this on a show, Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations. The lead singer of Queens of the Stone Age, he has this drink [that] I love. It’s silver tequila, tonic, grapefruit juice and lime juice. They call it Corvette Summer. It’s named after a cheesy 1970s movie. I love that drink. I like that tart [flavor].

Yeah, I did. There was a bar in Fair Oaks that I used to [go to] in my drinking days. And they have one of those things where you eat the worm and you put your name on a wall in a plaque. It’s a mealworm. It’s high in protein.

Do you drink tequila with lime and salt?

I read that you infuse tequila? Yeah, I do all the infused tequila [here]. I’ve been doing that for about 12 years. ... When I started working with the ingredients, we had strawberry, pineapple, and pineapplestrawberry-kiwi. And that was it, just those three. [Now], on any given day, we have anywhere from 10 to 15 different infusions of tequilas back there. Right now, I have a pear and vanilla bean. ... I’ve done pumpkin, cinnamon ... corn and jalapeño ... dragon fruit ... pineapple-habanero ...blueberrymango ... strawberry-rhubarb.

Any infusions with dangerous animals? I’ve seen enough of those. ... You know, [people say that] the viper helps with fertility. ... I stay away from all that stuff.

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AFTER

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No. You can if you want, but typically, tequila is [paired with] sangrita. It’s basically orange juice, onion, ancho chili and salt. You blend that all together, and that’s it. You sip that, and it’s a palate cleanser in between [drinks]. Tequila shouldn’t taste bad. If you’re tasting bad tequila, then switch the tequila.

Your favorite tequila to drink straight up? Right now, it’s hard [to choose a favorite]. I really like Tequila Ocho. I met the owner, a really cool guy who’s an ex-collegiate wrestler. Back in the day, we used to take shots behind the bar of Chinaco, [so I like that] just for memories or whatever. Ω For more information on Midtown Cocktail Week, which runs through Sunday, August 26, visit www.midtowncocktailweek.org.

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EDUCATION IS FOR... HIPSTERS

NERDS

ATHLETES

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EVERYONE. INSIDE: TALE OF TWO STUDENTS 05 BUDGET 101 06 PEER COUNSELING 11 A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW

SACRAMENTO STUDENT GUIDE 2012

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‘This is what I love to do,’” Crystal says. “But I CRYSTAL JORDAN’S FACE LIGHTS UP as she recalls one of her proudest moments: watching her oldest needed to go back and get my degree –– not just to get the degree, but to educate myself.” daughter, Asia, graduate from Visions Charter Now, Crystal says she experiences more School. The two pore over photographs from last hurdles as a nontraditional student, which she June on Asia’s laptop, giggling at the silly faces hopes her children won’t have to overcome. and poses they made after the ceremony. The The biggest challenge, the single mom says, is 39-year-old and 18-year-old look more like sisters managing her time. than mother and daughter. Although Crystal encourages her children With just a few classes standing between her to go to school when they are younger and have and her bachelor’s of science in psychology from less responsibilities, she hopes her own success Liberty University, the mother of three is about to as an adult will inspire them experience the excitement to go no matter what their of her own graduation. age. Crystal hopes by “The best advice I told finishing college, she can “The best advice I told her her was to not stop –– to keep encourage her children was to not stop –– to keep going. It’s hard to go back to to do the same. Crystal’s going. It’s hard to go back to school when you stop and you own experiences that take a break,” Crystal says. delayed getting her degree school when you stop and And just as Crystal is have served as a learning you take a break.” finishing college, Asia is taking point for her children. her mom’s advice, planning out Crystal was enrolled –CRYSTAL JORDAN her first year of college. The at Wayne State University duo says even though they are in Detroit, Michigan in taking different paths to get 1993. But, after she got where they are going, they are married and became pregnant, it became clear inspired and motivated by each other. Crystal needed to work full time to support her “Seeing her so close to graduating really family. Eventually, she separated from her husband encourages me,” Asia says. “It lets me know I can and moved to California with her children, Asia, do it, too. I’m really proud of her and it gets me Michael and Micah, to take care of her brother excited about going [to college].” while he waited for a heart transplant. With the life lessons her mom has It was a new start for her and her family. She turned her passion for helping people into a imparted, Asia is most looking forward to the independence her first year of college will bring. steady social work job, but returning to school She hopes to attend American River College and was always on her mind. study culinary arts. “In the field I was working in, I told myself,

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SacRaMEnTO STUDENT GUIDE a SpEcIaL advERTISInG SUppLEMEnT aUGUST 23, 2012

BUdGET WHETHER YOU’RE 18 and just SHOp SavvY fleeing the nest or 35 and going back to get that degree, stretching every last dollar when you’re in college isn’t a choice, it’s a given. Be smart. Make a budget and stick to it. Here are our top six budget tips so you don’t have to eat ramen every night or steal toilet paper from public bathrooms (no, we aren’t admitting to anything).

GET YOUR GRUB On Going out to eat is fun… and really expensive if you don’t know the right spots. Check local papers, websites and social media pages for food and drink specials. Some restaurants, like Opa! Opa!, offer students a discount for showing their student ID card. Bisla’s offers $1 tacos and sliders on Tuesdays, plus drink specials throughout the week. Sure, you’ll have to skip the caviar, but after a long day of schooling, doesn’t that $2 domestic sound better anyway? And, we offer discounted gift certificates to numerous restaurants, bars and clubs in Sacramento on our sweetdeals website. You can save up to 50 percent off great restaurants including Ink Eats & Drinks, Hamburger Patties and Squeeze Inn to name just a few.

Repeat: French cheeses are not for broke students. You’ll have money for such luxuries later. For now, make the most of inexpensive groceries. Look for local farmers markets (there’s at least a dozen within the surrounding region and some are even open year round, like the Sunday Farmers Market under the XYZ freeway) to buy healthy, local produce for a fraction of what supermarkets charge. Budget-friendly stores like Dollar Tree or Big Lots are also a great resource — and they sell more than ramen.

GEEk-TEcH FOR THE caSH-STRappEd If you are a student without a computer, there’s always your school’s library or computer resource center to catch up on that term paper you’ve been putting off. But if you want to use your own computer — maybe you aren’t ready to let the world in on your obsession with The Real Housewives of New Jersey (don’t worry, your secret’s safe with us) — buy refurbished. Don’t pay full price for a personal computer or laptop when places like Best Buy sell refurbished computers for a fraction of the cost. Also check out Sacramento Tech Exchange, which sells refurbished computers and fixes and sells everything from laptops to Blu-ray players.

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It’s easy to get so buried in studying for exams and writing papers that you forget about your social life (or at least what’s left of it) in its entirety. It’s important to take a break from all that hard work and have a little fun. To really save money, stay in with your friends and play some of your favorite drinking games or drink before you go out. If you do go out, Sacramento has dozens of spots that are great for a night of binge drinking (just make sure you have a designated driver) that are sure to be easy on your wallet. Most bars have drink specials for students on certain days of the week and some local campuses offer free live entertainment. Check out Ace of Spades, which has happy hour with $2 wells from 2 to 7 p.m. every day, or head to Harlow’s happy hour from 3 to 7 p.m. on weekdays for appetizers and drinks starting at $2.

iT’s NoT easy BeiNg easy College students get around — this is no secret. But why buy condoms when you can get them for free? Listen up, ladies. We aren’t just talking to the guys here. Take care of yourself and your partners (we’re not

counting), and head to a campus health center, a free local clinic or a family-planning center where you can get the hook up for your hookup. It’s convenient, easy and you’re saving money! And most of these places provide free birth control, too. Plus, you can usually get tested for sexually transmitted infections and diseases free of charge and get complimentary (and really good) sexual health advice.

Start Your Career Path

Dress The parT It’s 7:45 on a Monday morning and you’ve already hit the snooze button six times. Why did you sign up for that 8 a.m. class? We know the last thing on your mind is what you’re going to wear, but you never know when you are going to bump into your future husband or wife, or even your next boss. Don’t get in the habit of throwing on whatever you find on your floor that morning or wearing your beerstained shirt from last night’s keg stand before you scramble to class. Whether it’s 8 a.m. or noon, baggy sweatshirts or pajama bottoms a “no-no.” Shop clearance racks at your favorite stores or at local discount boutiques, like Crossroads and Freestyle.

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Peer Counseling If you could go back In tIme to your fIrst year of college and gIve yourself any advIce, what would It be?

“I would tell myself to go to college right away after high school instead of wasting two years.” Oleg Sedykh, American River College

“Don’t be as shy when starting at a new school. A college campus can be intimidating, but there are ways to make it better and take away your fears. I joined a group called UNIQUE (Union Network for Innovative Quality University Entertainment) that helped me meet a bunch of people.” Carly Preston, CSUS

“It is hard think about what I would do differently, going to Tech skills has been really easy for me and there is not a lot you can do before you prepare. I think just doing a little bit more research on the different jobs I can get with the certifications they offer [would have been nice].” Christopher Collins, Tech Skills

“Sign up for every scholarship humanly possible and to actually know how to do my FASFA. Halfway through the semester, I got kicked out of school because I lost my financial aid.” Erica Shaw, Paul Mitchell The School Sacramento

“I would tell myself to not let boys get in the way.” Caitlin Kerton, CSUS

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