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RADIO SWEDEN See SCENE, page 35

ELECTION = EXPENSIVE See NEWSLINES, page 10

SIS BOOM

BAH! See HEALTHLINES, page 19

THE END IS BEARD

BY CARSON MEDLEY PAGE

22

See MUSIC FEATURE, page 26

An up-to-the-minute whodunnit Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 36, Issue 14

Thursday, November 29, 2012

HOLIDAZE See FESTIVITIES CALENDAR, page 30

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Make a donation, and we’ll send a card on your behalf. buttehumane.org

2 CN&R November 29, 2012

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CN&R

Vol. 36, Issue 14 • November 29, 2012

26

OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

NEWSLINES Downstroke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

GREENWAYS

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EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

HEALTHLINES The Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Weekly Dose. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

38

22

ARTS & CULTURE Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Festivities Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 In The Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Scene. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

REAL ESTATE

39

CLASSIFIEDS

41

BACKSTOP From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

If you do your holiday shopping with local merchants this season, you will help to: • Strenghten the local economy • Maintain the unique character of our community and region

ON THE COVER: DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Melissa Daugherty Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Meredith J. Graham, JoVan Johnson, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, MaryRose Lovgren, Mazi Noble, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Kyle Emery, Stephanie Geske, Melanie MacTavish, Kjerstin Wood Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Design Melissa Arendt, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Osa Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino, Robert Rhody Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay

General Manager Alec Binyon Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Sharon Conley, Shannon Davis, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Lisa Ramirez, Pat Rogers, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Jeff Traficante, Bill Unger, Lisa Van Der Maelen President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Receptionist Kendra Gray Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

• Support the businesses that support the CN&R • Grow small businesses who collectively create the most new jobs • Keep sales tax revenue in your community by avoiding online retailers Read our Shop LocaL Gift Guide starting on paGe 12 of this issue of CN&R for great local gift ideas. Shop our SweetdeaLS store for discounted gift certificates from local retailers to stretch your holiday dollars. LocaL retaiLerS: call your CN&R advertising representative today to share your gift idea with our 90,000 regular readers in the Shop Local Gift Guide.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (250 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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CN&R 3

Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

New faces, new council When the Chico City Council meets next Tuesday, Dec. 4, it will

Herger AWOL on pro-vets bills Oman Wally Herger’s commitment to our military and its veterans. And no one would argue that Rep. Wally Herger

ver the years, some folks have praised Congress-

helped make the veterans’ cemetery and home a reality, that his district staff has provided constituent services to veterans, and that he supports local events honoring our veterans. But, how’s he done legislatively? To what extent has he supported proposed legislation affecting military personnel? According to the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), not particularly well. MOAA is an independent, nonprofit and nonpartisan organization whose by focus includes military personnel matPete Stiglich ters, especially in regard to legislation affecting the military. It does not track The author is a individual legislators’ voting records, retired Air Force believing that “co-sponsorship records colonel who lives in Cottonwood. He was are more telling of an elected official’s stance and position.” an unsuccessful Several random checks of MOAA’s Republican candidate for Congress in 2010 “Take Action” database (moaa.org) and 2012. reveal Herger’s reluctance to co-sponsor proposed military legislation. A check of proposed bills tracked by MOAA on Oct. 16, 2010, showed him co-sponsoring zero out of 24 bills. A second check on July 16, 2011, showed him putting his name behind one out of 16 bills. And then, as of Nov. 12, 2012, 4 CN&R November 29, 2012

Herger gets credit for co-sponsoring one out of 24 proposed bills. Realistically, no one expects Herger to support every piece of veterans’ legislation, especially given the country’s dire financial situation. But, by any reasonable measure, there’s clearly room for improvement. A sampling of the bills Herger could have co-sponsored but chose not to includes the Reserve Retirement Credit for Active Duty Service since 9/11; Surviving Spouses’ Benefit Improvement Act of 2009; Disabled Veterans Tax Termination Act; Military Retirees Health Care Protection Act; Military Spouse Job Continuity Act of 2010; Retired Pay Restoration Act; CHAMPVA Children’s Protection Act of 2011; and the Honor America’s Guard and Reserve Retirees Act. Rubbing salt into the wound, Herger apparently felt the need to co-sponsor such “critical” bills as the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Act; Designation of U.S. Postal Service located in Eureka, CA as the “Sam Sacco Post Office Building”; Girl Scouts USA Centennial Commemorative Coin Act; and the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act (source: OpenSecrets.org). Heck, even Sen. Barbara Boxer has a better record, currently co-sponsoring nine out of 14 bills supporting our military. Dare I say, my friends, the proof is in the pudding. Ω

hold a brief ceremony at the beginning of the meeting, during which outgoing Councilman Bob Evans, who came in sixth on Nov. 6, will be honored for his two years of service. Following that, three new members, Tami Ritter, Andrew Coolidge and Randall Stone, along with the re-elected Ann Schwab, will be sworn in for four-year terms. Although the philosophical balance on the council will remain as it’s been since 2002, with progressives holding a majority of the seats, the three new members are sure to offer some surprises. Council members are independent thinkers, and though they may lean certain ways, that’s not necessarily how they will vote. As its first act, the council will select a mayor and vice mayor to serve for the next two years. Schwab, the current mayor, has served two terms, during which she’s been the most influential and popular mayor of the past decade. We certainly would have no problem with her being picked again. On the other hand, it’s probably time for a change. If so, the job will go to one of the two remaining veteran progressives, Scott Gruendl and Mary Goloff. Gruendl was mayor from 2004 to 2006. He did a good job, notably by initiating the push toward sustainability that Schwab has so effectively championed during her tenure. But we believe that, at a time when there are three new people on the council, it would be fitting to have someone new in the mayor’s seat, as well. Goloff, who is in her second term, hasn’t been interested in the position heretofore. But she may want to cement her legacy by taking on the bigger job during what will probably be her last two years on the council. If so, we would strongly support her selection as mayor. Finally, our thanks to Bob Evans. He’s served the people of Chico with intelligence and great good will. We’ll miss him. Ω

What ‘fiscal cliff’? Count us among those who think that the so-called “fiscal cliff”

is actually more of a “fiscal slope” whose impacts would be felt gradually, not immediately. That’s why President Obama should hold strong to his insistence on raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans. He’s got a mandate now. If recalcitrant Republicans balk at new taxes, he should just let the Bush tax cuts—which after all were passed as temporary measures— expire. Then, in January with a new Congress seated, he could reduce taxes on all but the wealthiest Americans. Many Republicans would go along because it’s a tax reduction, not a tax hike, and doesn’t violate their foolish no-tax pledge. That would also give Congress plenty of time to fine-tune cuts to the Pentagon as well as other automatic elements such as hiking the payroll tax, expanding use of the alternative minimum tax and cutting Medicare payments to doctors. The worst thing Obama could do is go along with an austerity program that would reduce the budget deficit on the backs of the poor, the sick and the young while letting the wealthy go on paying less than their fair share of taxes. He’s said he has no intention of doing that, and we expect him to be true to his word. It strikes us that the Democrats are holding the best cards here, and that their hand will only get better after Jan 1. They should stop fear-mongering about the “fiscal cliff” and the likelihood of recession and prepare people for a gradual resolution of the problem. The sky won’t fall on Dec. 31. Ω

If recalcitrant Republicans balk at new taxes, [Obama] should just let the Bush tax cuts expire.

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FROM THIS CORNER by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Is the war on drugs ending? Slowly but surely, America is abandoning its failed war on drugs, beginning with marijuana. Voters in 18 states and the District of Columbia have approved the medical use of marijuana, and on Nov. 6 Washington and Colorado became the first states to legalize marijuana for personal use. It’s about time. Since its inception in 1971, as Katrina vanden Heuvel points out in The Washington Post, the war on drugs has resulted in 45 million arrests but no discernible decrease in drug use. “The result of this trillion-dollar crusade?” she asks. “Americans aren’t drug free—we’re just the world’s most incarcerated population. We make China look like Woodstock.” The American public is finally starting to agree— hence the liberalization of marijuana laws. The question now is how the federal government will respond to the new state laws, since they conflict with federal restrictions. So far the Obama administration’s response has been inconsistent at best. In October 2009 the Department of Justice announced that it would not prosecute medical-marijuana providers who were following state laws, but two years later federal prosecutors in California began large-scale raids on cultivators and distributors, shutting down 600 dispensaries. Recently, during an interview on CNN, Gov. Jerry Brown was asked his opinion on the new laws in Washington and Colorado. He came down firmly on the side of states’ rights. “I believe the president and the Justice Department ought to respect the will of these sovereign states,” Brown said. “[They] shouldn’t try to nullify a reasonable state regulation. The measures that have gotten so far have gotten there after vigorous debate. … We don’t need some federal gendarme to come and tell us what to do….” Not that the medical-marijuana business in California is benign, as Butte County residents well understand. Timothy Egan, writing in The New York Times, notes, “This chaotic and unregulated system has resulted in pricegouging, phony prescriptions and outright scams. No wonder pot dispensaries have opposed legalization—it could put them out of business.” Moving marijuana from the black market into legitimate retail stores, where it can be regulated and taxed just as liquor is, is a necessary precondition to having a serious discussion about use and abuse. As Egan says, “The model is the campaign against drunk driving, which has made tremendous strides and saved countless lives at a time when alcohol is easier to get than ever before. Education, without one-sided moralizing, works.” It will be interesting to see how Washington’s and Colorado’s experiments in legalization play out. Clearly, the historical trend is toward increased loosening and abandonment of marijuana and other drug restrictions. If nothing else, we can’t afford to keep 500,000 people behind bars, and costing up to $60,000 a year each, for drug offenses. President Obama has positioned himself as a transformative leader. He has an opportunity now to live up to his promise by ending the war on drugs. If he chooses not to do so, at the very least he should leave the states alone to try new approaches.

Robert Speer is editor of the CN&R.

Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

Zingg stood by idly, too Re “Déjà vu” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, Nov. 21): Chico State University President Paul Zingg, in the aftermath of Mason Sumnicht’s tragic death, suspends Greek activities. President Zingg stated fraternity members don’t get a pass when they “stand by idly and watch a brother gulp down 21 shots for his 21st birthday and then let him pass out in his own vomit.” Early in 2009 Mr. Zingg was informed that Chico State students were dying from drug-alcohol overdoses at an extremely high rate. Also in early 2009, Mr. Zingg received many suggestions to help prevent drug overdoses. Mr. Zingg, if you were aware that dozens of students suffered fatal overdoses, then why have you not funded substanceabuse-prevention programs that specifically address and reduce student overdoses? Mr. Zingg, would this not mean that you too have stood idly by and watched students die while providing minimal additional intervention or prevention? To blame the Greek community as being compliant in the death of Mason Sumnicht is beneath contempt. Mr. Zingg, drug abuse, Chico State and denial are synonymous, and that is your problem. Until you admit the campus has a drug abuse problem, student deaths from drug overdoses will continue to rise. Allocate funding for an effective substance-abuse-prevention program or idly stand by and watch students die. Until Chico State, city of Chico and Butte County political leaders understand that punishment, blaming others, being apathetic and denial change nothing, nothing will change.

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A better way of doing it Chico voters have passed a measure that has the Chico city clerk reporting to the City Council, not the city manager. This results in the requirement that a majority of the council approve the wishes of any council member to instruct the city clerk. This necessarily means four council members meeting to approve the wish. This is a flagrant violation of the Brown Act, as a majority of the council cannot ever be present at the same time at the same place even if they do not talk to each other, let alone decide to approve the wish of a council member to instruct the city clerk. If there was a problem with the city manager having undue power, then the City Council had the power to direct the city manager not to impede the functioning of the city clerk or otherwise be disciplined and a negative memorandum inserted in his or her personnel file. This could have saved the city some real taxpayers’ money. A parliamentarian could have been consulted for paltry $200. BRAHAMA D. SHARMA Chico

LETTERS continued on page 6

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I would like to thank the editorial board of the CN&R for endorsing my campaign for state Senate. It was a long shot, but I am glad I tried. I also thank the District 4 voters who believe I have the “right stuff” to represent you in the Legislature. I was ready to work on the challenges facing California. Thanks to my campaign team—a diverse group of incredibly bright and articulate people who kept me focused while challenging me to be clear in my message. Most of all I thank everyone for letting me represent you and your kids for the last eight years on the CUSD Board of Education. I am grateful for the experience. I believe the students are in good hands, from the corporation yard to the superintendent’s office. The employees of CUSD are focused on providing the best public education affordable for Chico’s kids. Finally, I want to encourage the young people of the North State to get involved in local politics. We need your bright minds and creative ideas to keep our state viable. I certainly appreciated your help to make sure my campaign was relevant to your generation. JANN REED Chico

NOTICE TO CITY OF CHICO RESIDENTS: OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE ON BOARD AND COMMISSIONS

“This ‘taker’ group of voters overwhelmingly voted for the present administration because they knew the alternative would mean they might have to work and contribute.” —Tom Dowd needs to be upheld and honored between elected officials and their various appointees. In fact I turned down campaign contributions from donors who expressed an interest in being appointed. This is not a hard promise to keep. I challenged the other candidates to take the same pledge that day at the forum. Guess what: No one accepted my challenge, and one candidate began to tell me how mistaken I was for the notion of linking cash contributions to appointments. So much for perception in politics. It will be fun to connect the dots this time around and see if any campaign contributors are “recognized” for their particular skills and “value” to the community at large. DAVE KELLEY Chico

Wall Street wakes up It’s interesting that right after Hurricane Sandy the cover story on Bloomberg Businessweek was, “It’s Global Warming, Stupid.” It takes Wall Street literally being under water to make corporate America open its eyes to environmental concerns. They are finally realizing that oil-company profits pale in comparison to the continuation of business in general. Even so, I still don’t think their main concerns are the survival of the planet for future generations, just the ability to keep the corporate business world functioning.

He’s not a real ‘taker’

Re “Confessions of a ‘taker’” (Guest comment, by Jaime O’Neill, Nov. 15): Jaime O’Neill says that according to critics of the election results the “takers” outvoted the “makers.” The Chico City Council is seeking applications from I agree. However, I don’t agree volunteers to serve on the City of Chico’s Board and that Mr. O’Neill qualifies as a Commissions. Applicants must be residents of the City “taker.” He is certainly entitled to his modest government pensions of Chico and qualified voters (18 years or older). because he contributed and earned them. Persons may apply to one or more of the following Board The “taker” label more aptly describes those who have never or Commissions: Airport Commission, Architectural RON SHERMAN contributed and yet have been able Review and Historic Preservation Board, Arts Chico to live off government programs Commission, Bidwell Park and Playground Commission their whole lives. Under the present Who took the pledge? administration their numbers have and Planning Commission. All appointments will be At the Synthesis Magazine candiincreased so dramatically that they four year terms beginning January 2013, and expiring date forum, all 10 of the attending finally outnumber the people who January 2017. council candidates were asked for work for a living (the “makers”). one promise they could keep if This “taker’’ group of voters elected to City Council. My one overwhelmingly voted for the Applications are available from the City Clerk’s Office, campaign promise was not to present administration because 411 Main Street, 3rd Floor and on the City’s website, appoint anyone to any board or they knew the alternative would commission who had given any mean they might have to work and www.ci.chico.ca.us. Please call 896-7250 if you have monetary donation to any candidate. contribute. any questions. No money, no appointment. I I am acquainted with many made it clear that other non-mone- “makers” (small-business owners). n e w s & r e v i e w b u s i n e s s u s e o n ly tary campaign supporting activities Not one of them voted for Obama. ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED IN THE CITY ss not part of the issUe dATe 03.03.11 ACCT eXeC amb TOM DOWD promise. I just CLERK’S OFFICE BY 5:00 P.M. MONDAY, DECEMBER 3, 2012 designerwere FiLe nAMebelieve reV dATe Durham lawofficesofbh030311r2 new there is a public trust that 6 CN&R November 29, 2012

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More on the stolen iPod Re “Missed communication” (Letters, by Danielle Batha-Bengston, Nov. 21): Regarding Chico Cash Exchange and their complaint about the coverage they received in the article about my stolen Ipod (“Who’s got the iPod?” Newslines, Oct. 4): As I stated originally, it was not about the money but the principle of the matter. And, as I told reporter Stephanie Geske, I had already bought a new [iPod]. Second, I have to wonder what all this post-article fuss is about. The original article was well written, newsworthy and relevant to the local community. After all, how many people realize that if you have something stolen and it winds up in a pawn shop, you do not get it back unless you pay them what they invested in the item? Third, in her letter to the editor, owner Danielle Batha-Bengtson made it sound as if the CN&R had never tried to contact her in order to get her side of the story. Well, I tried to contact the manager there several times, and it always seemed that they were too busy to contact me. As a matter of fact, I have yet to hear from them, and they have had my property for almost a year. Batha-Bengtson also stated that when I came by to pick up my iPod it was on police hold and that is why I did not get it back. However, that is not what I was told by her employee. I was clearly told that if I coughed up $20 I could have it back right on the spot. So much for the story of a police hold. Personally, I feel I have been robbed twice. GEORGE MARLEY Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.

Have you ever stolen anything? Asked outside the downtown post office Reece Taylor

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CN&R 7

Wayne Deese points toward the source of generator noise that has troubled him and his wife for a decade.

COMMISSION, BOARD SEATS OPEN

Want to serve the city of Chico without the pain and agony of running for election? The city has five commissions and one board with seats opening up at the end of the year. Those seats are for the Planning Commission (three), the Bidwell Park and Playground Commission (three), the Arts Commission (four), the Airport Commission (four) and the Architectural Review and Historic Preservation Board (three). Applicants may apply for more than one seat. The appointments last four years, with the exception of the Airport Commission, which has two four-year and two two-year seats open. Applications and instructions are available on the city website or in the City Clerk’s Office on the third floor of the Chico Municipal Center at 411 Main St. The applications must be turned in by 5 p.m. on Dec. 3. The appointees will be chosen by vote of the City Council at its Dec. 18 meeting.

WARNER STREET BRIDGE BUST

A 41-year-old Chico man was arrested on the Chico State campus for possession of narcotics and stolen property on Nov. 23. Joseph Carlucci was pulled over by Sgt. David Bird of the University Police Department for failing to stop at the Warner Street bridge stop sign at 2:45 a.m., at which point a second suspect exited the vehicle and ran off, according to a UPD press release. During a search of the vehicle, Bird found methamphetamine and stolen property belonging to Chico State students out of town for Thanksgiving break. After contacting the students, another UPD officer discovered evidence of forced entry at their home on the 600 block of West Fourth Street. Carlucci was arrested and taken to Butte County Jail. The second suspect—described as a 20- to 30-year-old Hispanic male—has yet to be identified.

OFFER A HOME THIS SEASON

Butte Humane Society is kicking off its annual holiday-themed adoption campaign, making it the perfect time of year for folks to welcome a homeless pet into their lives. The “Take Us Home for the Holidays” event begins on Saturday, Dec. 1, and aims to have every animal available for adoption that day into a new home by Dec. 31. As an incentive, adopters will draw a coupon at random for such things as discounts on services at the shelter’s clinic or free accessories. A portrait of every adoptable pet will be posted in the lobby of the shelter, with a bow attached once the animal finds a home. Go to www.buttehumane.org to learn more. “The holiday season is a time for family and togetherness,” said Trent Burnham, BHS adoptions manager, in a press release. “What better way to celebrate than by extending your family to a homeless animal?” 8 CN&R November 29, 2012

PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

Inset: Butte County Supervisor Bill Connelly

Can we get a little quiet here? Rural Butte County couple wages decade-long battle against generator noise coming from a neighbor’s property

I moved from the Los Angeles area to southern Butte County in search of a little peace and quiet, n 1998, Wayne and Michelle Deese

and for a brief while they found it. “We took great measures to ensure it was what we wanted,” by Wayne said of the property they Ken Smith bought and live on at the graveled east end of Cox Lane outkens@ newsreview.com side of Palermo. “We looked for over a year, and we even camped out here a few nights before we bought the place. It was wonderful then, pristine and perfectly quiet.” Until 2000, the golden silence the Deeses sought to enjoy during Wayne’s retirement was broken only by the occasional bleating of a sheep or neighboring children playing in the distance. Then one night, while enjoying a dip in the hot tub they’d installed on the back patio, they were bombarded by the grating noise of a generator running from across Honcut Creek, noise that has continued intermittently ever since, mostly late at night. “The noise is so loud and grating, it can’t be overstated,” Michelle Deese said during a recent interview in the couple’s home. “It usually starts up around 9 p.m. and goes until the early morning hours.” The Deeses initially appealed to the neighbor himself, whose name is Mike Fisher, and came to a compromise early on. “I went to Home Depot and bought some concrete blocks and three-quarter-inch-thick plywood to help him build a U-shaped, temporary shelter to help cut back on the noise,” Wayne said. “He seemed fine with it and said he’d build a more permanent shelter.”

But the quiet was short-lived. After a few months, Fisher moved his generator out of the shelter, saying his cord had burned out and he needed to use a shorter one. Then the muffler on the generator broke. The Deeses claim their noisy neighbor then started running multiple generators, and refused further attempts at communication and compromise. “We don’t communicate with him anymore,” Wayne said. “He’s become very mean, inconsiderate and hateful.” Since attempts at neighborly communication went south, the Deeses have appealed to everyone from the Butte County sheriff to the Board of Supervisors for help, with no relief. The Deeses produced years’ worth of emailed communications chronicling their efforts, and Michelle has become a regular speaker at Board of Supervisors meetings—most recently on Oct. 9— pushing for changes to the county’s noise ordinance to protect citizens from generator noise. Several of the Deeses’ neighbors have also appeared at the supervisors’ meetings, signed complaints and filed statements. Michelle explained the current ordinance allows for 55 decibels of noise at the property line. The Deeses bought a noise meter and say they’ve regularly received readings of 62 decibels at their home, several hundred yards from the neighbor’s property line. The Deeses and their neighbors have further alleged that Fisher shoots guns carelessly, and Wayne alleges he once

told responding deputies that he runs his generator late at night “out of spite and to annoy people.” They say he has been reprimanded only twice, fined for code violations in 2004 and warned by California Department of Fish and Game officials in 2008 for using a generator to pump water out of Honcut Creek, which the Deeses say he has continued to do in subsequent years. “It used to seem like people were at least willing to listen and try to help, but not anymore,” Wayne said. “The last time I went to the Sheriff’s Office they were downright hostile.” The Deeses have considered selling their property and relocating to escape the noise, but fear they won’t even be able to sell the land after disclosing the noise issue. Furthermore, it has spread, and now two other neighbors have begun operating generators late at night. “It’s like a cancer,” Michelle said. “I am within the county’s noise

ordinance and am tired of fooling with these people,” Fisher said by phone Wednesday morning. “Their complaints are irrational and unwarranted and there is no justification. “The only problem is with some clown that lives on top of the hill over on Cox [Lane] that has been hassling me for 12 years. There’s absolutely no way that sound at a nuisance level is traveling a quarter-mile from my property.” Fisher said county officials measured the noise level of his generator several

years ago and found it to be under the 55-decibel limit. Michelle Deese also acknowledged the visit, claiming the readings were just below the limit and that noise has worsened since. Fisher said three neighbors on his side of the creek whose property abuts his have never complained. He also claimed he was never warned by the Department of Fish and Game about pumping water from the creek, and said when he did so four years ago it was with permission from the owner of the upstream Dunstone Quarry. He also denies having made statements to deputies about wanting to antagonize his neighbors. Fisher said he uses the generator only to pump water from his well since installing solar panels over the last few years for other energy needs, but contradicted himself when asked why he operates it late at night: “I’m not here during the day, and am actually only here on weekends. If I come home Friday night and it’s cold, it takes two to three hours to warm the house up. I’m not doing this to annoy people, I’m doing this to live.” When asked if he would be willing to house the generator or take other steps to abate the noise, Fisher was very direct: “No. I’m not willing to do anything for these people. They’ve cost me over $40,000, and their bullshit requirements and crap, and I’m not going to do anything for them.” Fisher said the $40,000 was spent on legal fees resulting from a 2004 civil action filed by the Deeses. On the morning of Sept. 30, after

listening to Fisher’s generator run “late into the night and early in the morning,” Michelle Deese sent a brief email to all five supervisors summarizing the couple’s decade-long struggle, which concluded with the line, “Will you buy our house?” Presumably joking, Supervisor Bill Connelly responded with a message reading, “Yes for the right price.” When Michelle furnished a figure, Connelly again responded: “I would but the generator noise is just to (sic) bad out there on Cox Lane.” The Deeses say that, though they have met Connelly, they don’t believe their relationship with their neighbor—or their noise problem—is ripe for joking. “This is not funny. This is our life,” Michelle said. It’s not the first time Connelly’s sense of humor has been questioned. As reported earlier this year (“Connelly’s ‘funny’ email,” Downstroke, March 29), Connelly forwarded a politically questionable e-mail “joke” about Muslims being killed by a truck driver. Off-color jokes and problem neighbors aside, life on Cox Lane may be a lot less quiet in the not-too-distant future. A proposed development would add 28 houses to the area, which is currently rural homes and agricultural land. Ω

Cell-phone blues

City Finance Director Jennifer Hennessy and her department have the daunting task of figuring out how to repay local cell-phone users the utility tax the city has been collecting under an outdated ordinance. PHOTO BY MELISSA DAUGHERY

Election spells financial blow to city of Chico hat happened with Measure J? W That’s something city of Chico staffers and the City Council will be discussing next

month as they grapple with yet another hit to the city’s coffers. Measure J was the so-called telephoneusers’ tax that 53 percent of Chico voters nixed during the general election. The measure was placed on the ballot to update the city’s decades-old ordinance to include cellular and certain Internet phones, not just land lines. The city had already been collecting the fee from cellular providers, but the measure would codify the practice. Because cell phones account for the majority of the $1.4 million generated annually by the tax, passage of Measure J would have secured about $900,000 for the general fund. And that’s a big chunk of change, as City Manager Brian Nakamura relayed to the council’s Finance Committee during the group’s regular meeting Tuesday morning, Nov. 27. Nakamura contextualized what that dollar figure means in terms of public safety, services that account for a majority of the city’s general-fund budget, noting that the amount could finance seven or eight police positions or two-thirds of a firehouse’s operations. “Those are significant reductions and impacts,” Nakamura said. Moreover, the remaining revenue is likely to shrink as people switch from land lines to solely cell phones. City Attorney Lori Barker said she was still looking into the ramifications of the measure’s defeat, including the possibility of

employees’ salaries. And those are just some of the known quantities, Fields said. “We can cross our fingers and hope the state finds its own way,” he said. In many respects, it’s diffi-

establishing a procedure for those who request a refund. (During a telephone interview after the meeting, Barker explained that the city requires that refunds apply only to utility users’ taxes generated within a year.) In the meantime, the city is setting the incoming revenue aside. Finance Director Jennifer Hennessy noted that the issue is complicated, since some of the big carriers provide both land lines and cellular service but do not differentiate between them. City Accounting Manager Frank Fields, who later elaborated by telephone in Hennessy’s absence, said the Finance Department will have to develop a process to get the revenue back to the taxpayers. As for what the defeat of Measure J means to the city in the remaining portion of the current fiscal year, Fields estimated the general fund will take a hit of around $600,000. That’s on top of other recent reductions of property tax and sales tax, as well as this year’s dissolution of the city redevelopment agency and its associated funding, a portion of which paid for certain administrative

SIFT|ER Rent’s up Having trouble making rent no matter how many hours you work? You’re not alone. Out Of Reach 2012, a comparison of fair-market rent prices versus wages across the United States conducted by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, indicates that even in Arkansas, where the rent-to-earnings ratio is the least disparate, a worker would need to make $11.41 an hour (40 hours per week, 52 weeks per year) in order to rent a two-bedroom apartment. In California, the third most expensive state, the average housing wage is $26.02.

The top-10 most expensive 1. Hawaii $31.68 2. District of Columbia $28.96 3. California $26.02 4. New Jersey $25.04 5. Maryland $24.83 6. New York $24.68 7. Connecticut $23.58 8. Massachusetts $22.84 9. Virginia $20.26 10. New Hampshire $19.29

Source: National Low Income Housing Coalition

cult to understand why the measure lost. Back in January, when a majority of the City Council voted to place the measure on the ballot, Barker explained that the existing 5 percent telephone tax was consistent with what has been imposed elsewhere throughout the state since the mid-1980s. “That tax was created at a time when … everyone had local service, they paid for their long-distance separately based on time and distance, and it was all land lines,” she said. In other words, telephone users have been paying the tax for decades. But with changes in technology and billing practices, she said, there have been challenges to the tax, and in fact the IRS will no longer charge for it, except in the case of local service. Thus far, the city has been notified by at least one company, Metro PCS, that it wasn’t going to submit those revenues, based on the antiquated city code. During that meeting, former City Manager Dave Burkland noted how important it was to preserve the funds. “Some may not think it’s the best time, but I think what we’re talking about is a clarification that preserves an existing tax,” he said. To make the update even more palatable to voters, the council eventually decided to reduce the rate, from 5 percent to 4.5 percent. Councilmen Mark Sorensen and Bob Evans, both of whom argued the measure would expand the tax, cast the dissenting votes. Barker said the City Council could bring the measure back to the voters, although by law such a vote must take place during a council election. Its first opportunity will be in November 2014. Neither she nor anyone else at the finance meeting ventured a guess as to why the measure failed. But that will probably come up when Measure J is discussed at length by the full council, likely at the panel’s Dec. 18 meeting. In the interim, Barker’s still analyzing the extent of the impacts of the defeat. “The measures have passed almost everywhere they have been presented to the voters,” she said. —MELISSA DAUGHERTY melissad@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 November 29, 2012

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continued from page 9

How special it is Election set for empty state Senate seat hen Butte County Clerk/ W Recorder Candace Grubbs learned there would have to be a

special runoff election in January to fill Doug LaMalfa’s now-empty state Senate seat, she told the Chico Enterprise-Record that the news made her “feel like punching somebody.” Grubbs estimated the election, which will tie up her staff during the holidays and comes immediately on the heels of the Nov. 6 general election, will cost the county $400,000. Butte is one of 12 counties that make up the sprawling 4th Senate District. Each bears a financial burden for the election, depending on the number of registered voters. Butte has the most, 122,554, followed by Shasta County’s 100,256. Colusa County, which is only partially in the district, has the fewest, with 7,766 registered voters. The irony is that LaMalfa insists he stepped down from his seat at the end of August to save the district’s taxpayers millions of dollars by avoiding a special election. “I’ve thrown my hat over the fence and am taking nothing for granted in my campaign for Congress, but I do not feel it would be right to wait until the end of the year to resign from the Senate,” he told the conservative website Flash Report. “Resigning now gives the Governor the ability to consolidate elections, saving local counties and taxpayers at least $2 million.” The final tally on the Senate race came on the day before Thanksgiving, as the 12 counties and their combined 873 precincts weighed in with the secretary of state. Right up to the end former Assemblyman Jim Nielsen, a Republican, had 50.7 percent of the votes cast on Election Day and those absentee ballots collected before Election Day. He needed 50 percent plus one vote to win outright and avoid a special election. But, alas, it didn’t happen; Nielsen finished with 188,207 votes, or 49.8 percent, forcing a special election to be held Jan. 8 between him and the second-place finisher, Democrat Mickey Harrington, who picked up 104,572 votes, or 27.7 percent. The remaining 85,297 votes cast were shared by four other candidates, two of whom had dropped out of the race, but not soon

State Senate candidates Mickey Harrington (left) and Jim Nielsen. CN&R FILE PHOTOS

enough to have their names removed from the ballot, which apparently confused the voters. In fact, 3rd District Republican Assemblyman Dan Logue, who said he dropped out on doctor’s orders, still gained 43,303 votes, enough to finish third. Had his name not been on the ballot, Nielsen undoubtedly would have gotten a winning majority. Logue handily defeated firsttime candidate Charles Rouse of Corning, a Democrat, to win reelection to his Assembly seat. The other three candidates on the Senate ballot, Jann Reed (24,966), Dan Levine (9,882) and Benjamin Emery (7,146), were all listed as “No Party Preference.” Emery was the other dropout. The race was obviously

confusing, with Logue running for two seats at once and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association actually endorsing both Nielsen and Logue for the Senate seat. The results were confusing as well. Reed wrote a letter to both this paper and the Chico Enterprise-Record congratulating Nielsen on his victory—before learning he hadn’t won. The letter was held up at her request and a new one appears in this paper. But her original letter, with its premature congratulation, was printed in the E-R on Nov. 26. Things first got weird when incumbent LaMalfa announced on Friday, Aug. 31, that he was stepping down to concentrate on his run to replace retiring U.S. Rep. Wally Herger, who’d announced back in January that he was calling it quits. LaMalfa had gained a run for the seat by finishing first of seven candidates in the June 5 primary. But he waited three months to announce his immediate resignation.

On Monday, Nov. 26, Secretary of State Debra Bowen officially certified the Jan. 8 election based on a proclamation issued by Gov. Jerry Brown to fill the vacancy. The election is on, even if one of the candidates decides to withdraw his name from the ballot before Jan. 8. Brown issued the special-election proclamation on Sept. 5, five days after LaMalfa quit. Soon after he’d gotten Herger’s blessing, LaMalfa anointed Nielsen as the best choice to replace him. Other candidates were caught off guard by LaMalfa’s Aug. 31 announcement, and some, including Logue, suggested he’d done it to help pave the way for Nielsen. Harrington is a 73-year-old union representative who has never held office. The Magalia man has run for the Assembly three times in the past, losing to Rick Keene in 2006 with 39 percent of the vote, Logue in 2008 with 44.5 percent of the vote and then to Logue again in 2010 with 37 percent of the vote. Nielsen is 68 and was first elected to the state Senate in 1978. He’s since held office in the Assembly as well. He’s been accused of not actually living in the district he represents and instead using a double-wide trailer he owns in the Tehama County community of Gerber to establish his residency. Critics, including Don Bird, who last year was slapped with a three-year restraining order after a long stint of hounding Nielsen, have charged that the politician really lives in a gated community in Woodland. Neither Gov. Brown nor Tehama County District Attorney Gregg Cohen has chosen to look into that claim. —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

Program paid off Criticized energy-efficiency outreach apparently successful year, Chico’s Sustainability LofastTask Force (STF) was accused a conflict of interest in doling

out part of a $400,000 PG&E efficient-energy grant to two of its members, Jon Stallman and Scott McNall (see “Charges fly over PG&E grant,” Newslines, Dec. 15, 2011). Since then, not only has the task force been cleared of the charges, but the accused men also have used the money to create dozens of local jobs while helping 100 homeowners save money and improve their health. “We trained 30 unemployed or underemployed contractors in clean-energy construction, and all of them got jobs in that field,” said Stallman, director of The Energy X-Change, which trained the contractors in partnership with McNall and Butte College. Stallman represented Butte College on the Task Force and received $70,000 of the grant money to help contractors and homeowners increase residential and commercial energy efficiency. McNall, representing Chico State, received $10,000. The grant was part of a program called Energy Pioneers, which coordinated a group effort involving Butte College, Chico State and the city of Chico. “Energy Pioneers created an energy model education program using the contractor workforce, the local community and municipal education,” Stallman said. It was Chico City Councilman Mark Sorensen who leveled the original ethics charges in a late-2011 complaint to the state Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC). The charges were echoed in a Chico Enterprise-Record editorial. Sorensen filed a second conflict-of-interest complaint because, he said, Mayor Ann Schwab, who chaired the task force, was a Chico State employee and thus conflicted. The FPPC looked into both charges and ruled them baseless. “The FPPC found no cause for a conflict of interest and told

Sorensen to stand down,” Stallman said. Sorensen says the grant was clearly for a worthy cause, but he believes the task force is in a gray area when it comes to decisionmaking. “Moving forward, we want to avoid things like this,” he said. Schwab is unsure of the motivation for the charges but said she felt miffed when she had breakfast with Sorensen at Mom’s restaurant one morning in late 2011 and he didn’t mention the charges. That night she received word of the complaint from the FPPC. “Talk about a way not to build a partnership,” she said. The Energy X-Change used

some of the grant money to conduct free detailed home-energy efficiency analyses on 100 test homes in Chico. Stallman, who has a master’s degree from Chico State in technical education, used specialized meters and machines to determine where the homes were wasting the most energy and money. Detailed tests were conducted on windows, doors, walls, vents and air conditioners in what Stallman calls a “whole-home science approach.” Results of the tests were then given to the homeowners in the form of verbal instructions, checklists and computer-generated graphics. Any upgrades recommended were left to the homeowners’ discretion. “Some homeowners feel they are paying too much in energy costs, so they install $30,000 in

solar panels,” Stallman said. “But with a more customized diagnosis like ours, they might need to spend only a tenth of that.” Stallman said they also uncovered dangerous situations in several homes. “Three of them had serious asbestos problems,” he said. “One was catastrophic and had several vents inadvertently pumping asbestos insulation into their bedroom.” The owner of another home, he said, complained of feeling constantly sick and lethargic. A meter showed extremely high readings of carbon monoxide, which led to the discovery that the home’s clothes dryer exhaust duct was completely clogged, causing carbon monoxide to backfill into the home. Overall, Stallman said, he thinks the project was a great success. Schwab agrees. “It was such a good program with thorough explanations to the households and great job training for the contractors,” she said. Final, overall results for the project will be reported in February. Now, anyone wishing to have a home evaluated by Energy XChange must pay for it, Stallman said. “People got jobs from this program, such as the contractors we trained and those hired to make the recommended home upgrades,” he said. “Plus we educated and empowered the community in having environmentally friendly and proficient homes.”

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Chico Is My Happy Place Chico is rad. Fact. Show your love for this awesome city by rocking “Chico Is My Happy Place” tees and stickers, available exclusively at Home Ec. Home Ec also carries many other fun and unusual holiday gifts and decorations. Visit them in downtown Chico to explore their selection of smartly designed homewares, modern home decor, and other random awesomeness. Gift certificates and complimentary gift wrapping available.

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Chico’s Own Locally Grown Wines. The Perfect Holiday Gift. Bertagna Son Kissed Vineyards grows only the highest-quality, organic grapes. Meticulous farming in the field and high attention to detail in the winery produces a higher quality product. The wine can be purchased at Chico Natural Foods, S&S Produce, Chico Costco, Raley’s, Safeway, Maisie Jane’s, J&J Cellars, The Olive Pitt, CA Kitchen in Red Bluff and Wagon Wheel Market to list a few. Please see our website for a complete listing. Exclusive wines & Tastings available by appointment.

Inspired by the old world utilitarian ideal of making something that is “built to last,” IZOLA curated a collection of whimsical objects with a masculine sense of antiquity. Laundry bags, toothbrushes, flasks, dope kit, & travel accessories. BIG Store has all the cool gifts for the man on your gift list.

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Enjoy a True Chico Tradition Shubert’s Homemade Ice Cream & Candy has been a Chico tradition for over 75 years! Homemade Boxed Chocolates, Peanut Brittle, English Toffee and Divinity are just a few treats our families have come to look forward to during the holidays. Pre-order Snowballs now! The perfect holiday dessert! Don’t forget your Shubert’s Mints this season! No holiday celebration would be complete without them!

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Give the Gift Everyone Loves... A gift certificate from Tres Hombres. Choose any denomination, get a gift card, and your holiday shopping for friends & co-workers is complete. Choose from a large selection of “The BEST Margaritas in Chico” or try one (or two) of over 125 premium tequilas. Enjoy outdoor dining even on those crisp winter days in the comfortably heated sidewalk seating. Or come sit inside and dine at a table, the taco bar, or the longbar. You’ll find Tres Hombres conveniently locate next to the University. Next time you’re making plans to gather just say “Meet me at Tres.”

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CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION 12 CN&R November 29, 2012 NEWS & REVIEW BUSINESS USE ONLY

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Building a Healthy Community Beyond Fitness is really going ’Beyond’ Fitness this December by hosting the 3rd annual Holiday Craft Fair, featuring beautiful handmade items from local craftspeople! There are three opportunities to catch this Craft Fair: December 6th, 12th and 18th. Plus, come in during the hours of the Craft Fair from 9am– 7pm, mention this ad to membership, and receive a free guest pass! Holiday Craft Fair is at the Skyway Location.

A women’s clothing and accessory store offering fashionably unique clothes at affordable prices. Beautiful dresses, semiformal and casual wear ranging in sizes petite to 18. Unique handbags, gift ideas and jewelry are all available. Stop in and visit Tuesday–Friday 10:30am–5:30pm and Saturday 10:30am–3:30pm.

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Crystals on Garments Andy’s Embroidery has a large selection of stock crystal designs, like the pictured shirt and tote bag for the pet lover. Andy’s can add sparkle to any garment! All of the work is done in-house by the attentive and professional staff. Andy’s Embroidery offers a huge selection of personalized gifts from coffee mugs to woven sofa throws. They are family owned and celebrating their 24th year in business. Stop by their store on Wall St. to shop the wide variety of options.

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Give the “Gift of Pleasure”... Treating your friends, loved ones or employees to a Tui Ná massage at Wendy’s Massage is the ultimate expression of how much they mean to you! Wendy’s ambiance is the perfect place for them to relax, refresh and rejuvenate—a time when all their bodily tensions will melt away. Wendy’s gift cards are wonderful for Birthdays, Holidays and Anniversaries... the perfect way to say— “You’re Special to Me!”

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CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION November 29, 2012

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It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like Christmas! Kick off the Christmas Season at Christian & Johnson! C&J is stocked with a unique and beautiful selection of decor, gifts, flowers and plants to help celebrate the Season. Always popular, our little feathered and chenilled owls are flying out the door and into homes around Chico. Stop by, browse, and enjoy - and don’t forget the complimentary gift wrapping! C&J has been making Holidays bright since 1907.

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Enhance Comfort & Mobility Incrediware is made for everyday wear or with the athlete or medical patient in mind. At sports LTD you’ll find socks, in addition to ankle, back, and knee braces that can bring comfort to your body within minutes of putting them on. Incrediwear can significantly enhance comfort and mobility, outcomes that occur due to increased blood flow, regulation of temperature, and delivery of a greater supply of oxygen to the targeted area. Incrediwear uses patented organic germanium bamboo charcoal blend making them ideal for anyone experiencing discomfort related to circulatory issues or anyone who has suffered a sports related injury, tendonitis, or injury from repetitive use.

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Tasty Gift Ideas Voted Chico’s Best Asian Cuisine, Best Take-Out and Oroville’s Best Restaurant, Tong Fong Low offers a delicious dining experience. Stuff your loved ones holiday stockings with Gift Certificates for this popular, locally owned and operated restaurant. Tong Fong Low wishes everyone good health and happy dining! Catering available.

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The Finest Saddle in the World Brooks bicycle saddles have been the finest on the market for over 100 years, and are still made in England with impeccable attention to detail. The B17 is the flagship model, ideal for long distance sports touring, trekking and atb use. Virtually unchanged since 1898, the B17 is available for gents and ladies. The Standard models feature black steel rails, the B17 Special features copper plated steel metalwork, and the B17 Titanium … Both the B17 Special and the Titanium also feature hand hammered copper rivets. Brooks saddles are the perfect gift for the cyclist who gives their bicycle only the best. Brooks products are available and can be special ordered at Pullins Cyclery, providing cyclists with everything they need and expert service since 1918.

PULLINS CYCLERY

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California Sunshine in a Bottle Share the rich, golden elegance of the AWARD WINNING Butte View olive oils. Pure, light and delicate – experience the wonderful aromas and distinctive accents that make each hand crafted oil truly unique and excellent. 250ml/500ml. Available in Chico at Maisie Jane’s, Made in Chico, S&S Produce, in Oroville at Collins & Denny Market & Wagon Wheel Market and in Paradise at Noble Orchard.

BUTTE VIEW OLIVE COMPANY

2950 Louis Ave. • Oroville, CA (530) 534-8320 • www.butteview.com

CN&R’S GIFT GUIDE — A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION 14 CN&R November 29, 2012

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November 29, 2012

CN&R 15

EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS Environmental activist Bill McKibben addresses the crowd at Marin Center at the 2012 Bioneers Conference.

SNOWPACK DOWN, CONCERNS UP

Bioneers speaker Caleen Sisk (second from left) with members of the California Student Sustainability Coalition.

California’s winter snowpack is likely to continue decreasing significantly, stressing both the state’s drinking-water supply and agriculturalirrigation system over the next 30 years, a study finds. Researchers from Stanford University analyzed future climate trends, and concluded that early snowpack melts will translate to less runoff water to irrigate the state’s crops when they need irrigation most during the spring. The team also hypothesized that early springtime flooding will strain dams and reservoirs before the water reaches cities in low-lying areas. “The Western U.S. exhibits the strongest increases in the occurrence of extremely low snow years in response to global warming,” said Stanford climate-change scientist Noah Diffenbaugh, who led the study. “It also exhibits some of the strongest decreases in runoff that occurs during the growing season.”

SMOKE SPEWING GALORE

Despite the scientific community’s warnings about catastrophic global warming, the coal industry is expanding in a major way. The World Resources Institute (WRI) identified plans for about 1,200 new coal-fired plants across 59 countries, about three-quarters of which will be in India and China, according to the UK’s Guardian newspaper. The new facilities will produce 1,400 gigawatts of energy—equivalent to that of China, the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases. India and China are planning 455 and 363 new plants, respectively. “This is a scary number of coal-fired plants being planned,” said Guy Shrubsole of Friends of the Earth. “It is clear the vested interests of coal companies are driving this forward and that they will have to be reined in by governments.” “This is definitely not in line with a safe climate scenario—it would put us on a really dangerous trajectory,” noted WRI’s Ailun Yang.

GOVERNOR URGES CLIMATE ACTION

Gov. Jerry Brown has challenged California’s green-building entrepreneurs to help lead a national charge against climate change. During an address at the Greenbuild convention in San Francisco on Nov. 16 (two days after California’s carbon cap-and-trade system went into effect), Brown (pictured) urged thousands of attendees to push for climate action, according to SFGate.com. Brown—who oversaw the introduction of the nation’s first energy-efficiency standards for buildings in 1978 during his first tenure as governor—emphasized that California can lead the way on climate efforts, but more nationwide support is necessary. “We can be a little bit out in front, but we can’t be too far,” he offered of the Golden State’s efforts to cope with climate change. “So it’s up to you to galvanize the other states, and the United States, to get with it.” 16 CN&R November 29, 2012

Emerging awareness Local, national environmental leaders spread message of hope and challenge at this year’s Bioneers Conference story and photos by

Leslie Freeland

C

aleen Sisk, chief and spiritual

leader of the Mt. Shasta Winnemem Wintu tribe, spoke at this year’s Bioneers Conference, asking that her tribe’s way of life be remembered, respected and given a chance for revitalization. She described how her attempts to persuade the government to help restore the chinook salmon population—the historical source of the tribe’s subsistence—to the McCloud River have been thwarted because the Winnemem are not a federally recognized tribe. The Winnemem believe that all life is interconnected, and when the salmon go, the people will soon follow. Sisk was among a roster of impressive speakers at the recent 23rd annual threeday environmental and social-justice seminar. Bioneers—aka the Collective Heritage Institute—is a nonprofit organization founded in 1990 by Kenny Ausubel and Nina Simons to promote social and environmental health using the earth’s natural systems as an operating manual. The Bioneers Conference invites pioneers in the fields of conservation and restoration of cultural and biological diversity—“bioneers.” The presentations at the

conference may be heard via the publicradio series “Bioneers: Revolution from the Heart of Nature” (go to www.bio neers.org/radio to learn more). Sisk explained that when Shasta Dam was erected during World War II, it flooded most of the tribe’s sacred land and sacrificed the run of the chinook. Prior to that, the Baird Hatchery on the McCloud River had captured the fish for breeding and exported eggs around the world. When the Winnemem recently learned that descendents of the McCloud chinook were thriving in a hatchery on the Rakaia River in New Zealand, Sisk and her tribe traveled there and were welcomed by the native Maori tribes. The Maori, said Sisk, have agreed to transport some of those salmon eggs home to the McCloud River; the Winnemem are proposing a plan to circumvent Shasta Dam and provide a viable run for the salmon. Sisk presented a portion of the documentary Dancing Salmon Home, which chronicles the Winnemem tribe’s journey to New Zealand, and said she is hopeful there will be a part two, celebrating the return of the salmon. The hope of rising triumphant in order to preserve life was at the core of this year’s conference theme—emergence. That message of resilience and regenera-

tion rang clear throughout the seminar. I had first attended the annual

Bioneers Conference—which is always toward the end of October in San Rafael— in 2007 as part of a Chico State Bioneers class. It was an electrically charged, informative experience, and everyone in the room seemed to feel it. This year, the presenters were equally charged, speaking to an estimated 3,000 attendees from all over the world—political figures, educators, artists, business owners, students, entrepreneurs and community members of all ages and color. One of the conference’s headliners for 2012 was environmentalist and author Bill McKibben, co-founder of climate-change activism organization 350.org. McKibben was greeted with a standing ovation from the crowd—one of the event’s most enthusiastic audience reactions. Widely known for his book The End of Nature, about the threat of global warming, McKibben was recently celebrated for his Rolling Stone magazine article “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math” (go to

Bioneers connection:

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ECO EVENT http://tinyurl.com/billmcclimate to read the article), in which he discusses the amount of carbon emissions being dumped into the atmosphere, the rising temperature of the planet, and the skyrocketing profits of the fossil-fuel industry. McKibben reiterated those topics at the conference, where he also promoted his cross-country “Do the Math” tour (go to http://math.350.org/ to learn more): On Nov. 7, 350.org hit the road to rouse activists and students to organize, in the fashion of the 1980s anti-apartheid movement, to persuade universities and other investors to stop supporting Big Oil companies considered by environmentalists as dangerous to the health of the planet. He shared a slideshow about 350.org’s Connect the Dots campaign (go to www.climatedots.org to learn more), an international effort to demonstrate the relationship between extreme weather and climate change around the globe. He also spoke of the 350.org-led demonstration in August 2011 in Washington, D.C., during which 65 activists were arrested while peacefully “sitting in” in front of the White House. The campaign was successful in halting the Keystone XL pipeline project, intended to tap the oil in Canada’s tar sands. McKibben cited NASA scientist Jim Hansen’s assessment in a

THE WINTER CRUSH Get a firsthand look at the citrus olive oil crush at Lucero Olive Oil (2120 Loleta Ave. in Corning) during its annual Winter Crush on Saturday, Dec. 8, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The fest will also include tours of the mill, cooking demonstrations, live music and a vendor market highlighting local artisans, eateries and microbreweries. Admission is free; visit www.lucerooliveoil.com/events for more info.

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Expires 12/29/12 recent New York Times article that burning the oil from Canada’s tar sands would equal “game over” for the climate. “This is the moral crisis of our time,” said McKibben of climate change. “There is no more room for speculation or indecisiveness. If we do not act now we will operate on emergency response from here on in. “It’s going to be a fight,” he said. “We’re going to do it peacefully and we’re going to do it civilly, but we are going to fight.” In addition to McKibben, Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club and author of Coming Clean: Breaking America’s Addiction to Oil and Coal, was another crowd pleaser. Brune spoke about the victories of the grassroots Beyond Coal Campaign (go to www.beyondcoal.org to learn more) to shut down existing coal plants and prevent the creation of

new plants, due to environmental and community health concerns. Ditto for the Rev. Fletcher Harper, an Episcopal priest and executive director of GreenFaith, a national interfaith environmental coalition (to learn more go to www.green faith.org ). Harper underscored the sentiment that the climate crisis is a moral and spiritual imperative. Interestingly, he pointed out that, aside from Facebook, religious institutions are the largest social network on the planet, with a reach and scope that is unparalleled, and therefore, an untapped resource for environmentalists. “We have to blush in the presence of the Native Americans who are scratching their heads wondering how we are only realizing now the importance of the environment to our spiritual well-being,” Harper said. Ω

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UNCOMMON SENSE Additions to the compost bin It’s the time of year to start piling falling leaves on the compost heap. Sure, grass clippings, coffee grounds and most kitchen scraps are the standard ingredients. But here are 10 other householdwaste products you might not have thought about. 1. Hair. The trimmings from your bangs or beard or from cleaning your hair brush make for a fine compost addition, as long as it’s not bleached or dyed. 2. Cotton swabs. That includes Q-tips and cotton balls made of 100 percent and real cotton. But consider how they’ve been used before you toss them in the compost bin. Ditch the ones with nail polish remover or make-up. 3. Vacuum-cleaner accumulations. The collected material is mostly dust, soil, crumbs, and hair from both you and your pets, and it can all be composted.

4. Used paper towels. Of course it depends on how they were used—avoid those sopped with greasy, oily and potentially bacteria-soaked messes.

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7. Fireplace ashes. Wood-fire ashes diminish acidity and add potassium to a compost pile. Add in moderation—too much alkaline will keep the compost from breaking down. 8. Nail clippings. No, really. You’ve already tossed in you hair clippings. But just like the dyed hair, don’t use clippings from polished nails. The nails provide keratin and break down readily in a compost pile. 9. Corks. Those wine-bottle stoppers are made of tree bark and decompose as such. Don’t compost cork board or tile, as they may carry residual glue. 10. Dryer lint. It’s made up of tiny fibers from your clothes, towels and blankets. Polyester fibers shouldn’t contaminate the compost pile, assuming a majority of your wardrobe is made of cotton, wool or other natural material.

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November 29, 2012

CN&R 17

Make Christmas special for the

G

THE

reen HOUSE

by Christine G.K. LaPado-Breglia christinel@newsreview.com

kids at the

Esplanade House PLEASE JOIN US TODAY! The Chico News & Review invites

community members to stop by our office to choose a name and purchase gifts for an Esplanade House child. Please have wrapped gifts returned to the CN&R office by

Wednesday, Dec. 19

★ Be a Special Santa to benefit the children of the Esplanade House, a transitional shelter facility for homeless families. Thank you from:

The Esplanade House and

353 E. 2nd St., Chico • (530) 894-2300

DOING THE RIGHT THING IN THE YEAR OF THE SNAKE The January/February 2013 issue of Adbusters (ad-free) magazine was recently delivered to my mailbox. With a theme of “The Big Ideas of 2013,” it included a number of gems, including this: “As we enter 2013—the Year of the Snake—a great challenge awaits us, one that can activate our deep hidden potential: Can we mobilize for Singularity? Is our played-out Western civilization still capable of personal sacrifice, spiritual fortitude and meaningful applications of our alleged intelligence? Do we have it in us—maybe with a bit of help from Seneca, Buddha, Confucius and Muhammad—to shine a light into the darkness? “Can we get the bees swarming again? Learn to talk without commercial interference? Keep money circulating without derivatives and usury? Construct a global market regime in which the price of every product tells the ecological truth? Kill off corporations that break the public trust?” Sustainability 2013: How will you help in the Year Go to www.adbusters.org to of the Snake? learn more about Adbusters magazine and to subscribe. A MIND TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY I was approached recently by a reader who told me how moved he was by something from my June 7, 2012, column—a particularly salient section of a thought-provoking piece attributed to an unnamed Hopi elder. In the spirit of thoughtfulness about the way we carry ourselves on this planet in these challenging, interesting times, I would like to leave readers with the piece in its entirety: “You have been telling the people that this is the Eleventh Hour. Now you must go back and tell the people that this is the Hour. And there are things to be considered… Where are you living? What are you doing? What are your relationships? Are you in right relation? Where is your water? Know your garden. It is time to speak your truth. Create your community. Be good to each other. And do not look outside yourself for the leader.”

“What are you doing?” Then he clasped his hands together, smiled, and said, “This could be a good time! “There is a river flowing now very fast. It is so great and swift that there are those who will be afraid. They will try to hold on to the shore. They will feel they are torn apart and will suffer greatly. “Know the river has its destination. The elders say we must let go of the shore, push off into the middle of the river, keep our eyes open, and our heads above water. And I say, see who is in there with you and celebrate. At this time in history, we are to take nothing personally, least of all ourselves. For the moment that we do, our spiritual growth and journey comes to a halt. “The time for the lone wolf is over. Gather yourselves! Banish the word ‘struggle’ from your attitude and your vocabulary. All that we do now must be done in a sacred manner and in celebration. “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.”

Mon.-Fri., 9am – 5pm

EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

18 CN&R November 29, 2012

THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

CHEMICALS DELAY KIDS’ DEVELOPMENT

A new study links flame-retardant chemicals found in most California households to delays in children’s neurological development. Researchers at UC Berkeley found children exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, from the womb through the first five years of life have poorer attention and motor skills and lower IQ scores, according to SFGate.com. PBDEs are widely used in furniture, infant products, electronics and other goods, and can remain in a human’s system for up to 12 years. Previous studies on animals have shown PBDEs are endocrine disruptors that affect thyroid hormones and the communication among brain cells. The American Chemistry Council has argued that “fires continue to be a major safety concern” and “flame retardants play an important role in mitigating fire-related deaths and injuries.”

KIDS DECIDEDLY UNFIT

The Department of Education recently released the discouraging results of a physical fitness test administered to 1.3 million of California’s fifth-, seventh- and ninth-graders. The test, which measured students’ abdominal strength, aerobic capacity, body composition, flexibility, upper-body strength and trunk strength, found only 31 percent of students were able to pass all six assessments, according to The Associated Press. In addition, the test found that more than 13,000 students failed all six tasks—a rate higher than in previous years—and that almost 30 percent of children were at risk of health issues due to body fat. However, the percentage of students who passed all six tests was about the same as in 2011. “When we can call fewer than one out of three of our kids physically fit, we know we have a tremendous public-health challenge on our hands,” said Tom Torlakson, state superintendent of public instruction.

CHEVRON’S CARCINOGENIC DUST

More than three months after the Chevron fire at a refinery in Richmond, carcinogenic chemicals linger within a 9-square-mile area between Albany and San Pablo, an environmental group finds. Tests conducted by the Global Community Monitor found high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dust and soil in the area around the disaster site, according to SFGate.com. The fire released a black plume of smoke and soot over the East Bay, sending about 15,000 people to local hospitals to seek treatment. Although a Chevron representative claims there “is not a significant risk” from the fire, Denny Larson, of the Global Community Monitor, maintains otherwise. “PAHs are extremely dangerous,” he said. “They are one of the most potent carcinogens in existence.”

The evolution of cheering Medical professionals say high-school cheerleading should be considered a sport by

Evan Tuchinsky

O physical therapist, Mary Kay Genzlinger has seen significant changes in ver the 30 years she’s been a

cheerleading. Teens don’t just shake pompoms and exhort the home crowd to chant “L-E-T-S G-O, let’s go, let’s go!”—they also perform acrobatic stunts that rival routines in competitive gymnastics. “It’s even more competitive and high profile than it was 10 years ago,” Genzlinger observed during a recent phone interview. “They’re doing gymnastic maneuvers.” Yet there is a key distinction between gymnastics and cheerleading. Gymnastics is a sport, and gymnasts are treated as athletes. But, neither the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), collegiate athletics’ governing body, nor the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF), the state’s high-school athletics governing body, considers cheerleading a sport. Twenty-nine states do sanction cheerleading as a high-school sport, providing set standards for medical and competitive oversight. If the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has its way, so will the remainder. On Oct. 22, the AAP issued guidelines for preventing injuries in cheerleading. Atop the list of recommendations: sanctioning cheerleading as a sport. The AAP considers this important, its report says,

“because being classified as a sport gives athletes valuable protection including qualified coaches, well-maintained practice facilities, access to certified athletic trainers, mandated sports physicals and surveillance of injuries.” Genzlinger, who treats athletes (including cheerleaders) at the Feather River Hospital Rehabilitation clinic, wholeheartedly agrees. So does Dr. Baran Onder, a sports medicine specialist at the Argyll Medical Group in Chico. Both see the recommendation as a natural offshoot of cheerleading’s evolution. “Cheerleaders are definitely athletes,” Onder wrote in an email. “They practice regularly, have competitions, and have tryouts for the team. I really don’t think there is much room for debate on this question.” Said Genzlinger: “They can have some horrible injuries, much like athletes do, so they should be treated like athletes.”

Whether the AAP makes headway remains to be seen. Kelly Staley, superintendent of the Chico Unified School District, wrote in an email that California schools work under the guidelines of the CIF, and “they do not recognize cheerleading as a sport. This may change in the future, but it has not yet hit California.” The CN&R contacted the CIF’s state office and Northern Section office, but did not receive a response by publication deadline. In the meantime, regardless of sanctioning, cheerleaders at North State schools will continue to perform—and some will get injured. “Relatively speaking, the injury rate is low compared to other sports, but despite the overall lower rate, the number of catastrophic injuries continues to climb,” Dr. Cynthia LaBella of the AAP wrote in the report. “That is an area of concern and needs attenHEALTHLINES continued on page 20

APPOINTMENT CAREFREE COLON Feather River Hospital’s popular Dinner with the Doctor lecture series continues with “Colon Bliss” presented by Dr. Ruth McLarty, who will speak on preventing constipation and proper colon care at Paradise Lutheran Church (780 Luther Drive in Paradise) on Thursday, Nov. 29, at 6 p.m. Dinner is $10; the lecture is free. Call 876-7154 for reservations or more info.

November 29, 2012

CN&R 19

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HEALTHLINES tion for improving safety.” Genzlinger has overseen the rehabilitation of cheerleaders with an assortment of ailments—head, neck, spinal, joint. Onder said the spectrum includes “the same sort of injuries you would see in many other forms of land-based athletic activities, ranging from minor sprains, strains and overuse injuries, to more severe such as fractures, ACL [knee ligament] injuries, and concussions. “They are also variable depending on the individual. With ‘flyers’ you are more concerned with more high-impact devastating injuries if they get dropped. Tumblers have a higher incidence of shoulder, hand and wrist injuries, and lowerextremity injuries as well, depending on how good their landing technique is. Male cheerleaders who throw may have a higher incidence of overuse shoulder injuries.” As a result, it’s not uncommon to see cheerleaders on crutches or with an arm in a sling. Some injuries require months of healing and rehabilitation. “It’s pretty devastating for the cheerleader, the team, the coach— everybody who’s involved,” Genzlinger said.

continued from page 19

of research done that provides evidence that neuromuscular training programs—focusing on balance, landing mechanics, plyometrics, and strengthening specific muscle groups—help prevent devastating knee injuries such as ACL tears in this population of athletes, which is a concern since female athletes are six times more likely to tear their ACL during sports participation than their male counterparts.” Like Onder, Genzlinger stresses the importance of preparing cheerleaders for the physical demands of their specific activities. “If they’re doing lifts, they need to have good upper-extremity and scapular [shoulder] strength,” she said. “They need to have good core control if they’re doing pyramids or jumps. They need to practice on

The AAP recommends more

than sanctioning. Its guidelines, released in a policy statement titled “Cheerleading Injuries: Epidemiology and Recommendations for Prevention,” also include: • preseason physical examinations; • access to strength and conditioning coaches; • training in techniques for “spotting”; • performing stunts only on spring/foam floors or turf (never on hard, wet or uneven surfaces); • limiting pyramids to two athletes high; • removing athletes suspected of head injuries from practice or competition, and not letting him/her return until cleared by a medical professional. Onder offered some additional recommendations. “Seeking medical attention promptly for injuries or other medical issues—whether it be from the athletic trainer or team physician— so that the issue can be evaluated in a timely manner is also a good idea,” he said. “For the coaches, there should be a strong emphasis on core and hip-stabilizer strengthening exercises during the preseason and offseason for a conditioning regime. “There has recently been a lot 20 CN&R November 29, 2012

Mary Kay Genzlinger says cheerleaders are athletes. PHOTO BY KYLE EMERY

Read the recommendation:

To learn more about the American Academy of Pediatrics’ guidelines for cheerleading, go to www.aap.org and enter “cheerleading injuries” in the search box.

different surfaces—there’s a difference between performing on a basketball court as opposed to a football field. “Just be more informed—I think that’s true of a lot of athletic trainers and coaches. They need to be more aware of the type of injuries that can happen and assess them as soon as you can. You have to have a sharp eye for that, because a lot of these kids don’t let you know when they’re hurting, so you have to see what their movement patterns are.” Sanctioning cheerleading as a sport won’t prevent all injuries, but health-care professionals see it as a step in the right direction. “From a medical standpoint, I really don’t see any obstacles in treating cheerleaders like one would any other athlete,” Onder said. “[But] from a school/organizational standpoint, the issue is always going to be one of funding and support for the program. “Since the passage of Title IX there has been an explosion in female athletic participation in sports across the board, and more athletes require more funding. Ideally there would be sufficient funds to support every sport equally, but this typically is not the case, so there will always be controversy as to which programs should be cut at the expense of others.” Ω

WEEKLY DOSE A little stress doesn’t hurt Everybody knows long-term stress can be unhealthy, leading to everything from heart disease to digestive problems, but what about short-term stress? In 2009, researchers from Stanford University took blood samples from 57 patients before and after a stressful situation—knee surgery. Patients with “positive stress response,” or higher levels of immune cells in their blood produced by stress hormones, recovered more quickly than those who did not display a strong stress response. Turns out, the right amount of short-term stress helps people: • perform at a higher level under pressure; • improve memory and the immune system; • activate brain cells, helping prevent Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. Keep in mind everyone’s ability to cope with stress (short or long-term) varies greatly; it’s important to exercise, maintain a healthy diet, make time for meditation and appropriately prioritize tasks.

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CN&R 21

The author’s wife, Julia, used a “Find my iPhone” app to narrow the search for the missing phone to this apartment complex near the corner of West Fourth Avenue and North Cedar Street. The circled silver dot marks the spot.

To catch a thief BY CARSON MEDLEY

I

How the author and his ace crime-fighting team cracked the case and recaptured his cache of memories

was robbed in broad daylight at perhaps the safest place in Chico: the Wildcat Recreation Center locker room. There’s only one way in and one way out. Who would do such a thing? Only students, faculty and staff are allowed in. Weren’t we all one big Chico State family? Or was I that naïve? My iPhone and sunglasses were stolen. So what? Sunglasses come and go. I was eligible for an iPhone upgrade in two weeks. I didn’t give a lick about the iPhone. All I cared about was content that mattered: my soul. Exactly 1,512 pictures of my family and 47 videos. My new family. My wife and I were recently married. We had our first baby four months ago. I had backed up only 500 of those pictures, and none of the videos. Yes, my stupidity. But did I have to learn my lesson this way? The iPhone was my photo album. Our first ultrasound. All the stages of Julia’s pregnancy. Videos of Julia’s 42-hour labor and three hours of pushing without medication. Holden’s first dirty diaper. His first smile. His first Giants game. His first everything—the visual

Author Carson Medley points out the locker from which his iPhone, which contained 1,512 family photos and 47 videos, and sunglasses were stolen. How he retrieved them is quite a detective story.

image of our journey was gone. Perhaps Susan Sontag said it best: “Photographs alter and enlarge our notion of what is worth looking at, and what we have a right to observe.” My life—the people who matter most to me—was in that phone. I was not about to let some dime-store hood take a riotous excursion with privileged glimpses into my heart. I had to move fast. I could not rely solely on the heroics of the overworked and underappreciated university police. I would go vigilante. Hit the streets myself. Get back my possessions even if it killed me—but not before calling on the services of my No. 1 team of amateur sleuths: a stay-at-home mom and her 4-month-old infant. It all started with my daily swim in the Chico

State swimming pool. Those glistening, restorative waters represent a blissful refuge for me. For 45 minutes a day I can hide underwater, empty my mind, pray and dream. That water heals my soul and makes the next 23 hours and 15 minutes manageable: Little is more taxing than juggling three jobs and being a father for the first time. The locker room was empty save a few swimming-pool regulars. There are eight rows of lockers. I always choose the lockers on the next-to-last row; that’s where all the older men who are not students but faculty or staff seem to flock. It’s closest to the water. I methodically placed my clothing, gym bag, and personal items in the locker. A young man entered and sat on the corner bench wedged next to my exposed locker. It made me feel prickly. I’m sensitive about personal-space boundaries. Why had the young man chosen to sit so close to me when there were so many empty lockers around? Are we really that afraid to be alone? I shook off the thought and entered my digital locker code. The locker is secured by pressing a “C,” then a fourdigit number followed by the pound key. The keypad is sensitive. I always punch in the numbers slowly. Another young man entered the locker room. He gave a fist-bump to the other young man. He started going up and down the lockers to my left and pressing their key pads as if trying to recall where he had put his gear. He acted flustered, but it seemed phony. He kept shouting to his friend: “Where my locker at. You remember? Where my damn locker at?” I laughed to myself. I thought I was the only one prone to embarrassing lapses of memory like that. As I walked out to the pool, though, something bothered me. I am a writer. I have a photographic memory when it comes to a person’s vernacular, a person’s physical appearance, and a person’s body language. I study people the way an astronomer studies stars. I am always observing people. My wife tells me all the time not to stare. I am a peoplewatcher. What writer worth her typewriter ribbon isn’t?

I made a quick, subconscious study of these two young men. I observed their movements. Something seemed unnatural. Further, why had they chosen to change in that section of the locker room? But by the time I secured my earplugs, strapped on my goggles and nosedived into the warm sapphire water, the locker room was as far away as the 2016 election. I was back at my locker 45 minutes later. I

opened it. Nothing seemed amiss. I grabbed my towel and showered. I put my clothes back on and split. I was halfway out of the locker room when I realized I didn’t have my sunglasses. I went back to the locker. Empty. I patted down my pockets. My iPhone was missing, too. I then remembered my wedding ring was in the side pocket of the gym bag. It was still there. I slipped it on. I thought maybe I left my phone at my office. I knew I had left my wallet there. I asked at the front desk whether sunglasses had been turned in. Nothing. Had I been robbed? Why didn’t they take my wedding ring? Had the putrid, wet St. Bernard scent wafting from my Five Finger barefoot running shoes deterred them from rifling through the contents of my bag? Maybe I wasn’t robbed? I had to be sure. I checked back in my office. Nothing. Panic ensued. I high-tailed it back to the recreation center. I started to believe I really had been robbed, but how? The lockers seemed impossible to break into. I went back into the locker room. It was deserted. I stepped out to the pool. A group of fraternity men were lounging. Was it them? I studied their faces. Could one be wearing my sunglasses? Wait—what about the two kids who were creeping around when I was changing? Suddenly, they became not only the main suspects, but the only suspects. Who else could have cracked into my locker? There was no one else around. And how obvious now—they had pulled a fast one. Was I jumping the gun? You can’t pin the tail on the donkey without knowing who or where the donkey is. Wasn’t picking suspects about as random as throwing darts at a stock and hoping you picked a winner?

I searched through all the open lockers. An employee asked if everything was OK. I told him I thought my stuff had been stolen. I still didn’t want to blame someone for merely acting suspicious. He asked if I had a “Find My iPhone” application. Yes, my wife had set one up for me. I sprinted back to my office. I phoned her and said I thought my phone had been nicked. I could not hear her; Holden was wailing in her lap. She said she would call me back in five minutes. I called the university police. My wife called back. I was still waiting on the police. Where were they? “Your phone is at Fourth Avenue and 900 Cedar.” I was not losing my mind. My phone had been pinched. “Where’s that?” I asked. “Check your email?” “Why?” “Just check it.” I checked my email. Julia had sent three maps, each with a silver dot hovering above a car. My iPhone was supposedly there. A Chico State family member now possessed my most intimate treasure. Whoever it was had taken it from my sanctum sanctorum. That iPhone was the only tactile link to my family during the nine hours I was sequestered at work. The photos and videos kept me close to them; they got me through the day. When the police finally

arrived at my office, they sat down and asked me the standard questions: “What was

“THIEF” continued on page 24

PHOTO BY KYLE EMERY

22 CN&R November 29, 2012

November 29, 2012

CN&R 23

The author’s wife, Julia, used a “Find my iPhone” app to narrow the search for the missing phone to this apartment complex near the corner of West Fourth Avenue and North Cedar Street. The circled silver dot marks the spot.

To catch a thief BY CARSON MEDLEY

I

How the author and his ace crime-fighting team cracked the case and recaptured his cache of memories

was robbed in broad daylight at perhaps the safest place in Chico: the Wildcat Recreation Center locker room. There’s only one way in and one way out. Who would do such a thing? Only students, faculty and staff are allowed in. Weren’t we all one big Chico State family? Or was I that naïve? My iPhone and sunglasses were stolen. So what? Sunglasses come and go. I was eligible for an iPhone upgrade in two weeks. I didn’t give a lick about the iPhone. All I cared about was content that mattered: my soul. Exactly 1,512 pictures of my family and 47 videos. My new family. My wife and I were recently married. We had our first baby four months ago. I had backed up only 500 of those pictures, and none of the videos. Yes, my stupidity. But did I have to learn my lesson this way? The iPhone was my photo album. Our first ultrasound. All the stages of Julia’s pregnancy. Videos of Julia’s 42-hour labor and three hours of pushing without medication. Holden’s first dirty diaper. His first smile. His first Giants game. His first everything—the visual

Author Carson Medley points out the locker from which his iPhone, which contained 1,512 family photos and 47 videos, and sunglasses were stolen. How he retrieved them is quite a detective story.

image of our journey was gone. Perhaps Susan Sontag said it best: “Photographs alter and enlarge our notion of what is worth looking at, and what we have a right to observe.” My life—the people who matter most to me—was in that phone. I was not about to let some dime-store hood take a riotous excursion with privileged glimpses into my heart. I had to move fast. I could not rely solely on the heroics of the overworked and underappreciated university police. I would go vigilante. Hit the streets myself. Get back my possessions even if it killed me—but not before calling on the services of my No. 1 team of amateur sleuths: a stay-at-home mom and her 4-month-old infant. It all started with my daily swim in the Chico

State swimming pool. Those glistening, restorative waters represent a blissful refuge for me. For 45 minutes a day I can hide underwater, empty my mind, pray and dream. That water heals my soul and makes the next 23 hours and 15 minutes manageable: Little is more taxing than juggling three jobs and being a father for the first time. The locker room was empty save a few swimming-pool regulars. There are eight rows of lockers. I always choose the lockers on the next-to-last row; that’s where all the older men who are not students but faculty or staff seem to flock. It’s closest to the water. I methodically placed my clothing, gym bag, and personal items in the locker. A young man entered and sat on the corner bench wedged next to my exposed locker. It made me feel prickly. I’m sensitive about personal-space boundaries. Why had the young man chosen to sit so close to me when there were so many empty lockers around? Are we really that afraid to be alone? I shook off the thought and entered my digital locker code. The locker is secured by pressing a “C,” then a fourdigit number followed by the pound key. The keypad is sensitive. I always punch in the numbers slowly. Another young man entered the locker room. He gave a fist-bump to the other young man. He started going up and down the lockers to my left and pressing their key pads as if trying to recall where he had put his gear. He acted flustered, but it seemed phony. He kept shouting to his friend: “Where my locker at. You remember? Where my damn locker at?” I laughed to myself. I thought I was the only one prone to embarrassing lapses of memory like that. As I walked out to the pool, though, something bothered me. I am a writer. I have a photographic memory when it comes to a person’s vernacular, a person’s physical appearance, and a person’s body language. I study people the way an astronomer studies stars. I am always observing people. My wife tells me all the time not to stare. I am a peoplewatcher. What writer worth her typewriter ribbon isn’t?

I made a quick, subconscious study of these two young men. I observed their movements. Something seemed unnatural. Further, why had they chosen to change in that section of the locker room? But by the time I secured my earplugs, strapped on my goggles and nosedived into the warm sapphire water, the locker room was as far away as the 2016 election. I was back at my locker 45 minutes later. I

opened it. Nothing seemed amiss. I grabbed my towel and showered. I put my clothes back on and split. I was halfway out of the locker room when I realized I didn’t have my sunglasses. I went back to the locker. Empty. I patted down my pockets. My iPhone was missing, too. I then remembered my wedding ring was in the side pocket of the gym bag. It was still there. I slipped it on. I thought maybe I left my phone at my office. I knew I had left my wallet there. I asked at the front desk whether sunglasses had been turned in. Nothing. Had I been robbed? Why didn’t they take my wedding ring? Had the putrid, wet St. Bernard scent wafting from my Five Finger barefoot running shoes deterred them from rifling through the contents of my bag? Maybe I wasn’t robbed? I had to be sure. I checked back in my office. Nothing. Panic ensued. I high-tailed it back to the recreation center. I started to believe I really had been robbed, but how? The lockers seemed impossible to break into. I went back into the locker room. It was deserted. I stepped out to the pool. A group of fraternity men were lounging. Was it them? I studied their faces. Could one be wearing my sunglasses? Wait—what about the two kids who were creeping around when I was changing? Suddenly, they became not only the main suspects, but the only suspects. Who else could have cracked into my locker? There was no one else around. And how obvious now—they had pulled a fast one. Was I jumping the gun? You can’t pin the tail on the donkey without knowing who or where the donkey is. Wasn’t picking suspects about as random as throwing darts at a stock and hoping you picked a winner?

I searched through all the open lockers. An employee asked if everything was OK. I told him I thought my stuff had been stolen. I still didn’t want to blame someone for merely acting suspicious. He asked if I had a “Find My iPhone” application. Yes, my wife had set one up for me. I sprinted back to my office. I phoned her and said I thought my phone had been nicked. I could not hear her; Holden was wailing in her lap. She said she would call me back in five minutes. I called the university police. My wife called back. I was still waiting on the police. Where were they? “Your phone is at Fourth Avenue and 900 Cedar.” I was not losing my mind. My phone had been pinched. “Where’s that?” I asked. “Check your email?” “Why?” “Just check it.” I checked my email. Julia had sent three maps, each with a silver dot hovering above a car. My iPhone was supposedly there. A Chico State family member now possessed my most intimate treasure. Whoever it was had taken it from my sanctum sanctorum. That iPhone was the only tactile link to my family during the nine hours I was sequestered at work. The photos and videos kept me close to them; they got me through the day. When the police finally

arrived at my office, they sat down and asked me the standard questions: “What was

“THIEF” continued on page 24

PHOTO BY KYLE EMERY

22 CN&R November 29, 2012

November 29, 2012

CN&R 23

“THIEF” continued from page 23

taken?” “Where was it taken?” Frustration pulsated though my veins. I explained to them that I had a map leading to my phone. They had a final question, though—the most important one. “Do you have an idea who took it?” Oh, I had an idea. However, because I’m a white Berkeley-educated liberal Mississippian with Atticus Finch aspirations, it was an idea that made me uncomfortable and sad: “Both were African-American, 19 or 20 years old,” I said. “One had extremely dark skin, and the other had really light skin.” Chico State has more than 15,000 students, yet only 1.8 percent of them are black. Did I really have to pin the burglary on the only two black students in the locker room? But they were the only people in the locker room. I had dedicated my last novel, Ain’t Whistlin’Dixie No More, to all those who had the nerve to confront racism, expose stereotypes, hyperbolize hypocrisy, empower the disenfranchised, and expunge ignorance. And here I was accusing two young black men of stealing from me based on nothing more than a hunch. I wasn’t sure what I wanted more, my iPhone back or to discover that these two particular young men were not the malefactors. Maybe I was scared I would be called a racist. What proof did I have that they had pilfered it? I did not want these two young men to be the thieves. Why would it make me feel better

24 CN&R November 29, 2012

Crime stoppers: the author, his wife and their son, Holden. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MEDLEY FAMILY

if two white kids took the phone? But this had nothing to do with being black or white. Or did it? No, this was about a crime that was cold and calculated. It was about the reckless abandon of someone wiping away the most precious memories of a stranger’s life, and for what—a couple hundred dollars? The police took my statement. They got another call and had to leave. They said they would be back in a couple minutes. It turned into an hour. I had in hand the map of where

my phone was supposedly located. The longer I waited, the more likely the delinquents would expunge the photographs. The hour glass was upturned. I took two hours of sick time. I went out into the streets of Chico looking for them. My wife and son were in that phone. I hot-footed it through the university

’hood searching for the address, but I couldn’t find it. Five students with a plucky “Remember the Alamo” spirit whom I met along the

way had joined the search. I asked an old man up on a ladder painting an apartment building if he knew the whereabouts. He smiled. “Son, you’re looking for Fourth Avenue, not Fourth Street.” I didn’t know there was a difference. I had recently moved here. I got back to my office around 4:00. A different officer arrived. He apologized for the delay and asked for the map. I told him about all the pictures of my wife and son that were on the phone. His eyes were compassionate. Said he had kids and couldn’t imagine what it would be like to have all that stolen from him. I knew he would help me. The officer called shortly thereafter from a huge apartment complex that the silver dot on my map had led him to. He reported that no car occupied that parking space. Turned out the map was outdated. Only an ember of hope remained. That night I was certain all my pictures were gone. I bawled. My wife told me it would be fine. We had our whole lives to take pictures, she said. But it was a lie. I was an idiot for not saving the pictures. I was a moron for searching for the suspects when I had a wife and infant at home. My bank account would be in the red because I’d have to buy a new $300 phone. I don’t give up easily. The next morning I went to the Rec Center. The assistant director helped me identify the suspects by going back and watching footage from a surveillance

video. We started watching video of all the men who entered the locker room after me. I immediately recognized the two men. They straggled in behind me. That’s all we needed. The assistant director was able to track back and see the exact time the suspects entered the gym. To enter you punch in your Wildcat I.D. Next, you put your palm on a sensory detector. It scans your fingerprints and matches the two: Open Sesame. She found the suspects’ address; it matched the one provided by the iPhone application. The police soon knocked on the suspects’ door. It was 60 feet from the silver dot. The suspects were questioned and confessed. They handed over my items. The police had triumphed. Less than 18 hours had elapsed. By noon, my phone and sunglasses were returned. Every picture remained. The crooks were unable to wipe it clean. Julia had also locked the iPhone—all from her iPad and while breastfeeding an infant. The police were grinning from ear to ear. Both men said they went home the night before feeling terrible. They understood my loss. It had nothing to do with possessions, but everything to do with memories and love and how pictures keep us connected to our family, to the ones who when harmed turn us vigilante and cast us out into the streets to track down and vanquish the desperados. Once the celebration had ended (my

entire office had gotten caught up in the

drama that had unfolded like an Would they learn their lesson? I episode of CSI: Chico State would rather have Judicial University), the police asked Affairs expel them from the me the big question that university than press charges. Mark Twain would test my higher The police, however, mental faculties: Do you informed me that most stusaid not to let want to press charges? dents get only probation. I needed to think Could I have the two school interfere about it. I told the young men come into policemen I would my office and explain with your have an answer by their actions? Could I 5 o’clock. I went assign them Kant’s Cateducation. What back to the pool, the egorical Imperative? scene of the crime, these young men Couldn’t I give them a and plunged into the week to read James needed was an still waters. I would Baldwin’s Go Tell It on exit only when I had the Mountain? They education, not made a sound decision. could come back and tell It was a long, me how and why it uncomfortable swim. My school. changed their life. mind was ringing with Certainly, if I didn’t press Emerson: “Nothing can charges, I would be entitled to a bring you peace but yourself. month of self-righteousness for Nothing can bring you peace but giving two young black men in Butte the triumph of principles.” If two white County a second chance. kids had stolen from me, I would have But wait a minute. These were university pressed charges instantly. Yet, it was two students, adults—not preschool children— black kids who had committed the crime: I who knew the difference between right and had to think about it? wrong. And if they didn’t know the differMaybe I should be nice and let them go. ence, then they needed to go back to preAfter all, they had returned everything. But school and learn it. would it be nicer to press charges and have I had made my decision. I was at peace. I them punished now rather than down the would press charges. This was not about race line? What about the next guy they robbed? but about crime. Life is a sum of all your

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choices. These two kids had made a bad choice; they would have to deal with the consequences. Mark Twain said not to let school interfere with your education. What these young men needed was an education, not school. When I was little my mother used to

say that Jesus would meet me halfway. Now, I don’t think Jesus was too concerned about my iPhone, but the police—and the good friends in my office and those students who were helping me roam the streets—were. I had to walk at least half the distance. Isn’t that our job as citizens? When it comes to crime you must be a self-advocate. Go back and read Emerson’s “Self-Reliance.” Understand it when he says, “The best lightning rod for your protection is your own spine.” Don’t merely depend on dialing 911 and gnash your teeth because the police didn’t respond with the quickness of greased lightning. They’re busy. It’s a tough, thankless job. Can you imagine? Sometimes we have to meet them halfway. Be suspicious. Be paranoid. Give those whom you are suspicious of the benefit of the doubt, but make sure you prove your doubt wrong. Justify it. Get yourself a tracking application. Back up your pictures. Hire yourself a stay-at-home mom and her 4month-old infant crime fighter who wears a Sherlock Holmes cap and smokes a pipe. And never steal from a writer. Ω

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CN&R 25

Arts & Culture Fin

Parting shot: (from left) Dan Elsen, Josh Kinsey, Adam Scarborough, Chris Roberts and Mike Crew. PHOTO BY KYLE BURNS

Chico’s favorite indieinstrumentalists plan their last show

L running active bands in Chico. The instrumental five-piece began playing together in 2003 and have a Fin du Monde is one of the longest

been an energetic constant in the local music scene ever since, making a name for themby selves with a complex, powerful Jason Cassidy brand of experimental rock. Yet, jasonc@ despite the band’s very active crenewsreview.com ative presence—marked as much by a penchant for organizing eclectic TWO MORE local shows featuring some of the SHOWS! most exciting touring bands (everyCafé Coda’s 6th anniversary: one from Giant Squid to Judgment Friday, Nov. 30, Day) as they were for their own 8 p.m., at Café bombastic live performances and Coda, with La Fin well-crafted recordings (three du Monde, Palaver, albums and two EPs)—the Chico Clouds on String News & Review has never done a and Chris Keene Cost: $5 proper feature on La Fin du Monde. And even now we are just The final La Fin sneaking in under the wire. du Monde show: With bassist Josh Kinsey movSaturday, Dec. 8, ing to Austin, Texas, the band is 7:30 p.m., at the El Rey Theatre. about to come to an end: La Fin du Openers include Monde will play its last show on The Americas, Saturday, Dec. 8, at the El Rey West By Swan Theatre. While the local-music and Aubrey community will experience a major Debauchery. Tickets: $10, change as a huge chunk of the available at scene’s foundation disappears, the www.ticketweb.com longtime collaborators will be facand Music ing the reality of no longer playing Connection. in the band they’ve been in for all Café Coda their adult lives up to this point. “I’m pretty sad. It’s a bitter265 Humboldt Ave. sweet kind of thing,” said drummer El Rey Theatre Dan Elsen, adding that after nine 230 W. Second St. years together, “It’ll be strange in three weeks.” All of the guys in the band grew up in the Paradise/Magalia area, and came together as La Fin du Monde in the aftermath of the breakups of the members’ two different high-school bands—Lurgee and Fenix Down. Those left standing—drummer Elsen, guitarist Adam Scarborough, bassist Kinsey, second bassist Mike Crew and second guitarist Jeremiah Root—initially were just going to do LFDM as a temporary project, but encouraged by positive audience responses, the new band stuck. After guitarist (and occasional vocalist—yes, LFDM had a few vocals way back in the day) Root left the band after a few shows to join the Marines, Chris Roberts joined and solidified the permanent line-up. Scarborough praised Roberts as being one of the keys to the bands development, citing his classical26 CN&R November 29, 2012

music background and “technically difficult” style for pushing them to get better at their craft. And it is definitely a craft, one that they worked at religiously one day a week over the course of the band’s existence. From the start, LFDM tried to eschew playing to any one genre. Even though they’ve been described as experimental, post-rock, math-rock, jam-rock and even metal, they never deliberately wrote in any of those styles. They simply agreed to say, “Let’s not set up any rules,” Elsen explained. “We didn’t feel like we could define the music. It’s obvious that it’s just weird rock.” As the band progressed, the process of writing their often long and rhythmically complex compositions started to change. Instead of the guitarists each coming in with semi-fleshed-out tunes, the band started presenting one idea at a time and just building from there, with everyone adding on parts until they were satisfied that the song was done. “It’s painstakingly composed,” said Elsen. “[And] it’s very linear—point A to point B.” The approach itself, writing as a collective, has been key to the invention and creative spark. “What other people are playing will change the way that you’re playing,” said Roberts. “In the early days it took five to six weeks” to write a song, Elsen added. “Now it [can take] three to four months.” And all that time working together really shows on their latest album—the just released Embers, recorded at Louder Studios in Grass Valley with well-known engineer Tim Green (who has recorded everyone from The Melvins to Wolves in the Throne Room). The eight-song CD is a shape-shifting beast, with two songs over nine minutes long and one, “Grey Skies Shade Bombs,” breaking the LFDM record for epicness with nearly 13 minutes of sustained sonic exploration. The final show will also be a dual CD-release party, for both Embers and an EP of previously unreleased first recordings made in Elsen’s kitchen. Even though it wasn’t logistically possible for the final show to take advantage of the synchronicity between their band name (which translates as “the end of the world”) and the apocalyptic hoopla surrounding 12.21.12, they will nonetheless be going out with a bang a couple weeks before the world follows suit. In addition to CD releases, they’ll be filling up the stage in the grand El Rey Theatre with some of their longest-running local musical friends—The Americas, Aubrey Debauchery, West by Swan—as well as playing two long final sets of their own. “We’re all friends,” Scarborough said. “We’re not leaving on bad terms. Life happens. We’ve had a good run.” Ω

THIS WEEK 29

THURS

Theater HOORAY FOR HOLYWOOD: NUNSET BLVD: A new musical comedy written by Jerry Miller that follows the Sisters of Our Lady of Kankakee as they try to save their beloved orphanage and order by going Hollywood. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 12/9. $16-$18. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

Poetry/Literature CHICO STORY SLAM: Names go in a hat and 10 “tellers” share their unscripted stories, with applause determining the winner. Last Th of every month, 7pm. Opens 11/29. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

30

FRI

Special Events CHRISTMAS FAIRE: For the 37th year, the fine arts and crafts festival will offer wares from hundreds of vendors and entertainment throughout three days. 11/30-12/2, 10am. Prices vary. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St., (530) 345-9652.

EAT, PRAY, SHOP: The benefit for Chico Christian Preschool classrooms will feature local vendors, baked goods, handmade gifts, a raffle and silent auction. F, 11/30, 10am-6pm. Chico Christian School, 2801 Notre Dame Blvd.; (530) 864-0478; www.chicochristian.org.

HISTORIC HOLIDAY HOME TOURS: Ride the trolley and tour the Bidwell Mansion, Stansbury

COMEDY PET THEATER Wednesday, Dec. 5 Laxson Auditorium

SEE WEDNESDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Home and Glenwood Farm House at Patrick Ranch Museum. Go online for more info. F, 11/30, 4-9pm. $25. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade; (530) 895-6144; www.chico chamber.com.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM WINTER ART FAIRE: A preview party Friday night will kick off the weekend-long fair with arts and crafts and tours of historic Glenwood Farm House. F,

11/30, 4-8pm; Sa, 12/1, 10am-4pm; Su, 12/2,

10am-4pm. Prices vary. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Chico Halfway between Chico and Durham, (530) 342-4359.

STANSBURY HOME DICKENS’ CHRISTMAS: Santa, horse-drawn carriage rides, entertainment, spiced cider, homemade cookies, holiday raffle and a live appearance by Mark Twain. F, 11/30, 6-9pm; Sa, 12/1, 1-8pm; Su, 12/2, 1-5pm. $2-$6. Stansbury House, 307 W. Fifth St. On the corner of Salem and 5th street, (530) 8953848.

Theater HOORAY FOR HOLYWOOD: NUNSET BLVD: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

OLIVER!: The California Regional Theater presents Charles Dickens’ classic with a live orchestra. F, Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 12/16. $20. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. corner of East and Ceanothus, (530) 8913050, www.crtshows.com.

Art Receptions EVERYTHING GREEN RECEPTION: Green is the theme for the latest MANAS all-medium openentry show. F, 11/30, 7pm. Manas Art Space & Gallery, 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

FINE ARTS STANSBURY HOME DICKENS’ CHRISTMAS: See Friday. Stansbury House, 307 W. Fifth St. On the corner of Salem and 5th street, (530) 8953848.

TREE LIGHTING & TRUCK PARADE: A tree lighting ceremony (with a visit from Santa ) in the park will be accompanied by a parade of festive big-rigs, which will move from Pearson Road and then up the Skyway. Sa, 12/1, 6pm. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Dr. in Paradise; (530) 872-6291.

WORLD AIDS DAY: A candlelight vigil and recep-

STORIES 1

Showing through Jan. 5 1078 Gallery SEE FINE ARTS

tion with keynote speakers and a performance bu the Doin’ It Justice Choir. Sa, 12/1, 5-7pm. Free. Trinity United Methodist Church, 285 E. Fifth St.; (530) 343-1497.

Theater A CHRISTMAS CAROL: The Chico Theater Company presents this stage rendition of Charles Dickens’ classic story. Sa, 7:30pm. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

HOORAY FOR HOLYWOOD: NUNSET BLVD: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

OLIVER!: See Friday. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. corner of East and Ceanothus, (530) 891-3050, www.crtshows.com.

2

SUN

1

SAT

Special Events ANNUAL POKER RUN & TOY DRIVE: Hundreds of motorcycle enthusiasts unite for raffles, a toy drive and food followed by a parade through downtown Chico and a ride through the surrounding area. Proceeds benefit children in need. Sa, 12/1, 9:30am. Chico City Municipal Center, 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 828-2139.

CBI SILENT AUCTION: A silent auction accompanied by wine, appetizers, desserts and more to benefit Congregation Beth Israel’s religious school. Sa, 12/1, 6:30-8:30pm. Congregation Beth Israel, 1336 Hemlock St. corner of Hemlock and 14th St.; (530) 321-2227; www.cbichico.org.

CHRISTMAS FAIRE: See Friday. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St., (530) 345-9652.

CHRISTMAS TREE AUCTION & HOLIDAY FEST: Hors d’oeuvres, desserts, a Christmas tree auction, a silent auction featuring local art, a no-host bar and live music to benefit the Torres Shelter and the Chico Community Shelter. Sa, 12/1, 6pm. Chico Masonic Life Family Center, 1110 East Ave. Between Guynn Ave. & Nord Ave.; (530) 891-9048.

FESTIVAL OF TREES & GIFT FAIRE: Bid on Christmas trees decorated by local busi-

FREE LISTINGS! Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events nesses and organizations or browse vendors booths and visit Santa. Sa, 12/1, 9am. Prices vary. Paradise Veterans Hall, 6550 Skyway 6550 Skyway & Elliot Road in Paradise; (530) 873-3462.

FRONTIER CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION: A gold-rush era holiday celebration set at Bidwell Bar 150 years ago with pioneer crafts, Christmas gifts and panning for gold. Sa, 12/1, 12-4pm. Prices vary. Lake Oroville Visitor Center, 917 Kelly Ridge Rd. in Oroville; (530) 538-2219.

MUSE ART COLLECTIVE HOLIDAY SALE: Henna, jewelry, pottery, art and more by local female artisans accompanied by live music from local female musicians during and after the fair. Sa, 12/1, 10am-10pm. Prices vary. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

ALTERNATIVE GIFT FAIRE: Shop among local and global missions to purchase a gift for someone in need. Su, 12/2, 9am-1pm. Prices vary. Bidwell Presbyterian Church, 208 W. First St.; (530) 343-1484.

CHRISTMAS FAIRE: See Friday. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds, 2357 Fair St., (530) 345-9652.

GENDER BENDING BALL: The A.S. Gender and Sexuality Equity Center hosts drag performances, DJ dancing and more celebrating expressions of the “gender spectrum.” Su, 12/2, 6-9pm. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St.; (530) 898-5724.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM WINTER ART FAIRE: See

Art 1078 GALLERY: Stories 1, the 1078’s annual December group show showcases five artists with strong ties to Chico. 11/29-1/5. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

ANGELOS CUCINA TRINACRIA: Maria Phillips

Exhibition, large, other-worldly watermedia paintings on display. Ongoing. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: A New Leaf, paintings by Candy Matthews and fine jewelery from Mike and Susi Gillum exploring the beauty of leaves. Through 12/1. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

B-SO SPACE: Here nor There, electronic art

curated by Kate Adams on display. Ongoing. Ayres Hall Room 107 Chico State, (530) 8985331.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: Work n

Progress, an exhibit of work by student artist Dennis Wickes. Through 12/6. 3536 Butte Campus Dr. Inside the ARTS Building in Oroville, (530) 895-2208.

CHICO ART CENTER: Cottage Artisans 30th

Annual Show & Sale, Ten local artists featuring a wide variety of quality handmade arts and crafts. F, 11/30, 4-8pm; Sa, 12/1, 10am-5pm; Su, 12/2, 10am-4pm. Contact Chico Art Center (530) 895-8726, ccjenningsbatik@juno.com, http:// for details on this exhibit. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO CITY MUNICIPAL CENTER: Works by

Claudia Steel, an exhibition of etchings, serigraphs, watercolors and oils. Through 1/11, 2013. 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 8967200.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Banding by Day and Night, a close look at birds in hand with incredible detail. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO MUSEUM: I Heart Chico, paintings, poetry, kids’ art, photography, textiles, videos and interactive collaborative exhibits inspired by Chico. Through 1/31, 2013. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

CHICO STATE HUMANITIES CENTER (TRINITY HALL): Gone to Ground, a new series of photographs of bunkers in Albania from photographer Wayne Barrar. Through 11/30. 400 West First St. 100 400 West First Street, (530) 898-6341.

Friday. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Chico Halfway between Chico and Durham, (530) 342-4359.

Estates Show, over 100 paintings, prints and drawings by Picasso, Chagall, Renoir, Whistler, Dali, Ayres, Hornaday, DeHoff and more. Through 12/28, 9am-5pm. Free. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.james snidlefinearts.com.

MANAS ART SPACE & GALLERY: Everything

Green Show, green is the theme for the latest MANAS all-medium open-entry show. Reception F, 11/30, 7pm. 11/30-1/11. 1441 C Park Ave., (530) 588-5183.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Folk Art & Crafts, local folk art and one-of-a-kind sculptures, dolls and old-world Christmas ornaments. Through 11/30. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 3453063.

TIN ROOF BAKERY & CAFE: Chico landmarks in the Snow, photographs of Chico landmarks in the rare three-inch snowfall of 1987 by Karen Kolb on display. Through 11/30. 627 Broadway St. 170, (530) 345-1362.

THE TURNER PRINT MUSEUM AT CSU: Issues:

Social, Political, Gender, prints exploring a range of issues from English political satire to American social realism. Curator’s talk and reception: Th, 12/6, 5:30 p.m. Through 12/16. 400 W. First St. Meriam Library breezeway, CSU, Chico, (530) 898-4476, www.theturner.org.

Call for Artists 2013 ART FIESTA BOOTHS: Artist booths are still available for next spring’s event. Call or email for more info. Through 4/1, 2013. Matador Motel, 1934 Esplanade, (530) 4874553.

GREEN ARTS COMPETITION: Mixed media artwork that answers the question “what does it mean to be green,” with winner based on message, creativity and aesthetic appeal. Top finalists will have their work published on the Associated Students homepage. Ongoing. CSU Chico, 400 West First Street, Yolo Hall Room 178, (530) 898-6677.

Museums GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Fall Exhibits, three exhibits running through the fall semester including “Take Flight,” “Gold Fever: The Untold Stories of the California Gold Rush” and “Third Views, Second Sights: A Rephotographic Survey of the American West.” Through 12/31. $3-$6. 625 Esplanade, www.csuchico.edu/gateway.

GOLD NUGGET MUSEUM: Victorian Quilts, Historic quilts from early 1800s to 1940s on display. Through 11/30.Veterans Day Exhibit, A display honoring those who serve. Ongoing. 502 Pearson Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8722, www.goldnuggetmuseum.com.

NDGW CHRISTMAS DINNER: A buffet-style dinner to benefit various community projects supported by the Golden West Cleft Palate Charitable Foundation. Sa, 12/1, 6-9pm. $4-$12. Veterans Memorial Hall, 2374 Montgomery St. in Oroville; (530) 5336930.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS AND APPRAISALS:

THIS WEEK continued on page 28

OROVILLE HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIRE & RAFFLE: Over 50 vendors offering handmade wares, a raffle and more hosted by Oroville Community Radio. Sa, 12/1, 10am4pm. Prices vary. Oroville Municipal Auditorium, 1200 Myers St. in Oroville; (530) 228-4891.

PATRICK RANCH MUSEUM WINTER ART FAIRE: See Friday. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Chico Halfway between Chico and Durham, (530) 342-4359.

EVERYTHING GREEN! Friday, Nov. 30 MANAS Art Space

SEE THURSDAY, ART RECEPTIONS

What tha’, Dickens?! There’s something about the characters of Victorian wordsmith Charles Dickens that makes people want to sing their stories, and in Chico we have two musical versions of his classic works from which to choose this holiday season. First up, the fairly new kids on the block at California Regional Theater will present Oliver! The Musical—the Broadway adaptation of Oliver EDITOR’S PICK Twist —Nov. 30-Dec. 9, at the Chico Unified School District’s Center for the Arts at Pleasant Valley High School. And out at Chico Theater Company, the holiday classic A Christmas Carol opens a three-week run Saturday, Dec. 1 (through Dec. 16). Sing it, Tiny Tim! “Oh what a day! I don’t care if it’s gray if it’s Christmas together!”

—JASON CASSIDY November 29, 2012

CN&R 27

Thank You Chico for naming Grana Best New Restaurant 2012

THIS WEEK continued from page 27

BULLETIN BOARD

STANSBURY HOME DICKENS’ CHRISTMAS: See Friday. Stansbury House, 307 W. Fifth St. On the corner of Salem and 5th street, (530) 895-3848.

VICTORIAN MISTLETOE PARTY: Bell ringers, Christmas music and treats to continue Judge

Charles F. Lott’s traditional holiday party. Su, 12/2, 8am-5pm. Free. Lott Home in Sank Park,

1067 Montgomery St. in Oroville; (530) 538-2497.

Farm to Table Osteria in Downtown Chico. It’s not too late to reserve the loft for your holiday party.

198 E. 2 Ave. 530-809-2304 www.granachico.com nd

WATSKY: Perhaps the most vanilla-looking (successful) rapper alive, the slam poet/internet sensation hit it big with a YouTube video titled “Watsky Raps Fast.” A-1, Sick Bird and TyBox open. Su, 12/2, 8pm. $13. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

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Poetry/Literature BOOK PRESENTATION: Local pastor and author

Greg Cootsona presents his new book, The Time for Yes: Enjoying What’s Best in Work, Life and Love. Su, 12/2, 4pm. Free. Lyon Books, 121 W. Fifth St., (530) 891-3338, www.lyon books.com.

Theater HOORAY FOR HOLYWOOD: NUNSET BLVD: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

OLIVER!: See Friday. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. corner of East and Ceanothus, (530) 891-3050, www.crtshows.com.

3

MON

Poetry/Literature WORD PLAY: A night of poetry, readings, comedy and song. First M of every month, 7pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.live atflo.weebly.com.

4

TUES

Special Events UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES: The Humanities Center at Chico State’s weekly film series. This week: The Unbearable Lightness of Being. Tu, 12/4,

7:30pm; Tu, 7:30pm through 5/2. Opens 1/29.

$3/donation. Ayres 106, Chico State Campus.

Music DANU: CHRISTMAS IN IRELAND: A Celtic-style Christmas celebration with traditional instruments like the flute, tin whistle, fiddle, button accordion and more. Chico Children’s Choir will also perform. Tu, 12/4, 7:30pm. $18-$31. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

5

WED

Special Events CINEMA TEN78: The latest installment in the

Doors open at 7, Show starts at 9 90 MINUTE SHOW

fall/winter series of films curated and hosted by Peter Hogue, Chico State English emeritus. W, 7:30pm. $3. 1078 Gallery, 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078gallery.org.

COMEDY PET THEATER: A blend of comedy, worldchampionship juggling, clowning, and the extraordinary talents of performing pets, most of which were rescued from animal shelters. W, 12/5, 7:30pm. $19-$31. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 36 28 CN&R November 29, 2012

Community AFRO CARIBBEAN DANCE: Dances of Cuba, Haiti,

Brazil and West Africa with live drumming. Tu, 5:30pm. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 345-6324.

CHALLAH BAKING WORKSHOP FOR WOMEN Tuesday, Dec. 4 Chabad Jewish Center SEE COMMUNITY

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Music

CAMPUS TREE TOURS: A detailed tour of the trees on Chico State’s campus. Call for more info. F, 11/30, 10am. Free. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade, (530) 342-2293, www.parks.ca.gov/ default.asp?page_id=460.

CHALLAH BAKING WORKSHOP FOR WOMEN: A

Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8726320, www.buttecounty.net/ bclibrary/Paradise.htm

PAWS SPAY & NEUTER CLINIC: For dogs over 40

demonstration on the art of baking Challah. Call or email to register. Tu, 12/4, 7pm. Free. Chabad Jewish Center, 526 W. Fourth Ave., (530) 809-1662.

pounds. Call or go online for more info. Through 11/30. Butte Humane Society Low Cost Spay & Neuter Clinic, 587 Country Dr., (530) 896-0303, www.chicospayneuter.org.

CHAPMAN FARMERS MARKET: A farmers market

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free

in the park serving as a neighborhood collaborative forum focusing on healthy lifestyle promotion, education and access. F, 2-5:30pm through 12/31. Free. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 592-0889, www.cchaos.org.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, free your feet and your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, 891-6524.

DINNER WITH THE DOCTOR: Feather River Hospital’s dinner and lecture series continues with “Colon Bliss” featuring Ruth McLarty, M.D. Call for reservations. Th, 11/29, 6pm. $10. Sierra Nevada Big Room, 1075 East 20th St., (530) 876-7154, www.sierra nevada.com/bigroom.

EVOLUTIONARY SHIFT NETWORK: Celebrate conscious awakening, connection and examples of the birth of a new “universal humanity.” Su, 67:30pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers Market, Municipal Parking Lot on Second and Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

FIND & FULFULL YOUR LIFE PURPOSE: A threehour workshop with a life purpose and career coach. Th, 11/29, 5:30-8:30pm. $50. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 589-5889.

FOLK DANCING: Traditional folk dancing, no partners necessary. Call for more info. F, 8pm through 11/30. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

FREE HEALTH CLINIC: Free services for minor

medical ailments. Call for more info. Su, 1-4pm. Free. Shalom Free Clinic, 1190 E. First Ave. Corner of Downing and E. 1st Ave, (530) 5188300, www.shalomfreeclinic.org.

IMPROVING THE PERMITTING PROCESS: A workshop to discuss how the city’s permitting process can be improved. Call to RSVP. Tu, 12/4, 8:30-10am. Free. Chico City Municipal Center, 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 891-5556 ext. 303.

KNITTING CIRCLE: Knitting kits available for purchase. Sa, 2-4pm through 12/22. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

PARADISE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Used book sale. Every other Sa, 10am-3pm. Prices vary. Butte County Library, Paradise

basic medical care and mental health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 8727085.

SOCK THE HOMELESS: A (new) sock drive for the needy in room 607. Donors will be entered into a raffle. Through 12/2. Butte Hall, 400 West First St. Chico State Campus, (530) 898-6204.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 891-6524.

TREE PLANTING WORKSHOP: Participants will begin the permit process for planting a roadside tree, provided by the city. Call to register. Sa, 12/1, 9am. Free. City Municipal Services Center, 901 Fir St., (530) 896-7800.

WILDLIFE VIEWING: Guided wildlife tours. Rain

cancels. Sa, 10am through 2/3; Su, 1pm through 2/3. $4. Gray Lodge Wildlife Area, 3207 Rutherford Rd. in Gridley, (530) 846-7505.

WRITING GROUP: All writers welcome. Bring

paper, a pen and writing to share. F, 3:30-5pm. Opens 11/30. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

ZUMBA FOR SANDY RELIEF: A Zumba fundraiser for Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. Call for more info. F, 11/30, 6:30-10pm. $12-$15. Manzanita Place, 1705 Manzanita Ave. Inside Chico Elks Lodge, (530) 592-0548.

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water quality testing and more. Ongoing; check Friends of Bidwell Park web site for dates and locations. Ongoing. Call for location, (530) 891-4671, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

PATRICK RANCH VOLUNTEERS: There are multiple volunteer opportunities available at the museum, including help with Autumnfest 2012 and the annual Christmas celebration. Call or email for more info. Ongoing. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway, Chico Halfway between Chico and Durham, (530) 345-3559.

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.

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Sharing a drink (and a bite) with the neighborhood at south Chico pub

A martini waiting for you at Park Ave Pub, courtesy of your pals Dean and Ashley. You might want to grab the

ttention Billy Boy: You have a salt ’n’ pepper

ZMan on your way down, because his next one is on Vicki. Now, I don’t know these fine folks, but I reckon I may have inadvertently stumby bled upon their regular watering hole. Ken Smith Maybe Vicki was the college girl sitting at kens@ the bar, sipping a draft three stools down newsreview.com from the guy in motorcycle leathers talking weather with the friendly bartender. I know their names only on account of the board hanging above the bar: “Pub Pals—Buy your Pal a Drink” it reads, with columns for gifter, giftee and type of libation or dollar amount. The board is a per★★★ fect example of the reason why I love corner pubs and tucked-away neighborhood Park Ave Pub bars. They’re all about community, and 2010 Park Ave. even if everybody doesn’t know your 893-3500 www.parkave name, there’s comfort to be had in the fact pub.net the patrons likely know each other’s. I’d long been tempted to stop into this Hours: cozy-looking building on Park Avenue, Mon.-Thurs., and was finally prompted to do so one 3:30 p.m.-2 a.m.; recent afternoon, overcome by a sudden Fri.-Sun., particular craving that can be sated only by 11 a.m.-2 a.m. fried food washed down with a cold beer. I was pleasantly surprised upon walking into the pub. Opened in 2010, the former home of Woody’s has been complete★★★★★ ly remodeled and is surprisingly spacious EPIC inside, comfortably dark but not overly ★★★★ so, and beautifully appointed in dark AUTHORITATIVE wood. The locals’ love of North State pro ★★★ teams is apparent, but the sports bar vibe APPEALING is not so overwhelming as to be off-put★★ ting. It’s also a great deal less divey than HAS MOMENTS one might imagine, and impeccably clean. ★ FLAWED The bathroom, scented by potpourri,

964 Mangrove Ave

2027 Forest Ave

2201 Pillsbury Rd

343-4254

342-7265

891-1200

smelled kinda like gingerbread cookies. Park Ave offers plenty of options for a fried food fix, and a convenient way of mixing and matching them. Patrons can choose three or five items from their list of appetizers ($9 or $12), which includes mozzarella sticks, jalapeño poppers, onion rings, mushrooms, cheddar-stuffed spuds and chicken tenders and wings. Individual sides are also available for $3.75. My dining companion and I opted for a trio of appetizers, choosing the poppers, ’shrooms and cheesy spuds. All were quite good and deep fried to a crispy golden brown, and the serving sizes were such that we couldn’t finish the basket before our main dishes came. While many a bar offers fried finger foods, Park Ave Pub also has other options, including sandwiches, burgers, chili and more. We decided to split two items, the spicy burger ($10) and pesto chicken sandwich ($9). Park Ave’s burgers are all 1/3 pound and served on fresh baked panini bread, and come with a choice of tater tots or French fries. The spicy burger came garnished with grilled jalapeños, pepper jack cheese and avocado, and was quite good, as was the grilled chicken breast sandwich topped with tasty pesto and diced tomatoes. Of special note was the parmesancrusted bread on the chicken sandwich, which would’ve fit the burger well (I’ll remember to ask for it next time). Even more notable were the pubs fries, which the bartender-cum-chef explained are hand cut and made fresh daily. All-in-all, Park Ave Pub is a really cool neighborhood bar with some pretty tasty pub grub. While the food alone isn’t so special as to make it destination-worthy, the friendly atmosphere is worth a trip, and it’s definitely a great place to stop into if you find yourself in the neighborhood. Ω November 29, 2012

CN&R 29

Entertainment,

cheer

and charity

Entertainment

scopic fashion, with one performance beginning as another ends. Harlen Adams Theatre at Chico State. University Box Office: 899-6333.

The Holly and the Ivy

Dec. 1-2, 7:30 p.m. The annual Christmas concert presented by the Oroville Community Chorus and Concert Band. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Myers St. $10. 589-2869.

The Spirit of Christmas

Dec. 1-2. Sat., 7 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. A performance by the Paradise Community Chorus. $10. Paradise Performing Art Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 872-8454

A Christmas Carol

Dec. 1-16, Thurs.-Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m. The Chico Theater Company presents this stage rendition of Charles Dickens’ classic story. $12-$20. Chico Theater Company, 166-F Eaton Rd. 894-3282.

Danu: Christmas in Ireland

Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m. A Celtic-style Christmas celebration with traditional instruments like the flute, tin whistle, fiddle, button accordion and more. Chico Children’s Choir will also perform. $18-$31. Laxson Auditorium. University Box Office: 8986333.

The Yule Logs

Dec. 6, 9:30 p.m. A rockin’ holiday celebration in one of Chico’s favorite hole-inthe-wall bars. $5. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St. Go to www.yulelogsmusic.com for more info.

Christmas Returns to Oz

Dec. 7-8, 7:30 p.m. The Creative Arts Center brings Dorothy and Toto back to Oz in search of the true Christmas spirit. $10. Oroville State Theatre, 1489 Meyers St. 532-0346.

Glorious Sounds of the Season

Dec. 7-9. Fri.-Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m. Chico State Music Department students and staff ensembles perform in kaleido-

The Yule Logs

The Nutcracker in Paradise

Dec. 7-9, Fri, 7:15 p.m.; Sat, 2:15 & 7:15 p.m.; Sun, 2:15 p.m. Northern California Ballet hosts this rendition of the Christmas classic. $12-$20. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 872-8454.

Chico Community Band Christmas Concert

The CN&R’s annual holiday-season Festivities Guide

Dec. 9, 2 p.m. The 40-member Chico Community Band presents its annual Christmas concert highlighting beloved Christmas tunes. Free. Lakeside Pavilion, 2565 California Dr. 895-4711.

The Nutcracker in Chico

Dec. 13-16. Thurs.-Fri., 7:30 p.m.; Sat., 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m. The Chico Community Ballet celebrates its 33rd season with an extravagant performance of the holiday ballet. $16-$26. Laxson Auditorium. University Box Office: 898-6333.

Voom Voom Variety Show

Dec. 14, 7 p.m. A whirlwind of five-minute performances by local artists, musicians, dancers and more to kick off Chikoko’s Bizarre Bazaar. $5. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. Go to www.chikoko.com for more info.

NSS: Experience the Season

Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m. The North State Symphony’s annual holiday-concert fundraiser. $10-$30. St. John’s Catholic Church, 416 Chestnut St. University Box Office: 898-6333.

Festivus for the Rest of Us

Dec. 14, 8 p.m. Café Coda’s holiday concert featuring music from Pageant Dads, The Sad Bastards, Lish Bills, BOGG and more. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave. 566-9476.

Blue Room Christmas Spectacular

Dec. 15, 7:30 p.m. Featuring new Christmas songs by Loki Miller, a holiday skit and stories accompanied by a com-

Voom Voom Variety Show

munity choir. $20-$25. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W. First St. 895-3749.

The Yule Logs

Dec. 22-23, 7-8:30 p.m. Chico’s beloved holiday rock band has a two-night stand in which they’ll roll out holiday hits and originals. $5-$10. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. Go to www.yulelogsmusic.com for more info.

Community Christmas Light Extravaganza

Nov. 29-Jan. 1. Take the Polar Express through acres of a spectacular Christmas-light displays, meet Santa, sip hot chocolate next to the fire. Mon.-Thurs., 5-9:30 p.m., and Fri.-Sun., 3-9:30 p.m. All proceeds benefit Max’s Miracles charity. Max’s Miracle Ranch, 3476 Smith Ave. in Biggs. 868-1026.

The Christmas Faire Danu: Christmas in Ireland

30 CN&R November 29, 2012

Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Fri., noon-7 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. A three-day fair featuring quality crafts, fine art, food, music and entertainment. Silver Dollar Fairgrounds.

Historic Holiday Home Tours

Nov. 30, 3 p.m. Ride the trolley and tour the Bidwell Mansion, Stansbury Home and Glenwood Farm House at Patrick Ranch Museum. Call or go online for schedule and tickets. $25. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway between Chico and Durham. 8921525. www.patrickranchmuseum.org.

Bidwell Mansion Tours

Nov. 30-Dec. 2 and Dec. 13-16. Daytime and evening tours of the historic home and trolley rides. Call for times. Bidwell Mansion, 525 Esplanade. 895-6144.

Patrick Ranch Museum Winter Art Faire

emony. Free. Historic Downtown Oroville. 538-2542.

Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Fri., 4-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts and crafts, plus tours of historic Glenwood Farm House available. Patrick Ranch Museum, 10381 Midway between Chico and Durham. 342-4359.

Hanukkah Party

Dec. 9, 6 p.m. Congregation Beth Israel’s traditional dinner for the community, featuring activities for kids, Israeli dancing, a gift shop, live music and more. $5$20. ARC Pavilion, 2020 Park Ave. 342-6146.

Stansbury House Victorian Christmas

Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Fri., 6-9 p.m.; Sat., 1-8 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Santa, horse-drawn carriage rides, entertainment, spiced cider, homemade cookies, holiday raffle and a live appearance by Mark Twain. Donations: $2-$6. Stansbury House, 207 W. Fifth St. 895-3848.

Christmas Tree Auction & Holiday Festival

Dec. 1, 6 p.m. The Torres Community Shelter hosts this festival complete with hors d’oeuvres, desserts, nohost bar, live music and a Christmas-tree auction. Chico Masonic Life Family Center, 1110 East Ave. 8919048. Dec. 1, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Trees decorated by local businesses will be available for bids, while vendors will offer a variety of holiday crafts. Proceeds benefit local families in need. Prices vary. Paradise Veteran’s Hall, corner of Skyway and Elliott Rd. 8733462.

Historic Holiday Home Tours

Community Tree Lighting

Oroville Holiday Craft Faire

Christmas Extravaganza

Dec. 1-2, Sat., 7 p.m.; Sun., 4 p.m. Performances by the Paradise Community Chorus and the Paradise High School Bobcats. $10. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunneley Road, Paradise. 872-3767.

Frontier Christmas

Holiday Art & Music Faire

Dec. 1-2, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Stained glass, Glorious Sounds ceramic arts, jewelry and more, plus live of the Season piano, harp and contemporary music. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. 873-1370.

Paradise Tree Lighting

Dec. 1, 6:30 p.m. Community tree-lighting ceremony and lighted truck parade. Free. Paradise Community Park, Black Olive Drive and Pearson Road

NSGW Christmas Dinner

Dec. 11, 5:30 p.m. Chabad Jewish Center’s annual Menorah Lighting ceremony in celebration of Hanukkah with traditional food and music. This year, a menorah will be constructed out of donated canned food. Chico City Plaza. 809-1662.

Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Over 50 vendors will offer handmade wares during this craft fair hosted by Oroville Community Radio. Prices vary. Municipal Auditorium, 1200 Meyers St. 228-4891.

Festival of Trees & Gift Faire

Dec. 1, noon-4 p.m. A gold-rush era holiday celebration set at Bidwell Bar 150 years ago with pioneer crafts, Christmas gifts and panning for gold. Prices vary. Lake Oroville Visitor Center, 917 Kelly Ridge Road above Oroville Dam.

Grand Hanukkah Celebration

Dec. 1, 6-9 p.m. A buffet-style dinner and raffles to benefit The Native Sons of the Golden West Cleft Palate Charitable Foundation. $4-$12. Oroville Veterans Memorial Hall, 2374 Montgomery St. 533-6930.

Alternative Gift Faire

Dec. 2 & 9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Shop among local and global missions to purchase a gift for someone in need. Donations are tax-deductible. Bidwell Presbyterian Church, 208 W. First St. 343-1484.

Music & Tree Lighting

Dec. 3, 5:15 p.m. Enloe Medical Center’s tree lighting will include music, hot beverages and holiday cookies. Free. Enloe Medical Center, 1531 Esplanade. 332-6745.

Light Up a Life

Dec. 4, 7 p.m. This tree-lighting ceremony benefits Paradise Hospice and will include singing by a youth choir, a hospice family tribute and more. Paradise Hospice House, 1289 Bille Road. 877–8755.

Chico Community Tree Lighting

Dec. 7, 5:30 p.m. Join local choral groups, The Yule Logs and Santa Claus himself and watch as the Christmas tree is lit in the Chico City Plaza. Free. 345-6500.

Breakfast with Santa

Dec. 8, 8 a.m.-noon. Three pancake/photo sessions at 8, 9 and 10 a.m. Mrs. Claus and the elves will be available all morning for arts & crafts. Call ahead to register; $10 per person. CARD Community Center, 545 Vallombrosa Ave. 895-4711.

Ehmann Home Christmas Open House

Dec. 8, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Bring your favorite Christmas story to share and gather around the piano for collaborative holiday music. Refreshments will be served. Free. Ehmann Home, 1480 Lincoln St., Oroville. 877-7436.

Menorah Car Parade

Dec. 8, 8 p.m. Chabad Jewish Center’s annual car parade will light up the streets of downtown Chico. 809-1662.

Oroville Christmas Parade

Dec. 8, 6-8 p.m. Annual parade of lights in downtown Oroville, with a visit from Santa and a tree lighting cer-

Bizarre Bazaar

Dec. 14-15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Chikoko design/artist collective hosts its annual alternative craft faire, featuring the handmade clothing, jewelry and utilitarian art of 40 local artists. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St. Go to www.chikoko.com for schedule.

Cookies & Photos with Santa

Dec. 15, 3-5 p.m. Tasty treats and a photo op with Mr. Claus to benefit programs for individuals with developmental disabilities. Little Red Hen Plant Nursery, Eighth and Wall streets. 891-9100.

Christmas Day Camp for Kids The Nutcracker in Chico (and Paradise)

Dec. 21 –Jan. 4. Camp for kids to keep themselves busy during and after the holidays. Call for prices. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. 533-9622.

Charity ARC gift-wrap volunteers. Dec. 14-22, Mon.-Fri., 2-6 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. Oroville ARC store, 2745 Oro Dam Blvd. 891-5865 ext 203. Jesus Center needs food and clothing donations along with volunteers. Hams are especially needed along with coats, blankets, socks, canned food and hygiene products. Call 345-2640 for info. Knit or crochet a scarf, hat or sweater for the homeless. Bring finished, unwrapped gifts to the Jesus Center, 1297 Park Ave. 345-2640. Salvation Army Angel Trees and toy barrels are popping up around Chico. Also, volunteers needed to distribute food boxes and toys in December. Salvation Army offices, 700 Broadway. Info: 342-2199. November 29, 2012

CN&R 31

32 CN&R November 29, 2012

Red Taylor Swift Big Machine Records In the six years since her debut album, Taylor Swift has come across as a country Cinderella with the wrath of a Southern belle and the humor of a liberal-arts geek. Over time, we’ve seen some of the honeysuckle twang drip away, but Swift continues to honor both the glass slipper and the Sharpie’d Converse sides of her personality. Red begins with “State of Grace,” a perfect stadium-show opener that pumps you up but doesn’t leave you exhausted for what’s to come. Heading down home, “Sad Beautiful Tragic” seems born from the creative saviors that are moonlight, a half-empty bottle, and raindrops on the window. While “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” acts as the album’s big breakup song, it fulfills a more critical role—one it shares with “22”—as the unselfconsciously silly song you belt out only among friends who really know you. More important, these songs humanize a wonderful album and serve as reminders that Swift earned the fulfillment of her dream and wasn’t born with a silver guitar in her hands. The album opens with the pop princess and closes with the country girl-next-door’s “Begin Again,” a song about the hope and promise of letting your guard down to love again—a softly inspiring reminder we all need to hear from time to time.

MUSIC

How Did This Get Made? www.earwolf.com Having recently jumped on the podcast train, I’ve been searching for and devouring these online radiotype shows at an almost alarming rate. Some are clearly better than others, and How Did This Get Made? has really gotten under my skin. In a good way. Hosted by Paul Scheer and Jason Mantzoukas (from TV’s The League) and funny woman June Diane Raphael (Party Down), the show aims to pick apart some of Hollywood’s biggest blunders. They tackle important questions like, “Is Sandra Bullock’s character in All About Steve just quirky or actually crazy?” And “When you escape from hell, do muscle cars just appear whenever you need them, like in Drive Angry?” Joined by comedian guests and sometimes even the directors of the movies they’re mocking, the threesome dissect a different flick each week, trying to get to the bottom of puzzling plot points, strange character traits and just plain inexplicable cinematic moments. In between episodes, which are uploaded biweekly, they announce the next bad movie and pose challenges to listeners, promising to read the best responses on air. If you love movies—and love to hate the bad ones—check this show out. It’s available on iTunes or www.earwolf.com, and, of course, it’s totally free.

PODCAST

—Meredith J. Graham

First Came Memphis Minnie Maria Muldaur Stony Plain Records Designed as “a loving tribute to Memphis Minnie (1897-1973), the pioneering blues woman,” Maria Muldaur’s 40th album features a raft of special guests paying homage to the indomitable guitarist (née Lizzie Douglas). A chance encounter 50 years ago with the classic blues singer Victoria Spivey (when Muldaur was just getting started in music) led to her introduction to Minnie, who made more than 200 records during her four-decade career. Muldaur has, as she put it, “joined with some of my Sisters in Music” on this baker’s dozen of songs. Also on board are a few guys (e.g., Roy Rogers, Alvin Youngblood Hart, David Bromberg, Steve Freund) providing support. But, except for Hart, whose vocals help liven up “I’m Goin’ Back Home,” the music focuses on the ladies, spotlighting Bonnie Raitt (a rambunctious “Ain’t Nothin’ in Ramblin’”); Rory Block (a very tasty slidesteeped “When You Love Me”); Del Rey (whose guitar backs up Muldaur on five songs including “Tricks Ain’t Walkin’,” the song that sparked Muldaur’s interest in Minnie); Ruthie Foster (a relaxed “Keep Your Big Mouth Closed”); Phoebe Snow (“In My Girlish Days” from 1976) and Koko Taylor (her 2007 “Black Rat Swing”). Muldaur is in super fine form and her version of the iconic “Chauffeur Blues” heads this terrific tribute.

MUSIC

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

—Matthew Craggs

—Miles Jordan November 29, 2012

CN&R 33

Tiger hungry for slice of Pi.

Killing Them Softly

Brad Pitt reunites with The Assassination of Jesse James … director Andrew Dominik to star as an enforcer hired to seek out the bumbling perpetrators who boosted a mob-sponsored card game. Also starring Ray Liotta, Richard Jenkins and James Gandolfini. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Starlet

The story of an unlikely friendship that develops between two neighbors in a San Fernando Valley neighborhood—a pot-smoking 21-year-old aspiring actress and the bitter widow who lives next door. Pageant Theatre. Not rated.

Now playing

4

Argo

High-sea stunner Visually powerful adaptation of fantasy-adventure novel

Aquirky novel Life of Pi is plenty eccentric in its own right—quirky to a fault, perhaps, but not without a good ng Lee’s film version of Yann Martel’s

deal to offer all the same. Onscreen Martel’s exuberantly postmodernist stew of a tale becomes a flamboyantly episodic ramble—part high-flyby Juan-Carlos ing philosophical discourse, part epic Selznick adventure, part literary puzzle, and (intermittently, but also persistently) the giddy, convoluted life story of Piscine “Pi” Patel, its central character/narrator. The picture’s big selling point is the amazing tale Pi has to tell about losing his parents and his older brother in a disasLife of Pi trous shipwreck and yet also surviving Starring Suraj adrift in a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger Sharma, Irrfan Khan and from his parents’ zoo as his only companRafe Spall. ion. That part of the story, part miniDirected by Titanic, part Robinson Crusoe, part nothAng Lee. ing-you’ve-ever-seen-before, takes fine Cinemark 14, and duly spectacular form in Lee’s film Feather River (even in the 2-D version that I chose over Cinemas and Paradise Cinema the 3-D option). That astonishing adventure is central 7. Rated PG. to the story, but it’s only one part of the narrative action. Substantial early segments of the film are devoted to more Poor contemplative matters—an extended account of how Piscine Patel came to have that French first name and how and why he opted for his shortened nickname, Fair and an elaborate and engaging discourse on the young man’s multi-faith, multipledeity religious perspectives. And we get some dramatic glimpses of Pi’s difficult Good pre-shipwreck relations with his family and his harsh and demanding father in particular. Very Good Pi is present here at three different stages of his life—the pre-teen younger brother (Ayush Tandon), the teenaged shipwreck survivor (Suraj Sharma), and Excellent the calm but spirited adult (Irrfan Khan)

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who narrates much of the film’s action. The supporting cast includes an obstreperous cook (Gérard Depardieu) aboard the ship and a writer (Rafe Spall) to whom Pi tells his perhaps incredible tale. And the dazzling array of animatronic/ CGI creatures in the film, ferocious wild beasts and frenzied marine life, become significant characters in the story as well. Arguably, the beautifully rendered Bengal tiger (dubbed “Richard Parker” in another of the story’s name-giving events) delivers one of the two most impressive performances in the film. (Sharma delivers the other.) A zebra, a hyena and a rat all have roles to play, initially, in Pi’s lifeboat/ark, and there are various astonishing episodes with a mid-ocean stampede of flying fish, a “floating” island populated entirely by meerkats, and most apocalyptically a cresting white whale. The latter provides the occasion for the film’s most climactic moment of rapturous visual imagery, each of which envisions living creatures blissfully afloat in a merging of sea and sky, underwater and above. No matter then, to me, that the whole may add up to less than the sum of its parts. Some of these parts are among the best things I’ve seen at the movies this year. Ω

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34 CN&R November 29, 2012

In 1980, in the midst of the Iranian hostage crisis, a CIA agent organized an undercover caper that was desperate, dazzling and very improbable. In the hands of Ben Affleck and company, that little farrago becomes a riveting, briskly entertaining thriller. There is no shortage of peril and suspense in the basic incident— agent Tony Mendez (Affleck) is attempting to spirit six Americans hiding in the Canadian embassy out of Iran. And the tension is only heightened by the outlandishness of Mendez’s scheme—he and the six escapees will exit Iran disguised as a Canadian film crew. That scheme adds a second, curiously complementary element to the story—Mendez must set up an actual production company as a supporting cover story for the film-crew disguise. The cover-story movie becomes a sci-fi epic called Argo which might be filmed in Iranian locations. The movie angle adds a rich level of ironic comedy to Affleck’s own production, which thereby also becomes a dark, barbed comedy-drama about the business of making movies. Cinemark 14. Rated R —J.C.S.

4

Life of Pi

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG —J.C.S.

5

Lincoln

The new Abe Lincoln picture from Steven Spielberg and Tony Kushner is an historical epic of a quality that is exceptionally rare in American movies. Kushner’s brilliant script focuses on Lincoln and his contemporaries and on the complex political maneuvering involved in getting slavery abolished, via the Thirteenth Amendment, in the first four months of the war’s final year, 1865. That much historical specificity may sound a little daunting—or by some lights, a little too dry—but the Spielberg/Kushner Lincoln is never dull. There’s a fresh, canny mixture of docudrama and dramatic entertainment throughout, and a wonderfully trenchant and diverse cast provides vivid foreground and background alike in this unusual and complex version of Spielbergian spectacle. Daniel DayLewis’ reedy and avuncular performance in the title role is a genuinely magnificent spectacle in its own right. Sally Field (as the emotionally divided Mary Todd Lincoln), David Strathairn (as William Seward, Lincoln’s shrewdly droll right hand man and Secretary of State), and Tommy Lee Jones (as the firebrand abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens) make especially strong impressions. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

Red Dawn

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Howard Hardee and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

Opening this week The Collection

This sequel to the 2009 horror flick The Collector follows the story of one of the serial killer’s victims who escapes and is then forced to try to rescue a girl from the The Collector’s booby-trapped home. Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

A remake of the 1984 film about commies invading a rural U.S. area only to have local high-schoolers take up arms to try to fend them off. This time the commies are North Korean instead of Soviet, the rural area is Washington instead of Colorado, and the lead is played by Thor instead of Patrick Swayze. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Rise of the Guardians

A 3D animated-film version of William Joyce’s The Guardians of Childhood kids’ books about a group of famous characters—Jack Frost, Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy and the Sandman—who band together to save kids from the nightmares of the Boogeyman. Starring the voices of Alec Baldwin, Hugh Jackman, Jude Law, Chris Pine and Isla Fisher. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

3

A Royal Affair

This handsomely appointed costume drama from Denmark mixes romance and court politics in a gently melodramatic account of a pivotal phase in the country’s movement toward a republican form of government in the 18th century. In his role as physician to King Christian VII, the German Dr. Johann Friedrich Struensee brings Enlightenment thinking to the hidebound Danish court, which contributes eventually to Denmark’s bloodshed-free variation on the French Revolution. But the real drama here derives from a politically fraught romantic triangle involving Struensee, the buffoonishly immature King, and his young English-born Queen Caroline Mathilde. Struensee (played by Euro heartthrob Mads Mikkelsen) is both inspirational mentor to the young, beleaguered King Christian (a farcical Mikkel Boe Følsgaard) and lover to the vivacious but grossly neglected Queen (Alicia Vikander). The tumultuous triangular relationship leads to personal calamity for all three but with happier long-term outcomes, especially in the political arena. The ruthlessly scheming courtiers are sketched as credible caricatures, and the central threesome makes strong individual impressions. But the script (based on a novel by Bodil Steensen-Leth and adapted by director Nikolaj Arcel and co-writer Rasmus Heisterberg) leaves little room for any real character development. Pageant Theatre. Rated R —J.C.S.

4

Skyfall

Daniel Craig’s continued development of the James Bond character well beyond its previous dimensions is at the forefront of Skyfall, the first Bond film directed by Sam Mendes (American Beauty). The film’s opening sequence finds Bond botching an attempt to recover a stolen hard drive containing mega-important information (albeit after another stunningly awesome overthe-top chase scene, which has become something of a signature for the rebooted series). From there it’s all womanizing, day-drinking and swallowing handfuls of prescription medication. And when a bleary-eyed Bond is put through a series of physical and mental tasks to determine whether he is still fit for service (secret service, that is), we are confronted with a concept entirely foreign—Bond being bad at stuff. He misses practice shots and labors through push-ups and chin-ups, all while looking generally disheveled. The dialogue between Bond and his latest nemesis, Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem), is the most compelling aspect of the film—excluding the scene in which a military helicopter crashes into a Scottish castle. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —H.H.

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The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 2

In Breaking Dawn, Part 1, Bella (Kristen Stewart) got knocked up a with mutant baby who tore her up pretty good, forcing Edward (Robert Pattinson) to turn her into a vampire to save her from pushing daisies. In Part 2, vampiress Bella is all sunshine and smiles, and she’s got Edward well ’n’ truly whupped. They take runs through the woods and he shows her how to prey. And her new vampire family has fixed them up with a Thomas Kinkade cabin in the woods, so that the newlyweds can have rough vampire sex without annoying anyone. The only dark side to these happy days is that their newborn daughter is growing at an alarming rate, and some sinister cabal of bloodsuckers is breathing down their necks over some misunderstanding (not to mention the fact that the drama here is mostly conveyed by eye candies standing around in a posh living room explaining what’s going on). Finally, the swishy tribunal shows up on their back 40 and a battle royale explodes all over the snowscape. It’s actually a very well-crafted climax that concludes with a perfectly delivered punch line. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

Still here

4

Flight

Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —J.C.S.

Wreck-it Ralph

Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated PG.

SCENE

6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

Swedish shredheads

THE COLLECTION

LIFE [PG]

OF

RED DAWN

[R]

PI

 12:45 3:00 5:10 7:20 *9:35PM  IN : 1:15 6:55 *9:40PM  IN 2D: 4:05PM  12:55 3:05 5:10 7:15 *9:25PM

[PG-13]

RISE OF THE GUARDIANS [PG]

lin Gunnarsson and Lina Falck don’t

TWILIGHT SAGA

 IN : 12:45 5:15 7:30 *9:45PM  IN 2D: 3:00PM

BREAKING DAWN PART 2 [PG-13]

recent Rockin’ Scandinavia broadcast from the KCSC station in the basement of the Bell Memorial Union, a male student entered the studio bearing flowers. Gunnarsson’s deadpan reaction spoke of a lifetime of spurning advances from metal dudes. She explained that accepting the flowers would be burdensome, as she and Falck had class following the show. “Well, maybe you could give them to your teacher?” the suitor suggested. “No, I don’t give gifts to my teachers,” Gunnarsson said without inflection. “Oh, well, you have a good day,” he said, sheepishly closing the door. Though they haven’t targeted a specific career (and don’t know whether they will continue to operate as a duo), they feel they would be best suited to concert promotion or artist management. And while they have fun hosting Rockin’ Scandinavia (they are often overcome with giggles on-air), they consider the radio show a serious step forward for them. “If we’re going to work within the music industry, it’s all about who you know and having a big network,” Gunnarsson said. “We’re both really driven. We want to do it for real. It’s really fun having the radio show, but we put a lot of effort into it because we want to tell people we had a show and it went Ω really well.”

SKYFALL [PG-13]

12:45 3:45 6:45 *9:30PM 1:00 3:55 6:50 *9:45PM

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hosts of the metal-themed KCSC radio show Rockin’ Scandinavia—have bigger hair, bigger holes in their ripped jeans, bigger by personalities and dozens more Howard bracelets than the typical yoga-pantsHardee and-Uggs-clad students. howardh@ newsreview.com But they don’t just look the part of ’80s metal chicks; Gunnarsson (aka Alex Gun) and Falck (Mary Lii) are bona fide “Swedish metal priestesses” who proudly talk of their home counRadio Sweden try’s contribution to the international Rockin’ metal scene, how awesome KISS is Scandinavia airs and their aspirations in the music Wednesdays, industry. 2-3 p.m. (and The duo’s weekly radio show is a archived shows quirky mix. In between blood-curare available for download) on dling metal tracks, the pair interjects KCSC internet trivia and anecdotes in their heavily radio, www.kcsc Swedish-accented English about the radio.com bands, often from first-hand experiences backstage at European festivals www.face book.com/ (“getting dragged to a bar” by KISS rockinscandinavia drummer Eric Singer is one picture they painted). When the girls met each other in high school nine years ago, they both aspired to become veterinarians. But that was a goal they apparently shared with thousands of students in Sweden, making competition for admission into veterinary school fierce. It was around that time they began attending music festivals, which they “really fell in love with,” Falck said. “We’ve been to so many concerts and festivals since.” The pair changed gears following high school, spending several years immersing themselves in Sweden’s metal scene, a culture that spawned the “Gothenburg sound” highlighted by bands such as In Flames, Meshuggah and At the Gates. Though extreme metal is far more popular in Sweden than in the United States, they maintain it’s not quite mainstream. The bulk of their radio show is devoted to metal from home (and is even downloaded by fans in Sweden) and throughout the Scandivian/Nordic region, but as they say on their website, they are “also punching in music from world-renowned bands/artists that can, in one way or another, be connected with Scandinavia.” When they enrolled together at Umeå University in northern Sweden, they began studying business administration with a focus on music and events management. They chose Chico State as their exchange destination because of the university’s strong music program and recommendations from fellow Swedish exchange students. Aside from the small-town feel, they say the most striking difference is Chico’s sense of fashion (or lack thereof). “Everyone here wants to blend in; few people want to stand out and have extreme styles,” Falck said. “Or have any style at all,” Gunnarsson chimed in. Naturally, their style attracts attention. During a

 1:20 3:20 5:20 7:25 *9:35PM

KILLING THEM SOFTLY [R]

KCSC Radio’s house Scandinavians love metal, but don’t bring them flowers

Elook like your average Chico State coeds. The two 25-year old Swedish exchange students—and

IN

SHOWTIMES GOOD FRI 11/30 - THUR 12/6

2175 Baldwin Ave Oroville 95966 (530) 533-7720

Call for details (530) 899–0110

friday 11/30 – thursday 12/06

12/4 Danú: Christmas in Ireland 12/5 Comedy Pet Theater 12/7 Sweet Honey In The Rock 12/13-16 Nutcracker 1/22 Clint Black Trio 1/23 Golden Dragon Acrobats 1/30 Erth’s Dinosaur Petting Zoo 2/1 Tommy Emmanuel 2/6 Cirque Mechanics 2/7 Whose Live Anyway? 2/12 Juan de Marcos & the Afro-Cuban Stars

2/14 Russian National Orchestra 2/17 Eric Bibb & Habib Koité 2/20 Paco Peña: Flamenco Vivo Lina Falck (left) and Elin Gunnarsson are dressed for radio. PHOTO BY SEBASTIAN LARSSON

All shows at Laxson Auditorium CSU, Chico

TICKETS - (530) 898-6333 or CHICOPERFORMANCES.COM

ARGO (Digital) (R) 11:10AM 1:55PM 4:40PM 7:25PM 10:10PM FLIGHT (Digital) (R) 1:00PM 4:05PM 7:10PM 10:15PM KILLING THEM SOFTLY (Digital) (R) 12:45PM 3:10PM 5:35PM 8:00PM 10:30PM LIFE OF PI (3D) (PG) 12:00PM 1:30PM 3:00PM 6:05PM 7:30PM 9:05PM LIFE OF PI (Digital) (PG) 4:30PM 10:30PM LINCOLN (Digital) (PG-13) 12:35PM 3:50PM 7:05PM 10:20PM RED DAWN (Digital) (PG-13) 12:45PM 3:05PM 5:25PM 7:45PM 10:05PM RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (3D) (PG) 12:45PM 3:15PM 5:45PM 8:15PM RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (Digital) (PG) 11:30AM 2:00PM 4:30PM 7:00PM 9:30PM SKYFALL (Digital) (PG-13) 11:20AM

12:55PM 2:30PM 4:05PM 5:40PM♦ 7:15PM 8:50PM♦ 10:25PM TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (Digital) (PG-13) 11:05AM 12:30PM♠ 1:55PM 3:20PM 4:45PM 6:10PM♣ 7:35PM 9:00PM 10:25PM♣ WRECK-IT-RALPH (3D) (PG) 2:10PM 7:20PM WRECK-IT-RALPH (Digital) (PG) 11:35AM 4:45PM 9:55PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) - MET OPERA: LA CLEMENzA DI TITO (Digital) (NR) Sat. 12/1 ONLY 9:55AM (SPECIAL SHOWING) TARANTINO XX: RESERvOIR DOGS 20th Anniversary Event (Digital) (R) Tues. 12/4 ONLY 7:00PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) TARANTINO XX: PULP FICTION EvENT (Digital) (R) Thurs. 12/6 ONLY 7:00PM

Showtimes listed w/ ♠ NOT shown Sat. 12/1 Showtimes listed w/ ♦ NOT shown thru Tues. 12/4 Showtimes listed w/ ♣ NOT shown Thurs. 12/6

November 29, 2012

CN&R 35

NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 11|29—WEDNESDAY 12|5 SINGER SONGWRITER SAGA Saturday, Dec. 1 Maltese Taproom SEE SATURDAY

Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

TRAPT: The post-grunge rock band, best

known for their 2002 single “Headstrong,” is touring in support of their new album, Reborn. Venrez opens. Th, 11/29, 8pm. $17. Senator Theatre, 517 Main St., (530) 898-1497, www.jmaxproductions.net.

29THURSDAY BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynns Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo, 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473.

IMPROV JAM: Open jam with Michael

Gaughan. Th, 5-8pm. Opens 11/29. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

JOHN SEID: John Seid and friends, featuring Larry Peterson and Steve Cook playing an eclectic mix of tunes all night. Th, 6:30-9:30pm through 11/29. Free. Johnnies Restaurant, 220 W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond; (530)

895-1515; www.johnnies restaurant.com.

MATTEO PLAYS FILM SCORES: Classical guitarist Matteo plays film scores and light classics. Th, 6pm. Free. Angelos Cucina Trinacria, 407 Walnut St.; (530) 899-9996.

NOT DEAD YET: A Grateful Dead tribute band on the back patio. Th, 11/29, 69pm. Free. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

OPEN MIC: COMEDY: Everyone is welcome to try their hand at stand-up comedy.

Th, 8-10pm. Opens 11/29. Cafe Flo, 365 E.

30FRIDAY

one of the final shows from local instrumental rockers La Fin Du Monde. The bill also includes Palaver, Clouds on Strings and Chris Keene of Surrogate. F, 11/30, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

COUNTRY NIGHT: Live country music with Rancho Mars. F, 5-8pm. Free. Towne Lounge, 327 Main St.; (530) 896-0235.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradition: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffy’s Tavern, 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

JASON BUELL BAND: Live country in the lounge. F, 11/30, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort, 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa;

SPY PICNIC: Rock hits from the ’80s and

(530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

MOTIFS: Live music in the lounge. F, 11/30, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

NATHAN THOMAS BAND: Live modern

country music. F, 11/30, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

SAPPHIRE SOUL: A tight group of blues musicians playing a collection of originals and standards. F, 11/30, 8:30am. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.gold countrycasino.com.

’90s. F, 11/30, 8pm. $1. LaSalles, 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

S.T.O.P. SLAVERY BENEFIT CONCERT: A fundraiser for Chico State’s anti-slavery organization, Stop Trafficking of Persons, featuring an eclectic mix of music from The Cause, Hallelujah Junction, Davey Andrek, Blue Spruce Band, Some Kind of Sorcerer and DJ Redline. F, 11/30, 6:30-11:30pm. $6-$8. Chico Womens Club, 592 E. Third St.; (530) 894-1978.

1SATURDAY ACOUSTIC MUSIC JAM: A jam hosted by Butte Folk Music Society and led by

BECAUSE: A Beatles tribute band out of

Northern California. F, 11/30, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feath erfallscasino.com.

WATSKY

He raps faster than you, “A rappin’ Labradoodle, half a WASP and half a Jew.” George Watsky has garnered a lot of attention for his one-minute “Watsky Raps Fast” video (22 million YouTube views), and the former poetry-slam champion from San Francisco has kept the flow steady with a stream of mixtapes and videos and touring, currently on the Sloppy Seconds Tour, which stops in Chico Sunday, Dec. 2, at El Rey Theatre.

BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynns Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

CHICO BAILE LATINO: MORE THAN SALSA: Salsa, Merengue, Cumbia and Bachata dance lessons followed by an open social dance. F, 8pm through 11/15. $2$4. The Hub, 685 Manzanita Ct. Inside the Holiday Inn, Chico; (530) 518-9454.

CODA 6TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW: Café Coda’s anniversary is highlighted by

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 26 continues. First M of every month, 78:30pm. $10. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafe coda.com.

TRAPT

Tonight, Nov. 29 Senator Theatre

JAZZ TRIO: Every Wednesday with Carey

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: With the Carey

SEE THURSDAY

Robinson Trio. M, 5-7pm. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

songwriter competition begins with 10 contestants playing two songs apiece.

Sa, 9pm through 12/15. Opens 12/1.

Free. Maltese Bar & Taproom, 1600 Park Ave.; (530) 343-4915.

local musician Steve Johnson. First Sa of every month, 2-5pm. Free. Upper Crust Bakery & Eatery, 130 Main St.; (530) 345-4128.

(530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

heaviness at Coda with locals Cold Blue Mountain and Into the Open Earth and Oakland’s Negative Standards. Sa, 12/1, 8pm. $5. Café Coda, 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafe coda.com.

GODS OF THUNDER: A KISS tribute band in

the brewery. Sa, 12/1, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino Brewing Company, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com/ brewing-co.

lounge. Sa, 12/1, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort, 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa;

JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria, 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

THE JEFF PERSHING BAND: Chico’s

COLD BLUE MOUNTAIN: Some holiday

JASON BUELL BAND: Live country in the

2SUNDAY

master of the funky stuff. Sa, 12/1, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill, 375 E. Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

MOTIFS: Live music in the lounge. Sa, 12/1, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

SAPPHIRE SOUL: A tight group of blues musicians playing a collection of originals and standards. Sa, 12/1, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino, 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.gold countrycasino.com.

Su, 12/2, 8pm. $13. El Rey Theatre, 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

THE YULE LOGS: A performance from Chico’s favorite holiday rock band at the plant nursery. Su, 12/2, 4pm. Free. Magnolia Gift & Garden, 1367 East Ave.; (530) 894-5410; www.magnolia gardening.com.

3MONDAY FIRST MONDAY JAZZ SERIES: The jazz

SINGER-SONGWRITER SAGA: The first night of a three-part weekly singer-

You’ll Leave Relaxed

WATSKY: A-1, Sick Bird and TyBox open.

series highlighting the contributions of a different jazz innovator each month

HOLIDAY PARTY

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1722 Mangrove, Ste 38 • (530) 636–4368 2540 Esplanade, Ste 6 • (530) 899–0888

Christine Lapado-Breglia on upright bass. W, 5-7pm. Chicoichi Ramen, 243 W. Ninth St.; (530) 891-9044.

Robinson and company. W, 5-7pm. Opens 12/5. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveat flo.weebly.com.

LAURIE DANA: Soul, light rock, blues,

4TUESDAY

country, tin pan alley, jazz and more. W, 7-9pm. Free. VIP Ultra Lounge, 191 E. Second St. Upstairs from The Beach.

AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo, 365 E. Sixth St.; (530) 514-8888; www.liveatflo.weebly.com.

DANU: CHRISTMAS IN IRELAND: A Celticstyle Christmas celebration with traditional instruments like the flute, tin whistle, fiddle, button accordion and more. Chico Children’s Choir will also perform. Tu, 12/4, 7:30pm. $18-$31. Laxson Auditorium, 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico; (530) 898-6333; www.chicoperformances.com.

NTS POST EVE Y ONLINE B AT G IN R E T IS REG hico

newsreview.c

om/c

OPEN MIC: All ages welcome. W, 7pm. Free. 100th Monkey Books & Cafe, 642 West Fifth St.

SWING DANCE WEDNESDAY: Every Wednesday night, swing dancing lessons 8-10pm. W, 8-10pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

OPEN JAM NIGHT: Join the jam. Drum kit, bass rig, guitar amp and PA system are provided, bring your own instruments. All ages until 10. W, 7pm. Free. Italian Garden, 6929 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 876-9988; www.myspace.com/theitaliangarden.

COLD BLUE MOUNTAIN Saturday, Dec. 1 Café Coda SEE SATURDAY

SIMON LYNGE: The singer-songwriter out of Greenland returns to the Grange. Tu, 12/4, 7pm. $10. Paradise Grange Hall, 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise, (530) 873-1370.

5WEDNESDAY HAPPY JAZZ: A weekly jazz appointment with Shigemni Minetaka on piano and

Duffy’s Hoodies NOW AVAILABLE in Men’s & Women’s Sizes

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CN&R 37

ARTS DEVO

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SANTA VS. SATAN Chico’s kick-ass merrymakers The Yule Logs have outdone themselves this year with a sweet and sinful video version (directed by Shawn Dyer) of their hit single “Wish List,” from their 2011 disc You Ruined Christmas. The song’s jangle and infectious vocal harmonies play soundtrack to Santa’s red-faced anagram pulling all kinds of devilish hijinks—from punking the band to break dancing to a hot-dog-eating contest with the other man in red. Go to youtube.com/ user/theyulelogs to see new video—as well as 2009’s masterpiece “ChristmasDevil by his side. time is Here (Again!).” And visit theyule logs.bandcamp.com and buy a copy of their latest audio release, a live double-disc called … Double Live!, recorded during last December’s two-night stand at the Chico Women’s Club (where they’ll hold up residence again this year—Dec. 22-23.) Whew! ST. NICK VS. KRAMPUS! As I mentioned last week, it’s all Krampusnacht for me for the rest of the year, and I’m gonna need a soundtrack with which to frolic naughtily with Krampus during my new-style holiday, so I figured it best to reach out to my DEVOtés and ask for your advice on holiday songs that don’t suck. (And I already have The Yule Logs all cued up, so you don’t need to suggest them … Unless! Maybe they’re working on a special extra-hot Krampus track!? Get on it, fellas! Pull Bone Gruel or Witchdick out of retirement if you need a collaborator!) If you suggest a song that makes it on Arts DEVO’s 2012 Holiday Mix, I’ll send you a digital download (or burn a CD if you beg me). Songs can be new or old, and from absolutely any genre, but like I said, it can’t suck: No Rudolph, Frosty or other holiday characters; nothing creepy (“Santa Baby,” “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus”); and Krampus rides shotgun. none of the ubiquitous standards you might hear on repeat in Kohl’s or from an elementary-school holiday show (“Let it Snow,” “Jingle Bells,” etc.). Post your suggestions to Arts DEVO’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/pages/Arts-Devo or email them to jasonc@newsreview.com by Monday, Dec. 10. SPEAKING OF MUSIC THAT DOESN’T SUCK There are a lot of pleasing

glass/water pipes | adult novelties | cigars | hookas | gifts & more

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530.345.0032 m-f 8-8 | sat 9-8 | sun 10-8 38 CN&R November 29, 2012

chords being struck this week at DEVO H.Q., most notably the holy grail of lost live concert video footage: 28th Day at the I-Beam in San Francisco in 1985. It’s the only video evidence of a live performance of Chico’s most legendary band, and with the once-shabby audio restored to unbelievable fidelity, it is now available for all to behold. Visit guitarist Cole Marquis’ YouTube page at youtube.com/user/colemarquis and watch each song and remind yourself that they were making this music as contemporaries of bands like R.E.M. and The Cure. Legendary! Also, getting air time are tracks from the artists making up the insanely entertaining bill of the Group Hug Tour coming to the Senator Theatre Friday, Dec. 14. The evening is headlined by Oakland rapper Kreayshawn (of “Gucci Gucci” fame) and features an all-female roster of MCs—including Rye Rye (hear “Boom Boom” and, especially, the ridiculously awesome classic “Shake it to the Ground”); Honey Cocaine (best rap name in the world?) and Chippy Nonstop, whose collaboration with prankster Andy Milonakis—“Spaghetti”—will either take your holiday party to the next level, or completely clear the place out … how a proper party song should. Rye Rye

Sponsored by the City of Chico

butte county living

Credit & Budget Workshop Thurs, December 6 , 3 — 5pm

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

th

Access Training Room off parking lot

Location:

• • • 1001 Willow St. • Chico • Community Housing • Improvement Program, Inc. • Community Housing Improvement Program, Inc.

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

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Call 891-6931 or 1-888-912-4663 to reserve a seat or more information CHIP is a HUD approved Housing Counseling Agency.

www.chico.newsreview.com

Quality, Affordable & Friendly Housing

butte county living houses

K N I H T E.

Location

Bd/Ba

Rent

Dep.

612 W. 2nd Ave 177 E. Francis Willard

2/1 $775 6/2.5 $1550

$875 $1650

Location

801 W. 1st Ave. #1 925 Chestnut St #2

Rent

Dep.

Location

2/1 2/1

$600 $700

$700 $800

1163 Olive St #7 1901 ½ Mulberry St

Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

FRE

Bd/Ba

Rent

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3/1 3/1

$750 $725

$850 $825

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico

RELIABLE 895-1733 | www.reliableproperty.com

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

apartments

Bd/Ba

Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

www.chico.newsreview.com

Open Houses & Listings are online at: www.century21JeffriesLydon.com BIG CHICO CREEK ESTATES

PARK LOCATION

The location is a 10 on this classic 50’s home. Features include 1,848 sqft, 3bd,

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Steve Kasprzyk (530) 518–4850

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Call or TEXT for more info.

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

Bangor Biggs Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico

$125,000 $362,000 $539,000 $440,000 $400,000 $331,000 $317,000 $313,000 $285,000 $265,000 $260,000

3/ 2 4/ 2 4/ 3 3/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2.5 4/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2

1296 2867 2803 2528 2696 2190 1803 1822 1698 1581 1104

1140 Palm Ave 2191 Robailey Dr 5 Vermillion Cir 1291 Wanderer Ln 3 Roxanne Ct 84 Cortina Dr 806 W 12th Ave 899 E 8th St 4 Emilio Way 78 Lacewing Ct 11910 La Porte Rd

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Chico Clipper Mills

$240,000 $239,000 $227,000 $196,500 $188,000 $180,000 $177,000 $170,000 $165,000 $151,500 $109,000

3/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 1.5 3/ 1 2/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 1.5

1092 1547 1565 1136 1460 1108 1116 1092 1242 1126 1403

November 29, 2012

CN&R 39

OPEN

hOuSE

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon Sun. 2-4 4 Woodstone Lane (X St: Shallow Springs Terrace) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 3270 sq. ft. $649,999 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 Shastan Homes (Wisteria Lane & Waxwing Way) Off Glenwood… Starting at $321,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

Sat. 2-4 16260 Stage Rd. (X St: Hwy 32) Forest Ranch 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2342 sq. ft. $299,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

5000 Malibu • Paradise BRAND NEW LISTING -BE IN BY THE HOLIDAYS! Gorgeous custom home in very desirable neighborhood in Paradise. Features include three spacious bedrooms with bay windows, three full baths and powder room. Huge formal dining room, family room with cozy wood burning stove, formal dining room with hardwood floors. Kitchen has updated appliances, gas range, tons of tile, breakfast bar and separate eating area with lots of light. Family room opens to back deck that overlooks the tranquil backyard setting. Downstairs with endless uses, 800 plus square-feet, full bath with tons of storage and closet space. Too many amenities to mention. Unbelievable property.

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 7 Savannah Lane (X St: W. 11th Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1532 sq. ft. $269,900 Brandon Siewert 828-4597

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1009 Gateway Lane (X St: W. Sacramento Ave) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1875 sq. ft. $269,500 Frankie Dean 840-0265 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

listed at: $319,000 Heather Braswell, Coldwell Banker Ponderosa 530/872-5424

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 Banner Peak (X St: Bruce Road) New Homes Starting at $269,000 Ed Galvez 990-2054

Sat. 2-4 133 W. 4th Avenue (X St: Esplanade) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1616 sq. ft. $260,000 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 1099 Sierra Vista Way (X St: Downing) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1848 sq. ft. $255,000 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Sherry Landis 514-4855 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat. 11-1 & Sun. 11-1 1497 E. 1st Avenue (X St: Verbena) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1468 sq. ft. $249,900 Dustin Wenner 624-9125

Sat. 11-1, 2-4 & Sun. 11-1, 2-4 2330 Porter Way (X St: Rio Lindo) 3 Bd / 1 Ba, 1050 sq. ft. $175,000 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Brandi Laffins 321-9562

Sun. 11-1 123 Henshaw Avenue #25 (X St: Esplanade) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1456 sq. ft. $45,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

www.century21JeffriesLydon.com Ask the Professionals at Century 21 — 345-6618 NEW LISTING! Cute home with in-law unit near bidwell park

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SMILES ALWAYS JOYCE TURNER

571–7719 • joyce_turner@ymail.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of November 13, 2012 — November 19, 2012. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

3964 Ord Ferry Rd 2330 Hanlon Rd 6056 Mason Ct 15060 Trails End Rd 6122 Lambert Ln 14430 Clarion Way 2820 Spencer Ave 5 Gleness Dr 135 Pierpont Dr 5597 Miners Ranch Rd 7451 Crosacountre Rd 40 CN&R November 29, 2012

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

Dayton Durham Magalia Magalia Magalia Magalia Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville

$147,000 $420,000 $191,000 $135,500 $110,000 $106,000 $620,000 $215,000 $205,000 $195,000 $170,000

4/ 2 3/ 1 2/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 1 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 3 2/ 2

1604 1448 1919 2611 1625 1621 860 1784 1706 1916 1200

2008 16th St 4 Lacy Ct 417 Lodgeview Dr 3066 Yard St 108 Valley View Dr 5501 Alpine Ct 1853 June Way 926 Bille Rd 6245 Himmel St 1380 Orput Ln 12165 S Stoneridge Cir

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

Oroville Oroville Oroville Oroville Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise Paradise

$155,000 $145,000 $144,000 $140,000 $350,000 $315,000 $275,000 $225,500 $188,000 $135,000 $115,000

3/ 1.5 3/ 2 2/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 3 3/ 2.5 3/ 2 3/ 2 3/ 2 2/ 2 2/ 2

1558 1418 1620 1311 2503 2490 2082 1742 1644 1173 1250

Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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ficTiTiOUs BUsiNess FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FREE FLOW TECH at 278 Vail Dr. Chico, CA 95973. NICK KOEHLER, 9 Roxanne Ct. Chico, CA 95928. JEREMY MCCARTHY, 278 Vail Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: NICK KOEHLER Dated: August 7, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001165 Published: August 16,23,30, September 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NOR CAL MEAT AND SEAFOOD at 3549 Esplande #443 Chico, CA 95973. WILLIAM L BILLINGSLEY 286 1ST Avenue Chico, CA 95926. TONY K MUNROE 3549 Esplande #443 Chico, CA 95926. EDWARD SKAGGS 1487 East First Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: TONY MUNROE Dated: October 30, 2012 FBN Number 2012-0001549 Published: November 8,15,22,29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as VICTORIA;S PIANO STUDIO at 11 Integrity Ct Oroville, CA 95965. VICTORIA HIEB-SWIGER 11 Integrity Ct Oroville, CA 95965.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TOP TIER at 1712 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. VINCENT GIACOMO COMMENDATORE 1712 Hemlock St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Vincent Commendatore Dated: October 15, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001473 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EARTHEN URN at 1837 Norman Ave #1 Chico, CA 95928. KEVIN REGAN 1837 Norman Ave #1 Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: KEVIN REGAN Dated: November 2, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001564 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012

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This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Victoria Hieb-Swiger Dated: October 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001536 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EVAN’S EXPERT TREE SERVICE at 2225 Norte Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. TREVOR W. EVANS 2225 Norte Dame Blvd Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Trevor W. Evans Dated: November 2, 2012 FBN Number: 2012: 0001566 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as REBECCA’S REMEDIES at 2394 Durham St Durham, CA 95938. REBECCA LYNN YARROW 2394 Durham St. Durham, CA 95938. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: REBECCA YARROW Dated: October 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001498 Published: November 8,15,22, 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as OLOFAT ONE BITE BBQ at 1040 Windsor Way Chico, CA 95926. SIGRAH BILLYOS 1040 Windsor Way Chico, Ca 95926. SCOTT SUZUKI 1050 Columbus Avenue #14 Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SCOTT SUZUKI Dated: November 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001576 Published: November 8,15,22 29, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CANOPY HAIR STUDIO at 1245 Mangrove Avenue Chico, CA 95926. REBECCA M. WALKER 23 San Ramon Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: REBECCA M. WALKER Dated: October 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001429 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as OROVILLE CAB COMPANY at 1388 Longfellow Ave Ste 14 Chico, CA 95927. BYRON J CHARLES SHOBAR 69 Jackie Drive Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BYRON SHOBAR Dated: October 30, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001533 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LITTLE SISTER at 1447 Bel Air Drive Paradise, CA 95969. Patricia White 1447 Bel Air Drive Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Patti White Dated: October 12, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001462 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as THE HEMLOCK APARTMENTS at 1750 Humboldt Rd Chico, CA 95928. IRIS M. RING 871 Birdhaven Ct Lafayette, CA 94549. TERRANCE O. RING 871 Birdhaven Ct. Lafayette, CA 94549. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: IRIS AND TERRANCE RING Dated: October 31, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001561 Published: November 15,22,29 December 6, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GO GREEN CHICO CARPET CLEAN at 1167 Peninsula Drive Chico, CA 95928. DAVID WIKUM 1167 Peninsula Drive Chico, CA 95928. CANDICE WILLIAMS 1167 Peninsula Drive Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed; DAVID WIKUM Dated: November 8, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001588 Published: November 22,29, December 6,13, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTHPOINT AUTOMOTIVE at 4950 Cohasset Road Chico, CA 95973. PAUL STEINMETZ 1850 Villas Road Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: PAUL STEINMETZ Dated: October 15, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001467 Published: November 22,29 December 6,13, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MYSTIC ROOTS BANDS, STAY POSITIVE PRODUCTIONS, STAY POSITIVE SOUND at 738 Picaso Ln Chico, CA 95926. DAYNA WYMAN 738 Picaso Ln Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DAYNA WYMAN Dated: November 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001596 Published: November 21,29, December 6,13, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MARIO’S WEED AND PEST at 1485 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. Michelle Burns-Hammack 1485 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. Mario Jimmy Thompson 1485 Hooker Oak Ave Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: MARIO JIMMY THOMPSON Dated: November 6, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001582 Published: November 21,29, December 6,13, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TEA TREE HENNA at 1332 Normal Avenue Chico, CA 95928. ELIZABETH KYSAR 1332 Normal Avenue Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ELIZABETH KYSAR Dated: October 29, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001544 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name RAPID REFILL 375 at 208 H West East Ave Chico, CA 95926. LOWOLF ENTERPRISES INC 611 County Dr Suite 500 Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a corporation. Signed: CHARLES W LOHSE PRES. Dated: November 13, 2012 FBN Number: 2009-0001281 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BILL KUTZ TILE EXPRESS at 11128 Midway # 2 Chico, CA 95928. WILLIAM PILLSBURY KUTZ 8 Lindo Park Dr Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: WILLIAM KUTZ Dated: November 21, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001640 Published: November 29, December 6,13, 20, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LADIES INK at 11128 Midway # 2 Chico, CA 95926. DESTINY DIANNE BOWEN 8 Lindo Park Drive Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DESTINY D. BOWEN Dated: November 21, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001641 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LEGAL PHOTOCOPY SERVICE at 30 Landing Circle, Suite 200 Chico, CA 95973. MICHAEL CHITTIM AND ASSOCIATES. 55 Declaration Dr, Ste A Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed: Michael Chittim Dated: November 8, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001590 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as INSTASHIRT, INSTASHIRT.COM at 430 W 7th St Chico, CA 95928. REYNCOR INTERNATIONAL LLC 430 W 7th St Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: BENJAMIN REYNOLDS Dated: October 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001502 Published: November u29, December 6,13,20, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LABYRINTH BILLING SERVICES at 1459 East Lassen #36 Chico, CA 95973. REBECCA DIGGS 1459 East Lassen #36 Chico, CA 95973. THis business is conducted by an individual. Signed: REBECCA DIGGS Dated: September 28, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001391 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO JEWELRY REPAIR at 1413 Mangrove Ave Chico, CA 95926. SATURNINO AUGUILAR 153 Mobile Dr. Corning, CA 96021. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: SATURNINO AGUILAR Dated: November 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0001651 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012

NOTICES NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage facility act (B&P code 21770 et.sec.) the undersigned will sell the contents of: Erik Hellman, large power toys, fishing poles, love seat, desk, entertainment center. Lewis Steisberger, MP-3 dock, tools, fridge, toys, furniture, electronics. Edith Guerro, folding room divider, shelving units, deep fryer. Kyndra Couloures, love seat, speakers, bike, toys, tools, home decor. To the highest bidder on: December 8, 2012 Beginning at 1:00pm. Sale To be held at: Extra Storage 3160 Olive Hwy Oroville, CA 95966 Published: November 21,29, 2012

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage facility act (B&P code 21770 et sec) the undersigned will sell the contents of units: Dawn Credell, misc. household items. Braxton Jackson, misc. household items To the highest bidder on: December 8, 2012. Beginning at 2:00pm. Sale to be held at: Extra Storage 60 E. Grand Ave Oroville, CA 95965. Published: November 21,29, 2012 NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage act: (B&P code 21770 et.sec.) the undersigned will sell the contents of: Lillian Willyard, furniture, clothes, household items. Richard Rawls, bags of clothes, stuffed animals. Anthony Nava, clothing, bicycles, bike parts. To the highest bidder on: December 8, 2012. Beginning at 12:00pm. Sale to be held at: Extra Storage 2298 Park Ave. Chico, CA 95928 Published: November 21,29, 2012 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE SHEILA R. MCGREGOR To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: SHEILA R. MCGREGOR A Petition for Probate has been filed by: LORELIE PLOWMAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: LORELIE PLOWMAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: December 20, 2012 Time: 1:30pm Dept:Probate Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a

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42 CN&R November 29, 2012

copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40456 Attorney for Petitioner: RONALD W. DREIFORT 168 E. First Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Published: November 29, December 6,13, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner GARY L WILLIAMS JR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ELIZABETH KRISTINE WAGONER Proposed name: ELIZABETH KRISTINE WILLIAMS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 14, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: A The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT GLUSMAN Dated: November 6, 2012 Case Number: 157857 Published: November 15,22,29, December 6, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner FRANCES LOUISE WALL filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FRANCES LOUISE WALL Proposed name: PEACE KANUNA MANO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: December 21, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court

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655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: ROBERT A. GLUSMAN Dated: November 7, 2012 Case Number: 158253 Published: November 22,29, December 6,13, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner AIMEE FEW filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: FOREST MICHAEL FEW Proposed name: FOREST MICHAEL MADDRILL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: JANUARY 11, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept:TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: SANDRA L. MCLEAN Dated: November 9, 2012 Case Number: 158267 Published: November 29, December 6,13,20, 2012

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SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT DEANNA J. TRISDALE You are being sued. Petitioner’s name is: JOHN H. TRISDALE You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court One Court St. Oroville, CA 95965 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: JOHN H. TRISDALE 1523 7th Street, Oroville, CA 95965. Signed: Kimberly Flener Dated: November 14, 2012 Case Number: FL042128 Published: November 21,29, December 6,13, 2012

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ARIES (March 21-April 19):

“They are trying to make me into a fixed star,” complained religious leader Martin Luther a few centuries ago. “I am an irregular planet.” I invite you to use that declaration as your own in the coming weeks. You have every right to avoid being pinned down, pigeonholed and forced to be consistent. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need abundant freedom to mutate your identity. You deserve a poetic license that allows you to play a variety of different roles and explore the pleasures of unpredictable self-expression.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The Star-

Spangled Banner” is America’s national anthem. It features the lyrics of a patriotic poem written by Francis Scott Key. But the melody itself is entirely lifted from a bawdy old song that celebrates Bacchus, the ancient god of wine and ecstatic dancing. I love it when things are repurposed as dramatically as that. Do you? The coming weeks will be prime time to repurpose stuff with creative abandon. Make the past useful for the future, Taurus. Turn good old ideas into fantastic new ones. Don’t just recycle, transform.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m guessing

that in the coming weeks you will be receiving a multitude of inquiries, invitations and temptations— probably more than you feel capable of responding to and certainly more than you should respond to. A few of these opportunities might be appealing and lead to interesting adventures. But some will be useless, diversionary or trivial. Will you be able to tell the difference? That’s your big challenge. If you’d like help dodging unwanted solicitations, give out this phone number as your own: (212)-479-7990. It’s a free service provide by The Rejection Line at www.rejectionline.com. People calling that number will be politely told you aren’t available.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): For millen-

nia, the plant known as the yellow avalanche-lily has thrived on mountain slopes and meadows throughout western North America. It blooms early in the spring, just in time for broad-tailed hummingbirds that migrate from Central America to sip the flower’s nectar. But now there’s a problem with that ancient arrangement. Due to global warming, the lily now blossoms 17 days earlier than it used to. But the hummingbirds haven’t made an adjustment in their schedule, so they’re barely showing up in time to get their full allotment of nectar. I suspect this is a metaphor for a shift you may be facing in your own life rhythm. Fortunately, you’ve been forewarned, and you can adjust better than the hummingbirds.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In our calendar, there

is no special holiday devoted to honoring the joy and power of rebellion. This oversight confounds me. All my experience tells me that the urge to revolt is a fundamental human need. Every one of us has a sacred duty to regularly rise up and overthrow a stale status quo that is oppressing us—whether that’s an organized group effort we’re part of or our own deadening routine. I’m telling you this, Leo, because it’s an excellent time to celebrate your own Rebellion Jubilee. Your vitality will soar as you shed numbing habits and decaying traditions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Recently,

you’ve had resemblances to an 8-year-old kid wearing the pajamas you loved when you were 5. Your bare arms are jutting out beyond where the sleeves end, and there’s a similar thing going on with your legs. The fabric is ripped here and there because it can’t accommodate how much you’ve grown. You’re feeling discomfort in places where the overly tight fit is squeezing your flesh. All of this is somewhat cute but mostly alarming. I wish you would wean yourself of the past and update your approach.

Classy clothier

by Rob Brezsny sound that resembles a long snore or a rapid chuckle. But over the years, biologists have also detected a third type of frogly expression: a clipped, repetitive croak. Just this year, they finally figured out that this belonged to an entirely distinct species of leopard frog that they had never before identified. It’s still so new it doesn’t have a name yet. I expect a metaphorically similar development in your life, Libra. You will become aware of a secret that has been hiding in plain sight. You will “find” something that actually revealed itself to you some time ago.

by Kjerstin Wood Genoveva Santana grew up in Orland and has lived in Chico for the past 19 years. She recently moved her boutique, Sassy and Classy, from Orland where it had been open for two years. Featuring clothing with many bright colors and patterns, and a variety of jewelry and accessories, the shop has been open in Chico since August. Santana celebrated the store’s grand opening on Nov. 17 with live music, refreshments and the support of her family. The boutique is located at 1722 Mangrove Ave., and the phone number is 899-8312.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Tom Tolbert

is a sports talk-show host on San Francisco radio station KNBR. I am amazingly neutral about him. Nothing he says fascinates me or mirrors my own thoughts. On the other hand, he never makes me mad and he’s not boring. I neither like him nor dislike him. I simply see him for who he is, without any regard for what he can do for me. He has become a symbol of the possibility that I’m able to look at a human being with complete impartiality, having no wish for him to be different from what he is. In the coming week, I suggest you try to achieve this enlightened state of mind on a regular basis. It’s prime time, astrologically speaking, to ripen your mastery of the art of objectivity.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If

you say “rabbit, rabbit, rabbit,” as soon as you wake up on the first day of the month, you will have good luck for the next 30 to 31 days. At least that’s how reality works according to a British superstition. But judging from your astrological omens, I don’t think you will have to resort to magic tricks like that to stimulate your good fortune. In the next four weeks, I suspect you will be the beneficiary of a flood of cosmic mojo, as well as a surge of divine woowoo, a shower of astral juju, and an upwelling of universal googoo gaga. If it would give you even more confidence to invoke your favorite superstitions, though, go right ahead. Even scientists say that kind of thing works: http://tinyurl.com/SuperstitiousBoost.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

According to Greek myth, Perseus cut off the head of Medusa. She was the creature whose hair was composed of snakes and whose gaze could turn a person into stone. The immortal winged horse Pegasus was instantaneously born from Medusa’s blood. He ultimately became an ally to the nine Muses, and Zeus relied on him to carry thunder and lightning. I predict that while you’re sleeping, Capricorn, you will have a dream that contains elements of this myth. Here’s a preliminary interpretation of that dream: You are undergoing a transition that could, in a sense, give you the power of flight and more abundant access to a muse.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s time

for you to be leader of the pack, Aquarius; to take your gang to the next level; to make sure the group mind isn’t suppressing innovation and enforcing peer pressure but is rather inspiring every member of the tribe to be as creative as they dare to be. And if it’s not realistic for you to wield that much power, then do whatever you can to synergize the alliances that hold your posse together. Build team morale. Gossip constructively. Conspire to animate an influx of fresh magic.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you’re a

food company that wants to sell chicken in the shape of a chicken wing, it must have actual chicken wing meat in it. Otherwise, the law says you’ve got to call your product “wyngz.” I’ve always thought that there’s a lot of information the media presents as “news” that is really as fake as wyngz. That’s why I advocate calling the bogus stuff “newzak” (rhymes with “Muzak”). Your assignment in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to make sure you’re not putting out any wyngz- or newzak-like stuff in your own chosen field. The fates will help you rather dramatically if you put a high premium on authenticity.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A lot of leopard frogs live on Staten Island, one of New York City’s five boroughs. Most of them make a

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of November 29, 2012

Who is your store for? My store is clothing for the “Missy,” which is generally women ages 25 and up. You won’t find juniors clothing here. I try to carry unique clothing that is affordable and appealing to all different styles and preferences.

How did you come up with the name?

tomers, giving suggestions and advice. And I have the staple items that add to any outfit. My customers always tell me that what I have is affordable, and that’s important; that they keep saying “your prices are good.”

How does it feel to own your own business?

I actually didn’t think of it. One day I was with my husband, Jose, and our family, and his brother’s wife said it. We were all brainstorming ideas, and I liked her suggestion and decided that’s what I wanted to name my store.

I am so blessed to be able to do this, something I love and care about. It is really a family business, too, with my husband and my son as our handymen and my two daughters, Alessandra and DeAnna, who are a huge part of my business. I’m very grateful.

What does the store offer to customers?

Why is fashion important to you?

I want to offer a fun, vibrant atmosphere for someone to shop in. My goal is that a woman who comes in finds something she feels beautiful wearing, no matter what the occasion is. I try to really be hands on with helping my cus-

It is part of our daily lives; it helps show who we are with the way we dress. I always love to wear dresses, and that is just part of who I am. Everyone’s different and the way we dress gives us a chance to show that.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter himself@anthonypeytonporter.com

Hot water Abraham-Hicks talks about allowing one’s inner guidance to work and actually guide one’s behavior, rather than paying so much attention to what others say and whatever passes for conventional wisdom. I think of tuning in to my inner guidance as pretty much the same as being here and now and attentive to whatever presents itself, always a good idea. Esther Hicks used to relate an experience of hers to illustrate the point. It seems Esther found herself in a hotel room wanting, I think, a shower. She turned on what she expected to be the hot water and got cold instead. She expected hot water because, at least in the United States, hot water is found on the left. If there are separate knobs for hot and cold, the hot is on the left. If there’s only one control knob or dial or lever, turning it counterclockwise or pointing it to the left brings hot water. That’s what I expect when confronted with an unfamiliar faucet anyway. So Esther let what she thought was the hot water run and run and still got only cold water. Then, in desperation I suppose, she turned on what should have been cold water and got hot water at last. She then

congratulated herself on being able to ignore her unexamined and erroneous premises and get what she wanted in spite of them. I’ve heard that story any number of times, but it’s not something I had ever thought much about. Last week I found myself staying in the unoccupied apartment of a friend, and after a nine-hour drive from Chico I wanted a shower. Yes, I turned on what I thought was the hot water and got cold. I let it run— still cold. Since the apartment was in a large complex, there was no telling how far the heated water had to travel, and who knew if the pipes were insulated well enough to keep the water hot until it got to me? The owner hadn’t stayed there in a while, so maybe the glitch had gone unnoticed, and I couldn’t very well complain on her behalf, so too bad about a hot shower—cold was the best I could do. That’s what I was thinking. The next day I remembered Esther’s incident and turned on what should have been the cold water and without even letting it run the water was warm right away. I could’ve done that before, but I was on automatic pilot, and my automatic pilot is as goofy as yours. That’s it. I’m sticking to manual from here on.

November 29, 2012

CN&R 43


C-2012-11-29