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ISSUE 2

| VOL 1| SPRING 2010

PRESENTED BY: THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN ALUMNI CLUB (AAAC)

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S T AT E C U T S C O U L D C AU S E I NJ U R I E S ‘ M AK I NG T H E S AL E ’ AD VI C E F O R J O B S E E K E R S AL U M NI & S T AF F : P E O P L E WH O M AK E A D I F F E R E N C E M O NI Q U E M AR S H AL L : B AC K AG AI N WI TH A N E W B O O K !

NEWS

Making the Cut GSU Students Unite Against Proposed Budget Changes By Nadeerah Franklin

Students hoping to attend Georgia State University this Fall may discover that it’s not just textbooks weighing down their backs, but the weight of the state.

Courtesy of Solidarity-us.org

The March 1, 2010 budget report submitted to state lawmakers by Chancellor Erroll Davis suggests that all 35 institutions in the University System of Georgia will potentially see drastic reductions of up to $300M to make up for $1.1B state budget shortfall.

The report included mandated assessments from all thirty-five presidents in the University System including Georgia State’s own, Dr. Mark P. Becker, whose plan represented a total of more than $34M in cuts. The proposed cutbacks would call for a reduction in programs, services as well as workforce and are said to be more severe than the previous year.

The report included mandated assessments from all thirty-five presidents in the University System, including Georgia State’s own, Dr. Mark P. Becker, whose plan represented a total of more than $34M in cuts. The proposed cutbacks would call for a reduction in programs, services as well as workforce and are said to be more severe than the previous year.

The plan put forth by Dr. Becker would eliminate 622 filled positions at GSU alone, putting the school in the #2 spot for the most job cuts and the #3 spot for the most money recovered by the University System.

The plan put forth by Dr. Becker, would eliminate 622 filled positions at GSU alone, putting it in the #2 spot for the most job cuts and the #3 spot for the most money recovered by the University System.

According to the budget proposal all students, new and returning, could certainly feel the squeeze. Enrollment of Georgia State freshman and transfer students could be reduced by over 1,000 students annually, over 390 course offerings could be slashed, campus facilities including the Capitol Hill Child Enrichment Center, Brookhaven Campus, Regents Center for Learning Disorders, and many more institutions could be reduced or eliminated altogether as a result of the budget crisis.

According to the budget proposal, all students, new and returning, could certainly feel the squeeze. Enrollment of Georgia State freshman and transfer students could be reduced by over 1,000 students annually, over 390 course offerings could be slashed, campus facilities including the Capitol Hill Child Enrichment Center for AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI B L AC K B O AR D Center, Brookhaven Campus, TO LEARNRegents MORE VISIT US ONLINE Learning Disorders, and many more institutions could be

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B L AC K B O AR D

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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PRESIDENT ’ S POST

New Year, New Leadership SPRING 2010 | VOLUME 1 | ISSUE 2 Creative Director / Editor-In-Chief

I

President, Contributing Writer

am happy to introduce myself as interim president of the African-American Alumni Club at Georgia State University. I took over the leadership role from Ms. Kimberly Walker in January of this year. We are thankful for her contributions and will continue to develop and implement her agenda. I am a proud alumnus of the Robinson College of Business and I look forward to helping the club to become an even greater resource to students, alumni, and club members. The club leadership has several major initiatives for 2010. We will grow and endow our scholarship program to provide much needed assistance to students in an environment of rising tuition and matriculation costs. We will raise funds to provide mentoring services to local underserved schools. We will also continue to plan events to give members an opportunity to have

fun, connect with new people, and learn about new career and business opportunities.

Nadeerah Franklin Cory Walker

Staff Writer

Judy McCullough

Staff Writer

Stephanie Abrams

General Club Inquiries

Tel: (404) 413-2190 or (800) GSU-ALUM

BACK ISSUES E-mail nadeerah.franklin@live.com

As always, new members are welcome, and those interested in volunteer and leadership positions are encouraged to reach out to us. This is going to be an exciting year.

ONLINE EDITIONS Log on to: www.gsu.edu/alumni The b l a c k b o a r d newsletter founded in 2009, is the official publication of African-American Alumni Club of Georgia State University. The b l a c k b o a r d

Regards,

publishes during the Fall, Spring and Summer semester and is distributed free to alumni and friends of Georgia

Cory Walker Interim President, African-American Alumni Club Georgia State University

State University.

Mail to: Georgia State University

Alumni Association, P.O. 3999, Atlanta, GA 30302-3999. Send letters to the editor and story ideas to: Editor-In-Chief Nadeerah Franklin, E-mail: nadeerah.franklin@live.com

AAAC

2010

The African-American Alumni Club, a unit of the Georgia State University Alumni Association, is open to all GSU alumni and friends. If you would like to become a member or would like more information about AAAC, visit: www.gsu.edu/alumni. No part of this paper may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the Editor-in-Chief or from the Alumni Association. The ideas expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Alumni Association, the students, staff or faculty of Georgia State University or the University System of Georgia.

B L AC K B O AR D

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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LETTERS

The Gift that Keeps on Giving I AM SO GLAD TO SEE THAT THE b l a c kb o ar d covers topics on business and the things that are relevant to readers. In your article “Networking that Works,” I found some very useful advice that I had never considered before, including the benefits of volunteering. Some like to say that there is no point to community service, but I would argue that the one who gets the most out of volunteering is the volunteer. I often volunteer at children hospitals and the appreciation I receive from the children and their parents, the connections I have made are all bigger than words can describe. It is a gift. Volunteering will always be a part of my life.

Steps in the Right Direction IT MADE ME PROUD TO SEE AFRICAN-AMERICAN ALUMNI and students of Georgia State recognized in the Fall 2009 issue of the blackboard. All too often we get immersed in our own lives and forget that real progress is being made in the lives of those who are right next to us. Although, we have a ways to go, it is healthy to witness how we’ve grown as a community. –Derek Smith Atlanta, GA

–Monica Harris Decatur, GA

POST IT IN THE BOARD! The b l a c k b o a r d welcomes your letters and feedback. Please submit your correspondence to: Nadeerah Franklin, Editor-in-Chief at nadeerah.franklin@live.com. Letters should include the respondent’s full name, email and daytime phone number and should not exceed 300 words. We reserve the right to edit letters for space, clarity and style. Only one submission per person.

B L AC K B O AR D

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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CAREERS

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs Separate yourself from the pack I have an interview coming up, yet I am worried that a few employment gaps on my resume will reflect badly on me. How can I give a powerful presentation and assure the interviewer that I am the best person for the job? –D.I. Atlanta

By Nadeerah Franklin

First, congratulations on landing the interview. Many job seekers today are barely making it this far. While it is accurate that these gaps represent lulls in employment, they do not equate to lulls in productive activities. For example, during those breaks you may have enrolled in a business management course, volunteered at your local YMCA or taught yourself a new software application. So consider what you have done in this time that you could play to your advantage. Even a stayat-home mother returning to the workforce can assert that she has skills in conflict resolution. So play up your skills according to function not chronology. If the interviewer asks you directly about the reasons for any gaps, be honest as one background check can provide everything he/she may need to know. If the job is for you, you’ll get it. –Nadeerah Franklin

First things first, soul-search before you job search. Know what you like, what you don’t like and what you’re good at. Consider the things that you take for granted like your hobbies. Do you have a knack for cutting hair, but never looked in to it as a profession? Remember that people still have to get their hairs cut for the start of that new job or for the first day of school. So be resourceful. However, be mindful of your limits. Avoid jumping into something because you’re frantic, but do it knowing you already like it and you’ll make money at it.

Courtesy of Microsoft.com

TODAY, THERE ARE MORE PEOPLE VYING FOR fewer jobs than in previous years. While Wall Street may be experiencing an upswing, Main Street still lags behind. For the few employers who are hiring, they are very discriminating. So it is far more profitable for job seekers to be well prepared when pounding the pavement than to not be.

Make your first impression count. Consider how well you’re presenting yourself on paper, in person, on the phone and online as these are the first impressions a headhunter receives about you. For example, what does your resume say about you? Employers are not only looking at what is said in your resume, but how it is said; the format, the fonts, the layouts you select all reveal something about you and your personality. If your resume is unorganized, has typos, uses multiple fonts or is 100 pages long, it may be filed away in the trash. So

be consistent. Use your spell check; minimize the number of fonts you use to no more than 3. Keeping current is important business, so have both a digital and hardcopy version of your resume as many employers accept applications online. Balance Style and Substance. Organize your resume to include a beginning, middle and an end. For example: at the top of your resume, provide a summary of specific job-related skills that will grab the reader’s attention. In the body, don’t just tell your job duties, sell what you’ve achieved at school, at work, volunteering, etc. and use verbs to sell your points. Conclude your resume with relevant training or accomplishments. If you’re certain you have the skills for the job, then customize your resume to fit the advertised job description. Make the sale. Bring the sale home with your cover letter. It is your sales pitch; it should sell how you’ve heard about the position, sell why you think you’d be a great fit and sell your professional personality. Selling is the key, as an employer has to buy in to you and believe what you’re saying. Establish credibility by being organized, prepared and polished. Include business cards, a professional brochure/portfolio, thank you and follow-up notes and of course professional attire as part of your overall sales presentation. Remember what you put in to job seeking is what you’ll get out of it. Best of luck!

Making the Cut From page 1

Despite all of the drastic proposed reductions, “eduflation” the rising costs of obtaining a degree, remains a lingering concern for those enrolled. As students could potentially experience fewer professors, receive less services, suffer through the elimination of their course offerings (jeopardizing their ability to graduate on time), lawmakers on Capitol Hill are also considering raising the cost of tuition by as much 35% and fees to as much as $1000. As a result of the options placed before them, many students are outraged. In fact, dozens of disenchanted students from colleges all across the state rallied together on March 3 and on March 15 at the state capitol in protest of what they perceived as an unbalanced means to balancing the state’s budget. "Unless HOPE covers all of it,” said Sean Phillips a GSU sophomore “I'm not going to be able to go to college. The point of America is to do better than those who came before us, but we will be worse off," (source AJC.com). In his March 1st letter to state lawmakers, Chancellor Davis argued, “Such a reduction would dramatically and negatively alter a University System in which the people of this state have invested so much…”

B L AC K B O AR D

Further layoffs will be the equivalent of cutting muscle, not fat.

–Dr. Mark P. Becker

In the March 3, 2010 university-wide town hall meeting, Dr. Becker noted that the next proposed round of layoffs would be the 3rd for Georgia State. While these proposals are currently under review by the Senate and House Subcommittees, they are not yet finalized. All students, staff and faculty have been put on high alert and while their futures at Georgia State remain uncertain, we remain hopeful that they’ll make the cut. For more information about the University System of Georgia’s budget measures, visit www.usg.edu.

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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PEOPLE

ALUMNI TRAILBLAZERS

Reach One, Teach One Yohance Mitchell changes lives one student at a time IF ‘IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO RAISE A CHILD’ THEN every village needs a Yohance Mitchell to help raise that child well. Mitchell (B.A. ’96, Communications) has devoted his career to enriching the life of every child he teaches. Motivated by the need to help fix Georgia’s struggling education system and assist low performing and low-income students, he and his wife Di Yonna Mitchell combined their skills of project management, marketing, sales, and their passion for teaching to form what is now called the Vision Tutoring program.

Funded by the Georgia Department of Education, with over 90 instructors and 300+ students, the Vision Tutoring program provides individualized tutoring service, in all core subjects from grades 1 – 12, at no cost for those eligible. The program recently won the Millers-Coors Business Plan Competition and was awarded $25,000. “My goal in life” said Mitchell “is to expect the best from my children so they can be the best.” Mitchell spoke with the b l a c k b o a r d about his experience at GSU, the educational efforts of Vision Tutoring and its recent accomplishments.

YOHANCE MITCHELL (B.A. ’96, COMM) VISION TUTORING/ ATLANTA

How has attending GSU made a difference in your life? During my tenure at GSU, I was exposed to one of the most diverse college cultures in the nation. I was involved in an array of student activities which helped shape my lifelong GSU memories …leadership roles exposed me to time value, commitment and team work. The Georgia State experience will forever be embedded in my heart.

Georgia ranks 45th in the nation based on its SAT scores. How does this program help to combat this statistic? The school districts only provide funding for SAT assistance after a th student has passed all state standardized tests (usually 12 grade); however, through our private tutoring program, we offer test preparation for the SAT at any grade level.

As a graduate of GSU, what advice would you offer new students? Participate. Get involved. Dare to make a difference. If you get involved in the myriad of student activities available, you will meet people from all over the world. You will channel the innate leader within and accomplish measurable results. You will develop friends for a lifetime. I can attest to several lasting friendships through the incomparable GSU experience. Dare to lead and dare to make a difference.

What has been one of the biggest challenges you’ve had to overcome while leading the program? We desire to expand and incorporate additional programs to enhance our service; however, we must obtain the resources necessary to effectively implement these strategies.

Switching gears now, what is the Vision Tutoring mission statement? Our mission is to help students:  Reach for academic success  Build self-confidence  Develop an appreciation and love for learning  Apply skills to real world  Make a positive difference in society and the lives of others We hire the best tutors with a strong educational background, but most importantly, these tutors must possess a passion for reaching students and helping them realize their individual standards of excellence. In essence, when the student “gets it,” understands the material, and can apply it, we have done our job. How is supplemental education different from a standard education in the classroom? Supplemental Educational Service (SES) is provided outside of the classroom to supplement academics. Our program is free to eligible students and provides one-on-one instruction, which caters to the location and schedule preferences of parents. How does the Vision Tutoring program cater to special-needs children or children with learning disabilities? Students with minor special needs or disabilities are placed with tutors who possess Special Education certifications and experience.

What is the success-rate for Vision Tutoring? 96% of students, regardless of the number of tutoring hours, increased their application of grade level skills through our program. The average grade-level score increased 67% from pre to post test with at least 20 hours of instruction. For example, a student scoring 60% on their grade level pretest, which is considered a failing grade, would master material with a 100% after 20 hours of instruction with a Vision tutor. What kind of feedback are you getting from users of your program? Parents have completed surveys documenting their satisfaction of the effectiveness of our program, the convenience provided with their choice of the schedule and location (in-home included), and the company’s professionalism. Within their children, they have noted improvements in confidence, attitudes, motivation, and grades. Parents and students have also raved about our inspiring tutors who connect with children and make learning fun. Our testimonials can be viewed on our website at www.visiontutoring.org. What’s in store for Vision Tutoring? A non-profit entity focusing on arts, culture, business, and mentoring will be next on the horizon. How can those interested in your program contact you for more information? Visit our website at www.visiontutoring.org or call our office at (770) 629.2329. We can also be reached via email at info@visiontutoring.org.

YOHANCE AND DI YONNA MI TCHELL WINNERS OF THE $25,000 MI LLER-COORS BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

–Nadeerah I. Franklin B L AC K B O AR D

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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PEOPLE

STAR STAFF

The “Can-Do” Attitude Wilma Newkirk shares her passion for performance DRIVEN, TALENTED AND AN EXPERT IN ADMINISTRATIVE affairs, Wilma Newkirk knows what it takes to get the job done: the willingness to roll up your sleeves and do the dirty work. “I never run from a challenge,” said Newkirk “in fact I look forward to hard work.”

I put a lot of my personality into my work. I love resolving issues… working cohesively with a team of professionals who really make a difference at GSU.

So when charged with the responsibility to serve as a marketing administrative professional in the telecommunications industry, Newkirk went straight to work. Operating in a marketing environment allowed Newkirk the room to develop her creative talent while maturing in the field of telecommunications. But, it also would prove useful in her career later down the line.

What impact does OIA have on GSU students? One way GSU students are impacted is by making the option available for them to travel abroad through the Study Abroad and Exchange Programs. GSU students can also get assistance and apply for scholarships through our office to further support their scholarly efforts abroad.

Newkirk would later switch gears to try her hand as a department supervisor for a large call center of a major banking institution. Her background in marketing and creative design enabled her to find innovative ways to carry out her responsibilities more efficiently and create solutions to significantly impact the bottom-line of her company. As a result of her resourcefulness and ‘can-do’ attitude, Newkirk received a promotion for her performance and later became an analyst responsible for process enhancement and risk mitigation.

Georgia State University is a school where everyone at some point is the student and the teacher. What lessons have you learned from your experiences here at GSU? What advice would you give a newcomer? What I would tell a newcomer is to plan for his work and then work his plan. I would tell him that GSU is a good school and, if he is resolute, he can accomplish his goals. I would tell him that along the way he will meet different challenges, but to be unwavering… encourage yourself when no one is around to encourage you.

In 2006, Newkirk left her home state of New York bound for Atlanta to take on a new role serving as Administrative Coordinator for Georgia State University. The b l a c k b o a r d recently caught up with this spirited staff member to learn more about her role in the Office of International Affairs and the impact OIA has on Georgia State University.

How can those interested in OIA contact your office for more information? You can contact OIA by calling 404-413-2530, or via OIA e-mail: oia@gsu.edu. You can also visit our web site: http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwoia/index.htm.

What is an administrative coordinator and what are the major responsibilities for your position? An administrative coordinator performs functional tasks within a department such as assisting upper management with special projects and providing reporting. My primary function at GSU is to support the department with the daily processing of International Agreements between GSU and various global institutions. I help with the coordination of the Annual Metro Atlanta WorldQuest event that is sponsored by the College of Education, Office of International Affairs and the Southern Center. My most recent accomplishment was giving the OIA database a new look, making it more intuitive

–Nadeerah I. Franklin

What do you like most about working for Georgia State University? I like being given assignments with a timeline. I love minimizing effort, thus the [emphasis put on] process improvements. I feel a sense of satisfaction when my colleagues and I reach our goals. What role does the Office of International Affairs play at GSU? OIA is devoted to encouraging excellence through worldwide partnerships; through organizing and initiating university-wide endeavors with the foresight to institute an international angle within all phases of student life at GSU. B L AC K B O AR D

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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A&E

EVENTS

Happy Birthday Nina! Performers Pay Tribute to Nina Simone By Stephanie Abram

On Tuesday, February 23, 2010 the Office of the Dean of Students Intercultural Relations presented My Name is Nina Simone: Reflections of an Artist and Activist to pay tribute to the late singer and advocate Nina Simone. Held at the Rialto Center for the Arts, the program featured stunning acts from several performing artists including dancer Tracy Pierre. Pierre’s dance tribute “Four Women,” featured a single woman impersonating four other every-day women. With her performance of “I Am African” the audience stood to their feet in huge applause.

I was playing for Nina.

B L AC K B O AR D

“I think Ms. Simone loved music and being an activist,” said Pierre. “She always showed a lot of grace, even when she was sick and had to be pushed on to the stage in a wheelchair. It was obvious that she had a love for what she did.” The tribute also included poems and musical renditions. The audience would soon become captivated by the spectacular performance of “I Put a Spell on You” performed by Ms. Brittany Moody, a current GSU student and talented saxophone musician. Moody admitted she selected the song because she knew the audience would strongly connect with it. When asked if Nina Simone inspired her in any way, Moody replied, “Yes, Nina’s history and background were powerful and she showed great tenacity throughout her life. I was playing for Nina.” To learn more about the work of Nina Simone visit: www.ninasimone.com.

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

Nina Simone Courtesy of soundingproject.wordpress.com

Tracy Pierre Courtesy of www.fit4youathletictraining.com

Brittany Moody Courtesy of Stephanie Abram

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A&E

ON THE AGENDA GSU FINANCIAL PLANNING ALUMNI CLUB NETWORKING EVENT April 27, 2010, 6:00-8:00PM Hudson Grille at Brookhaven 4046 Peachtree Road - Atlanta, GA Call: 404-413-2190 SPEED NETWORKING & BUSINESS CARD EXCHANGE April 29, 2010, 6:00-8:00PM GSU Brookhaven Center - Atlanta, GA GEORGIA STATE NIGHT @ SIX FLAGS April 30, 2010, 5:00PM Six Flags over Georgia - Atlanta, GA GEORGI STATE COMMENCEMENT May 15, 2010, 2:00-5:00PM Georgia Dome – Atlanta, GA *Event dates and times are subject to change.

BOOK REVIEW

The Lady Who Wrote the Blues Monique Marshall Opens up in Sapphire’s Pain By Nadeerah Franklin second grade writing poems and short-stories. As a teenager, I kept a daily journal and a diary. Writing is my way of expressing my deepest thoughts…It is my escape, my truth.

MONIQUE MARSHALL, THE AUTHOR OF Diamondz Are Forever (Publish America, $17.95) is back with her latest book, Sapphire’s Pain: Poetry & Truth (Publish America, $24.95), a raw and intensely personal collection of hip, urban poetry that candidly reveals the lives of three young girls growing up in the inner-city. In collaboration with her two younger sisters, Jasmine and Elizabeth, Monique Marshall (BA ’04, Sociology) dares to expose the tragedies of being poor, being young and being a girl. The voices of these three talented writers combine to personify the heroine Sapphire. With illustrations by Keith A. Wood-Ferguson, Marshall demonstrates her outstanding ability to capture the soul of young Sapphire, who like the gemstone, is remarkably resilient and amazingly beautiful despite the grimness of her reality. With gripping poems like “The Dark Man,” this collection speaks to young women who have suffered from the hand of abuse, struggled with issues of low selfesteem, and have seen up-close the impacts of poverty and drugs and yet have persevered against all odds to discover their own self-worth. The b l a c k b o a r d recently caught up with Ms. Marshall to explore her latest work and discuss her experiences and lessons learned while at Georgia State. Tell us, what made you decide to be an author? I have always loved to write. I can remember being in the

Were there ever any experiences at GSU that you were lead to write about? If so, what were they? In one of my Sociology classes we were to select a place that we could observe for two weeks. I selected Auburn Avenue. Once I researched the history and development, I realized that the story of my hometown of Farrell, PA is not much different then Auburn Avenue. Both Farrell and Auburn Avenue are relics of their former glory. I have written several poems about what I witnessed on Auburn Avenue. “The Dark Man” was raw and dripping with emotion. Tell us where the idea for this poem originated? This poem is a true story. Sexual abuse occurred often in my family. Not just myself, but also my little sisters, my older sister, and my god-sister. By writing this poem and making it known, we hope to help others to speak up and get help. There are recurring themes of poverty, sex, love, drugs, faith throughout the book. What would you want your readers to take away from reading your book? I would want my readers to know that no matter how bad or depressing their current environment or circumstances are that they can persevere and become successful people. We must be our best selves, despite past mistakes.

EVENTS

Honoring the Dream 27th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Convocation By Judy McCullough GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY SPONSORED THE TH 27 annual Martin Luther King Jr. Convocation on January 19th to pay tribute to Dr. King for his efforts in the areas of social equity and civil rights.

Several individuals in attendance were honored with the Torch of Peace and Hosea Williams Awards for their community service and commitment to values upheld by both Dr. King and Hosea Williams.

According to Tonya Cook (Intercultural Relations chairperson for 11 straight years,) over 600 guests were in attendance including L. Douglas Wilder, the first African-American governor in U.S. History. Wilder served as 66th governor for the great state of Virginia from ‘90 to ’94. His most recent public office was that of mayor for Richmond, Virginia, which he held from 2005 to 2009 (source Wikipedia.org).

The 2010 Torch of Peace Award recipients included: Alumnus: Cynthia Blandford Nash Professor: Cynthia East Staff member: Frances Williams-Simmons Graduate Student: Susan Manikowski Undergraduate student: Alice Barrett Golden Key International Honor Society received the student organization award

Wilder, the keynote speaker for the event, discussed issues relevant to African-Americans both yesterday and today. Despite being the first African-American to hold the highest state office or be amongst those who’ve witnessed the historymaking inauguration of President Barack Obama, Wilder contends that “racism is not over… these are small steps to achieving the dream.” B L AC K B O AR D

Ms. Brenda Jackson, co-founder and president of the Howey Hudson Lowe Foundation, Inc., was decorated with the 2010 Hosea Williams Award for her achievement in community service. “I am humbled and excited about receiving this award,” said Jackson. Congratulations to all honorees! For more information about this event contact Intercultural Relations at (404) 413 1580.

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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GENERAL

AAAC SNAPSHOT  Club Chartered: Aug, 1994  Headquarters: Atlanta, GA  Member Network: 10,000  Primary Activities: Networking & Community service

WE’RE ONLINE! For meetings dates, events, and much more, visit us online:

www.gsu.edu/alumni Follow the GSU Alumni Association on:

CALL TO ACTION

Opportunity Knocks Volunteering in your club community “All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence.” –Martin Luther King, Jr. THE DOORS OF THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN ALUMNI CLUB ARE always open to all Georgia State University Alumni and friends. We invite all visitors to join in the fun by participating in public, club events and ongoing club meetings. Without the support of people like you to help drive the club, it would be impossible for us to reach our objectives. We encourage all those who desire to make an impact to join in any volunteer efforts and get involved in our monthly meetings. The AAAC is seeking committed volunteers to serve on its executive board and assist with the b l a c k bo a rd newsletter. If you’re interested in making your mark in the AAAC, for more information please contact: Cory Walker AAAC Interim-President walkercoryd@gmail.com

Thank you for your support!

B L AC K B O AR D

TO LEARN MORE VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.GSU.EDU/ALUMNI

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