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SPRING/SUMMER 2013

Working

Together: Building a multi-generational workplace

page 80

T H E N AT I O N A L A S S O C I AT I O N O F C O L L E G E & U N I V E R S I T Y F O O D S E R V I C E S

also inside

• Gluten-Free Solutions • 2013 NACUFS National Conference • Comfort Foods ...and much more!

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The biannual magazine of the National Association of College & University Food Services

Advertising Information and Article Submission Advertising of a product or service in this publication does not imply endorsement. Advertisers assume responsibility and liability for the content of any advertising. The National Association of College & University Food Services is exempt from any liability resulting from publication of articles. Editorial mention of commercial interests is intended entirely as an information service to readers and should not be construed as an endorsement, actual or implied, by NACUFS. The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the official opinions of NACUFS. The number of mailings sent to each member institution is based on annual dues classification. There is an $85 charge for all additional mailings. An annual subscription to Campus Dining Today® is $60 for members and $75 for nonmembers. ©2013 The National Association of College & University Food Services. All rights reserved. No part of this publication shall be reproduced, stored in a retrievable system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, which includes but is not limited to, electronic, mechanical photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the prior written consent of NACUFS.

Editor in Chief Acquisitions/Contributing Editor Contributing Editor

Rachel A. Warner Donna Boss Jennifer Trayan

Editorial Board Kimberle Badinelli, Virginia Tech Merrill Collins, Connecticut College Lisa Snider, Foodservice Rewards Jerry Waller, University of Wisconsin–River Falls Rachel A. Warner, NACUFS

NACUFS BOARD OF DIRECTORS President

Timothy Dietzler, Villanova University

President-Elect

Mark LoParco, University of Montana

Past President

Nona Golledge, University of Kansas

Secretary/Treasurer

Rich Neumann, Ohio University

At-Large Director

Terry Waltersdorf, Faith Baptist Bible College

Northeast Region President

Mike Kmec, Connecticut College

Mid-Atlantic Region President

Louis Logan, Millersville University

Midwest Region President

Greg Minner, Purdue University

Southern Region President

Robert Miller, Georgia Southern University

Continental Region President

Kerry Paterson, University of Colorado Boulder

Pacific Region President

Robert Holden, University of California, San Diego

2013 National Conference Chair Amy Beckstrom, University of Colorado Boulder Industry Advisory Council Chair Nancy Lane, Hubert Guest Director

H. Michael Rice, Michigan State University

Executive Director

Gretchen Couraud, NACUFS

For advertising information, email advertising@nacufs.org or call (517) 332-2494.

CORRECTIONS: Campus Dining Today strives to provide accurate journalism and fair reporting. It is our policy to correct substantive errors of fact. If you think we may have published incorrect information, please call (517) 332-2494 or email news@nacufs.org.

in this issue

F E AT U R E S 42 Comfort Foods

COVER STORY

Working

Chefs from different generations and backgrounds contribute their takes on the comfort foods of their youths.

Together:

56 2013 NACUFS National Conference

Building a multi-generational workplace

68 Recognizing Excellence in Campus Dining

NACUFS honors the dining programs and individuals that have helped advance the industry and the association.

80 Working Together: Building a MultiGenerational Workplace

87

Strategies for Working With Generational Differences

 Scott Hoffland of the University of

Wisconsin–Milwaukee offers tips on managing different generations.

90

Blending Multiple Generations for a Successful Team

The University of California, Santa Barbara, uses various methods to build their diverse team.

92

80

Training Generations

How dining services trainers approach generational differences provides intriguing insight into their understanding of learning styles and training program development.

99

104

68

Tips of the Trade

Campus dining professionals of all ages share their advice and observations about working with different generations.

Perspectives on Career Advancement, Counseling, and Mentoring Through the Ages

A sampling of perspectives from directors and their employees reveals a plethora of different needs and desires in the workplace.

SPRING/SUMMER 2013

49 D E PA R T M E N T S 6 From the Editor 8 Leadership Agenda 9 Executive Director’s Perspective 12 Campus Dining by Design

Creativity and innovation shine in these featured campus dining renovations.

30 What’s Hot on Campus

Colleges and universities are making their mark in unique ways.

49 Wellness and Nutrition: Gluten-Free Solutions

Using a team approach can help you successfully implement a gluten-free program on campus.

12 30 110 NACUFS Education:

Generational and Behavioral Styles

Leadership Institute presenter Tom Champoux explores how both generational differences and behavioral styles affect how we work with one another.

F R O M

T H E

E D I TO R

FROM

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the editor

W

hen I was growing up in the rural Upper Peninsula of Michigan, we only had to dial the last five digits of a phone number to connect to our neighbors. Today, my husband and I only have our mobile phones, and the idea of having a landline telephone seems almost quaint. We’re not alone—according to a 2012 report by the Centers for Disease Control, more than half of Americans either don’t have or use a landline, a trend that continues to rise. And mobile phones aren’t just used for talking; my smartphone is my camera, GPS, calculator, social media hub, email device, gaming console, entertainment system, and the list goes on. In fact, talking is probably what I use my phone for the least.

The growing trend toward mobileonly households is illustrative of the RACHEL A. WARNER rapid advance of technology over Editor the past few decades. What was Campus Dining Today science fiction 20 years ago is now rwarner@nacufs.org reality, and a Jetsons-like future no longer seems so far-fetched. Star Trek’s replicator could synthesize meals on demand, and this technology may be coming to our table sooner than we think. Last year, a startup company called Modern Meadow announced they were developing a process by which to create synthetic meat using 3D printing technology, an option they claim is more environmentally friendly than traditional methods of raising animals for food. A 3D-printed steak may seem unpalatable to us now, but will it be the norm for the next generation?

“Successful operations are embracing these differences and leveraging the strengths of each generation to create diverse and dynamic workplaces.”

It’s not just technology that is evolving—the social and political landscape all over the globe has changed tremendously as well. These shifts have had a profound impact on the workplace, and we can expect a continued evolution as the next generation starts to join the workforce. This issue highlights some of the differences between generations in the workplace, the challenges they face, and strategies for working effectively together. The age ranges to describe the main three generations in the workplace vary slightly by researcher, but for this issue of Campus Dining Today, the generations are defined as follows: Baby Boomers, born 1946-1964 (ages 49-67); Gen X, born 1965-1980 (ages 33-48); and Millennials, born 1981-2001 (ages 12-32). Without a doubt, collegiate dining is an industry that is thriving while integrating each of these generations in the workforce. Successful operations are embracing these differences and leveraging the strengths of each generation to create diverse and dynamic workplaces. What’s clear is that adaptability is key. It is possible to embrace technological advances and new ways of thinking while respecting the traditions and experiences of those who brought us this far. As an association, NACUFS is embracing these changes as well. We see a balance of veteran leaders and emerging leaders serving together on the board of directors, committees, and project teams, as well as on the NACUFS staff. It takes all of us and the unique traits and talents of each generation to be successful. It’s not always easy and we may not always truly understand each other, but in the end, it’s worth it. u

Rachel A. Warner

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LEADERSHIP L E A D E R S H I P

AG E N DA

W

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agenda

hen I started at Villanova University 25 years ago, I entered a multi-generational workforce, although I was not aware of the generational labels then as I am today. Within our dining services team we had retired senior citizens working part-time alongside our student staff; leading the team was a good mix of Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation (also known as Traditionalists or Veterans). Today, our workforce still consists of four generations—much the same while dramatically different.

TIMOTHY DIETZLER

NACUFS President timothy.dietzler@villanova.edu

In the Leadership Challenge, Kouzes and Posner identify transformational leaders as being the most effective in leading a multi-generational team. Transformational leaders do this by following five key practices: Modeling the Way, Inspiring a Shared Vision, Challenging the Process, Enabling other to Acts, and Encouraging the Heart. Transformational leaders have a preoccupation with purpose, values, morals, and ethics.

“Transformational leadership

Many individual members of NACUFS are exceptional is perhaps most necessary transformational leaders. The late Dave Prentkowski was one such leader, whose legacy to NACUFS is one of service, contribution and achievement; Dave will truly be missed by during periods of change.” our industry. NACUFS also embodies these five practices of transformational leadership as an association. Without a doubt, NACUFS is a resource to utilize to connect with your multi-generational team and effectively provide them with opportunities for development, building relationships, inspiration, and taking action. Transformational leadership is perhaps most necessary during periods of change. NACUFS is in a historic time with the transition from Dr. Joseph Spina as executive director to Gretchen Couraud. Over Joe’s 22 years as executive director, NACUFS thrived. One of Dr. Spina’s greatest accomplishments was his success in maintaining and protecting the culture of NACUFS while transforming the way the association operates by building an effective office team that balances and supports our volunteer culture. We thank Joe for his many contributions to the association and wish him well in his retirement; we welcome Gretchen and look to a bright future with her at the helm. My primary goal in my presidency, with support from the board, is to ensure a successful transition. Retaining the collaborative culture of NACUFS and our regional identities is essential. Since the national conference in Boston, I traveled to Okemos several times to meet with the association staff and Gretchen to facilitate the transition of our executive directors. Following her November start, Gretchen has worked closely with the staff to observe and learn about our association. She has done an excellent job connecting with industry, key partners, and members. So far, our efforts have been an important bridge in building and maintaining a cohesive team. In March, Mark LoParco, Nona Golledge, and I enjoyed introducing Gretchen to our members at the regional conferences. Gretchen’s “listening tour” was beneficial to her and our members. I have observed Gretchen demonstrating the five practices of transformational leaders and I am confident that her vision, enthusiasm, and experience will guide NACUFS into the future. I am looking forward the National Conference in Minneapolis and to Mark LoParco’s year as president. Mark will take us through another transition and period of change as we update and redefine our five year strategic plan. Thank you for this opportunity to serve you as president at this pivotal and important time for NACUFS. u Timothy Dietzler

Throughout my travels I shared my initial observations about NACUFS’ strengths and challenges ahead and sought member input about our future. NACUFS is a strong association in a stellar financial position. To the credit of association leaders, industry partners, volunteers and staff, NACUFS is an organization with strong core programs and services such as the institutes, national conference, benchmarking surveys, and more. The “Every challenge is an volunteer leadership and culture is one of sharing, networking, and hard work opportunity if approached with strong camaraderie.

by a team with the right attitude.”

GRETCHEN COURAUD

NACUFS Executive Director gcouraud@nacufs.org

Similarly, dining services on college and university campuses is a critical component to campus life and student success. You are on top of cutting-edge issues such as nutrition, wellness, sustainability and food allergies. But we do face challenges ahead.

First, NACUFS’ membership has declined 21 percent in the last two years. That’s a sharp drop and one that deserves significant attention. The balance between industry and institutional members must be addressed. Second, NACUFS needs to take a hard look at its value propositions. It’s time to go back to basics and focus on why institutional members are staying or leaving and better articulate the value of membership. Related to NACUFS’ value proposition to our own members is the value proposition of dining services to higher education and top administrators. You are essential services on campus, but if decision-makers aren’t aware of your value then we need to learn how to document your contributions and tell your story. Third, it’s time for NACUFS to review its governance model. Associations have changed a great deal over the last 25 years. Successful associations are pursuing industry best practices that are strategic and nimble. Many of the frustrations that were voiced by members during my travels are actually governance issues and should be approached systemically by the board rather than individually by the national office, regions, or individual committees or project teams. But every challenge is an opportunity if approached by a team with the right attitude. My professional experience in association, foundation and nonprofit organizations, with concentrations in organizational management, fundraising, and advocacy are a good fit for NACUFS’ challenges and opportunities today. I have a passion for mission-based, volunteer-driven organizations. Together we can build on 54 years of successes and build NACUFS to the next level. I look forward to continuing to hear about how you are contributing to success on your campus and where you’d like NACUFS to go in the next five to 10 years. If we didn’t meet at a regional conference, please feel free to contact me directly or share your dreams at the national conference. u Gretchen Couraud

P E R S P E C T I V E

his March I completed my initial membership listening tour by attending all five NACUFS regional conferences. This gave me the opportunity to meet many of you and listen to your thoughts on NACUFS’ strengths as well as challenges and opportunities ahead; thank you all for your hospitality and candor. A special thank you to each conference planning team and the hosting institutions. Your dedication and commitment is impressive and speaks volumes about the culture of volunteerism and professionalism at NACUFS.

D I R E C TO R ' S

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perspective

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DIRECTOR’S

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by design

CAMPUS DINING

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THE ROCK CAFÉ at Ferris State University

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Photos courtesy of STV Architects

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erris State University administrators wanted the school to become a more engaged campus and create new connections between the classroom, campus, and community members. One key component in accomplishing this goal was the extreme makeover of The Rock Café, which is located on the south campus in the heart of the freshmen residential community. The makeover transformed the facility into a state-ofthe-art, contemporary dining venue that is inviting, efficient, and flexible. “We wanted the servery to be operated as an anytime residential dining venue with the flexibility to modulate service areas and options for summer conferences and during non-academic periods,” says Lori Helmer, director of dining services. “We also wanted to boost meal plan revenue opportunities, improve customer satisfaction, and assist the university in enhancing its overall image with prospective and existing students and their families. The project was the culmination of 15 years of dreaming, five years of planning, and five months of construction.” The transformation became a reality as a result of a campus-wide master plan developed by Porter Khouw Consulting principals David Porter and Albin Khouw. Recommendations in the master plan were incorporated into market-style dining at the Rock Café.

The exterior is in the style of the campus architecture.

Among the highlights of the Rock Café are continuous dining from Monday through Sunday (breakfast, lunch, dinner, and brunch) from 7 a.m. until midnight; an array of serving stations; a focus on exhibition-style cooking; smooth flowing, integrated design with no boundaries between serving and dining; a variety of seating options, including a 25-foot serpentine-style community table; and an adjacent convenience store. The seating area includes a private dining room and soft seating area with a fireplace. The back-ofthe-house area is storage and receiving only. All food prep and cooking is done in the front of the house. Stations feature durable solid-top serving counters with wood veneers on the customer side and stainless steel on the operator side. “The key to our success was detailed interfacing between all team members,” Helmer says. “We all had a lot of meetings to discuss menu profiles, production styles, storage requirements, and a host of other issues.”

FROM PAST TO PRESENT

In order to appreciate the results, understanding the pre-renovation condition is crucial. “Prior to the renovation, the Rock Café was dated and somewhat uninviting because the servery was tight, and menu variety and selection were somewhat limited and featured limited exhibition cooking,”

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The dining room features all new furniture including large and small tables and booths, new floor and wall coverings, new lighting, and a fireplace with soft seating.

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Natural light warms and brightens seating areas.

says H. David Porter, FCSI, president and CEO of Porter Khouw Consulting. “The dining room was not designed for the critical see-and-be-seen environment college students expect and the dining area lacked warmth. The primary focus of the renovation was to improve flow and throughput in the serving area and to create a comfortable and welcoming dining venue that would meet today’s students’ expectations and make a positive impression on incoming students.”

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The improved Rock Café is modern, contemporary, and inviting. The servery now features the following self-contained stations with sample menu selections:

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Comfort Zone—Hot entrees such as rotisserie chicken complete with grilled asparagus and rosemary red skin potatoes; World’s Fare—International and/or regional cuisine such as Oriental spareribs with wasabi mashed potatoes and sesame pea pods; Brick Oven Pizza—Daily selection of eight different pizzas with a variety of toppings, including dessert pizzas, breakfast pizza, and macaroni and cheese pizza; Woody’s Grill—A variety of gourmet burgers and sandwiches, char-grilled steaks, and specialty side dishes; Delicatessen—Made-to-order subs and sandwiches, built on fresh breads and rolls with a wide variety of meats, cheeses, and fresh vegetables, served hot or cold; Pasta Sauté—Three-stage sauté process featuring dishes with specialty pastas, fresh meats and vegetables, and unique sauces such as chicken with ricotta gnocchi, and fresh mushrooms in a white wine sauce served with fresh-baked breadsticks; Mongo Grill—Guest-selected fresh vegetables, seasonings, sauces, along with a large selection of proteins (including tofu, shrimp, pork, beef, crab, and chicken) individually stir-fried on a Mongolian grill and served with egg rolls, a variety of rice, and rice noodles; Gas Fire Wok—Daily featured stir-fry prepared in small batches for self-service such as ginger lime shrimp and Korean stir-fried noodles with pork; Breakfast—Eggs and omelets cooked to-order along with a buffet of selections such as raspberry cream cheese strata, homemade cinnamon swirl French toast, and fresh sausage gravy and biscuits; Pebbles and Rocks—Self-serve selection of Belgian waffles with fruit toppings, bagels, breads, and cereals served all day; Healthy Choice—An entrée such as veggie lasagna, broccoli alfredo chicken, or basil pesto pasta with vegetables that meet healthy profile dining criteria;

A Mongolian grill allows staff to mix and match ingredients selected by customers.

As a result of the changes to the dining program including new meal plans, expanded hours of operation and the renovation, FSU Dining Services has realized a 29.4 percent increase in voluntary meal plan sales (YTD) and a 172 percent increase in cash/credit card sales. Daily hours of operation are 7 a.m. until midnight. Methods of payment are meal plans, guest meal passes, dining dollars, cash, and credit cards. “The Rock Café plays a major role in recruitment and retention efforts,” Helmer says. “We have recordhigh customer satisfaction and it is the gathering place for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. It has also been a major plus for the university’s recruitment efforts as most prospective students and their parents have a meal in The Rock Café while they are on campus. Ending campus tours there has become a ‘seal-the-deal’ moment.” “This renovation changed the social dynamic on campus,” says FSU’s President David Eisler. Key people involved: Lori Helmer, director of dining, Ferris State University; H. David Porter, FCSI, and Albin Khouw, Porter Khouw Consulting, Inc.; Lori Burnley, ASID, LEED AP ID+C, and Ty Shappell, AID, LEED AP, both at STV Architects; Rockford Construction Company; Michael Hughes, associate vice president for Physical Plant, Ferris State University. u

Top: Food takes center stage in the marketplace. Middle: A fireplace and lounge-style seating encourage students to come to this facility not only to eat but also socialize and study. Bottom: Brick Oven Pizza features several varieties of pies daily, in addition to casseroles and other baked items.

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The dining room features all new furniture including large and small tables and booths, new floor and wall coverings, new lighting, and a fireplace with soft seating.

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“As a result of Porter’s equipment survey, we identified several pieces of existing equipment that could be reused in the redesign,” Helmer says.

D E S I G N

Island—Center-stage station featuring a huge tossed salad bar, homemade bakery treats, soup buffet with three homemade signature soups, entrée salad/specialty sandwich station, and a large condiment station; and Fresh Fruit & Yogurt Bar—Myriad ingredient selections to mix and match.

by design

CAMPUS DINING THE COMMONS BY UNITED SUPERMARKETS at Texas Tech University

Photographs by Artie Limmer, Texas Tech University

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Texas Tech approved naming the dining facility in recognition of a $3 million gift from United Supermarkets, which created student scholarship programs at the university.

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ocated on the southeast corner of the campus, The Commons by United Supermarkets is part of a new 178,000-square-foot, $8.7 million residence hall, New Hall on Boston. With two- and four bedroom suite-style residential units, study areas, multipurpose rooms, and staff offices, this facility provides apartment-style living options for 500 students. Five hundred parking spaces are available for new residents. In the past 10 years, Texas Tech has seen an increase in enrollment of 26 percent, which creates a need for more housing. The New Hall on Boston adds to the accommodations offered in 14 residence halls and three suite-style halls.

“The Commons was a unique project from the beginning,” says Sam Bennett, Ed.D., assistant vice president and director of Hospitality Services. “The university conducted a lot of research to determine the best location on campus for the new facilities. For The Commons, Hospitality Services set out to create a location that represents something completely different from any other foodservice venue on campus. It represents a new level of dining on campus, both figuratively and literally.”

The two-story, standalone, 20,838-square-foot retail dining facility, the Commons, is part of a new 178,000-square-foot, $8.7 million residence hall.

At Texas Tech that’s a tall order to fill given the extensive variety of dining options. The 20,838-square-foot, two-story, stand-alone, retail dining facility opened this fall and includes 5,385 square feet of back-of-house kitchen space (separated into 2,352 square feet on the first level and 3,033 square feet on the upper level); 8,765 square feet of serving/circulation space (5,520 square feet on the first level and 3,245 square feet on the upper level); 74 square feet of office space on the

first level; 1,719 square feet of storage (1,235 square feet on the first level and 484 square feet on the upper level); and 4,895 square feet of dining space (3,083 on the first level and 1,812 square feet on the upper level).

FO O D CONCEPTS FO R A L L TASTES & AG ES

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Top: On the upper level, Ciao Down Ristorante features pizza, pasta, and salads. Left: Sous Chef Drew Latham creates dishes at Khan’s Mongolian Grill. Right: Throughout both levels of dining areas, chairs to accommodate 478 persons are available. Seating options include traditional tables and chairs, serpentine-shaped booths, and bar stools next to display cooking areas.

The Commons contains several food concepts and digital menu boards and information boards that highlight the Smart Choices wellness program. On the 12,264-square-foot first level, The Commons features: • Einstein Bros® Bagels—coffee, bagels and sandwiches; • Parrilas Mexican Grill—traditional Mexican entrees and dishes; • Whole-y Guacamole—table guacamole made to-order; • Khan’s Mongolian Grill—a unique blend of Mongolian stir-fry; • Greens & Things—made-to-order salads; • Just Say Cheez—gourmet grilled cheese and soups; and • Grillz—specialty hot dogs, gourmet burgers and unique sides. On the 8,574-square-foot upper level, The Commons includes: • Ciao Down Ristorante—pizza, pasta, and salads; • UCreate & More—sandwiches served on gridiron grill bread, wings, and more; and • Chef’s Corner—mac & cheese bar, carved meats, and baked fish.

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As one enters the lobby or sits on the upper level, the first impression of the space is a suspended sculpture entitled “Transitions,” featuring more than 400 hand-blown glass spheres that appear to flow around and through a horizontal monolith. According to a statement by the artists from Studio Art’s Desire of Garland, Texas, the paths the spheres appear to take through the space represent the paths that students make through the university. The myriad colors suggest the diversity of the student population. Many spheres have a spot of red color signifying the impact Texas Tech has on their lives and the transitions students undergo during their university experience.

D E S I G N

A N I MPRESSIVE EN TRA N CE

“The Commons is a reflection of the vibrant campus community that brings students together in the new, popular space,” says Sean Callnin, partner at Ricca Newmark Design, the project’s foodservice consultant. “The open layout design is unique and the back-of-house space is minimized, which allows students to watch the chefs preparing their fresh meals. The variety of made-to-order items combined with the personal interaction the students’ experience with the chefs creates an enjoyable dining experience.”

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The Commons operates Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. until 11 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m. Einstein Bros Bagels is open Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. until 5 p.m., Friday 7 a.m. until 4 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. The average check is $5.97; projected revenue for 2012-2013 is $3.9 million; and gross sales for all locations within The Commons is projected at nearly $390,000.

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With all these food concepts, customers of all ages are finding choices they like. What’s more, they are trying new foods, which enhances their educational experience. Once again, the dining options bar is raised higher at Texas Tech. Key people involved: Sam Bennett, Ed.D., assistant vice president and director of Hospitality Services; Sean Childers, associate director of finance and administration, Hospitality Services; Alan Cushman, marketing & merchandising, Hospitality Services; Drew Latham, sous chef at The Commons; Dewey McMurrey, executive chef, operations; Antonio Regalado, general manager at The Commons; and Kirk Rodriguez, associate director retail operations, Hospitality Services; Dennis Gulseth, architect, and Paul Chapel, principal, at Boka Powell; Gail Thompson, project manager, and John Orfield, Leed AP, at Boka Powell interior design; and Sean Callnin, FCSI, partner, and Fred Kugeler, project director, Ricca Newmark Design. u

Top: As one enters the lobby or sits on the upper floor, the first impression of the space is a suspended sculpture entitled “Transitions,” featuring more than 400 hand-blown glass spheres that appear to flow around and through a horizontal monolith. Right: At UCreate & More, staff members prepare flatbread chicken sandwiches.

by design

CAMPUS DINING

EVK RENOVATION

Nestled between three residential dormitories, Everybody’s Kitchen (EVK) serves as the main dining facility for freshmen students on the west side of campus. A renovation took place in the 5,000-square-foot main dining and serving area and 1,400 square-foot master’s dining room, both supported by an 1,800-square-foot kitchen.

EVK before the renovation. “We’re hard-pressed to remember what the space looked like and how it was set up in the past,” says Kris Klinger, director of USCHospitality. New to EVK are a Mongolian grill, a hearth pizza oven, and an extensive 20-foot salad bar and deli station. The ceiling was Fresh menu items raised and seating options provide micro-environments for students to dine, study and promote healthy socialize. eating. Key renovation features include a bold color palette infused with composite wood accents, contemporary lighting, creative use of textured glass, and wall treatments. The restaurant can accommodate 264 guests in the 2,400-squarefoot main dining room and 164 guests on the outside patio (the north patio occupies 3,700 square feet and the south patio, 4,500 square feet). The staff members serve approximately 4,000 guests daily, 98 percent of whom are on a student meal plan.

The serving counters entice customers.

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mong several additions and updates to the University of California’s dining operation, three renovations bring more contemporary design to campus.

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Photos by Kat Shanahan, Promotions Coordinator, University Center

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EVK, CAFÉ 84, AND TROJAN GROUNDS at University of Southern California

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EVK operates seven days a week from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. The average check is $11.00. EVK generates $8.5 million in top-line revenue, serving over 866,000 meals per year. It currently employs 57 front line staff (FPH, culinary specialists, storeroom specialists, cashiers, guest services representatives, and stewards), 20 student workers, one senior manager, one kitchen manager, one assistant kitchen manager, one kitchen supervisor, and two assistant managers.

A bold color palette infused with composite wood accents, contemporary lighting, creative use of textured glass, and wall treatments bring EVK to life.

CAFÉ 84 RENOVATION

Built in 1984 when the Olympics were hosted by Los Angeles, Café 84 is nestled between freshmen housing, Flour Tower and Webb Tower. It is also within a block of university-owned apartments. Café 84’s transition from a retail venue that offered favorites such as Jamba Juice, Baja Fresh, and the Wok Bar to a residential restaurant supports the university’s goal of evolving into a residential campus by creating and nurturing additional residential colleges on the USC campus. The new Café 84 offers an extensive salad and grain bar and deli station that is separate from the service area. The ice cream and smoothie stations provide a perfect ending to customers’ meals. New Café 84 favorites include the Wings Bar and the carving station’s rotating meat selections. High, low, and soft seating breaks the dining room into distinct pockets and settings. “We also introduced room service, called USC Express Catering,” Klinger says. “The menu and offerings are updated and phone entry is available. A new website supports online ordering.” USC Express Catering is based in the Ronald Tutor Campus Center. Similar to EVK, Café 84’s 7,500-square foot servery space, including seating, features a bold color palette infused with composite wood accents and contemporary lighting. A 2,000-square-foot kitchen supports the servery.

The new Café 84 is set up for residential dining.

Café 84 before the renovation.

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Various seating provide options for small and large groups.

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Positioning of menu items and simple merchandising contribute to the open design.

Café 84 currently employs 34 front line staff (FPH, culinary specialists, storeroom specialists, cashiers, guest services representatives, and stewards), 12 student workers, one manager, one assistant kitchen manager and one assistant manager.

TROJAN GROUNDS RENOVATION

The Trojan Grounds remodel repurposed the space into a more functional outlet for customers to grab a cup of coffee, latte, or other coffee-based drink, in addition to a sandwich or healthy snack. All hot and cold beverages are Starbucks branded. The unit offers a 24/7 operation during the school year.

NEW MENUS

While the construction team was busy creating the new space, USC’s “Culinary Construction” team was busy creating and developing new rotating menus for all three residential dining restaurants. The new menus incorporate the healthy choices requested by the student body and feature more local ingredients, seasonal items, and cultural influences. The always popular BBQ grill was spruced up and offers hamburgers and veggie burgers straight off the grill. Trojan Grounds is one of several operations featuring The Grub Line, including signature selections of grab-and-go fruit parfaits, seasonal fruit, healthy snacks, hearty salads, gourmet sandwiches, and gluten-free selections. Key People Involved: Dan Stimmler, associate senior vice president of auxiliary services; Kris Klinger, director of USC Hospitality; Jerry Wingate, director of design; Chris Ponsiglione, senior associate director of housing; Thierry Bourroux, associate director, residential dining department; Eric Ernest, executive chef; Francisco Pineda, senior manager; Carlos Perez, manager; Agustin Vilalba, manager USCHospitality; architects at SenningerWalker Architects; and foodservice consultants at Webb Foodservice Design. u

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Café 84 can accommodate up to 166 guests in the dining room and 90 guests on the outside patio. Staff members serve approximately 2,000 guests daily, 98 percent of whom are on a student meal plan. Café 84 is open Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. The average check is $11.00. Because this is Café 84’s first year operating as a residential dining unit, historical statistics are not available. As a retail unit, it grossed $2.5 million annually.

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CAMPUS DINING 1953 COMMONS at Dartmouth College

Photos courtesy of Bruner/Cott; Richard Mandelkorn, photographer

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he renovation mission was clear: A dated, dilapidated commons in a stand-alone building constructed in 1937 had to be converted into a contemporary facility. The a la carte dining format and seating area for 700 customers just wasn’t enough to meet today’s needs.

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The project began with a feasibility study of the historic and iconic 72,000-square-foot campus dining hall with functional elements such as the 74-year-old electrical and plumbing systems. Soon after the study was completed, the $22 million project began. Phased renovation was completed in August 2011. Located off Dartmouth College Green quad in the heart of this Hanover, New Hampshire, campus, this hall is the primary dining venue for undergraduates. “The renovation retains the contextual charm of the original 1930s Georgian brick exterior,” says Dan Raih, architect with Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc., the firm that provided architectural and interior design. “The contemporary granite and black steel main entry stair and ramp set stage for the modern renovation within. The broad idea for the interiors of the building was derived from the long tradition Dartmouth College has with the outdoors and its relationship with northern New England. We wanted to embrace this relationship and design an environment of the north, but with a twist. The building has black industrial windows, ash wood, and clean detail throughout, with the exception of a historic meeting room that was preserved.”

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The stand-alone 1953 Commons serves as a dining facility and space for students to gather.

Several challenges faced the project team, which also included Andrew Enright, also an architect at Bruner/ Cott; David Newlove, Dartmouth’s director of dining services; Don Reed, Dartmouth’s associate director; Jack Cahill, Dartmouth’s board plan manager/assistant director; and consultant Lenny Condenzio, principal, Ricca Newmark Design. One was to create the work in the building while it remained open, occupied and operational. Another challenge was to create a vibrant student commons offering state-of-the-art food options and menus, new student spaces for private and larger social gatherings open 24 hours a day, and enough seating to accommodate the majority of an undergraduate student population at the same time under one roof. The revitalized foodservice contains an 11,915-square-foot servery, a 13,791-square-foot back-of-house kitchen, and a 20,000-square-foot dining area with 1,093 seats. Adjoining dining rooms increase the seat count by 350 seats. In order to accomplish these things the design team needed to manage: • The conversion of second floor to dining seating separated from office spaces; • Renovating the main dining hall to increase seating count and create flexible social space; •M  oving kitchen support to the west side behind servery stations; •R  econfiguring kitchen support in the basement to accommodate food prep, kitchen support, refrigeration and storage, and dining offices in a more efficient layout;

In addition, the formerly unused second floor was renovated to create a series of intimate dining spaces with visual connections to the servery below.

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Top: Staff prepare fresh-baked goods daily at The Bakery. Left: The servery’s open sightlines and natural light encourage customers to circulate and try new fare. Right: Arched windows and artificial light brighten the dining area.

F RO N T-OF-HOUS E HIGH LIGHTS

The servery features tile at the walls and floor with stainless steel accents; a subtle color palette set off by splashes of color at the servery stations; tall ceilings; crisp modern detailing; views and connections to north and south dining rooms and the exterior beyond; and generous space for circulation between stations. This all-you-care-to eat facility also operates as an a la carte venue. The servery includes eight platforms: World View—a cook-to-order platform with international selections; The Hearth—anchored by an open-flame brick oven featuring specials, pizzas, calzones, strombolis, and pasta; Herbivore—a dedicated vegan and vegetarian destination including Indian and other vegetarian cuisines (the Herbivore kitchen and prep environment is completely meat-free); The Grill—with hamburgers and fries, in addition to Halal and grilled selections from around the world; Ma Thayer’s—traditional favorites, including comfort foods and artisan breads; The Pavilion—featuring Kosher meat and dairy stations, drawing from Middle Eastern, Eastern European, and traditional American fare; The Bakery—a wide selection of fresh-baked desserts, artisanal breads, breakfast breads, and glutenfree choices; and Big Greens—a salad bar with more than 75 items, including soups, paninis, composed salads, and tossto-order choices.

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“The renovation re-programmed the dining hall,” says Condenzio. “In the existing design, the kitchen occupied the central area of the main floor creating a separation between the north and south dining spaces. The renovation inverted the layout. The former closed kitchen space was replaced by a spacious, open plan servery. A series of large openings connect the dining spaces to the servery and views to the exterior. One can see through the entire main floor at several instances.”

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•R  econfiguring the main entry stair, ramp, and the lobby elevator to accommodate accessibility; •R  eplacing the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems to address code changes, life-safety. and increased energy efficiency; •U  pgrading the building envelope to increase energy efficiency and occupant comfort; and •U  pgrading all fire protection and code related items.

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“With three-quarters of the students eating at least one meal at Class of 1953 Dining Commons, this facility will seat a larger percentage of its undergraduate population under one roof than other Ivy League school,” Newlove says.

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The servery is the heart of the physical space and the two main dining rooms—north and south—serve as the ‘wings’ of the space. A two-story space in the center of the servery brings in light from the second floor windows and allows for a visual connection to the seating on the second floor.

BAC K-OF-H OUSE HIGH LIGHTS

A private room holds small, private dining functions.

•A  three-sided accumulator allows students to drop off plates, trays, and cups at two separate locations to reduce queuing during high-traffic periods. •A  state-of-the-art, glycol-based refrigeration system works in conjunction with a smaller traditional refrigerant compressor rack. “The kitchen’s key cold equipment chills contents via a closed-loop system that circulates a water/glycol mixture,” says Condenzio. “Glycol chilling, combined with a remote parallel rack system, not only reduces the use of greenhouse gases, it also eliminates ambient heat produced by compressors and trims costs by cutting the number of compressors needed. Quick disconnects branching off along the main glycol lines allow for individual pieces of refrigeration equipment to be serviced without having to shut down the entire cooling system.” •T  he operation’s flight-type dish machine has low-energy and water requirements as well as builtin heat recovery (HRU). The HRU is a built-in heat exchanger that redirects lost steam to raise the incoming water temperature significantly reducing the energy required to heat water for the final rinse operations.

SEATING AREA H IGHLIG HTS

•N  orth Dining Room is a warm, elegant space with original wood trusses set off by modern ash wood wall paneling and contemporary pendant light fixtures. • South  Dining Room is a large sun filled space with crisp modern detailing and a cool color palette • Second  Floor Dining is a series of colorful, eclectic spaces offering students different levels of social interaction. • All furniture is flexible and moveable to maximize use of spaces.

SUSTAINABILITY HIGH LIGHTS

Designed to LEED Silver standards, the renovated facility is 25 percent more energy efficient and produces a fraction of the landfill waste. • It includes high-efficiency exhaust hoods; heat recovery air-handling units; a central refrigeration system with a cold-air winter economizer; a food waste pulping system that is composted locally; waterless urinals; dual-flush toilets; thermally improved existing exterior walls; use of high-density closed cell foam insulation at existing exterior walls; and new high-performance thermally broken windows with Argon-filled glazing units with a heat mirror. •A  waste oil system connects fryers to a containment tank located on the loading dock. Waste cooking oil is pumped directly from the fryer to the tank, and then is hauled away to be converted to bio-diesel. •N  ugget compressed ice machines are located at all beverage stations because water consumption averages 30 to 40 percent less than cubed ice. Cubed machines require water to flow through the system multiple times during ice production. Key people involved: David Newlove, dining services director; Don Reed, associate director; Jack Cahill, board plan manager/assistant director; architects Dan Raih and Andrew Enright, AIA, LEED AP, and senior project manager at Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc.; interior designers, Bruner/Cott; foodservice consultant, Lenny Condenzio, principal, Ricca Newmark Design. Also involved were many students from various campus groups. u

by design

CAMPUS DINING

Building the entire 77,301-square-foot, three-floor Lavery Hall project cost $45,153 million. This includes the two-floor, 35,000-square-foot, $35.7 million Turner Place dining center and a top floor with 300 classroom seats and the Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) office. With glass walls and grand entrances throughout the facility, Turner Place has a light, open ambiance. The space was created by Faulkner with architects from Stantec and interior designers from Mesher Shing McNutt and Associates, and foodservice consultant Albin Khouw, principal at Porter Khouw Consulting. Housing eight separate restaurants, Turner Place offers a variety of cuisine that includes national brands and unique venues, some of which are the first of their kind on a university campus. For instance, two of the franchises, Qdoba Mexican Grill and Bruegger’s Bagels, are the first of either to appear on a college campus as a university-run franchise, according to Faulkner. The Qdoba at Turner Place is also one of the largest Qdoba operations in the country. Bruegger’s Bagels has a walk-up window where students can place and pick up orders without entering the building. Another Turner Place franchise, Jamba Juice, is the first and only Jamba Juice to operate in Virginia in any capacity, Faulkner says.

Atomic Pizzeria and Jamba Juice entice customers to frequent the lower level offerings. Murals at Atomic and Soup Garden add a special design touch.

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urner Place dining center at Lavery Hall in the northeast quad on the academic side of Virginia Tech opened its doors in August 2012. “This new facility will set the trend for campus dining for the foreseeable future,” says Ted Faulkner, dining services director. “It provides services that attract and engage the entire campus community. Spaces and services foster student engagement outside traditional classroom space and extend extraordinary service to all who visit campus. We wanted to create an exceptional destination experience with the facility, menu, and services.”

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Photographs by Logan Wallace, Virginia Tech

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TURNER PLACE at Virginia Tech

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At 1872 Fire Grill, meats and vegetables are cooked on a char grill fueled entirely by wood. This original concept features a “Wall of Fire” rotisserie roaster and hand-lowered char grill. It features steakhouse and homestyle menu items. Each space contains unique flooring and wall treatments, seating, color schemes, and custom food shields. Music is piped into zoned areas. Menu boards and screens measuring eight to 60 inches help guide customers through the space. Anticipated revenue at this new retail and a la carte operation is $10.2 million, serving an average of 9,400 customers daily. Hours of operation are from 7 a.m. until 10 p.m. Monday through Friday in select restaurants and venues. The operation is closed on weekends. Accepted payments are student meal plan accounts, Flex, Hokie Passport, Dining Dollars, and credit and debit cards. For this new dining operation, 400 new staff positions were created, with 47 FTEs and 33 existing that relocated, 70 to 80 at general wage, and 250 to 300 at student wage.

TURNER PLACE HIGH LIGHTS

Second floor units include: Origami with 46 seats—meals prepared Japanese steakhouse-style on teppanyaki grills and a fullservice sushi counter; Dolci e Caffè—an in-house branded European café concept resembling an open-air market and offering grab-and-go items such as fresh sweet crêpes, gelato (made on site using a hot-process method to create authentic-style product) with a toppings bar, pastries, and customizable, selfserve espresso beverages; Bruegger’s Bagels with 76 seats—a national chain offering coffee, salads, bagels and bagel sandwiches. Bagels are boiled and baked onsite in a display kitchen. A walk-up service window is accessible from the Turner Place patio; Q’doba Mexican Grill with 128 seats—a national brand offering assembled to-order burritos, fajitas, quesadillas, taco salads, and nachos; Soup Garden—offering a rotation of three gourmet soups and custom made-to-order tossed salads with a choice of four salad green blends and a wide selection of dressings and toppings, including hot chicken, steak, and shrimp; and Drink Machine—more than 100 different flavor combinations from this machine. On this level, 404 seats are provided for customers. In addition to the various areas indicated above, there are 154 open dining seats.

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Origami serves Japanese steakhouse-style shrimp, chicken, and beef entrees cooked on four teppanyaki grills. The restaurant also features restaurant-style seating and a walk-up sushi bar. Designers selected hood shapes that allow the light to glow evenly throughout the shape and acrylic yellow glass. A tree from Boone, North Carolina—used for the wood panels and shelves— required seven years of drying. Getting the bark sealed to be a cleanable surface presented a challenge.

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First level units include: Atomic Pizzeria with 64 seats—an in-house branded concept featuring wood-fired oven pizzas that can be custom-ordered, and grab-andgo hot items such as lasagna and pastas; 1872 Fire Grill with 256 seats—a high-end grill venue including a large carving station and a wall of flame for rotisserie chicken. One side offers traditional Southern homestyle favorites such as fried chicken and the other side offers upscale steakhouse cuisine with luxury seating. The char grill is fueled entirely by wood. Jamba Juice—a national chain offering fresh-squeezed juices, smoothies, fruit-infused teas, chai, and hot chocolate.

SEATING H IGHLIGH TS

Situated on two floors, the dining rooms include more than 800 seats. The first floor of Turner Place includes 429 seats, with seats indicated above at units, 36 open dining seats and a 256-seat regimental dining room for the corps of cadets formation dinners. When not in use by the corps, the room will be open to the general public. An additional 244 outside patio seats accommodate customers during warm months. An outdoor area features stand-up bars and seating with umbrellas, as well as piped-in music.

Atomic Pizzeria entrance.

B ACK-OF-H OUSE HIGH LIGHTS A N D SU STA IN A BILIT Y

In the back of the house, culinary production is supported by two blast chillers, fryers that allow recycling of oil, and a pulper. Sustainability factored in prominently to this project. Turner Place is on track to receive Silver LEED certification. Attention is paid to pulping, composting, recycling, local food sourcing, and use of pork, beef, and produce from the campus garden and farm. In the future an herb garden box will support dining. Key people involved: Dr. Patricia Perillo, vice president for Student Affairs; Dr. Frank Shushok, associate vice president for student affairs; Ted Falkner, director of dining at Virginia Tech; Brian Grove, associate director of dining; John Barrett, assistant director of dining; Mark Moritz, executive chef senior; Craig Gelbert, associate director of planning and business services; David Chinn, project manager; Jessica Hale, Jamie Parnell, Lance Mailem, and Alicia Barker, all from dining; Tom Fong, food production manager; Charles Morse, chef de cuisine; Susan Modica, office specialist; architects Wayne Nickles and Joel Martineau at Stantec; Robert Mesher, Shannon McNutt, and Joe Shing at Mesher Shing McNutt for architecture and interior design; Albin Khouw at Porter Khouw Consulting. u

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GROWING FRESH PRODUCE YEAR-ROUND at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks

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e on the dining staff at University of Alaska–Fairbanks want to offer our customers high-quality products that can be locally produced and connect customers to food sources,” says Mary DuRousseau, customer service specialist. Delivering on this wish is an enormous challenge. In the summer when temperatures in Fairbanks—located in the center of the state—might reach a high of 99° F and sunlight streams in for nearly 24 hours, delivering on this wish is possible thanks to a campus garden and a greenhouse, which also serves as an environment to grow produce and for starting plants. But in the winter, when temperatures might plunge to -69° F, receiving fresh produce is a challenge, if not impossible at times. When temperatures dip so low, produce shipped via boat and truck can takes weeks to arrive, which impacts the quality of the product. Even when produce is shipped in it may not survive the chill to transport it from one place to another. A solution to offering local produce in a low-impact, sustainable, year-round operation: dining is now using an aeroponics system to grow vegetables and fruit during the cold months. Aeroponics is the process of growing plants in an air or mist environment without the use of soil or an aggregate medium.

Two units rotate around the light source to maintain a consistent light source for all the plants.

To begin, starter plants are placed in the unit. Only organic nutrients are sprayed on the roots.

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Fresh vegetables can be grown during warm months and thrive when they receive daylight for almost 24 hours. “We selected aeroponics versus hydroponics because the roots are sprayed or misted with an organic solution. With hydroponics the roots are immersed in the solution,” says Robert Holden, former director of auxiliary, recharge and contract operations, who initiated the growing system. DuRousseau currently supervises the project. Set up at the entry to Lola Tilly Commons, two units hold racks with about 300 plants. “We selected these units because they are compact,” Holden says. “They rotate around the light source to maintain a consistent light source for all the plants.” One person maintains the system, daily checking water levels and nutrient mix and regulating the light source. The system is expandable, and very little effort is required to increase production. Lettuce is the first aeroponically grown product. In the future, the dining staff will grow strawberries and other crops that are particularly difficult to obtain in winter months. “The goal is to get the community involved in producing more local produce. By showing how we can grow produce in a cost effective manner and supplement the produce used on campus, we can then work with others to expand their production and fill in the community’s need for fresh produce,” Holden says. u

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EQUIPMENT TAKES CENTER STAGE at Murray State

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eeping student-customers’ attention is a full-time job for dining at Murray State. A Mongolian grill at Winslow Dining, a board operation that serves nearly 6,000 customers per day, does the trick. “We had the grill custom-made to fit the space, so it’s rectangular, not round,” says Paula Amols, director of dining services and Racer hospitality. “Winslow was not designed around front-of-house action stations, and with no major renovation planned to change that, we had to work with the existing space in order to offer an exhibition station.” The Mongolian grill makes possible Asian specialities, as well as a build-your-own omelet station at breakfast and for late night dining. The station—open from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday—offers quesadillas, grilled cheese, and burgers. For dinner, a Mediterranean or Tex-Mex option is available, all with the appropriate sauces and ingredients. Additional new menu offerings will be featured at the Thoroughbred Room (T-Room), the main retail facility serving nearly 1,000 customers daily. “The T-Room is slated for a major renovation in summer 2013, but some things just couldn’t wait,” Amols says. Customers get a taste of what’s to come with the renovation on a 19-foot-long salad bar that replaces the old, iced-down bar. One of the distinguishing design features of the salad bar is the front panels composed of graphic images from the Murray State University campus. On the self-serve side, the menu features three different greens, 18 toppings, and several composed salads that change daily. Salads are sold by weight. In the morning, customers find a fruit and yogurt bar where they can serve themselves a healthy breakfast.

On the entrée salad side, five menued salads—Mediterranean, Classic Chicken Caesar, Tuscan, SouthThe old salad bar in the western, and Asian—are featured. CusThoroughbred Room was tomers can choose between chicken, functional though not as shrimp, or tofu for a protein, and all aesthetically pleasing as the new salads are accompanied by a fresh, hot version. breadstick.

Culinary staff prepares customers’ selections to order on the rectangular Mongolian grill. The new self-service salad bar in the Thoroughbred Room entices customers to eat healthfully.

“We’ve also added several other pieces of new equipment that will improve food quality and consistency, increase staff safety and efficiency, and insure our food products are always safe,” Amols says. u

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irst-year students’ plates are full of information about adjusting to life on campus. At Vanderbilt University, campus dining wants to make a positive first impression and clearly communicate the dining options.

In addition to disseminating information through standard print communication pieces mailed to their homes, Facebook, and the website, campus dining uses the View-Master® (stereoscopes and reels) to introduce students to the VU Meal Plan and campus locations where those meal plans can be used.

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On move-in day, each first-year student receives a welcome bag in his or her room containing a note from Vanderbilt campus dining director Camp Howard, a View-Master with two reels, and a “Welcome Class of 20__” chocolate. The View-Master is loaded with a three-dimensional, custom reel explaining the first-year meal plan. An additional reel features all 19 locations on campus where students may use their meal plan. “We’ve received many comments from parents on move-in day saying their children weren’t helping unpack because they were looking at their View-Masters,” says Julie Akard Crider, communications manager of campus dining. “Students seem to enjoy the vintage yet novel 3-D viewers, while parents enjoy the nostalgia.”

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WELCOMING FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS at Vanderbilt

Students and parents are intrigued by the old-fashioned but innovative presentation of the dining plans.

“We have used these viewers for the last four years, and they have drastically cut down on questions about the meal plan and our dining program,” says Howard. “Students and parents alike are intrigued by the uniqueness of the View-Masters; they cannot resist picking them up.” u

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NUTRITION PROGRAMMING at Eastern Carolina University

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oday’s college students are much more responsive to standard nutrition messaging when the delivery is designed to target their interests. At Eastern Carolina University, integrating technology to engage students is proving to be very successful, says Janie E. Owens, RD, LDN, Aramark nutrition director. She and Stephanie Howard, marketing manager, and Mike Lysaght, residential district manager, reported their results at the 2012 NACUFS national conference. Their old method of delivering information consisted of posting a calendar of daily nutrition challenges in high traffic areas. “We never knew if students were meeting the challenges,” Owens says. Their 22nd Century program supplements the calendar of daily nutritional challenges with several new, technology-linked opportunities that produce measurable results by encouraging student interaction. For example, Owens’ team set up a contest on Facebook for students to upload pictures of individuals and groups that show them meeting the challenges. Each month, a random winner selected from uploaded pictures wins a prize. Additional messages support daily challenges, such as: “Choose water over soft drinks all day today. That is an easy one, you can do it!” and “Happy Meatless Monday! Nutrition Challenge of today: Go Meatless by trying the Malibu veggie burger at The Galley, Destination 360 or Burger Studio. They are delicious and a healthier option for you and your environment!”

Owens and her team are engaging students by utilizing free apps with web-based capability that can be used on iOS and Android. They use Fooducate/eat a bit better™, an app that gives foods a grade and shows product highlights. “It compares foods and offers better alternatives and educates about food and nutrition,” Owens says. On “Fooducate Fridays,” students can receive prizes for using apps to correctly grade an individual product or compare two products on a Facebook page. For example, a page once featured, “Happy Fooducate Friday, Pirates! The challenge this week: which salad is healthier

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for you—land or sea? Using your Fooducate app, scan [a brand-named] white chicken salad kit and [a brand-name] albacore tuna salad. The first person to correctly respond with the letter grade each item receives, which is healthier, and WHY will win a prize! Good luck, and enjoy the beautiful weather!” To solve the question, students use a smartphone to scan a product’s QR code. A QR code is a twodimensional barcode that links to a URL, text, a picture, or information, and free code reader apps are available for all smartphone platforms. (Download free QR code creators online.) Owens’ team also uses QR codes in a nutrition-focused scavenger hunt. Last year, they organized a scavenger hunt in March to highlight National Nutrition Month. Designed to resemble the television show “The Amazing Race”, teams traveled across the entire campus following clues to complete activities, answer questions, and take pictures. “This approach gets students in the locations and encourages them to interact with employees, complete activities, and learn about nutrition,” Owens says. To put together a successful scavenger hunt, Owens and her team developed these guidelines: • Determine the knowledge/information you want participants to gain; • Develop activities focusing on the targeted information; • Select locations where activities will take place; • Coordinate pathways for participant teams; • Create clues leading from one activity to the next; • Generate QR Codes with clues to each location; • Form questions that participants need to answer as they progress; • Test QR Codes (very important!) and provide a test QR Code to make sure all participants’ phones function properly; • Set up activities in selected locations; and • Ensure all participants have access to a smartphone and QR code reader. As to the overall success of their initiatives, Owens concludes “that 22nd Century nutritional programming isn’t completely new or different, but methods must be changed to meet the students where they are. Have fun with available technology!” u

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INTRODUCING BLOOM COFFEE at Washington University in St. Louis

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uring his first week on campus, John Griffiths, Washington University’s new campus executive chef, immediately felt the hustle of everyday campus life. He welcomed the activity on a college campus— he formerly held positions with James Beard award-winning chef Takashi Yagihashi at Tribute Restaurant and chef-restaurateur Larry Forgione at An American Place restaurant. He is now on the staff of Bon Appetit, the college’s foodservice provider

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Using proper techniques to blend and brew coffee is essential to the coffee shop’s success. Also key to the to success of Bloom Coffee is collaboration among (from left) John Griffiths, Frank McGinty, director of sales and marketing for Kaldi’s Coffee, and Andrew Dowd.

Though he welcomed the energetic environment, Griffiths noticed the absence of a coffee shop where students and faculty could approach life at a slower place and enjoy fine coffee. So he teamed up to create Bloom McGinty and Dowd demonstrate the technique of making the Coffee with Andrew Dowd, a Washington flavorful coffee during a mock tasting event in the coffee shop. University senior and barista who spent five consecutive summers in Nicaragua traveling to coffee farming villages and working in coffee shops since he was 16 years old. Opened in the fall of 2012, the coffee shop replaced the existing hot chocolate bar in the 3,000-square-foot, 120-seat Ursa’s Café, located in a residential hall on the south part of campus. The retail unit operates Thursday and Friday nights from 7 p.m. until 2 a.m. Griffiths and Dowd, both self-described “coffee geeks,” crafted a menu featuring St. Louis’ Kaldi’s Coffee Co. single origin beans as well as fresh fruit “mocktails” using fair trade, organic teas and house-made syrups. Griffiths’ culinary expertise ensures that Bloom Coffee is executed with the highest quality service, while Dowd provides students with education about coffee. “Working with a student who has a similar passion about coffee is an added bonus,” Griffiths says. “You cannot teach passion, you simply have to find it and grow it. Andrew’s sense of ownership and pride in this concept is key to Bloom reaching its fullest potential.” Student-customers are exposed to the nuance and flavors through coffee brewing methods that are on the forefront of contemporary coffee culture in high-end, progress cafes around the country. “The creative techniques and thought processes that baristas and roasters are applying to coffee have become similar to those applied by chefs to food,” says Jill Duncan. “Coffee bean varieties are different in both genetics and in the terroir of their origins. It’s exciting to see the craftsmanship applied to beans from growing them all the way to the final bloom.” u

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W H AT ’ S

“The university made a huge commitment to attracting the best and the brightest in terms of the sciences,” says Thomas Tucker, director of retail development and operations. “We responded to that by adding hospitality venues in that area of campus. We also wanted to respond to the demands for spaces for socialization, which help to inspire and cross-pollinate different disciplines.”

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he science community on the north part of campus needed a casual dining venue. Yale Dining’s response is the KBT Café, a coffee-centric space with comfortable furnishings providing an appealing food and socialization destination to support multidisciplinary interaction and communication.

37 Sandwiches on artisan bread are among the many signature menu items at the café.

Located in the lobby of the Kline Biology Tower on Science Hill, the 2,000-square-foot café welcomes guests with its mix of table and soft seating, many windows and natural light, and, of course, the enticing smell of fresh roasted coffee. The environment is so comfortable that since its opening in August 2011, staff register up to 400 transactions daily. The café is open from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. “We did about a year’s worth of research before we moved a brick up,” Tucker says. “We became convinced during that process that we wanted to secure our coffee through a direct trade partnership with sustainable coffee providers and get green beans. We also looked into the possibility of roasting our own coffee at the location. There were a lot of issues to resolve in terms of ventilation and HVAC if we were going to do that because we are on the bottom floor of the building. We found a two-keg roaster that uses smoke-elimination technology, which solves problems with the ventilation.”

Fresh-brewed coffee attracts both coffee aficionados and casual consumers.

C A M P U S D I N I N G TO DAY

BRING ON KBT CAFÉ at Yale

on campus

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Within a small 2,000-square-foot footprint, the café offers seasonal salads, sandwiches, soups and a variety of coffees.

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38 Artistically presented café au lait is one of the more popular coffee drinks at the café.

The technology works by directing the smoke from the roaster into a smoke eliminator. First the smoke goes into a series of dry filters and then is centrifuged to dissipate any residual smoke. Deliveries for green beans arrive weekly. The café regularly offers four proprietary coffees, including a light roast/breakfast blend, a Colombian dark roast, an espresso blend, and a Swiss water-processed decaf, as well as a monthly featured coffee. As an extension of the brand concept, the café offers coffee presentation, a home-brewing class, and a barista contest, all of which attract coffee lovers to the location. In addition to offering a sophisticated international coffee menu complete with equipment for small batch roasting and hand-crafted single-cup extraction, the menu also features a full menu of signature European-style bakery items, sandwiches, flatbreads, and salads, which incorporate a variety of fresh, seasonal, and locally grown ingredients. Among the most popular items are orecchiette Gorgonzola, prosciutto remoulade, and chicken charmoula sandwiches. In addition, the daily menu, which is served exclusively in this café, includes two soups. A high-speed convection oven allows staff to heat paninis and hot entrée items such as lasagna and macaroni and cheese. The café’s design was created by LDL Studio Inc., in Providence, Rhode Island. “We were confronted with a number of challenges, such as how to reclaim a classroom and transform it into a modern café and to fit as much serving equpment into a small space as possible,” says Rafi Taherian, executive director of Yale Dining. “We also had to respect the original architectural intent of renowned architect Philip Johnson.” Taherian adds that “this project delivered significantly more than expected in developing a social hub in a place where it was needed most.” u

on campus

ARRILLAGA FAMILY DINING COMMONS AND PERFORMANCE DINING DEBUTS at Stanford

T

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he first dining hall built on the Stanford campus in nearly 20 years—Arrillaga Family Dining Commons—brings a host of interactive food, health, and dining concepts to this beautiful campus. For example, on the second floor of the two-story, 26,000-square-foot dining pavilion, sits a signature platform named Culinary Studio, which contains a cooking suite where Stanford Dining’s chefs and guest chefs teach cooking classes and provide cooking demonstrations. Video cameras make it possible for large student audiences to see the food preparation and demonstrations.

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Opened last fall, the 675-seat facility also features the Wellness and Performance Dining program. This initiative was introduced and championed by Residential & Dining Enterprises (R&DE) Senior Associate Vice Provost Shirley Everett, and was developed by Stanford Dining, a division of R&DE, led by Executive Director Eric Montell, in partnership with Stanford Athletics, the School of Medicine, and the Culinary Institute of America. As part of this initiative, a Wellness and Performance Dining nutritionist position was created in R&DE to collaborate on the program. The goal of Performance Dining, which is open to all students on the dining plan, is to inform students about how to eat and enhance their physical and mental performance. Performance Dining focuses on the relationship between synergistic food and nutrient combinations, energy output, and the ability of the body to use food and nutrient components to improve performance in mind, body, and spirit. A full-time nutritionist counsels students and student-athletes, and consults for the athletics department and other groups.

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WHAT’S HOT

Top: The Performance Bar offers both hot and cold menu selections. All of the menu items that are served at the Performance Bar adhere to the Performance Dining standards. Bottom: Students eat lunch on the patio, outside the dining rooms on the second floor.

In the Commons’ dining area, the Performance Bar includes hot and cold menu items that adhere to performance dining standards. Performance Dining @ Stanford consists of six main categories: •E  nhanced Immunity: When students are training hard in a sport or under a lot of stress, they are more susceptible to colds, flu, and infection—making it even more important to improve the immune system. A major key in optimizing immunity is to prevent nutrient deficiencies that can compromise the immune system.

Adjacent to the Performance Bar in Arrillaga Family Dining Commons, a custom display cooking station rotates menu concepts such as paninis and Pad Thai. The Wall of Fire contains a charbroiler where staff members prepare meats, poultry, seafood, and vegetables, and a gas-fired deck oven for slow-cooked dishes and crispy calzones and flatbreads. An adjacent eight-spit rotisserie cooks meat and poultry items that culinary staff members carve to order.

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•A  nti-inflammatory Components: “Silent” inflammation (chronic low-grade inflammation) is connected to a number of diseases. Certain compounds in food, from fatty acids and vitamins to phytochemicals, have anti-inflammatory action within body tissues. • Food Synergy: Food Synergy is how components in food, such as phytochemicals, fiber, fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, work together for maximum health benefit and are more effective and enhanced together than separately. •B  rain Performance: What one eats and drinks can boost brainpower in the short and long term. The part of the brain responsible for memory and learning is highly susceptible to inflammation. Foods rich in anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds, in general, will likely improve brain performance. In addition, specific components in foods may also improve brain performance by helping to remove harmful biochemical products that accumulate in the brain. Furthermore, foods rich in protein seem to improve short-term brain performance, i.e., concentration and alertness. • S  ports Performance: What students eat and drink can enhance or detract from sports performance and recovery. Carbohydrates, which power muscle contractions, are the most important fuel for exercising muscles. High-quality protein eaten soon after strenuous exercise is essential for muscle recovery and repair. In addition, vitamins and minerals are involved in energy production, bone health, immune function, and building and repair of muscle. •A  ntioxidants: Antioxidants are nutrients such as phytochemicals, vitamins and minerals, which, by opposing “oxidation,” help keep the immune system strong and help protect the body from cellular damage caused by free radicals.

In addition, Arrillaga offers The Dish, a late night dining menu featuring items from hot wings and pizza to a new Fit & Healthy menu with pesto turkey wrap, high protein berry yogurt parfait, and roasted red pepper hummus. The Dish is open every night from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m. in the culinary suite area. Arrillaga also contains a wellness room with a sprung floor for classes such as yoga, pilates, and dance. A study room houses a projection screen and seats up to 30 students. What’s more, a creative collaboration room functions as a classroom, brainstorming space, and relaxation room. Wellness kiosks provide students with information on keeping the mind, body, and spirit healthy and balanced.

Top: A Stanford Dining chef plates halibut with saffron beurre blanc at the upper floor cooking suite. Bottom: Students gather at the edge of the servery and in front of one dining room on the second floor.

Sustainability continues to be a predominant dining hall theme. In addition to sustainable meal choices developed by R&DE’s EatWell initiative, the dining hall is constructed of sustainable building materials, including LED lighting and energy efficient cooking appliances. An outside experimental garden employs environmentally friendly, biointensive techniques for gardening. Some food produced in the garden will be incorporated into the Commons’ menus. u

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comfort foods C A M P U S D I N I N G TO DAY

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for All Generations By Lee Chaharyn, R.D.

H

ow does food gain the designation “comfort”? Is it tied to a place, such as a farm in the Midwest? Is it a function of heritage, based on the land of one’s ancestors? Or, does it originate in the most plentiful foods in the area, such as seafood along a coast? Certainly, emotion is tangled up in there somewhere.

It’s complicated, to be sure, so we asked an assortment of chefs from different generations and hometowns about the comfort foods of their youths. Six chefs, representing Millennials, Gen Xers, and Baby Boomers explain how their fond food memories inspire modern menu interpretations of comfort foods, as well as celebrating the classics.

MILLENNIAL: CESAR TOVAR

Sous Chef, Rice University Cesar Tovar, one of a family of five, grew up in Houston, Texas, eating Mexican and Vietnamese foods. Flautas with avocado sauce and barbacoa were common breakfast foods and his mother made chicken and vegetable soup to soothe whenever one of them was sick. His Mexican family also ate a lot of Vietnamese food because a Cesar Tovar Vietnamese restaurant was close to their home. As a family, they would often walk there and enjoy banh mi, pho, and spring rolls, and these became some of the comfort foods of his youth. “Occasionally we would replicate these dishes at home to suit our taste and give them our own twists,” Cesar remembers. At Rice University, Monday is comfort food day, and mashed potatoes, gravy, chicken-fried steak, and chicken-fried chicken are staples on that menu and well-loved by the students. Tuesday is Asian day and Thursday is Mexican day. Therefore, Tovar explains, “I go all out. Some people may use recipes but I cook from my heart,” he says with pride.

GEN X: MATTHEW POWERS

Executive Chef, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Without a doubt, Matt Powers is an adventurous eater. Growing up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he has always been fond of cheese. “My parents would experiment with different cheeses and fillers which always made grilled cheese a favorite. I love spicy foods and we always made our jambalaya spicy. I also liked having three or four different proteins in one meal.” He also recalls his mother’s version of Mediterranean pasta, honoring it by making his own version for his university students. Explaining his broad palate, he says, “I was always the adventurous type and did most of my ethnic discoveries on my own, maybe because I had no strong ethnic influences. I think the idea of new foods, techniques, and pairings and the eagerness to try them, without remorse, really broadened my palate. I just want to try everything. So much that I have come across during my years in the culinary world has completely caught me off guard. The different flavors and textures that I tried would always fascinate me and lead me to pursue even more unique culinary dishes.”

Matthew Powers

Comfort foods for Powers are foods with a positive emotional attachment. These foods always “hit the spot” no matter his mood, he says. Powers believes that paella and grilled cheese are comfort foods “because they symbolize a traditional dish whether that dish is in Spain or in Wisconsin.”

GEN X: JONNA ANNE, CEC

Executive Chef, SUNY at Geneseo Jonna Anne was raised in Michigan and New York, the family moving every couple of years for her father’s work. These were “very meat and potatoes communities,” she recalls. “My mother was a ‘casserole person’ and comfort food meant macaroni and cheese, Crock-Pot pot roasts, creamed vegetables, and roasted meats.”

For SUNY at Geneseo students, Anne’s food memories dovetail neatly with their current favorites. Their go-to comfort food, she says, is macaroni and cheese, and grilled cheese with lots of different fillings. “Burgers this year also seem to provide a lot of comfort, as well as warm and hearty fare such as roast turkey dinners and the pulled pork we make with a Carolina-style barbecue sauce. It’s great for fall and for football.”

“We know they consider these comfort foods from different reactions,” Kann says. “Some are clear statements telling us how the food makes them feel, some come from watching sales (colder wet days show a greater tendency towards these items), and spontaneous reaction. For example, one day at the spud bar a group of students got very excited about chili cheese fries and had a whole conversation about how awesome it was to have them occasionally.”

Michael Kann

“We make mac and cheese to order,” he explains. “I was inspired for the idea from S’MAC (Sarita’s Macaroni & Cheese), a New York restaurant. We serve it two or three times a week at major units and students go through the roof for it.”

BABY BOOMER: JIM CACCIATORE, CEC

Assistant Director, Hospitality Services, Azusa Pacific University Wednesday night was traditionally pasta night—usually spaghetti and meatballs—in the Cacciatore household in Burbank, California. Jim, a second-generation Italian American, recalls that pasta was a very big thing. “Dad would make lasagna every Christmas and we kids would have to help by shaping the meatballs. They were really small, a half-ounce or so.” His mother was well known for her “square” meals, particularly round steak, green beans, and brown rice. Rabbit was very common on the Cacciatore table. “It was pretty inexpensive and my mother would fry it like chicken or make a different cacciatore-style dish with onions, brown sauce, and Sicilian olives,” he says. Hand-held food is quite popular with Azusa students. “They can snack and walk. That’s part of the comfort— they don’t have to sit,” says Cacciatore. Azusa students are appreciative of the Mexicali Grill (named after the university’s outreach mission in Mexicali, Mexico), which features unique quesadillas and tacos, such as Korean beef and kimchi taco, or the St. Patrick’s Day corned beef quesadilla. Hummus and pita chips are offered as a side for burgers and sandwiches along with harissa and baba ghanoush dipping sauces.

BABY BOOMER: NANCY MILLER

Executive Chef, Villanova University Growing up primarily in the Finger Lakes region of New York, with stops in San Francisco and New Hampshire, Nancy Miller considers Pennsylvania home since she moved there at age 16. Her mother cooked basics, and Nancy says, “My first love was pastry. Baking was my focus for the first 20 years of my career. My foods are dessert-based.” “I personally love any dessert that has a hot/cold combination and of course, topped with ice cream, preferably homemade. Strawberry sticky buns are a yummy creation of mine. I use orange juice in the syrup and put strawberry halves in the goo at the bottom of the pan prior to baking them.” Nancy uses her love for pastry to provide comfort to her students. “Here at Villanova I came up with a sunflower butter pie recipe that mimics the peanut butter pie. Due to allergies we are a nut-free campus. This creation satisfies the urge for peanut butter pie without the allergy issue being a concern.” u

C O M F O R T

At Boston College, collard greens and kale, minus the ham hock, are a hit with the students, and turkey dinners have stood the test of time with the highest acceptability of any meal served weekly.

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Jonna Anne Associate Director for Food & Beverage, Boston College With his paternal grandmother from Louisiana and his mother from Idaho, growing up in Oregon presented Michael Kann with an eclectic food history. He grew up on collard greens and ham and Northwest foods such as barbecue salmon fresh from the Columbia River. The classic version of mac and cheese was standard from both cultures.

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GEN X: MICHAEL KANN

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My Mother’s Chicken Flautas

Banh Mi Sandwich with a Southern Twist

Cesar Tovar, Rice University Yield: 24 (3 per serving)

Cesar Tovar, Rice University Yield: 24

For the flautas: ½ gal. vegetable or canola oil, for frying 4 large rotisserie chickens, skin removed and meat finely shredded 1 cup freshly chopped cilantro leaves 4 jalapeños, seeded and chopped (keep seeds if more heat is desired) 8 Roma tomatoes, finely chopped 72 corn tortillas, 5- to 6-inch diameter 2 heads iceberg lettuce, shredded Salt as needed for seasoning

For each sandwich: 24 baguette rolls or 24 7-inch sections cut from a regular length baguette, purchased or homemade 3 cups mayonnaise 2 cups soy sauce ½ cup Sriracha sauce 1 lb. chef’s choice of flavored meat or tofu, sliced (room temperature) 4 cucumbers, cut into 48 julienne strips 48 cilantro sprigs 4 jalapeños, cut into 48 slices 2 nopales (prickly pear leaves), cut into 48 slices 8 carrots, shredded or pickled 1 jicama, shredded (raw) 4 avocados, cut into 48 thin slices ¼ cup chili powder 4 limes, cut into 24 wedges

For the avocado sauce: 8 very ripe avocados, halved, pitted and flesh removed 2 lbs. sour cream ¾ cup fresh lime juice Salt as needed for seasoning Instructions: Special equipment: toothpicks, tongs Fill a large pot with enough oil to submerge each flauta. Heat the oil over medium heat until a deepfrying thermometer reads 375° F. To make the flautas: In a bowl, combine the chicken, cilantro, jalapeño, and a pinch of salt. Working with 4 tortillas at a time, spread a spoonful along the middle of each tortilla. Roll tortilla tightly around the filling and secure with a toothpick. Using tongs, submerge each flauta in the hot oil and hold it in the tongs until firm, then release to continue cooking. Cook until golden brown, roughly 3 minutes, then remove to a paper towel-lined plate and immediately season with salt. Keep flautas warm in the oven on a sheet tray while assembling and cooking the remaining tortillas. To make the avocado cream: In a serving bowl, mash avocado, then whisk in the sour cream and lime juice until smooth and a bit runny. Season with salt or season as desired.

Instructions: Slice the bread lengthwise, leaving a hinge, and then use your fingers or a bread knife to hollow out the insides, making a trough in both halves. Set aside the insides for another use. Crisp up the bread in a 325° F oven, and then let it cool for a minute to desired temperature. Mix the mayonnaise, soy sauce, and sriracha sauce in a bowl to make a dressing. To assemble, for each sandwich: Generously spread the dressing on both of the cut sides of the baguette. Start from the bottom portion of bread to layer 2 avocado slices, 2 cilantro sprigs, 2 cucumber strip, 2 jalapeño slices, and 2 nopales slices. Layer the meat or tofu and add a drizzle of dressing. Garnish with the jicama and carrot shreds, sprinkle the chili powder, and squeeze the lime wedge. Close the sandwich, cut on a diagonal cut for easy eating, and enjoy.

To serve, arrange 3 flautas on the plate, and layer shredded lettuce on top. Generously spoon on avocado sauce, and garnish with fresh chopped tomatoes. (If a little spice is desired add salsa verde.)

Grilled Cheese Bar

Matt Powers, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Grilled cheese sandwiches are made to order. Customers may choose from a variety of options and build their own grilled comfort, complete with chips and a pickle. Powell’s favorite is Gouda, apple, and raspberry mustard on country white.

Breads: Country White Bread Wheat Berry Bread Cheeses: American Cheddar Gouda Mozzarella Pepper Jack Provolone Swiss

Add-ons: Apples Artichokes Bacon Tomatoes Spreads: Chipotle Ranch Garlic Mayo Pesto Raspberry Mustard

Jonna Anne, SUNY Geneseo Yield: 10 lbs.

1 ½ lbs. pulled chicken (leg meat) 1 ½ lbs. Andouille rope sausage, cut in 2-inch sections 1 ½ lbs. Italian rope sausage, cut in 2-inch sections 2 Tbsp. oregano 3 Tbsp. paprika 1 Tbsp. black pepper 2 Tbsp. salt 2 qts. chicken broth 1 oz. saffron 12 oz. olive oil 12 oz. diced onion 3 oz. minced garlic 1 ½ lbs. rice (short grain) 12 oz. fire-roasted tomatoes w/ juice 3 cups peas 24 lemon wedges ⅔ cup chopped parsley

Rub for 3.5 cups: ½ cup paprika ½ cup kosher salt ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup granulated garlic 6 Tbsp. granulated onion ½ cup chili powder 1 Tbsp. black pepper 1 Tbsp. cumin ¾ cup Ancho seasoning Pork: 12-15 lbs. pork butt ½ bag wood chips, soaked in water for at least an hour Instructions: Mix rub and reserve for later use. Dry outside of pork butt and thoroughly rub all of the rub mix on the pork. Place in pan and refrigerate for at least 2-3 hours before smoking. Place butts in smoker the night before use as late in the day as possible. Lock the smoker and turn on so that the temperature runs around 225° F. Place chips in smoker and let it run overnight. In the morning, check pork for doneness. If it is not done, wrap pork with foil and allow to cook further until tender. Pull butts from smoker when ready. When ready to pull the meat, remove fat and shred meat with hand; the pork should fall apart if properly cooked.

Instructions: Season chicken and Andouille and Italian sausages with oregano, paprika, black pepper, and salt. Set aside. Bring chicken broth to a simmer and steep the saffron threads. Steep for 10-15 min.; you may keep the saffron threads in the broth for the recipe is ok, or choose to discard them after steeping. Heat a pan, large enough to fit all ingredients, with olive oil. Brown the chicken, Andouille, and Italian sausage. Remove proteins from the pan and set aside; keep all oil in the pan. Sauté onions and garlic in the oil until translucent; add more olive oil as needed. Add rice; continue to sauté until the rice is coated with olive oil. Continuously stirring, add tomatoes and half of the broth. Bring to a simmer and continue to stir. Once liquid is almost absorbed, add the proteins and the remaining broth. Give a few stirs until mixture returns to a low simmer. Cover and cook until rice is done and the protein is cooked through, about 10 minutes. Serve with lemon wedges and garnish with fresh chopped parsley.

Pour a North Carolina vinegar sauce (recipe follows) over pork to moisten slightly and give it a slight tang. North Carolina Vinegar Sauce: 8 cups cider vinegar 6 Tbsp. kosher salt 3 Tbsp. cayenne 1 Tbsp. crushed red pepper ¾ cup brown sugar 2 Tbsp. hot pepper sauce Instructions: Thoroughly combine all ingredients.

F O O D S

Matt Powers, University of WisconsinMilwaukee Yield: 24

C O M F O R T

House Smoked Pork

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Chicken Paella

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Macaroni & Cheese Bar

Jonna Anne, SUNY Geneseo Yield: 6 pies

Michael Kann, Boston College Yield: 24 16-oz. servings

3 cups liquid eggs 20 oz. flour 24 oz. brown sugar 24 oz. granulated sugar 2 lbs. margarine, melted 2 lbs. chocolate chips 26 oz. walnuts 6 par-baked pie shells

13 ½ oz. salted butter 13 ½ oz. A.P. flour 1 Tbsp. + 1 ½ tsp. Spanish paprika 2 qts. + 3 ½ cups milk 2% 6 oz. vegan soup base 2 Tbsp.+ 1 ½ tsp. Worcestershire sauce ¾ tsp. hot pepper sauce 4 lbs., 5 oz. cheese cheddar spread (Wispride) 3 dashes white pepper 4 lbs., 8 oz. cavatappi pasta 1 lb., 2 ¾ oz. cooked popcorn chicken 12 oz. cooked ground sirloin 2 ¼ oz. cooked vegetarian crumble 7 ½ oz. bacon, raw, cut in ½-inch dice 7 ½ oz. linguica stick, cut in ½-inch dice 7 ½ oz. cooked sliced deli ham 10 ½ oz. broccoli florets, blanched and chilled 1 ½ oz. sliced scallions 1 ½ oz. thinly sliced mushrooms, sautéed 7 ½ oz. baby spinach 7 ½ oz. carrots, cut in match sticks 7 ½ oz. roasted red peppers, diced 6 Tbsp. chopped parsley ¾ cup basil, chiffonade 7 ½ oz. blue cheese, crumbled 7 ½ oz. cheddar cheese, shredded 3 oz. Asiago cheese, shredded ¾ cup red hot buffalo sauce 8 Tbsp. BBQ sauce 3 Tbsp., 1 ½ tsp. teriyaki sauce

C O M F O R T

Toll House Pie

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Instructions: Place eggs into mixer and beat with whip attachment until frothy, about 3 minutes on speed 3. Add sugar, brown sugar, and flour. Mix until blended. Add melted margarine; whip for 2 minutes. Mix in chocolate chips and walnuts. Divide batter among pie shells. Bake pies at 300° F for 1 hour. The centers will be set but still soft.

Instructions: Make sauce: Melt butter. Add flour and paprika to create a roux, cook for 15 minutes. Add milk, vegan soup base, worcestershire sauce, and hot sauce to make sauce. Melt cheddar cheese spread (can use a microwave). Add melted cheese to sauce and season with white pepper. Cook pasta in boiling water until done. Drain pasta and toss with sauce. Place in hotel pans and hold 140° F or higher for service. Heat the popcorn chicken, ground beef, and vegetarian crumble. Cook the linguica and the bacon. Hold all meats individually at 140° F. Prep the ham, broccoli, scallions, mushrooms, baby spinach, carrot sticks, roasted peppers, parsley, and basil and hold individually below 40° F. Service: Customer selects veggies in a bowl (about 2 oz.) Customer selects protein(s) and server portions, about 2 oz. total. In sauté pan, server combines 12 oz. of mac & cheese, vegetables, and the proteins. Finishes with sauce (BBQ, teriyaki, buffalo), cheese (blue, cheddar, or Asiago), and herbs if any selected and serve.

This Spud’s for U Potato Bar

Instructions: Heat/cook all potatoes according to instructions and hold per directions, hot above 140° F. Place all toppings in appropriately sized pans and hold at proper temperature for service. To Serve: Customer selects choice of potato from server on the serving station. Portions are listed below. • sweet potato fries 10 oz. • mashed potato 10 oz. • steak fries 10 oz. • cross cut waffle fries 6 oz. • protein 2 oz. (Chili, ham, bacon) • toppings 2 oz. •g  ravy/cheese sauce/Alfredo/ranch dressing 2 oz. of one of these toppings Server places the proper portion of potatoes in a 1 lb. paper-lined boat. Customer selects sauce to drizzle on top of the potatoes and server assembles. Customer selects protein, about 2 oz. Server assembles. Customer selects toppings, about 2 oz. Server assembles.

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2 ¼ cups sour cream 14 ¼ oz. sliced jalapeño peppers 1 ½ oz. sliced deli ham 1 ½ oz. bacon, diced and cooked until crisp 9 ¾ oz. crumbled blue cheese 6 ¾ oz. shredded cheddar cheese ¾ oz. sliced scallions 2 ¼ qts. nacho sauce 1 ½ lbs. salsa cruda 1 ½ lbs. cilantro sauce 4 ¼ qts. ranch dressing 6 lbs. sweet potato fries 6 lbs. mashed potatoes 6 lbs. steak fries 3 lbs. waffle-cut potato fries 1 ½ lbs. Alfredo sauce 3 lbs. chili beef

F O O D S

Michael Kann, Boston College Yield: 24 portions

Bulgogi Tacos with Kimchi Slaw

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F O O D S

Jim Cacciatore, CEC, Azusa Pacific University Recipe by William Morris, manager at Mexicali Grill Yield: 50 (2-oz.) portions

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Marinade: 1 ¼ cup vinegar 2 cups granulated sugar 3 Tbsp. chopped garlic 3 Tbsp. chopped fresh ginger 3 Tbsp. sesame oil ¼ cup soy sauce ¼ Tbsp. toasted sesame seeds ¼ cup Korean red pepper flakes 1 cup Korean pear juice 1 stalk green onion, chopped 6 ¼ lbs. beef flap, trimmed Korean slaw: 1/4 cup reserved marinade 3 Tbsp. Korean red pepper paste 5 cups finely shredded napa cabbage 1 stalk green onion, chopped on the bias 50 4-inch corn tortillas, lightly toasted Optional garnishes: onions, cilantro, thinly sliced radishes Instructions: Make marinade: Combine vinegar, sugar, garlic, and ginger ingredients until sugar is completely dissolved. Whisk in the sesame oil until emulsified, then mix in soy sauce, sesame seeds, red pepper flakes, pear juice, and green onion. Reserve ¼ cup marinade for slaw. Trim beef and butterfly. Marinate for 30 minutes to 1 hour. Remove meat from marinade. Cook meat on the grill until it is medium to medium-well done, Pull off the grill. Let rest for 5 minutes. Dice and serve. Mix reserved marinade and red pepper paste until thoroughly combined. Add cabbage and green onion to the marinade and toss until coated. Assemble tacos: fill tortillas with beef mixture, top with slaw and serve with optional garnishes.

Sunflower Butter Pie Nancy Miller, Villanova University Yield: 1 pie Ganache: 6 oz. heavy cream 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter 8 oz. bittersweet chocolate (55% to 65% is nice) 1 prepared chocolate crumb crust Sunflower Butter Mousse: 4 oz. cream cheese 4 oz. unsalted butter 1 cup confectioner’s sugar 1 lb. sunflower butter 1 Tbsp. vanilla 1 cup heavy cream 2 oz. sunflower seeds for garnish Instructions: Make ganache: Heat cream and butter together almost to a boil. Stir in the chopped chocolate to melt. Line the bottom of a chocolate pie shell with a small amount of the ganache. Reserve the rest to spread between the layers of mousse and for the top of the pie. Make sunflower butter mousse: Soften cream cheese and butter and beat together with the 10x sugar. Add sunflower butter and beat in. Add vanilla. With a whip attachment beat in the heavy cream. Alternatively, you can whip the cream separately and fold in. Layer the mousse with the ganache in the chocolate-lined pie shell. Place the pie in the freezer for a few minutes between adding layers to make the spreading easier. The finished pie should have 2 layers of mousse with a layer of ganache in between and ganache on the top. Sprinkle the top with sunflower seeds.

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Taking a Team Approach By Cheryl McEvoy Director of Communications and New Media National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

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hen college senior Priyanka Chugh was a freshman, it wasn’t hard to find gluten-free food. She had met with the manager of her building’s dining hall and explained that she has celiac disease, so she had to avoid gluten. He took her special dietary requests seriously, preparing gluten-free pizza, pasta, and other alternatives that Chugh came to know and trust. “If he was there, I knew the food was safe. If he wasn’t, then I couldn’t be sure. There was no training,” she explained. Then sophomore year arrived. The dining manager had taken another job, and Chugh quickly discovered that the remaining staff was ill-equipped to meet her gluten-free needs. Despite the university’s reputation for being a top academic institution with superior foodservice, gluten-free options were limited, and cross-contact was rampant. Chugh felt unsafe eating in the dining hall, and no one seemed to understand. Chugh’s experience highlights a problem in dining services across the US. Gluten-free requests are on the rise, but there’s often a lack of staff training or consistent protocols to meet those requests at each and every meal. Research is finding that more people benefit from a gluten-free diet than ever thought before, including many college students. By implementing a team approach now, you can be prepared to handle this rising demand.

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W HO’ S EATING GLUT EN- FR E E ?

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An estimated one in 141 Americans has celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten—a protein found in wheat, barley and rye. For these individuals, even a tiny bit of gluten is enough to set off a reaction, causing inflammation and damage in the small intestine. Short-term symptoms may include stomach pain and bloating, diarrhea, constipation, migraines, joint pain and fatigue—all of which can last for days, affecting the student’s ability to perform in class. Long-term effects from untreated celiac disease can include osteoporosis, fertility problems, thyroid disease and even some types of cancer. Making things even more complicated, some individuals experience no symptoms at all, so accidental gluten exposure (and the resulting intestinal damage) can go weeks or months without notice. In addition to individuals with celiac disease, a new population has been found to require a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet. Researchers now estimate that 1 in 17 Americans has non-celiac gluten sensitivity, a condition that causes symptoms similar to celiac disease but doesn’t present the same antibody response or intestinal damage seen in celiac disease. Anecdotal evidence also suggests that some individuals with other disorders like autism, ADHD, and arthritis may also benefit from a gluten-free diet. According to a 2011 survey by Aramark, about nine percent of college students are looking for glutenfree food. The rising need has contributed to a boom in gluten-free purchases; US Foods reports a 200 percent increase in demand for gluten-free products. Gluten-free alternatives are now widely available, both in local markets and through national distributors. Popular alternatives include gluten-free bread, pasta, pizza crusts, and cookies, but naturally gluten-free foods like quinoa, rice, and corn tortillas are also proving to be viable, crowdpleasing options in dining halls. Deciding which foods to serve is just part of launching a successful gluten-free initiative. The bigger, ongoing concern is how to serve those foods safely—and do so on a consistent, cost-effective basis.

TI P 1: KNOW YOUR CUSTOM E R S When starting any dining services initiative, it’s important to understand the needs of the people you serve. Often, that means going straight to the source: your students. Some may have been gluten-free for years and are comfortable speaking up about their needs. Others may have just been diagnosed or relied on their parents to make the food choices at home. “Students range from wanting the help to being very independent,” said Pam Edwards, assistant director of university dining services at University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Edwards and her team introduced gluten-free options after students began making requests, and they quickly discovered there’s no one-size-fits-all approach. So, Edwards meets one-on-one with each student to find out their likes and dislikes, then takes the student on a tour to meet the foodservice staff and get accustomed to the special ordering process. “That’s a really important part—that the students feel comfortable coming back and asking for things,” Edwards said. Miles Wynn, a junior mechanical engineering major at University of Nebraska–Lincoln, would agree. He met with Edwards and the dining hall team to discuss his gluten-free needs before he arrived on campus. Now, Wynn says he has the “utmost confidence” in the team, and he isn’t afraid to speak up. “I’ve found that everyone here is pretty approachable. You just have to ask and they’ll get something for you,” Wynn said.

That goes for new products, too. The University of Nebraska–Lincoln staff now stocks gluten-free pizza crusts based on Wynn’s suggestion, and even hunted down gluten-free French bread after he returned from France. An additional aspect of working with students is that you can identify solutions that work for their lifestyle. For example, do most students grab breakfast at the campus coffee shop instead of the dining hall? Stocking individually wrapped gluten-free breakfast bars can be a safe on-the-go option.

“You can always get the products, but it’s the staff who really make sure the food is glutenfree,” said Chugh. “If they don’t know what they’re doing, it’s useless.” At Loyola Marymount University, the Sodexo foodservice team had gluten-free options for students, but Resident District Manager Jason Adams decided that wasn’t enough. “People didn’t see the seriousness of [glutenfree requests],” he said. “They thought it was a health kick.” Adams signed up for GREAT Schools, Colleges and Camps, a gluten-free training program from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA). The course brought attention to challenges the team hadn’t considered—like having a separate toaster for gluten-free bread— and encouraged the staff to be on alert. Safety protocols are a primary concern. Mistakes can occur at any time in the foodservice process, so each staff member should be vested in protecting their students’ health. Glutenfree training programs like GREAT Schools, Colleges and Camps help staff members better understand the health risks of gluten-related disorders and define the step-by-step process to prepare and serve gluten-free meals safely. Participants learn how to identify cross-contact hot spots, and more importantly, how to avoid them. “If you’re going to offer gluten-free options, your staff needs training to back that up,” said Beckee Moreland, director of gluten-free industry initiatives for NFCA. “Celiac and gluten sensitive students can get severely ill if their food isn’t prepared properly, and it’s often due to a careless error that could have been avoided.” GREAT Schools, Colleges and Camps teaches another important skill­ —how to answer students’ questions. The staff should be able to communicate how gluten-free food is prepared and what precautions are taken to ensure the food is safe; the ultimate goal is to reassure the student and provide a welcoming atmosphere. “Students need to feel confident in the staff’s ability to serve safely,” Moreland said. “By answering questions accurately about what gluten-free options are available and how they’re prepared, the staff can build that trust.” When developing your gluten-free implementation plan, consider how to work with the timing of special dietary requests. Will you be able to safely create a gluten-free dish on the spot, or should

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It may sound surprising, but the cornerstone of a successful gluten-free initiative isn’t the food; it’s a well-trained staff, and that includes all levels of managers, chefs and servers.

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TI P 2 : P REP T HE TEAM

students call ahead to request a hot gluten-free meal? How will you handle special requests during high volume meal times? Discuss these issues with your team and consult with gluten-free students to determine a process that can be efficient without compromising your attention to cross-contact and other risks.

TI P 3 : DEFINE TH E PRO C E SS

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In addressing any special dietary need, consistency is key. Students need to know that they can rely on your staff to serve a safe meal again and again, not just when a certain staff member is working. To ensure that consistency, you’ll need a system.

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In addition to training the current staff, determine how to bring new employees up to speed on your gluten-free protocols. One way is to identify a gluten-free team leader who serves as the on-staff expert and is responsible for teaching the ins and outs of gluten-free safety, following a “train-thetrainer” model. Another option is to enroll each class of new hires in a gluten-free training program. Adams has not only trained his staff; he’s also now advocating to make gluten-free training a requirement in his district. Once managers and staff have been trained and gluten-free protocols are in place, then there’s the element of quality control. Gathering feedback is an important part of a successful dining initiative, but it’s absolutely critical when there’s a health need associated with that food. Students should have a clearly defined way to let your staff know if a mistake was made or, worse, if they were sickened by a meal. Staff members should be prepared to respond immediately to any error or complaint. This is another area where the gluten-free team leader can play a role in addressing what needs to be fixed. At the same time, you’ll want to know what is working for your students and staff, so keep an open dialogue and an open door. If your school has a gluten-free student group on campus, consider hosting a special dinner for the group and invite them to share opinions. “The challenge is prodding the students to let you know what they need. That’s the hardest part,” Wynn said.

CROSS-CONTAMINATION HOT SPOTS Does your kitchen meet gluten-free safety standards? Here are a few common places where crosscontact with gluten-containing ingredients can occur. There are many other places that can pose a risk of gluten exposure, so consider your ‘hot spots’ when developing your gluten-free initiative. 1. Prep Area: Gluten can stick in the cracks of wooden cutting boards, and residue from gluten-containing foods can put gluten-free ingredients at risk. Use a separate dedicated prep space and purchase new cutting boards to use only for gluten-free food. 2. Grill: Gluten cannot be burned off with heat. If you’re using the same grill to prepare gluten-containing items, clean it thoroughly before placing any gluten-free food on the surface. Better yet, use a foil barrier or cook the food in a clean pan. 3. Utensils: It may seem harmless to slice a gluten-free sandwich on the standard food line, but that crumb-coated bread knife bears gluten residue that can make celiac and gluten sensitive students sick. Use a clean set and slice on a separate, clean surface. Source: GREAT Schools, Colleges and Camps (www.CeliacCentral.org/GREAT/Schools)

TI P 4: I NFORM YOUR ALLIES

Many colleges and universities now have dietitians on staff, either in the health services department or on the dining services team. If your school has access to a dietitian, make sure to loop that person in to your gluten-free initiative. He or she can be a strong advocate for special dietary programs on campus and can help you develop gluten-free options that offer variety and balanced nutrition. In addition, health services staff may be able to connect you with students who are newly diagnosed or struggling to maintain a gluten-free diet on campus, especially those who contact the health center for guidance. And of course, don’t forget the admissions office. Prospective students and their parents will come with questions about gluten-free accommodations. This is a chance to set your dining services apart, so tour guides and admission staff should be briefed on what you can offer. Emphasize that the entire staff has been trained; the celiac and gluten sensitive community are aware of cross-contact risks and value gluten-free training as a sign of dedication to their health and safety. “[Our campus] is a home away from home for nine months of the year,” Edwards said, “and we want them to be comfortable.” Gluten-free options require more diligence, planning and participation than other menu programs, but a successful initiative is possible. By taking a team approach that involves input from students and gluten-free training, you can ensure a safe dining experience for this growing population. “Students deserve to choose their school based on their career goals, not on whether the school can feed them,” Moreland said. “Slowly, but surely, we are making that a reality.” u To learn more about gluten-free training for colleges and universities, visit www.CeliacCentral.org/ GREAT/Schools.

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Another group to contact is the Office of Residence Life. At the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, the residence life team maintains a list of students who have special dietary needs. Edwards has access to the list, so she can monitor who needs what and can check in with students to make sure they’re finding the right foods. Resident assistants (RAs) have also proven to be a good resource; when students are too embarrassed to speak up about their dietary needs, they’ll often confide in their RAs.

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In addition to developing a gluten-free menu and training your staff, a successful gluten-free initiative depends on engaging an interdepartmental group to help spread the word. On many campuses, students with medical needs like celiac disease must register through the Office of Student Disabilities in order to qualify for special accommodations. The office staff can alert you when a student requires gluten-free meals. However, as Chugh pointed out, many students feel uncomfortable associating themselves with a disability, or simply don’t want to fill out the paperwork.

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ARE YOU LEGALLY REQUIRED TO SERVE GLUTEN-FREE FOOD?

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While many colleges and universities are adopting gluten-free initiatives on a voluntary basis, a recent court settlement has operators wondering whether failing to offer such options or failing to offer them appropriately, could put them at risk for a lawsuit. In December 2012, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) announced a settlement with Lesley University regarding gluten-free and allergen-free options. The case stemmed from a series of complaints filed by students with celiac disease and food allergies. In the settlement, the Department of Justice deemed that the university was in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act; as a result, the university agreed to pay $50,000 to the students and implement new provisions, such as making gluten-free and allergenfree options available at every mealtime and training the staff on gluten-free and allergenfree protocols. What does this mean for you and your team? The Lesley University settlement sets a precedent that may serve as an example in future lawsuits. At the same time, it is only legally binding to Lesley University. Therefore, your staff is not required to implement the procedures outlined in the agreement, but could consider it a model to follow, especially if your school requires students to be on a meal plan. The important thing to remember is that the DOJ confirmed that celiac disease and food allergies can be considered disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act. That means that your college or university should be supplying “reasonable accommodation” for students with these conditions. How you accommodate those needs can vary. Should you offer gluten-free and allergen-free options in one dining hall or every dining hall? Can students with special dietary needs be housed in dormitories with private kitchens? Students may request different kinds of accommodations, based on their needs and their doctor’s advice. Consider gathering a task force including the Office of Student Disabilities, Residence Life, and legal counsel to determine the best strategy for accommodating your students. For more information about gluten-free needs at college, visit www.CeliacCentral.org/ college References: Department of Justice. “Questions and Answers About the Lesley University Agreement and Potential Implications for Individuals with Food Allergies.” Accessed February 27, 2013 at http://www.ada.gov/q&a_lesley_university.htm.

Cumin and Parsley Socca Flatbread

Roasted Garlic, Lemon and Herb Sauce

Ingredients: 1 cup certified gluten-free chickpea flour 1 cup filtered water 1 Tbsp. cumin 1 ½ tsp. dried parsley 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (or olive oil, canola, or vegetable oil) ½ tsp. salt Olive oil, for drizzling on top

Ingredients: 1 head of garlic 6 Tbsp. olive oil 2 Tbsp. fresh picked oregano 1 Tbsp. fresh rosemary sprigs 2 Tbsp. chopped scallions ¼ jalapeño, sliced with seeds (de-seed for a milder sauce) Juice of one lemon Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste ¼ cup spinach

To cook, heat the broiler in your oven. Oil a cast iron skillet or 9-10-inch pan with 2 Tbsp. coconut oil and heat the pan on the stove top. Once the oil is melted, pour batter and swirl around, making sure that batter covers the whole pan. Remove from stove top and place in oven until firm and beginning to blister and burn. The time depends on your broiler. It should take around 20 minutes. If a broiler is unavailable, bake the Socca at 400° F for about 30 minutes or more, until it is crispy. Slide the Socca out of the pan onto a cutting board, slice into pieces, drizzle olive oil and shower with coarse salt. Note: You can do variations to this batter to spice it up and make it different every time. Just make sure that you have equal parts water and flour and the rest is interchangeable.

Instructions: Heat pan to medium-low heat. Add olive oil, garlic heads, oregano, rosemary, scallions, jalapeno, salt and pepper. Keep pan on low heat so not to burn the garlic. It should take about 20 minutes to slow roast garlic and marry the herbs in the oil. Once garlic and herbs look slightly browned, remove from the heat and carefully pour into a blender. Add juice of lemon and spinach, then blend until fully incorporated. For more gluten-free recipes, visit www.CeliacCentral.org/recipes. Jaqueline Yngvason is a food stylist and culinary producer specializing in gluten-free, allergen-free foods. Learn more at TastyFreedom.com.

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Instructions: Mix the flour, water, salt, cumin, and dried parsley.

(Gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free) By Jaqueline Yngvason

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(Gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free) By Jaqueline Yngvason

LOW REGISTRATION RATE! $525*

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* ME M BER RAT E B E F O R E MAY 3 1

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For additional information and to register, visit www.nacufs.org/conference.

WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU IN MINNEAPOLIS!

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conference C O N F E R E N C E

he 2013 national conference committee and the entire Continental Region invite you to Minneapolis for the 55th annual NACUFS National Conference. This year’s event promises to be truly memorable, with education, networking, dining, and entertainment designed to give you the ultimate NORTHERN EXPERIENCE.

From the opening Theodore W. Minah Award Dinner and Reception through the Baltimore-themed Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Luncheon, your taste buds will be tantalized and your senses engaged in every culinary offering. The dynamic speaker line-up includes world-renowned professor Dr. Temple Grandin, author Joseph Pine II, and Steven Schussler, creator of the Rainforest Café. During your free nights, you can explore the city, which boasts the third largest theatre market in the U.S.

JULY 9-13, 2013

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There are also a few new things in store for you this year, including NACUFS’ first-ever fishing tournament and the launch of the conference Passport game, where you earn points to redeem for rewards just by being involved in conference activities! Be sure to stick around for the closing event—The Great Minnesota GetTogether—which will feature a lumberjack show, fishing pond, dancing, and food from around the state. The event will be held on Nicollet Island, located on the banks of the Mississippi River with the skyline of Minneapolis as a backdrop. Get ready for your NORTHERN EXPERIENCE and book your trip to Minneapolis! We look forward to seeing you there!

THANK YOU TO THE 2013 NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMMITTEE Amy Beckstrom, Co-Chair University of Colorado at Boulder Dean Wright, Co-Chair Brigham Young University

Culinary Challenge

Mark Zieres University of Wyoming

Dining Awards

Jack Donahue North Dakota State Univ.

Education–General Sessions Mark LoParco University of Montana

Education–Interest Sessions Lisa Gibson Sanford Medical Center

Food and Beverage

Terri Moreman US Olympic Training Center

Fishing

Hal Brown Utah Valley University

Headquarters/Showcase/AV Kelley Williams Brigham Young University

Protocol

Sponsorship

Registration/Volunteers

Treasurer

Special Arrangements

Staff Liaison

Sr. Maureen Schrimpe University of Maryland Hal Brown Univ. of Northern Colorado Lynne Hansen Brigham Young University

Janet Paul Concordia College Dave Schoenberg Saint John’s University Sandy Smith NACUFS

Marketing

Debra Lee Concordia College

Marketing

Mary Begalle Schwan’s Food Service

The 2013 National Conference Committee

CONFERENCE AGENDA Tuesday, July 9 C O N F E R E N C E

Pre-Conference Workshops

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Don’t miss opportunities for focused professional development before the conference. This year’s pre-conference events include “The Joy of Baking” Workshop, Advances in Animal Nutrition Research, and the Neighborhood Market Retail Workshop. Topics range from enhancing retail operations to nutritious baking options. Make sure they are on your calendar!

First-time Attendees Orientation

Make the most of your first national conference! We invite all first-time attendees to kick off the conference right. Meet your national and regional officers and learn what to expect during the conference. Information will be shared about our first-ever passport game, education sessions, showcase, networking opportunities, and much more.

7:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Advances in Animal Nutrition Research (Pre-conference) 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

“The Joy of Baking” Workshop (Pre-conference)

8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Neighborhood Market Retail Workshop (Pre-conference) 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Conference Registration

3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Display

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Pre-conference Vendor Reception

Wednesday, July 10 7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Conference Registration

7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Display

6:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Lake Minnetonka Fishing Tournament

7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

“The Joy of Baking” Workshop (continued)

8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Neighborhood Market Retail Workshop (continued) 3:15 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

First-Time Attendees Orientation

6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Theodore W. Minah Reception

7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Theodore W. Minah Dinner and Award Presentation 9:30 p.m. - 12:00 a.m. Customer Appreciation Party

Thursday, July 11 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

Awards Breakfast

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Display

7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Conference Registration

8:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Keynote Speaker:

Animal Welfare and Global Food Issues

Dr. Temple Grandin

Note: Agenda is subject to change.

Hot Plate: Feeding the World, Cooling the Planet

Remember Your Favorite Dining Experience? Let’s Talk!

The Healthy Asian Kitchen: Innovative Strategies for Campus Dining

Anna Lappé, Small Planet Institute

A Conversation of Four with Joe Pine

Mai Pham, chef and author

12:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Showcase 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Culinary Challenge

5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Industry Appreciation Reception/Institute Connections

Friday, July 12 7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Conference Registration

7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Display

7:45 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Regional Breakfasts

9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

General Session

Going Beyond Food Services

11:15 a.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Showcase

2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Interest Sessions

Joe Pine

The Northern (and Southern) Experiences of Your Marketing Strategies

Wellness Trends on Campus: A 360 View

Finding New Revenue: Cross Sales and Marketing to Commuters

Kimberle Badinelli, Virginia Tech

Sharon Olson, Y Pulse Elisa Verhille, Go RED Food Service Consulting & Connections, Inc. Jon Garrett, Premier REACH

Daniel Armitage, University of Memphis Peter Groenendyk, University of Memphis

Note: Agenda is subject to change.

Theodore W. Minah Reception, Dinner and Award Presentation

Network among friends and colleagues as NACUFS celebrates the recipient of its most prestigious award. Be sure to congratulate this year’s winner at the customer appreciation party.

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10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Super Sessions

Flowers and Food: A Blooming Relationship

The Rose Garden “Blazes” a Path to Greater Sustainability

Focus on Protein: A Successful Multi-Tiered Nutrition Promotion

First & Goal: Winning with In-House Concessions

Reinventing the Dining Program at Simon Fraser University

Mobile Paradise

Creation of a SUNY Sustainability Benchmarking Tool and Plan

C O N F E R E N C E

Showcase

Speak with industry representatives and preview the latest products and services during this year’s Showcase, which will feature more than 250 exhibitors.

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Michelle Virtue, Brigham Young University

Steve Davies, NatureWorks LLC and parent company Cargill Justin Zeulner, Portland Trail Blazers Lyle Peters, Green Drop Recycling Center Carla Castagnero, AgRecycle Buzz Chandler, StalkMarket

Elizabeth Devine, University of Massachusetts

Lucky Vasquez, University of California, Berkeley John Gibson, University of California, Berkeley Concession Manager, University of California, Berkeley Theresa Traulsen, Concession Solutions

13th Annual Culinary Challenge

Cheer on your favorite competitor in the exciting live-action competition, as the six regional winners vie for the top prize and ACF gold, silver, and bronze medals.

H. David Porter, Porter Khouw Consulting, Inc. Mark McLaughlin, Simon Fraser University

William McGee, University of Georgia Allison Harper, University of Georgia

Bill McNamara, SUNY Cortland Jonna Anne, SUNY Geneseo Kevin Craig, SUNY Brockport Steve McAfee, SUNY Oswego Ralph Perez Rogers, SUNY New Paltz

Measuring Resource Performance: Energy, Water and Food Waste Audits Kathleen Seelye, Ricca Newmark Design Tarah Schroeder, Ricca Newmark Design Andrew Shakman, LeanPath

The Changing Face of University Dining

William McCartney, East Carolina University

Note: Agenda is subject to change.

Making Good Nutrition Part of the Dining Day

View from Above: Luxury Catering at your Stadium

Food Truck Basics: Design, Operate and Survive

Connie Diekman, Washington University John Griffiths, Washington University

Chuck Davies, University of California, Berkeley Robert Statye, University of California, Berkeley

David Henry, University of California, Riverside Michael Neener, University of California, Riverside

Program Enhancements to Consider BEFORE You Renovate!

Collaborative Partnership: Food-Loop from Plate to Nitrate

Nutrition Programming as Easy as 1, 2, 3

Keeping “Green” Fresh

What an Experience: Two Facilities at Once

Fuel ‘Em Up to Learn

Assets to Leverage

Renovation of Jester Dining Hall at the University of Texas–Austin

H. David Porter, Porter Khouw Consulting, Inc. Jeff Yawn, Georgia Southern University

Carla Iansiti, Michigan State University Diane Barker, Michigan State University Laurie Throp, Michigan State University

Janie Owens, East Carolina University Stephanie Sumner, East Carolina University Joyce Sealey, East Carolina University

LaKiesha Stevens, Drexel University

Terry Pellegrino, Robert Rippe & Associates, Inc. Joie Schoonover, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Melissa Schrader, MS, RD, LD, Kansas State University Camille Korenek, MA, RD, LD, Kansas State University

Ann Roebuck, Envision Strategies, LLC Jennifer Wood, Loyola University Maryland

Lance Brooks, Foodservice Design Professionals Rene Rodriguez, University of Texas Scott Beardslee, Pfluger Architects

Note: Agenda is subject to change.

Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Display

Make time to browse through this year’s Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards entries to gather fresh ideas for your dining department at your college or university. The awards will be on display Tuesday afternoon through Friday during our conference registration hours.

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Interest Sessions

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3:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

C O N F E R E N C E

Member Forums

Be sure to stop by one of our several member forums on Saturday morning for roundtable discussions with your association colleagues about topics important to you.

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Maximizing the Health Factor in Collegiate Dining

“On Trend”: Fresh Ways with Ancient Whole Grains

The Perfect Seafood Experience: Affordable, Sustainable & Delicious

Arlin Wasserman, Changing Tastes Ken Toong, University of Massachusetts Dianne Sutherland, University of Massachusetts Andrea Canada, SPE Certified Nil Sonmez, COO, SPE Certified

Lisa Eberhart, RD, CSSD, LDN, CDE, North Carolina State University Donald R. Miller, CEC, CCE, AAC, Notre Dame University Tara Sanders, RD, Oregon State University Jason Ziobrowski, CEC, Indian Harvest

Dan Enos, The Oceanaire Seafood Room Claudia Hogue, Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute Jann Dickerson, Think Food, Inc.

4:45 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Temple Grandin

Catch keynote speaker Temple Grandin and her unique perspective on animal agriculture, including major events in animal welfare and how practices have changed over the years.

General Membership Assembly

Saturday, July 13 7:15 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

7:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Conference Registration 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

Council of Past Presidents

8:15 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Member Forums

Administration of Contracts

Board Plans

Kenny Hemmer, Emory University Mark Kraner, George Mason University

Carol Petersen, University of Northern Iowa Joie Schnoonover, University of Wisconsin–Madison

Catering

Michael Loprete, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Cathleen Chartier, The Lovett School

Concessions

John Gibson, University of California, Berkeley Paul MacGregor, University of Massachusetts

Culinary

Donald Miller, University of Notre Dame Barry Greenberg, University of Iowa

Note: Agenda is subject to change.

Training

Marketing

Sojo Alex, Envision Strategies Mike Wuest, University of Missouri

Nutrition/Wellness

Gina Guiducci, Brown University Robin Allen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Retail Operations

Mary Eilbeck, University of Dayton Spiros Vergatos, Vanderbilt University

Zia Ahmed, The Ohio State University Jon Lewis, Ball State University Hot Topic Sessions

Power of Sustainability and Permaculture for Business Enhancement

Foodservice 2015: Are You Ready?

Successful Food Allergy Practices

Social Media: Getting Started and Maximizing Impact

Meghan Little, University of Massachusetts Auxiliary Enterprises William O’Mara, University of Massachusetts Auxiliary Enterprises

Tom Lyons, Sysco Dennis Harrison, GS1. USA

Carrie Anderson, Purdue University Kathy Egan, The College of the Holy Cross Marty Dudek, The College of the Holy Cross Nancy Lane, Hubert Corporation

Crista Martin, Harvard University Jennifer Gilmore, North Carolina State University

10:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m. General Session

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Senior-Level Administration

9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Joe Pine

Listen to Joe Pine explain how to switch from a Service Economy to an Experience Economy through core frameworks, specific principles and abundant examples.

It’s a Jungle in There: Inspiring Lessons, Hard-won Insights, and Other Acts of Entrepreneurial Daring Steven Schussler

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards Luncheon

6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. Closing Event: Great Minnesota Get-Together at Nicollet Island Pavilion

Note: Agenda is subject to change.

C O N F E R E N C E

Doniquiandria Walker, Illinois State University Michelle Moss, Villanova University

Steven Schussler

Get the five Ps of entrepreneurial success with Steven Schussler’s funny personal stories and hard-won business lessons that entertain, educate, and inspire others to go after their dreams.

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picks

C O N F E R E N C E

MINNEAPOLIS

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Interact with some familiar and not-so-familiar species of marine life at the Minnesota Sea Life Aquarium. Take behind-the-scenes tours, or explore the interactive pool and get close to the creatures that live on our shores!

Shop at the mall that is described as “a city within a city.” From celebrity sightings to musical performances, the Mall of America is the Hollywood of the Midwest. In addition to shopping and restaurants, check out the 25 rides and attractions at Nickelodeon Universe or one of the 400 events that are held at the mall each year.

One of the largest jazz events in Minnesota, the Twin Cities Jazz Festival is set in Mears Park in downtown St. Paul. Whether you are a jazz fan or learning to like jazz, there is something here for all music lovers, young and old.

For a more formal getaway, catch a show at Minneapolis’ finest theater, the Orpheum Theatre. From Broadway musicals to stand-up comedy, this theater provides entertainment for everyone.

Located on Main Street in historic Stillwater, the Stillwater Antiques Mall is more than 5,000 square feet of a fine selection of antiques including furniture, clothing, jewelry, sports collectibles, paintings and more.

STILL NOT CONVINCED? Take a look at last year.

For the final event at Tufts University, “NACUFS Downeast—A Taste of New England,” attendees were treated to a wide variety of local fare, including clam chowder, oysters on the half-shell, and of course, plenty of lobster. Thank you to the 2012 National Conference Committee for an outstanding job and another wonderful conference!

DON’T MISS OUT ON THIS YEAR’S ACTION. Register by May 31 to receive the discounted rate for the 2013 NACUFS National Conference. Learn more and register at www.nacufs.org/conference. Be sure to stay at the official conference hotels to receive your registration discount.

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Last July, hundreds of NACUFS members met up in historic for the association’s 54th national conference—Revolut!onary Thinking. Throughout the conference, attendees heard from inspiring speakers, attended innovative educational sessions, and enjoyed incredible cuisine and entertainment—all amidst the historic sights and sounds of Beantown. As is NACUFS tradition, the association also took the opportunity to recognize and honor award winners at several events throughout the conference. (More on the award winners can be found on the following pages.)

C O N F E R E N C E

If last year’s event is any indication, this year’s meeting in Minneapolis is sure to follow the tradition of incredible national conferences.

C O N F E R E N C E

NATIONAL

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conference

CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT

ZIA AHMED

Senior Director, Dining Services The Ohio State University WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO ACCOMPLISH AS PRESIDENT-ELECT? Every year brings change, but this year, as we welcome our association’s new executive director, wrap up the execution of the existing five-year strategic plan, and ramp up our planning for the next era, we have a great transitional opportunity ahead of us. My key focus will be on helping the current president facilitate an inclusive approach in the creation and deployment of our next strategic plan; I will advocate a culture of inclusive excellence and transparency to do so. It is important that we move the association to where our members see the most value—keeping past performance always under consideration, while targeting future needs. Hence, I am committed to engaging a cross-sectional representation of our membership and will provide a platform for members to contribute candid and constructive feedback to the process.

TOP NACUFS EXPERIENCE: • S ince I became involved with NACUFS: Meeting so many wonderful people who helped me as a professional and an individual. •2  010: Working with a great team to plan the Midwest Regional Conference at the University of Akron. •2  008–2010: Serving on the Finance Committee on NACUFS Board of Directors. •C  hairing the 2015 National Conference Site Selection Committee. •A  ttending almost all of the Foodservice Directors Symposia over the last 10 years.

WHAT ARE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO NACUFS?

OTHER RELEVANT EXPERIENCE

All told, I believe my most significant contribution is continuing and varied engagement. Those who have been with me through this journey know that together we have more impact and influence than by working alone, and I have endeavored to contribute continually and in as many diverse roles as possible.

• Lean and Six Sigma Training & Certification.

My involvement with NACUFS has ranged from having served in a regional leadership position (Midwest Regional President 2008-2010), as a member of the board of directors and finance committee, chair and judge for dining awards, and as a regional conference chair and host. Additionally, I have enjoyed speaking engagements at many conferences, being a member of management consulting teams, professional practice team chair, and numerous project teams, including Visioning Summit, Elevating Dining Services, and Innovation Showcase project teams. This strategy has allowed me to lend my voice and involvement at many levels of the organization.

• 20+ years involvement in food service industry. • Managed a large food service operation’s complete revitalization and renovation projects. • Business Management Instructor at the University of Akron. • Leading a great senior team of six at The Ohio State University with well over 120 combined years of food service experience. • Currently oversee program with over 2,400 employees and over 5 million meals served annually.

RICH NEUMANN Director of Dining Services Ohio University

TOP NACUFS EXPERIENCE: •2  007–present: Secretary/Treasurer, Chair Finance Committee •2  013–2015: National Conference Education Chair-Interest Sessions •2  011–2012: Executive Director Steering Committee • 2002–2006: Midwest/Region IV President • J une 2012 & 2010: Presenter at Financial Management Institute • J une 2009 & 2011: Presenter/Mentor at Human Resources Institute OTHER RELEVANT EXPERIENCE • Oversee day-to-day operations of four dining halls and two grab-n-go’s serving 8,300 students on a meal plan; $34.2 million expense budget. • Developed and implemented Production Manager Internship and formal Student Leader Training programs for credit at Ohio University. • Presented 20 interest sessions at National Conferences and 23 interest sessions at Regional Conferences. • Major team player in the development of a six-year business plan for Culinary Services at Ohio University that funded the development of a Culinary Support Center, major renovation of two dining halls, and will fund the major renovation of two more dining halls.

WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO ACCOMPLISH AS SECRETARY/TREASURER ? NACUFS is about supporting college and university food service operations and helping them be the best. I am committed to keeping NACUFS strong financially during these challenging times, while serving the best interests of our members and the association. I plan to accomplish these goals by: • Aligning our spending with the strategic plan. •M  aximizing our resources by partnering with other associations that provide services our members need and sharing our resources with those associations. I have served as chair of the Allied Association Partnering Project Team. Through strategic partnering we can offer more services in a cost effective manner. •C  ontinued commitment to fund educational programs such as our institutes, online education programs, webinars, seminars, symposiums, and pre-conference workshops. Education is vital if we are to be successful. I have served as Secretary/Treasurer during good and bad economic times and have demonstrated that I am committed to keeping NACUFS financially strong. My 22 years of volunteer service further demonstrates my commitment to NACUFS.

WHAT ARE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO NACUFS? In my second term as Secretary/Treasurer we created a $500,000 National Conference Reserve to fund scholarships to the National Conference, keep the registration costs to future National Conferences affordable, and enhance the conference to encourage more members to attend. We lowered the registration fee beginning with the 2011 National Conference from $625 to $450. The 2013 National Conference registration fee is a very affordable $525. In 2009 the downturn in the economy necessitated utilizing $207,964 of our reserves. In 2010 we returned the entire $207,964 to our reserves.

C O N F E R E N C E

FOR SECRETARY/TREASURER

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CANDIDATE

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Recognizing Excellence IN COLLEGIATE DINING

2012

Collegiate foodservice is a demanding profession worthy of special attention. Each year, the many NACUFS awards and recognition opportunities celebrate success in culinary arts, menu design, merchandising, marketing, nutrition, and service to the association and the industry. NACUFS congratulates the 2012 recipients outlined in the following pages.

INDIVIDUAL HONORS REGIONAL PRESIDENTS’ AWARDS Continental Region

THEODORE W. MINAH DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD Russ Meyer The University of Nevada, Reno

David Friend, West Virginia University Percell Green, Messiah College Midwest Region

Karen Adkins, Ball State University Robin Allen, RD, LD, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Northeast Region

Renee Soluk, Harvard University James Barnett, Yale University Law School Pacific Region

RICHARD LICHTENFELT AWARD Nancy Lane Hubert

Timothy Dietzler

Villanova University

Bonnie Crouse, University of California– Santa Barbara Sharon Coulson, University of California–Davis Southern Region

Kirk Rodriguez, Texas Tech University Joseph Spina, NACUFS

STUDENT EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR

Emily Kirchner, Bryn Mawr College

DARYL VAN HOOK INDUSTRY AWARD Mona Milius Bakergroup

This issue of Campus Dining Today features the 2012 recipients of the association's awards and contests. Be sure to join us at the 2013 NACUFS

DAVID R. PRENTKOWSKI DISTINGUISHED LIFETIME MEMBER AWARD H. Michael Rice Michigan State University

National Conference to celebrate the winners of this year's awards.

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Mid-Atlantic Region

R E C O G N I T I O N

Greg Gefroh, University of North Dakota Barbara Lettich, Brigham Young University

DISTINGUISHED LIFETIME MEMBER AWARD RENAMED TO HONOR DAVID R. PRENTKOWSKI

David R. Prentkowski Jan. 14, 1957-Aug. 9, 2012

In 2012, NACUFS renamed its Distinguished Lifetime Member Award to honor longtime member and volunteer, David Prentkowski. Prentkowski was the director of food services at the University of Notre Dame, a position he held for 22 years. R E C O G N I T I O N

The award, now known as the David R. Prentkowski Distinguished Lifetime Member Award, was created in 1990 to honor retired members who have supported the betterment of college and university foodservice and the association. Winners of this award earn an honorary lifetime membership in NACUFS and their annual membership dues and conference registration fees are waived. The annual award is presented at the association’s national conference each July. Prentkowski presented the award to the 2012 recipient, H. Michael Rice, at the national conference in Boston. Prentkowski was active with NACUFS for more than three decades, serving in various volunteer roles, including as the association’s president in 1996-1997. NACUFS recognized Prentkowski’s outstanding service to the association by presenting him with the Richard Lichtenfelt Award in 2001. He received the association’s top honor, the Theodore W. Minah Distinguished Service Award, in 2006 as recognition of his exemplary contributions to NACUFS and the foodservice industry.

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“NACUFS has meant a tremendous amount to me during my career. I am truly honored to have this prestigious award named after me and I thank the board of directors for the acknowledgment,” said Prentkowski upon learning of the honor. Prentkowski passed away on August 9, 2012, leaving behind a legacy of service, dedication, and integrity to NACUFS and the foodservice industry. His impact will not soon be forgotten.

CL ARK E . DEHAVEN SCHOL AR SHIPS The Clark E. DeHaven Scholarship Trust, established in 1990, honors Clark E. DeHaven, NACUFS’ first executive director. Its purpose is to provide merit scholarships to students at member institutions who are committed to pursuing careers in accredited programs in the foodservice profession or related areas. The program has awarded more than $200,000 to more than 60 recipients since 1992.

2012 RECIPIENTS

Sara Dickinson Iowa State University

Brittany Jones Iowa State University

Courtney Gullett Cornell University

Kara Lucas University of Akron

2012 AWARDS & RECOGNITION

The 12th annual Culinary Challenge showcased the skills of chefs at member institutions in an exciting live-action competition presented at the NACUFS national conference. The contestants, chosen in regional culinary challenges, each had 60 minutes with an additional five minutes for plating, to produce four portions of a creative entrée using flounder as the mandatory ingredient, with side dishes and sauces to create a nutritionally balanced plate. Laura Strunk from the University of Notre Dame, was awarded first place in this year’s competition. Strunk won the challenge and a gold medal from the American Culinary Federation (ACF). Receiving second place and an ACF gold medal was Manfred Werner Edler from Villanova University; Cesar Tovar of Rice University took home third place and an ACF silver medal. ACF Silver Medals were awarded to Mary Ferrer of the University of California, Berkeley, Philip Edwards of Concordia College, and Nery Trigueros of Cornell University, who also was voted “People’s Choice winner by those who completed ballots at the competition. Three certified executive chefs judged the competition. Judging criteria were based on the taste of the finished product, the demonstration of cooking skills and culinary techniques, and the practice of organizational skills, including sanitation principles.

Top: The 2012 Culinary Challenge contestants and judges. Left: Culinary Challenge winner Laura Strunk presents her dish to the judges. Right: 2012 Culinary Challenge chair Jonna Anne shows off the mandatory ingredient, flounder.

Chef Laura Strunk (above) prepares her winning dish.

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CULINARY CHALLENGE

R E C O G N I T I O N

Watch the 2013 Culinary Challenge live on July 11 during the national conference in Minneapolis.

2012 AWARDS & RECOGNITION

C-STORE BEST IN T HE BUSINESS AWARDS

R E C O G N I T I O N

Recognizing leadership in product mix, marketing, layout, design, and great new ideas, the C-Store Best in the Business competition provides an opportunity for college and university campuses to share stories of their latest improvements and highlight their retail and convenience store best practices.

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THE HYBRID STORE Winner: Zee’s Quaker, University of Akron NEW STORE DESIGN INNOVATION Winner: Munchy Mart, University of Northern Colorado UPDATING YOUR EXISTING C-STORE Winner: South Campus Express, Syracuse University MERCHANDISING IN YOUR RETAIL VENUES Winner: The Emporium, University of Dayton Honorable Mention: The Creamery on Ninth (CONE), Brigham Young University RETAIL LOSS PREVENTION BEST PRACTICES Bits N Bytes C3, Boise State University “OUT OF THE BOX” IDEAS Market Street at McCracken, Miami University Eastway Market and Deli, Kent State University Union South Badger Market, University of Wisconsin Madison Sam’s Express, Texas Tech University

NUTRI TION AWARDS BEST VEGAN RECIPE

This biennial contest recognizes institutions that meet the dietary needs of their vegan customers and incorporate healthful alternative foods on their menus. 1st Place Eastern Michigan University

Quinoa Salad 2nd Place University of New Hampshire

Italian Tofu Sauté 3rd Place University of California—Riverside

Wasabi Crusted Tofu with Bok Choy and Shittake

MOST INNOVATIVE NUTRITION PROGRAM

This annual contest recognizes colleges and universities that have implemented a unique and effective nutrition program during the year. 1st Place University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

“Paint the Dining Hall Orange” 2nd Place Binghamton University

“Nourish U with Alexa” 3rd Place Cornell University

“Got Milk?”

2012 AWARDS & RECOGNITION

SUSTAINABILI T Y AWARDS

R E C O G N I T I O N

The NACUFS Sustainability Awards annually recognize and honor member institutions that have demonstrated outstanding leadership in the promotion and implementation of environmental sustainability, specifically as it relates to campus dining operations. The awards support the globally accepted triple bottom line philosophy, a method of evaluating operational performance by measuring financial success as well as environmental sustainability and social responsibility— also known as “people, planet, profit.” WASTE MANAGEMENT Gold: University of Washington:

Composting/Recycling Program

Silver: Johnson County Community College:

Composting/Recycling Program

Bronze: University of Nevada, Reno:

Food Waste Digester

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Marine Stewardship Council Certified Seafood Bronze: Emory University:

ENERGY AND WATER CONSERVATION Gold: George Mason University:

75% Local/Sustainable Foods by 2015

Reducing Environmental Footprint/Energy Reduction

OUTREACH & EDUCATION Gold: University of Massachusetts:

MATERIALS & RESOURCES Gold: Rhode Island School of Design:

UMass Dining Permaculture Initiative Silver: Stanford University: Sustainable Food Program “Living Laboratory”

100% Organic Waste Diversion

Bronze: Kennesaw State University:

Sustainable Food Program/The Commons

Silver: University of Illinois: Climate Action Plan GREEN STUDENT CHAMPION: Sarah Archibald, McGill University

One of the most prestigious competitions in collegiate foodservice, the Loyal E. Horton Dining Awards contest is a highly competitive peer recognition program. The awards recognize exemplary menus, presentations, special event planning, and dining concepts, and provide an avenue for sharing ideas and creative presentations. Judges spent several days at the NACUFS office in Okemos, Mich., poring over more than 140 entries for the 2012 contest. In the end, gold, silver, bronze, and honorable mention awards were presented to the “best of the best” in the contest’s six categories. The grand prize winners were announced at the association’s national conference in Boston and are featured on the following pages.

2012 Dining Awards Judges

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PROCUREMENT PRACTICES Gold: Messiah College: “Sunflower Power” Silver: University of California Berkeley:

2012 LOYAL E. HORTON DINING AWARDS

CATEGORY WINNERS SMALL SCHOOL

Gold Hendrix College Silver Concordia College

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MEDIUM SCHOOL

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Gold Azusa Pacific University LARGE SCHOOL

Gold University of Georgia Silver Stanford University Bronze University of Rhode Island Honorable Mention University of North Texas

RESIDENTIAL DINING CONCEPTS

GRAND PRIZE:

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA Providing value and variety for The University of Georgia’s meal plan customers is the core of its food service program. Throughout the year, UGA hosts special events that bring students together and contribute to their social growth. Dining on the University of Georgia meal plan is exciting for students as UGA has extensive menu options with unlimited accessibility. Special benefits are offered such as off-site meals when conflicts arise, access to nutrition services when seeking health knowledge, and an abundance of healthy dining options in an atmosphere that provides stress relief and fun. Dining with UGA Food Services and participating in the meal plan is a choice. Because of that, UGA strives to always offer the very best in service and dining quality. When students enter one of the four dining commons, UGA staff wants them to feel welcome and know that they are cared for. UGA is a home away from home for students, and the goal is to create a nurturing environment where students can interact, study, and just “hang out.”

2012 LOYAL E. HORTON DINING AWARDS

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY– HAWAII “The Earth trembles beneath your toes, the sky crackles, thunder rumbles through the land, and the heavens open up and pour out blessings. The Great Mystical Dragon of China has arrived.” On February 2, 2012, the Club Dining Facility at Brigham Young University Hawaii put on a Chinese New Year celebration for students, faculty, and staff. Dancing lights shone on the walls from hanging lanterns dimly lit. Cherry blossom trees greeted all guests in eager anticipation of the night to come. Giddy laughter was heard escaping behind performers’ closed curtains waiting for the night’s celebration to start. The Great Mystical Dragon of China came to bless all travelers going into the New Year with abundance and peace. Glittering gold and bright splashes of red adorned The Club, beckoning all guests to come.

SMALL SCHOOL

Gold Brigham Young University– Hawaii Silver Hendrix College Bronze Concordia College Honorable Mention Concordia College MEDIUM SCHOOL

Gold SUNY at Cortland University of North Carolina– Wilmington Silver SUNY at Cortland Bronze University of Richmond Honorable Mention University of Dayton LARGE SCHOOL

Gold Vanderbilt University Silver University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Bronze Virginia Tech Honorable Mention Yale University

R E C O G N I T I O N

GRAND PRIZE:

CATEGORY WINNERS

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RESIDENTIAL DINING— SPECIAL EVENT

2012 LOYAL E. HORTON DINING AWARDS

CATEGORY WINNERS SMALL SCHOOL

RETAIL SALES— SINGLE CONCEPT

Gold Lynchburg College Silver Hendrix College

R E C O G N I T I O N

Bronze Concordia College

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Honorable Mention Manhattan College MEDIUM SCHOOL

Gold College of the Holy Cross Silver University of San Diego Bronze University of Nevada, Reno Honorable Mention Northern Michigan University LARGE SCHOOL

Gold University of Massachusetts Silver Texas Tech University Bronze The Ohio State University Honorable Mention Miami University

GRAND PRIZE:

COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS Since its opening in January 2012, the Science Café has answered students’ desires for an additional dining opportunity on what had previously been an underserved area of the campus. To complement the Science Center’s Gold LEED Certificate, The College of the Holy Cross set out to create a concept that offered healthy foods in a sustainable matter. The menu offers seasonal, locally purchased items, prepared to order while the students wait. The Science Café features freshly-squeezed orange juice, breakfast bialy sandwiches, and Panini grilled Naan bread sandwiches. No bottled beverages are served, only premium filtered water, fountain drinks, and locally roasted organic fair trade coffee offered in reusable mugs and glasses. The Science Café occupies a small footprint which enables quick and efficient service. Despite its size, the Café sells an average of 525 meals per day, with roughly 70 percent of those meals being ordered during the peak hours of 11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. For customers in a rush or wanting freshly prepared food, the Science Café is a place for customers to enjoy a meal while leaving a positive impact on the environment.

2012 LOYAL E. HORTON DINING AWARDS

RETAIL SALES—MULTIPLE CONCEPTS/MARKETPLACE

CATEGORY WINNERS SMALL SCHOOL

Gold Ferrum College

Brock Dining Services, in partnership with Sodexo Canada, has been the exclusive food provider for 40 years at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, serving more than 17,000 students, faculty, and staff on a daily basis. Brock University is located in the heart of the agricultural Greenbelt within the Niagara region. The Tower Cafeteria was located in the basement of the focal point at Brock University for approximately 30 years. In May 2009, with the financial help of Sodexo, the construction for The Guernsey Market commenced. The market concept was well-received by the Brock community as it was a new and innovative concept that has not been attempted before in the Niagara Region. The Guernsey Market offers fresh, high-quality, local produce from the Niagara Region farmers. We stand by the farm-to-table concept, and with all of our food prepared in house by our chefs, the Guernsey Market is a highlight of what the Niagara Region stands for. Throughout 2011, the Guernsey Market implemented its own coffee blend known as Sir Isaac Brock Coffee, which is a local, fair trade, and organic coffee. Sir Isaac Brock Blend is available throughout the whole campus, but is roasted on-site in the Guernsey Market. A smoothie station and a sizzling salad station have also been implemented. All of the new additions were in response to the customers’ wants and needs.

Gold Brock University Silver University of San Diego Bronze Saint Lawrence University Honorable Mention University of Dayton LARGE SCHOOL

Gold North Carolina State University Silver The Ohio State University Bronze Virginia Commonwealth University Honorable Mention Michigan State University Miami University

R E C O G N I T I O N

BROCK UNIVERSITY

MEDIUM SCHOOL

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GRAND PRIZE:

2012 LOYAL E. HORTON DINING AWARDS

CATEGORY WINNERS SMALL SCHOOL

Gold Alfred State College Silver United States Military Academy

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Bronze Hendrix College

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Honorable Mention Bryn Mawr College MEDIUM SCHOOL

Gold Cleveland State University Silver Azusa Pacific University Bronz Washington University in St. Louis Buffalo State College Honorable Mention Case Western Reserve University LARGE SCHOOL

Gold University of Michigan Silver University of Arizona Bronze University of North Texas Honorable Mention Vanderbilt University

CATERING— SPECIAL EVENT

GRAND PRIZE:

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Just one week before “The Game,” the University of Michigan Wolverines scraped knives against the Buckeyes of The Ohio State University in a different kind of match up. Each university brought their top chefs to the table to engage in a culinary battle on the field of The Culinary Vegetable Institute (CVI) for a special Earth to Table Dinner. All courses prepared were representative of each school’s region. The guest list included friends of CVI, as well as fans of each side. To play off of the rivalry, guests were charged with picking a winning menu. With this understanding, both schools put together strong special teams to prepare unforgettable dishes featuring the finest sustainable ingredients, including seasonal vegetables grown on the nearby Chef’s Garden farm. Seventeen dishes were served in all to 120 very appreciative guests. Having a love of food in common, strangers and sometimes rivals left the event as friends. While one team was victorious that night, the true winners were all who celebrated delicious, locally produced ingredients. As an extra point, event proceeds were used to support CVI’s Veggie U educational efforts to local schools.

2012 LOYAL E. HORTON DINING AWARDS

VIRGINIA TECH

SMALL SCHOOL

Gold Concordia College Silver Hendrix College Bronze Calvin College MEDIUM SCHOOL

Personal Touch Catering’s strategy is to offer top-quality food and service at a reasonable price. Menus vary from standard full service events to a simple solution concept that allows clients to select the same menu items at a lesser fee based on delivery and presentation options.

Gold Ashland University

Success is defined by finding and retaining high-value customers. The department believes it’s critical that they exert the extra effort to ensure the retention of the business of top clients by creating and maintaining the highest level of client satisfaction. Most of their new business comes through referrals from repeat clients.

Gold Virginia Tech

Sustainability means a commitment to continuous improvement in a variety of different areas. In order to provide the best service possible, Personal Touch Catering recognizes the need to craft an inspiring work environment where all employees’ contributions are valued and creativity in both food preparation and sustainability efforts are encouraged. They accomplish this by ensuring that a healthy work/life balance is attainable, by maintaining a strong and comprehensive recycling program, by composting all inedible food waste and by fostering a sense of community by offering edible leftovers to local food banks. Personal Touch provides a a one-of-a kind experience for each event they cater, taking their clients’ visions and turning them into reality on a daily basis. Their dedication to creating a distinct occasion for each client and each event is paramount to their mission.

LARGE SCHOOL

Silver University of California, San Diego Bronze Syracuse University Honorable Mention University of Georgia

R E C O G N I T I O N

GRAND PRIZE:

CATEGORY WINNERS

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Together WORKING

BUILDING A MULTI-GENERATIONAL TEAM IN THE WORKPLACE Donna Boss and contributing editors

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T

he mixing together of four very different generations in the workplace is a unique phenomenon in our history. The great diversity they demonstrate can be the cause of continuous dissension and conflict, or the opportunity for creative vigor and new problem-solving ideas. In this issue, we explore this phenomenon from several points of view. The introduction presents an overview of the generations—the events that influence their perspective and values, as well as how they approach their work and colleagues. The other features highlight best practices in developing generational teams, training, career advancement and mentoring, and tips for working with

generations. Together, the articles provide an inside look at how college and university dining service professionals view and manage generational differences. They’re showing remarkable creativity as they take advantage of opportunities to put diversity into practice and become a driving force in creating a vibrant environment that leads to successful operations. In addition, in this issue’s food section, chefs contribute their takes on comfort foods, revealing their favorites and how they’ve translated these into customers’ popular, often-requested menu items.

Vive la différence!

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WHO ARE TH E GENERAT IONS?

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The contemporary American workforce and workplace have become more diverse than ever before. The combination of different ethnicities, different races, both genders, and four distinct generations creates daunting challenges for management. These differences require new techniques and new solutions if the workplace is going to remain and eventually become more productive and financially successful. “There is a growing realization that the gulf of misunderstanding and resentment between older, not so old, and younger employees in the workplace is growing and problematic,” according to Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, and Bob Filipczak in their book Generations at Work. “It is a rift that will not heal itself or just go away, as so many organizations—those even aware of it—fervently hope. It is a problem based in economics, demographics, and world views that must confronted to be solved.”

WHAT IS A GENER AT ION AND WH Y ARE T HE GENERAT IONS S O DIFFERENT? A generation is “a society-wide peer group, born over approximately 20 years, who collectively possess a common persona,” according to Michael D. Young, vice chancellor for student affairs, University of California, Santa Barbara, presenting “Managing Generations in the 21st Century Workplace” at a leadership institute, Navigating UC’s Strategic Course for Administration. Members of a generation share a common history, the shared experiences of seminal events that shape their values, expectations, perceptions, opportunities, and obstacles during the formative years. Those shared experiences give members of a generation a common bond, Young says, “making them perceive themselves to be part of a common generation, and also make them different from other generations in their values and their expectations.”

Right now, there are four generations that are attempting to blend in today’s workplace. •V  ETERANS/TRADITIONALISTS (ALSO KNOWN AS GI AND SILENT): Born 1925–1945, ages 68+ (very few in the college and university workplace) • BABY BOOMERS: Born 1946–1964, ages 49-67 • GEN XERS: Born 1965–1980, ages 33-48 •M  ILLENNIALS: Born 1981–2001, ages 12-32 Note that various researchers define the generations differently; age spans in each may vary by one to four years. The mixing together in the workplace of people born over such a range of history, and the range of remarkable events that shaped their characters, is an extraordinary phenomenon. It also creates enormous challenges when you consider that, more so now than ever before, people of such wide age range with such different experiences are expected to work together directly. The generations are less sequestered from each other than they have ever been, with less organizational stratification than ever to keep them apart. “At no previous time in our history have so many and such different generations with such diversity been asked to work together shoulder to shoulder, side by side, cubicle to cubicle,” declare the authors of Generations at Work.

Such different attitudes and values create areas of potential generational conflict in the workplace. These include differences over work ethics, views of organizational hierarchy, dealing with change, and managing technology. If managers are going to deal with areas of potential conflict—and take advantage of differing views and values to use them as a source of new opportunities and creative vigor rather than dispute and stress—they need to be aware of the specific differences in point of view among their employees, and appreciate just how wide the gap can often be.

The next page shows the most commonly observed differences among the generations in the ways they approach work, their careers, and their fellow workers, as observed by Anick Tolbize, Research and Training Center on Community Living, University of Minnesota, in his paper “Generational Differences in the Workplace,” and by Michael D. Young’s presentation, “Managing Generations in the 21st Century Workplace.” Differences in attitudes and expectations create opportunities for frequent misunderstandings and difficulties in communication and coordination, but they also create chances for new visions and problem-solving approaches in the workplace. In addition, they create new opportunities for maximizing what a workforce can achieve together through seeking what is different rather than attempting to avoid what each person has uniquely to offer. Which way our generational diversity will go depends greatly on how managers deal with the differences they find and how willing they are to learn the best practices for handling those characteristics. u Sources: Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation by Neil Howe and William Strauss Serving the Millennial Generation/New Directions for Student Services edited by Michael D. Coomes and Robert DeBard Generational Differences/Survey Report: A Study for Human Resources Management by Society for Human Resource Management, SHRM Research Generations at Work/Managing the Clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers, and Nexters in Your Workplace by Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, Bob Filipczak

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The very different times in which each generation grew up and underwent its formative experiences have created extremely different “personae” that each generation shares among many of its members. The Veterans matured during World War II, many of them lived through the Great Depression, and they learned to value and depend on discipline, authority, and tradition. The Baby Boomers, the largest generation, of roughly 78 million, grew up during the social upheavals of the sixties and acquired a lasting sense of optimism and self-worth. The Gen Xers came of age in a time of financial insecurity and as a result have become more self-reliant and more questioning of authority. And Millennials have grown up in a time of neo-optimism and accelerating technological advances, making them adaptable to change and accepting of diversity.

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G EN ERAT IONAL TRAITS IN THE WO R KPLACE

SEMINAL EVENTS To appreciate the enormous difference in the formative experiences of these generations and the enormous differences in personality and viewpoint that need to merge together to make a single workforce, consider the historical events that shaped the characters of these four generations.

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The Great Depression • Franklin Roosevelt Presidency (New

Veterans

Nagasaki • Cold War McCarthy Hearings • Post-War Economic Boom • Television • Commercial Air Travel • Big Band Era

Civil Rights/Black Power Movements • Birth Control Pill

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Deal) • Pearl Harbor • World War II • Atomic Bombs: Hiroshima/

Introduced • John F. Kennedy Elected President • Cuban Missile

Baby Boomers

Crisis • John Glenn Circles the Earth • Martin Luther King March on Washington • JFK, MLK, RFK Assassinations • Moon Landing • Woodstock • Vietnam War • Kent State Shootings • Rock and Roll

Watergate • Energy Crisis • Three-Mile Island • John Lennon

Gen Xers

Killed • Challenger Disaster • Fall of the Berlin Wall • Operation Desert Storm • Rodney King Beating and LA Riots • Punk Rock, Rap, and Grunge • Introduction of the Personal Computer

Oklahoma City Bombing • Clinton/Lewinsky Scandal • Columbine • Dot.com Rise and Fall • Institutionalization of Internet/Web/Cell

Millennials

Phone Technologies • Gore/Bush Presidential Campaign • 9/11 • Iraq War • Hip Hop • Social Media • Gridlock in Washington • Tablet Computers • Arab Spring • Widening Economic Gap • First African-American President Source: Generations at Work and New York Times news stories

DEFINING CHARACTERISTICS The major events each generation experienced had a major impact on their personalities and value systems. While these are broad generalizations, they are considered to be key attributes of each generation.

worked in the past • Believe in paying their dues • Their word is their bond • Have respect for authority • Like social order • Averse to risk • Prefer hierarchical organizational structures

BORN 1925–1945 • AGES 68+

Equate work with self-worth, contribution, and personal fulfillment • Believe hard work and sacrifice are the price for success • Started the workaholic trend • Loyal to employers • More process than results oriented • Value health and wellness as well as growth and personal gratification • Thrive on the possibility of change

BORN 1946–1964 • AGES 49–67

Aspire to achieve a balance between work and life • Not overly loyal to employers • View job-hopping as a valid career advancement method • Have strong feelings of loyalty to family and friends • Have strong technical skills and are results focused • Like to receive feedback

BORN 1965–1980 • AGES 33–48 Comfortable with technology • Value teamwork and collective action • Embrace diversity • Are optimistic and adaptable to change • Seek flexibility • Independent • Desire a balanced life • Are multi-taskers • Are the most highly educated generation • Are confident • Value training • Believe respect must be earned • Accept authority • Are rule followers • America’s most ethnically and racially diverse generation

BORN 1981–2001 • AGES 12–32

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restraint • Like conformity • Need respect • Make decisions based on what

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Conservative and disciplined • Have a sense of obligation • Observe fiscal

GENERATIONAL DIFFERENCES SURVEY REPORT:

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12%

10% Veterans

Millennials

Source: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM): Generational Differences Survey Report, August 2004

34%

Baby Boomers Gen Xers

44%

STRATEGIES FOR WORKING WITH Many organizations are experiencing generational conflict today. Senior leaders and managers sometimes have a hard time understanding, and therefore trusting, younger workers who are anxious to find their role in the organizational leadership. Younger workers often can‘t understand why senior leaders and managers believe and do what they do, and their questioning often leads to conflict. Most of this tension results from generational differences that exist because of contrasting values. We make choices and decisions based on our value system, and differing values often lead to misunderstandings and misinterpretation. This, in turn, hampers our relationships and lessens the effectiveness of our work together. It’s up to us to take advantage of our generational differences to help make our teams more productive and more successful. To do that, we must make an effort to recognize and respond to generational conflict situations and to resolve them in a way that makes work a better place to be. A way to do that is to implement M.E.E.T.:

M.E.E.T.

Other strategies to work with generational differences that create workplace challenges include: 1.  Do a “skills and interest” inventory of all department members (you might be surprised at the diversity of interests and abilities that cut across generations). When asked, people will respond. 2.Develop ways to pass along organizational knowledge to newer staff. Understand that storytelling is not necessarily a waste of time. 3.  Reverse mentoring. Choose or assign mentors not necessarily on similarities but rather on differences, with younger staffers providing guidance in some areas to those who are older. u

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By Scott Hoffland Director of Restaurant Operations University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee

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GENERATIONAL DIFFERENCES

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CLASHPOINTS

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Institutions

Baby Boomers

Gen Xers

Millennials

Want to put their own stamp on institutions

Are skeptical of institutions

Will judge institutions on their own merits

Baby Boomers

Gen Xers

Millennials

Money, title, recognition, the corner office

Freedom is the ultimate reward

Work that has meaning for “me”

Baby Boomers

Gen Xers

Millennials

Formal yearly feedback with clear rewards

Frequent, honest, immediate feedback

Feedback on demand

Veterans

Baby Boomers

Gen Xers

Millennials

Support me in shifting the balance

Help me balance everyone else and find meaning myself

Give me balance now, not when I’m 65

Work isn’t everything; I need flexibility to balance all my activities

Veterans

Baby Boomers

Gen Xers

Millennials

I learned it the hard way; you can too

Train them too much and they might leave

The more they learn, the more they stay

Continuous learning is a way of life

Veterans

Baby Boomers

Gen Xers

Millennials

Veterans

Are loyal to institutions

Veterans

Rewards

Satisfaction of a job well done

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Feedback

Work/Life Balance

Training

Job Changing

No news is good news

Job changing carries a stigma

Job changing puts you behind

Job changing is necessary

Job changing is part of my daily routine

Baby Boomers

Listen to their war stories (have patience with them).

Give recognition, rewards, and credit.

Appreciate and respect their experience. Use them as mentors or coaches. Structure technology training carefully.

Respect their hard work. Provide opportunity to work in teams. Work to build consensus; gather their input.

Gen Xers

Allow autonomy. Give FAST feedback (frequent, accurate, specific, timely). Offer opportunities for continued learning and development. Provide open communication and information.

Provide flexible work options to retain them.

Offer opportunities for personal & professional development.

Provide structured opportunities to learn and develop.

Provide structured opportunities to learn and develop.

Give access to information and decision-makers.

Provide “tokens” that indicate their experience (status) and/or affiliation.

Capture their experience.

Provide a challenge, fun & excitement.

Provide soft benefits and flexibility.

Millennials

Provide structure and guidance. Ask for their input (they will give it anyway). “Reverse” mentoring. Maintain technology. Manage projects, not time. Provide challenge & increasing responsibility. Stress mission and values.

Watch for results, not process.

Source: Excerpted from When Generations Collide by Lynne Lancaster and David Stillman References: “Generational Differences,” SHRM Survey Report, August 2004 “Think Young,” Clare Fitzgerald, INSIGHT Magazine “Aging Baby Boomers Bring Age Bias to the Forefront,” Bill Leonard, SHRM website “Employee Loyalty Rules Changing,” Steve Bates, SHRM Website “Diversity & Generations, The Boomers and the Xers,” Clare Raines, www.generationsatwork.com/articles/millenials.htm “Oh, Grow Up! Those Kids in the Conference Room,” www.cnn.com “Peter Pan in the Workforce,” Cam Marston, www.marstoncomm.com/ “Emerging Generations,” Mobility Magazine, October 2002 “Generation *##@**##@!!,” Fast Company, www.fastcompany.com “The State of the Workforce 2005: United States,” Corporate Leadership Council, March 2005 “Generation X & Y Employees,” Corporate Leadership Council, August 2004 “Attracting & Retaining Gen X, Baby Boomer & Mature Employees, Corporate Leadership Council,” February 2003 “Multi-Generational Preferences in the Workplace,” Corp Leadership Council, April 2004 Institute for Global Ethics, Ethics Newsline, October 11, 2005, www.globalethics.org Understanding Generational Differences in the Workplace: Bridging the Generational Gap, FSCS, 2003.

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Veterans

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OTHER TIPS FOR MANAGING THE DIFFERENT GENERATIONS

CASE STUDY

BLENDING MULTIPLE GENERATIONS

Successful

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TEAM

By Sue Hawkins, Director, University Center Dining Services University of California, Santa Barbara

The University Center (UCen) Dining Services is the retail entity of campus dining at UC Santa Barbara and provides foodservice in the campus student union as well as satellite units across campus. UCen Dining is self-operated and consists of four convenience stores, two full-service cafes, a coffeehouse, soup and salad bar, a fully sustainable hamburger concept, three exterior espresso/coffee carts, and campus catering. Our retail units and catering are supported by the central kitchen, a commissary kitchen that produces our baked goods, soups, and pre-packaged sandwiches and salads for our retail units. Annual sales for UCen Dining are $6.0 million and staffing consists of 22 career employees and 250 student staff. We are primarily student run, employing students in positions ranging from cashiers and production staff to unit managers.

The largest and most generation-diverse unit is our central kitchen. This department consists of six full-time career employees and 70 part-time student employees. The kitchen is heavily staffed by those in the Millennial generation followed by Gen X, and Boomers. Added to the complexity are people of varying languages and a staff of 10 who are developmentally disabled. The staff of the central kitchen is responsible for food production and distribution of food to satellite units. Most tasks are done in teams, and those groups are age-diverse. Tasks include prepping vegetables and meats, portioning salads, making sandwiches, scooping dough, and baking breads, muffins, and cookies.

The multi-generational team: (From left to right) Janelle Zagala, Millennial; Reynol Oropieza, Gen X; Jenna Bennett, Millennial; Froylan Zamora, Gen X; Mallory Wilson, Millennial; Salvador Reynoso-Reynoso, Boomer; Paige Rasmussen, Millennial; John Lazarus, Gen X; Will Love, Millennial

The University Center Dining did not set out in the 1970s to become a generationally diverse workforce. Financial performance dictated that labor costs needed to be kept low and the best way to achieve that was by incorporating student labor in the mix. Training methods in those days consisted of using in-house made manuals and one-on-one, hands-on training.

As we forwarded into the mid-1990s and 2000s, we discovered that most students we hired had never worked before coming to college, putting an additional strain on our staff in terms of training and working together as a team. We also noticed that we were failing miserably at getting students to classroom training, so in 2008 we created a Web-based training program that new students could take at their convenience. From this we learned that most of the students take the exam from home between the hours of 10 p.m. and 1 a.m. These are hours that we never could have staffed in a classroom setting and revealed to us that there are differences in how and when the newer generation prefers to learn. Other methods we use for training Millennials are pictorial. Gen Xers prefer computer training, and Boomers primarily rely on print. Because our Gen X and Boomer staff is largely more experienced and older, they often can achieve results with verbal instruction. Several challenges arise with blending the generations in the workplace. Baby Boomers have been in the workforce the longest and

Collaborating on salad prep are (from left to right) Shoroog Tobaishat, Gen X, John Lazarus, Gen X, and Alexis Wright, Millennial.

Even though it can be extremely challenging, an age-diverse staff is a staff of strengths. Millennials bring energy and new ideas to the organization. They are good natured, easygoing, and eager to learn. Baby Boomers tend to be more experienced, dependable, and reliable. They are proficient in making quick decisions, adept at problem-solving, and levelheaded in a crisis. Gen Xers are flexible and often creative in problem-solving. They are willing to try new ideas, are resourceful, and adaptable. Due to their location sandwiched between Boomers and Millennials, Gen Xers are crucial in the workplace for connecting the other two groups. They are proficient at being able to easily communicate with both generations. By blending the generations we have a very rich and talented staff that works together harmoniously for a common goal. Each generation has its unique qualities, which are needed for UCen Dining to be successful. u Two Millennials, (from left to right) Jenna Bennett and Alexis Wright, work well together side-by-side.

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(From left to right) Jenna Bennett, Millennial, Shoroog Tobaishat, Gen X, and Patrick Reynolds, Millennial, work together on sandwich prep.

have high expectations of Millennials in regard to attendance and attention to detail. Gen Xers tend to work well with both groups and often help in bridging the differences. Millennials who have no prior work experience sometimes tend to have difficulty with understanding structure and work place policy. Millennials are generally quick to learn and once trained can impress even the most stubborn Baby Boomer.

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In the 1990s, we began offering classroomstyle training to all of our student production staff. Throughout a two-week period each quarter our career staff found a variety of days and times to train groups, classroomstyle, in basic food handling via PowerPoint or video training.

Chef Mario Gill, Gen X, grills asparagus.

TRAINING

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Flexibility is essential when training employees of various ages. By Lisa White and Donna Boss

How dining services trainers approach generational differences provides intriguing insight into their understanding of learning styles and training program development. In today’s fast-paced, tech-savvy society, creating effective training programs that are suitable for employees of all ages is more challenging than ever. Millennials, Gen Xers, and Baby Boomers bring various learning experiences to the workplace and respond differently to information about how to perform their jobs. For instance, dining services directors and trainers interviewed for this article agree that younger employees often feel more comfortable with a cell phone or electronic tablet in hand, preferring to receive online training information in small bites. Older employees, on the other hand,

often prefer face-to-face interactions, more structured classroom training, and written materials. In response to these and many other generational differences, dining services trainers are putting together diverse methods and means of delivering training. In addition, they’re offering lessons to help employees understand more about their own learning proclivities, strengths, and weaknesses, and those of their colleagues. The goal is to create a dynamic, interactive, and efficient workplace that thrives on diversity.

Jill Scott, pastry chef de partie, Gen X, shows BYU student Hilary Carlyle, Millennial, how to program the revolving rack oven in the Culinary Support Center.

“The younger employees catch on right away and respond very well to the online approach to training,” says Wright.

online training coordinator. “So, trainers mentor them and show them how to navigate through the online courses. As time goes on, most are feeling much more confident about their abilities to use technology.”

“At first, some of the older employees were resistant to online training because they weren’t as familiar with computers and felt more comfortable with more traditional approaches such as classroom and one-onone training,” adds Gale Cotten, BYU’s dining

Over the past three years, BYU dining has created more than 110 unique courses covering everything from knife safety and proper glove use to production efficiency and customer services. Some courses are mandatory for all employees, some are only

Boomer Gene Latta (right), cook chill chef in the Culinary Support Center, shows Millennial BYU student Cynthia Guerro (left) how much cream is added to the chicken poblano soup recipe.

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In recognition of different learning styles and the effectiveness of different training techniques for various skills, Brigham Young University’s Dining Services uses a blended training approach of weekly staff meetings, on-the-job instruction, coaching, and online courses. For the past three years, the use of online training is taking a more dominant place in the overall training mix. In 2009, Dean Wright, director of BYU Dining Services, implemented an in-house, online training program primarily targeted to its largest employee group—2,000 student employees who are mostly under the age of 25 years old and holding a job in foodservice for the first time. Only about 100 employees are full-time, 90 percent of whom are over 30.

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BRI G HA M YOUNG UN I VERSIT Y MOVES INTO O N L I N E E NDEAVORS

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mandatory for new employees, and some are optional. Compliance with mandatory training is a condition of employment.

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At Cannon Commons, a residential dining facility, new hires are required to take Program 1, which contains 16 lessons, within the first 30 days of employment or before they are hired. Under Wright’s supervision, the facility’s managers decide which courses more seasoned employees must take and how many courses during each school year are required. Individual dining services managers customize the training requirements to fit their needs for employees’ job skill competency. All employees are required by OSHA to take Hazard Communication (HazCom) training, so dining services developed a two-part course, which was so successful that it has since been adopted by the university for all employees. Though the course subject matter dictates the online presentation of material, most courses include five to 25 minutes of basic information with interactive quiz questions, simulation scenarios, flash animations, drawings, and videos to help employees gain 100 percent subject mastery. Developed by Cotten using Adobe Captivate as the authoring tool, the list of required trainings are posted on a learning management system (LMS). The LMS automatically sends the employees an email listing required courses, tracks which learning modules employees have taken, and provides management reports about individual’s progress. LMS also tracks classroom training if it is also needed

At BYU’s Culinary Support Center, Executive Pastry Chef Fernanda Dutra, Boomer, shows BYU student Carrie Barber, Millennial, how to make lemon buttermilk panna cotta.

for course completion. For example, ServSafe training includes online and classroom training conducted by Executive Chef John McDonald. In addition, LMS tracks training held offsite at NACUFS institutes and other venues. When employees complete training they can print a completion certificate or the LMS can generate a report and send it via email to them, their managers, and/or supervisors. The system also automatically sends reminders and notifications to employees and management of training progress. “The advantage of using this type of tool is that it is accessible 24/7 and helps managers standardize training requirements and completion tracking,” Cotten says. “In 2011, Brigham Young’s online training saved the university thousands of dollars compared with conventional training,” Cotten says. “The total online training savings in 2011 was about $120,000, which includes $14,000 in savings for HazCom training alone. Previously, employees had to go to the library and watch a generic off-the shelf movie and were paid about $7.50 for viewing the one-hour video. Now, with online training, the lesson takes 20 minutes and costs about $3 per employee.” When creating each online course, which Cotten estimates takes about 20 hours, she and her team select themes of interest to trainees. “For example, in one retail unit, The Cougareat, management wanted a pirates theme for their new employee orientation, so I made them ‘Pirates of the Cougareat.’ It was great fun!” she says. In contrast, at the Culinary Support Center, OSHA mandated crane safety training for the cook/chill process. Cotten created a 15-minute crane operator module that met all of OSHA’s requirements. “This training was specifically written to educate older full-time employees who use this piece of equipment,” she says. Though many online courses directly replace hour-long, classroom-style training sessions, face-to-face training with one-on-one reinforcement is still an important facet of the educational experience for certain skills development, such as culinary arts and high level customer service. “While the basics of menu planning, for example, can be taught

David Henry (right), director of dining services at UCR, Boomer, and Cheryl Garner (left), executive director of dining services, Boomer, congratulate Philip Ference (middle), a Millennial and senior cook who works in the A-I residential restaurant and was recently voted as the employee of the year as part of the OZ awards program for full-time career staff employees.

UN I VERSIT Y OF C A L I FO R NIA, RIVERSIDE TA PS I N TO SAME G EN ERAT ION T RAINERS

or need more interaction, dining services pairs new employees with an experienced staff member for an on-the-job shadowing program called “Mentors.”

At the University of California, Riverside (UCR), different learning styles and preferences of staff members of different ages are addressed by creating a diverse range of training programs that includes videos, classroom sessions, and one-on-one opportunities. For example, the university uses training videos for new and returning student employees and one-on-one interactive classroom sessions for new and regular career staff. For employees who prefer

“The most important thing we’ve learned is that we must put together a training program built by the same folks who are in the training session,” says David Henry, director of dining at UCR. “For example, if we are training students, it’s best that people of their same age help develop the program to make it more relevant.” Dining services recently worked with student leadership teams during the summer to create and update safety training and orientation videos, which feature actual students.

UCR’s dining services recognizes student employees, naming them the Golden Stars.

UCR’s dining services office (DSO) also adapted the university’s iLearn, an online portal/dashboard, which students use from the very first day they arrive on campus to view class schedules, course assignments, receive test results, and other necessary information. “The DSO adopted this technology to interact and collaborate with our student employees about everything from their work schedules, employee handbook information, recruitment notifications, and other information relevant to dining service,” Henry says. “We’ve had great success and have vastly improved how we interact with our students. Students are required to check here daily and this allows us to connect with students where they spend so much of their time.”

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How material is presented during face-toface sessions requires trainers’ understanding of generational learning preferences and abilities to absorb information. “Older employees who conduct training sessions may have learned to take a didactic approach to training, standing up and reading a report for an hour and expecting the trainees to take notes to remember information,” Cotten says. “But that approach doesn’t work with today’s younger employees who require much more interaction and multimedia. So older employees must learn how to communicate more effectively. They may have the knowledge and skill proficiency, but if they can’t communicate in a way that the trainees can absorb, the time the time is wasted.”

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through an LMS module, to do it right still requires face-to-face time,” explains Wright.

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Celebrating the OZ awards at UCR are (front row, left to right) Raul Hernandez, Boomer; Julie Zeno, Gen X; Guadalupe DeLaRosa, Boomer; Josefina Flores, Gen X; Philip Ference, Millennial; (second row) Luis Frano, Gen X; Gema Rodriguez, Millennial; Jamisha Cowan, Millennial; Maria Herrera, Gen X; Takita Welchen, Millennial; William Camero, Boomer; back row Michael Neener, Gen X; Charley Johnson, Gen X; Lavert Bennet, Gen X; and Steven Acosta, Millennial.

“We’ve tapped into this program because the younger workers don’t check email the way older staff members do,” says Susan Coffman, UCR’s student program manager. “On the other hand, if we were to put our older career staff members into the iLearn environment, they would be uncomfortable. They would rather receive documented inter-office information in the form of paper documents that is hand-delivered to their work stations.” To support its training program, UCR’s dining services utilizes different employee recognition programs for older and younger employees. Held at the end of each quarter, Dazzle Mania recognizes exemplary student workers. The lighthearted celebration includes positive coaching, cheering, games, and food. For older staff members, the school puts on a more formal awards ceremony that includes a sit-down meal. “These events speak not only to training, but how staff members like to be recognized in different ways,” Henry says. “When we try to be too broad-based, the takeaway isn’t as strong.”

ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLE GE IMPLEMENTS A BU D DY SYSTEM We’ve been fortunate in our ability to acquire and keep staff members, which we attribute to providing suitable training and a hospitable work environment,” reports Wanda Grace, general manager of dining services at Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold,

Maryland. “We haven’t specifically tailored our training program for people of different generations, but we have noticed differences in these workers. For instance, older workers tend to have a good work ethic, since they have held jobs for a majority of their lives and will focus on the task at hand. For many students, this is their first job, so we have to reiterate their importance and explain that they are here to work and to focus on the tasks associated with their position.” When a new team member comes on board at Anne Arundel Dining Services, a “buddy” system is used to pair him or her with someone well seasoned in all aspects of the primary job function. “Buddies will work together until the new team member is comfortable performing by him or herself,” says Grace. “We try to cross-train as much as possible, so when new people have reached the level of confidence in their primary function, they will work with other team members to learn the basics of associated areas.” For example, an employee who is trained as an order-taker may train with a cashier to learn the importance of making sure the order tickets are filled out correctly, completely, and legibly. Later, this employee will train on the grill or another operation. “Age has no bearing on who is selected to train our staff, which ranges in age from 17 to 72,” Grace says. “Selected trainers must have the most knowledge and best performance level in their area of work. It is not unusual for employees who are 17 to 21 years old to be training a more mature new team member and visa-versa.

Staff members in this dining department do not look upon age as a determining factor of acceptance, Grace says. “The younger training members seem to enjoy having the opportunity to show the mature team members their knowledge and ability and are very encouraging to lessen the stress of the ‘new job’ syndrome. Likewise, the more mature staff enjoys taking the younger ones under their wings, finding satisfaction in teaching them new skills, and finding success in the success of others.”

“Millennials tend to prefer a link in a message as their reminder and are not afraid of using electronic devices to record information they want to remember,” he continues. “Gen Xers, Baby Boomers, and Veteran-era learners like to take hand-written notes and have a choice of using an iPad. Another notable Millennial characteristic is that their attention span is relatively as brief as their commitment to a job (average three to five years). This is in contrast to the typical Baby Boomer, who has been in the workforce 25-plus years.”

One factor influencing this acceptance is that new members are made to feel welcome as soon as they walk through the door and fall quickly and easily into the “family” fold. Birthdays and special occasions are tracked by self-designated team members and celebrated by everyone.

In January 2012, the University of Oklahoma’s dining services provided a two-day training seminar for foodservice supervisors. To reach all generations, Wahnee says, one day was focused on classroom-style learning, with campus and department experts providing hour-long sessions. Both new and experienced supervisors were able to take notes, ask questions, and discuss appropriate responses to role-playing scenarios. On the second day, the training was geared toward team building and networking.

UN I VERSIT Y OF OKLAHOMA BL EN DS T RAINING Blended training works most effectively at University of Oklahoma’s dining services, says Robbie Wahnee, Ph.D., director of talent and organizational development for housing and foodservices at the University of Oklahoma. A good trainer “will blend in clips from YouTube, add a dash of interactive classroom experiences with a pinch of playing games that are topic-enhancing, and present to the audience a smorgasbord of audio, visual, and/or kinesthetic” materials that convey a message, he adds. “Trainers must have the flexibility to alter presentations based on the manner in which trainees learn best.” The reason for blended training is to appeal to all generations’ learning preferences and styles. “For example, Millennials

At another event at the university, teams made up of members from all generations worked together to replicate a well-known jingle (a short tune used in advertising) with non-traditional instruments. Instruments, called BoomWhackers™, were given to teams that were then given a jingle, and the team had to create the tune using the BoomWhackers. Millennial participants wanted their jingle to be different than the original, while Baby Boomers wanted straight replication. “What could be taken from this is how different generations approach situations in the workplace,” Wahnee says. “For us, the exercise demonstrated the learning and communication styles of the generations involved.”

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want to know WIIFM—what’s in it [the training] for me,” says Wahnee, “So training must be solid, creative, eye-catching, and informational, providing knowledge and established principles quickly. Millennials also are more attentive to virtual learning rather than sitting in a classroom, taking notes, and nodding off. On the other hand, Gen Xers, Baby Boomers, and Veteran-era learners are more likely to enjoy a variety of choices that includes more interaction, such as listening to a presenter for one and a half hours, watching a live demonstration, or viewing a PowerPoint presentation.

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“I must emphasize how wonderful our staff is,” she continues. “The age factor never seems to enter into the ability to get along or work beside one another. They consider one another peers, regardless of age. One of our more mature team cashiers, Carol Dressler, coined the phrase ‘Every day is a great day at AACC!’ The great thing is that when she says it she really means it and you can’t help but smile and agree. She has said it so often and to so many people, it has become an unofficial college slogan and repeated by many of the administration, faculty, staff and students alike.”

G E N E R AT I O N S

Determining what types of training are necessary has become a multi-generational endeavor. An employee advisory committee was formed to provide employees of all ages with an organized and ongoing opportunity to improve the employee culture. In roundtable discussions and smaller team gatherings, employees have brought to light several important training opportunities.

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“Baby Boomers preparing for retirement wanted more guidance about retirement and wanted to make sure Gen X and Millennials had the tools to be prepared for retirement, too,” Wahnee says. “Knowing this, we’ve organized 30-minute employee empowerment sessions about benefits, retirement savings, and professional evaluations. We offer the sessions outside of traditional high-service times in the restaurants, providing more members of our team with the chance to participate.”

UNIVERS IT Y OF WISCONS IN–STOU T EMPH AS IZES EDU C AT ION ABOUT GENERATION S

more empathy for one another, including 400 student employees and their customers, and recognize the differences in themselves.” An important lesson learned during training sessions is that everyone needs to become more aware of how easily words can be interpreted differently and therefore how words must be chosen carefully to convey a precise message. For example, Thies says, if a supervisor sends a memo stating that the dress code for a meeting is business casual, a Millennial may wear nice jeans, a pullover sweater, and clean sneakers, but a Boomer may wear khakis, a button-down shirt and loafers. If the supervisor prefers one style over another, he or she must specify the expectation up front. Many materials Thies’ department uses for training cross generational lines. For instance, for customer service training, Thies’ department utilizes the FISH! video from Charterhouse Learning, which helps train employees about how to have fun with customers and better relate to them. An in-house PowerPoint presentation also is utilized to train workers of all ages on the aspects of good customer service.

At the University of Wisconsin–Stout, dining services offers basically the same training programs for its 400 student employees and 37 full-time staff members. Educating employees about generational differences goes a long way to improve communication among team members and with their customers, says Ann Thies, director of University Dining Services. “We train employees to understand different generations’ values and where they’re coming from. We also discuss different work ethics from generation to generation. For example, Millennials tend to demand change, while Gen Xers tend to accept change. Boomers, on the other hand, dislike change. The generational information is conveyed in formal training sessions and in one-on-one discussions between managers and all groups of employees that span the generations with the goal to encourage discussion and embrace awareness. “Training sessions about Millennials are most effective when student representatives who are in their 20s participate,” Thies says. “As a result of generational training, our staff members have

ME E T I N G T H E C H AL L E NGE Although challenging, tailoring training programs for staff members of different generations may be the best way to ensure that employees understand essential information and adhere to procedures. Maintaining a flexible approach goes a long way in reaching out to and including employees in performing at high standards. The end result is a vibrant workplace that shows diversity in its best light. u

Tips

TRADE By Donna Boss and Lisa White

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Generations learning to work together is a cultural phenomenon of our time. With primarily three generations—Baby Boomers, Gen X, and Millennials (a fourth generation, Veterans, are few in foodservice)—coming together with such different values and cultural orientations, the workplace is more challenging to manage, yet also more dynamic and creative than ever.

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MANAGING MULTIPLE GENERATIONS:

Indelibly imprinting their needs and attitudes into the workplace, Millennials’ influence is felt throughout organizations. Whereas Baby Boomers and late Gen Xers speak about worklife balance, Millennials let employers know they believe in life-work balance. As a result, many companies now offer more flexible working schedules. Another significant change in the workplace is the growing use of technology for communication, including scheduling and training. Yet as Jim Sullivan, a Boomer and founder and CEO of Sullivision, which specializes in employee training, recruitment, and retention, emphasizes, “While I agree that we must evolve from hi-fi to wi-fi, I still know one thing for certain— that no matter what, the restaurant business will always be more about the anthropology than the technology.” Campus Dining Today invited professionals from all three generations to share their advice about and observations on managing different generations.

MILLENNIALS Gina Vosberg

Student Scheduler North Dakota State University

UNDERSTANDING VALUES

On scheduling:

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As long as the information is relayed, I don’t care how I am approached.

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On feedback and performance reviews:

If I am doing something well, let me know. That’s motivating and I will continue. If I am doing something wrong, I like to be told right away so I can correct it. Open communication is best, but please not in front of coworkers or peers. If there is a complaint on the performance review, make sure that the issue has been addressed earlier, too.

Jenna Mitchel

Dining Room Attendant Rhode Island School of Design On scheduling:

The schedule is posted so I check that. I like to receive calls as early as possible telling me that a change that has been made. On feedback and performance reviews:

Tell me in person. I want to know where my weak spots are so I can work on them. I will listen and take in everything you say. Praise is not necessary—no news is good news. Email my performance review to me; I want a copy. On communication:

I’d rather personally talk to someone than communication through email or text message. Sometimes that is impossible because it is so busy.

Christina Nash

Dining Room Attendant Rhode Island School of Design On feedback and performance reviews:

Feedback through email works for me. Praise is nice to hear but it isn’t that important to me. I prefer performance reviews done in a relaxed style and conversational tone.

“In order to manage different generations, you must understand their values. Younger employees value time off. If they ask for a day off and you tell them they have no more vacation, they say, ‘So don’t pay me.’ Only in an emergency will they work overtime. They don’t work long hours to ‘get ahead’ so I give them as much time off as possible. Some of our management staff members think these young people aren’t interested in their jobs but I disagree—they just have different values, and the organization must acknowledge this. Some staff may work hard and get their jobs done and then they want an afternoon off. The younger generation doesn’t necessarily plan on being at a job for more than five years so they don’t plan for it. When I was their age, I didn’t think of retiring either. So we don’t make plans for them to necessarily stay on the job. One of the big changes in colleges and universities is the direction to be more like corporations. The outsourcing of education and online courses is growing, which will have an impact on how many buildings we construct or don’t construct. That will affect our foodservice volume and hours of operation.”

Jon Lewis

Director of Campus Dining Ball State University

GEN X

On scheduling:

Gen X tends to follow rules; managers must find out circumstances if exceptions to the rule are requested. On feedback and performance reviews:

People need to know what they do well, not just what they do wrong. Respect is earned and shown by listening to people’s opinions. Criticism should be given tactfully and without an audience. Face-to-face conversations in a private setting, plus in reviews. If a person makes a mistake, please be honest and make a genuine effort to help before more errors occur. I prefer a one-on-one performance review given in a quiet setting. I like feedback from peers of my choice, but also from suggested peers.

Deb Hydock

Assistant Director of Dining Services Gettysburg College On scheduling:

Gen X likes a set schedule. We’re typically willing to work any shift, but may require additional time off to care for children and/or parents (sandwich generation). Communicate schedules in writing. On communication:

Gen X tends to have the highest level of customer service skills—they get it. They have a higher level of engagement with the customer. They seem to genuinely care about their customers and see their job as more than just preparing or serving food.

Maria Shellenhamer Server, Gettysburg College On scheduling:

Communicate in person when working on the job; by phone when not in person.

On feedback and performance reviews:

Praise and recognition are always appreciated whenever deserved. Pull employee to the side for a private conversation about expectations, concerns, and areas that need growth. I prefer a private meeting for performance reviews. On communication:

The key to great communication is to be a good listener and validate concerns and ideas of all employees and customers.

BABY BOOMERS Kristen Weber

Retail Manager North Dakota State University On scheduling:

Be flexible and aware of family obligations. On feedback and performance reviews:

Face-to-face communication is best. Be accurate and specific. Keep lines of communication open.

Tammy Olson

A.M. Retail Supervisor North Dakota State University On scheduling:

Just ask us. On feedback and performance reviews:

Try and make sure everyone is praised at some point. Give constructive criticism privately. Find a way to get more employees to fill out reviews; everyone thinks [the person reviewed] will know who filled them out.

G E N E R AT I O N S

Administrative Clerk North Dakota State University

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Lynne Tanberg-Reski

Ginnie Dunleavy

Director of Auxiliary Services Rhode Island School of Design

G E N E R AT I O N S

On feedback and performance reviews:

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We do recognition in our trainings. RISD has a formal recognition program and a lot of informal wows and great jobs. I also will send a note of thanks and praise if warranted. For performance reviews, we set goals at the start of the year and do interim reviews in January and final reviews in June. We are on a merit system. The form is standard so I do not think we approach employees differently. On customer service:

This is the only area where we try and use multiple methods to train in order to touch different generational groups and make sure every employee hears what we are trying to convey. We do YouTube videos, hand-outs, roleplaying, etc. On communication:

Patti Klos

Director of Dining and Business Services Tufts University On scheduling:

When it comes to when we need workforce, we don’t make decisions on hours based on age. Rather, we look at skills and what operation needs. On feedback and performance reviews:

Recognizing that different people respond differently, we want to consistently provide feedback of when things are going well or aren’t. People of different ages respond differently and supervisors may use different words and ways of delivering praise; it’s more situational than generational. For performance reviews, we have standard process used with everyone. We’re not differentiating based on generation; how they respond is reflective of that. When coaching, we can tailor our approach to the way people respond to direction or encouragement.

With my direct reports, I find that in-person communication work best across all generations.

Danny Armitage Assistant Vice President, Campus Services University of Memphis

Bill Andreozzi

Business Manager Rochester Institute of Technology On scheduling:

I prefer to work an eight-hour shift, five days per week, but will work overtime when necessary. For scheduling, I would like as much advance notice as possible via email and posting by supervisor. On feedback and performance reviews:

Generally, give feedback anywhere at any time, but criticism should not be given to an employee in front of a customer; it should be done in training. I prefer one-on-one, face-toface performance reviews. I want to see [the review document] in advance and have time to review prior to meeting, which should be scheduled in advance.

On communication:

I find that there are challenges more with individual personality types than generations. Introverted vs. extroverted, assertive vs. passive, etc. On communication:

They are generally focused on doing the right thing, which I think comes from maturity. On Millennials:

This group trends toward needing more attention. I think this has more to do with age than with generation. Twenty years ago this age group still needed more attention. The biggest difference is attention to detail and attention deficit. This age group finds it harder to complete tasks without wanting to skip to the next task. So the ending minutes of the task are not as focused as the beginning. u

EXPLAINING WHY “Most younger staff members don’t build vacation time for a rainy day; once they earn vacation days they’ll use them right away.

I have just as much fun learning from the younger generation as I do teaching, coaching, and working with them. We both need each other to get the job done and when we can work together as a team it is a satisfying experience for both parties and our customers!”

Hal Brown

Director of Dining Services University of Northern Colorado

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Some of the younger ones don’t want to take the time to learn all the aspects of a job from the ground up, but rather they want a title or to be a supervisor even before they’ve been an employee. It was typical for my generation to work holidays, nights, and weekends, whereas nowadays everyone wants Monday through Friday schedules. Our generation didn’t have cell phones, email or Facebook. We didn’t drive nice cars or have spring break and had little or no use for credit cards. It can be a real challenge for both generations to understand and respect each other enough to work well together.

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When building a team, I need to explain more to the younger generation why we are asking them to sell certain products or do certain tasks. Once we go through the whole process from beginning to end, step by step, they buy in and make it fun. However, I, too, find myself needing to remember to explain more and more often to make sure we are on the same page; part of that is my job and part of it is the younger workforce I am working with. Our generation (Baby Boomers) wouldn’t ask why—we’d just run with it and learn as we went along.

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Perspectives on Career Advancement, Counseling and Mentoring Through the Ages By Susan Holaday

Past experiences, present conditions, and future expectations influence how directors approach their career ambitions and how they assist various-aged staff members with their future plans. A sampling of the directors’ and employees’ views reveals the plethora of different needs and desires in the workplace. Generations differ in significant ways, reflecting the influences of the era in which they grew up and shaped by the values of their times. Today, primarily three generations co-exist in the contemporary college and university workplace, all with their own attitudes toward and perspectives on the workplace and perspectives on their role within it. In this article, CDT explores how foodservice directors of different ages approach both their own career advancement opportunities and those of their employees. Keeping their own age-influenced perspectives and mentor experiences top of mind, the directors explain their approach when counseling, guiding, and coaching three groups of employees with different assumptions and expectations about career advancement. CDT also asked one of each director’s employees to offer insight about their career expectations and what they feel is the best help they can receive from their mentors. Representing different generations, these employees all seem comfortable speaking to supervisors about their goals and qualifications for future jobs.

Despite the differences in the generations, a common thread runs through all individuals’ answers to questions about career advancement–one of listening with a willingness to learn, adapt, and change. The t hree g enerations f eatured h ere a re Millennials, born between 1981 and 2001 (ages 12 to 32); Gen X, born between 1965 to 1980 (ages 33 to 48); and Baby Boomers, born between 1946 and 1964 (ages 49 to 67). Each group has its distinctive perspectives on the workplace, their role in it, and what they want and expect for career advancement.

“My career began 32 years ago with the goal of becoming a director at a large school. Today, I also teach in Ohio’s Restaurant, Hotel and Tourism program and would like to become an assistant/associate vice president should the opportunity come along, but otherwise, I am very happy with my current position. My early boss and my father urged me to work hard and finish my degree. They were right, and today I urge employees to learn new aspects of their jobs to become more promotable. Each year, we in dining services administration ask employees to tell us where they’d like to be assigned for the next year and make every effort to accommodate that. Those who are serious request work in an area where they need experience. To anyone who’s ever asked me how they can advance, I’ve repeated my early boss’ and my father’s advice. If an employee already has a degree, I emphasize learning new aspects of his/her job to become more promotable. For example, if an employee has management experience primarily in board operations, I recommend that he/she gets some retail and catering experience as well. I urge Millennials who are student leaders or assistant managers to finish college if they haven’t already. Then I tell them to do a selfassessment and answer the question: what is my ideal job? I warn them that this may not be an easy question to answer and they may change their mind in a couple of years, but they cannot advance themselves and their careers without a plan. Once employees identify their ideal jobs, they need to develop a personal plan on how to get there. I will help guide the process and offer advice, but the employee must do the work. I know they are ready to advance when they show initiative towards learning new skills and assisting in other areas of the department without being asked. I ask Gen Xers about their next career move and what they will do to achieve it.

For example, if employees want to advance from an assistant or production manager to a dining hall manager and beyond, I ask them to assess their current skill set and work toward gaining the skill set needed to advance. This usually entails gaining management experience in other aspects of college foodservice such as retail, catering, or board operations as they are all a bit different. I emphasize that excellent oral and written communication skills are required for advancement. If these skills are lacking there are seminars and classes an employee can take. I know an employee is ready to advance when they show initiative toward learning new skills and assisting in other areas of our department without being asked. I tell Boomers the same things I tell Gen X but I add this word of caution: Just because you may have more years of management experience than someone younger does not mean that you have acquired the correct skill set needed for advancement. You will really need to show that you are serious about advancing your career by taking the initiative to learn new skills and work on your weaknesses. I’m working on a succession plan to identify those interested in learning skills needed to do my job by offering the chance to help with director duties.”

AU T U M N RY D E R General Manager Ohio University

“I am very happy and enjoy my role as general manager, so I see myself staying in my current position for the next three to five years and continue to be part of the renovation project for Nelson Court, a phased project which will take place over the next few years. Next year, we’re opening a new catering facility; I’d like to be a part of that and see it all the way through, but if an opportunity arose to advance, I would have to consider the best option. You never know what the future holds.

G E N E R AT I O N S

Director of Residential Dining Ohio University

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Advancement to me means a chance to improve at a professional level. It also means having more responsibilities, duties, and challenges, and there may be a possibility for more pay. Our department communicates advancement opportunities very well, discussing them in our manager meetings to see if anyone is interested. My supervisor sends out emails to inform everyone of upcoming positions and the jobs are posted on the Ohio University job postings Web page. The best training for advancement is to work with your managers to learn what their job duties are. If the job is outside my area of expertise, I’d work to get on-the-job training. I think it’s very important for everyone to have a person to look up to. I have a mentor I look up to; she used to work with me here at Nelson. She trained me on my first fulltime position as the assistant manager and then trained me on how to be the production manager. Even though she no longer works with me, I still remember all the things she helped me with. She passed along to me sound advice: always be professional, work hard to get the things you want done, and always strive to do your best. She taught me a lot about the job but also about being a good person. She was very open-minded and very knowledgeable about life. I truly appreciate everything she taught me and will never forget her. One big thing she taught me was to work smart and be efficient. Also, she said to be kind and respectful to everyone, no matter how other people are, and to be a strong, confident, independent young woman. In our society, there are still challenges that come with being a young female in a management position. My mentor told me to always keep my head up and work hard to earn respect. If I ask someone to do a job, I better be willing to do it, too.”

JE FF YAW N

Director of Eagle Dining Services Georgia Southern University

“My advancement will come from the progression of our department takes in terms of what we serve students, the way we serve them, and the dining atmospheres we provide for them. My goal is to have my own independent restaurants as well as continuing to grow our dining department at Georgia Southern. Through my exposure and experience in dining services, I will gain an understanding of how to efficiently and effectively meet the needs of college consumers. All of our employees are made aware of different career opportunities within the campus community. We offer multiple opportunities by which our employees may progress in our department through skills training, continuing education, and direct guidance from leadership. We listen to what each employee’s aspirations are, learning their career objectives, evaluating what they are truly ready for. Patience is vital with Millennials because they are accustomed to having their needs and wants met quickly due to the technologically advanced world they grew up in. Generation X is used to consistency and permanency so we encourage them to be open-minded to change yet patient with it. We keep Boomers aware of opportunities and help them understand their role in our changing environment, and offer courses in technology. For counseling all generations, I believe that we must be willing to listen and be honest with responses. We must differentiate between what someone says and what he/she actually desires. And, we must understand the typical beliefs of each generation, for each has their commonalities but, more so, differences.” We don’t have a specific succession plan but provide promotion possibilities for up and coming ‘stars.’”

“I plan to retire within the next year. If I were interested in advancement, I’d like more opportunities to change the perception of dining services in the campus community’s minds. Within three years, I hope to be in a hammock with a mint julep in my hand. For those looking to advance, internal opportunities are posted on the university website and departmentally, and the NACUFS site is a good place to search. Training and development at departmental and university levels are helpful and NACUFS offers excellent educational opportunities.”

C A RO L Z. NORMAN Director of Dining Services University of San Diego

“My expectations for my own career advancement are having more networking and educational opportunities in order to further my growth and knowledge. I am ready to move on personally but my family obligations have kept me from doing that at this time. I lost my five-year-old son two years ago, so now spending time with my family is more important than my career advancement. I’ve had great mentors who have shown me everything I know today and given me projects requiring me to think outside the box. They counseled me daily about future opportunities and sent me to conferences where I could network and learn more about the business. In turn I give my employees the chance to learn from me and from others at conferences or during projects here at the university. I counsel each generation pretty much in the same way and give them space to make their own mistakes and discuss ways to improve.

When hiring Millennials, Gen Xers, or Boomers, I evaluate their abilities and potential to add to the team. I want team members who aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty or to question why something is done a certain way. I also want people who are willing to change when change is needed. Today, people including myself stay in their positions longer than ever. I can tell who wants to advance because they listen and do everything I ask. They work late and do not complain when things don’t go as planned. Many employees will come to me after a year or two and ask, ‘What can I do to get to your position some day?’”

C HA R LE S R A M OS

Dining Services Manager Tu Mercado, Missions Café, Franks Smoothies and Concessions University of San Diego

“I’m finishing up my Master’s business program in leadership, which has given me a new outlook to applying classroom topics to real life situations. In the future, I’d like to be director or assistant director of retail operations. Advancement would mean a director title with higher pay. I learn about opportunities through NACUFS postings, LinkedIn, or my own networking. My mentors are my former bosses at University of California, Santa Barbara and San Jose State University. I keep in touch with them and we bounce ideas off each other frequently via email, phone or conferences. I am fortunate to be in a spot that allows me to gather an abundance of diverse skills and experiences, and this seems to be the most logical opportunity for career advancement here or at another university.”

G E N E R AT I O N S

Administrative Coordinator, Special Projects, Eagle Dining Services Georgia Southern University

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WADE H ENLEY

Director of Auxiliary Services Bowie State University

G E N E R AT I O N S

“I’d like to learn and expand my skills through challenging assignments and want the opportunity to operate in an environment where I can learn from my mistakes without them being a career-ending experience.

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The genuine caring my mentor gave was a key influence in my career. He saw my progression and success as a source of pride for him. My mentor also showed me, through example, how to counsel others, and this directly impacted my style. Honest communication, giving assignments that encourage job growth, and being patient with each employee are essential when counseling employees from all generations. I see my role as providing a safety net for employees just in case anything goes awry. Yet my role is also to let my employees have opportunities to fully experience the feeling of success, so I need to know their motivations and interests. For example, Millennials are not necessarily interested in being with an institution for many years. Instead, they like to learn and grow as much as possible in a short amount of time. Many are looking for a more immediate return on their investment in their career. I look for signs that indicate employees’ readiness for added responsibility, such as Millennials’ dedication to learning all aspects of their job positions and a desire to do more than what is asked. Gen Xers, on the other hand, tend to have an ‘I work to live, not live to work’ mentality. I work to help Gen Xers balance the work and private lives. They value time off, so I counsel them to consider a delay in job advancement if their private life demands they spend a lot of time at home and/or with family. Boomers, in contrast, are driven toward some of the old trinkets of success like the corner office, reserved parking space, lofty title, and so forth. They believe in old-fashioned values like hard work eventually paying off. I try to make sure they realize that just putting in long

hours is not a prerequisite to getting ahead. I help Boomers find on-the-job challenges and related coursework that will help them stay motivated and engaged until they retire.”

JAT IN A COOK E

Auxiliary Services Specialist Bowie State University

“My current title is auxiliary services specialist. I handle the day-to-day operation of the ID Office, working closely with the director and assistant director of auxiliary services. My daily tasks consist of monitoring, invoicing, and reconciling transaction reports of dining services, bookstore, and vending. I train support staff and supervise the hiring and selection for student employees. My other administrative duties are ID production, equipment troubleshooting/diagnostics, and event scheduling. What I love best about my job is providing services to students and seeing how the services affect these young people. I really enjoy making a difference, whether by adding a new lunch option or a new card service. For me, advancement is about new challenges and obstacles as well as having the opportunity to learn new things. My goal is to always move upward. In three years, I see myself as a manager of auxiliary services and the ID Office, working closely with the dining services manager. In preparation I make sure I stay current with new trends in my career field. I also attend conferences when funds are available to cover the cost. I have a mentor and his advice is very valuable as I plan the next steps for my career. I’m learning which skills I need to improve upon to increase my chances for promotions.”

“As my career progresses in auxiliary services, I find my skill set as a manager, operator, and entrepreneur are needed as a coach, mentor, and experienced administrator within higher education. I love what I’m doing on this campus. Binghamton University is a highly progressive, growing institution with great people and clear vision for the future of higher education. I tell people I have the greatest job in the country because each day I go to work is the day that I feel I can make a difference in someone’s life. The services offered to our students, faculty, staff, and guests are needed and appreciated. I don’t know what the future may hold; I’m keeping my options wide open. As long as I have a passion for what I do and feel I can contribute, I’m going to keep on going and keep on working. I may eventually find myself in teaching, consulting, or hospitality services, but whatever I do it will be done with great enthusiasm. My personal mentors were always accessible, easy to talk to and approachable. They never put me down or dismissed my questions. They offered valuable advice, which was always designed to help my career. Though they spoke from their experience, they let me find my own way and take ownership of projects, and they allowed me the opportunity to learn from my own mistakes. My mentor always took time to check in with me, find out about my goals, and even opened a few doors to help me attain them. I’ve always been self-motivated and selfstarting, and was taught early on to ‘inspect what I expect.’ I listen to each voice. I watch closely which team member goes beyond expectations and then coach and counsel to individual strengths and set the expectation bar at levels for which success is challenged and results are measured. The worst thing a supervisor can do is put someone in over their head and set them up for failure.

Continued education and certifications, conferencing, and networking are good ways to keep updated about what is going on within higher education. Networking with colleagues offers the ability to meet other professionals with similar skill sets. You can learn from others who face similar issues on their campuses and thereby narrow the margin for error on your own campus.”

M A R IA C . R OBE R TS

Auxiliary Services Coordinator Binghamton University

“I hope to hold the title of assistant director soon, with the intent of growing into a director position. I seek opportunities to enhance my existing responsibilities and increase my competitive position. Advancement to me means taking on more responsibility with the intention of making a broader difference. Position, title, and compensation should be factors reflecting the success of contributions that result in the advancement. In current economic times, it has become increasingly difficult to participate in conferences and professional institutes, so I participate in opportunities such as no-cost webinars, online courses, etc. I am very fortunate to have Pete Napolitano as my mentor. He imparts information about his own career path as well as serves as a source of motivation and support.” u

G E N E R AT I O N S

Director of Auxiliary Services Binghamton University

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P ETER J. NAPOLITANO

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IS THERE A CORRELATION BETWEEN GENERATIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL STYLES? By Lori Mason, NACUFS director of education, and Tom Champoux, president and founder of the Effectiveness Institute

“Throughout the institute, participants discover that most of the conflict they experience with other people is due to a collision of behavioral style.” As a Baby Boomer on the cusp of Generation X, I sent him an email to get his take. Even though a solidly entrenched Baby Boomer himself, he quickly responded: “I am not sure if there is a researchbased correlation, but let me discuss this with my team, and I’ll get back with you.” The following information is a combination of the Effectiveness Institute’s core teaching, the thoughts of his leadership team, and our further discussion on the topic. The core belief behind the Effectiveness Institute’s Behavioral Styles training program is that an increased understanding of your own personal behavioral style helps build more effective communication, reduces tension, and develops more productive relationships. With this understanding, you gain insight into your impact on other people, learn how they respond to you, and how you perceive them. At the NACUFS Leadership Institute Tom says, “An individual’s behavior tends to be predictable. You talk, gesture, choose words, make decisions, solve problems, face challenges and interact with others in consistent ways which form your behavior patterns or ‘style’.” Throughout the institute, participants discover that most of the conflict they experience with other people is due to a collision of behavioral style. “Most ‘difficult’ people you experience are actually just ‘different’ or opposite of you in ‘Behavioral Style.’ The same is often true about generational differences,” Champoux explains. “Where people have the most conflict is in understanding that the way one style, or generation, makes decisions or approaches their work is usually a simple matter of difference, not right or wrong,” he clarifies.

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f you ask a group of NACUFS members to name an influential person who has helped them better understand their own personal behavioral style and how to effectively get things done through others, many in the group would undoubtedly name Tom Champoux, president and founder of the Effectiveness Institute in Seattle, Washington. Tom has been the primary presenter at the NACUFS Leadership Institute since shortly after its inception in 1985. With over 20 years of experience presenting this program, and as many years managing his human resources consulting and management training firm, and an early career as an inner-city educator, Tom has influenced learners in all four generations: Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millenials. Who better to pose a question to regarding a correlation between the various generations and their behavioral styles?

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The major differentiation in Behavioral Styles that Tom refers to are identified in a grid separated by four ‘lines’ or preferences of behavior that make up four particular behavior styles, identified as Analyzer, Stabilizer, Controller, and Persuader. “Each style combination has unique strengths and blindspots, and no one style is ‘best’,” Tom explains. The major points of differentiation between the styles are based on these preferences of behavior:

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1.

The way in which people make decisions.

2.

The need or lack of need for quality, accuracy and perfection.

3.

The preference for either a dynamic ever-changing environment or a stable environment.

4.

The tendency to be socially cautious or socially assertive.

“More recently,” Tom says, “we’ve been describing these preferences simply by where one’s energy is focused. What are the tasks and the work environment you get energy from (and therefore enjoy), and what are the tasks and work environments that you avoid because you do not get energy from them?” “My team discussed the question of whether there is likely a correlation between behavioral styles and generations, and our collective thoughts could not yield any research-based information linking the two—but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist, just that we don’t know about it,” said Tom. When

Tom and his leadership team conclude: “The reality is that there are so many variables that influence the energy a person uses to interact with the world, it is hard to discern what is a pattern—whether due to generational or other differences—and what is a reactive behavior (a strength overused.) The danger of describing all people in one generation, or even one behavioral style, in the same way is that it doesn’t recognize the complexity of all of the variables that come together to create each individual’s behavioral preferences.” Tom underpins this point by saying, “Comparing and contrasting generational or other differences, including behavioral styles, should only be done for the purpose of understanding how people are different, and then learning what can be done to create more effective communication and interaction styles between the different groups. That’s the focus we take at the NACUFS Leadership Institute—helping participants identify their own style and that of their team members. This knowledge helps them gain valuable, often life-changing, insight into their impact on others, and how to more effectively communicate and have a productive relationship with people who are different, not necessarily ‘difficult’ or ‘wrong’.” Julie Hamel, assistant manager of residential dining at the University of Iowa and the volunteer facilitator at the 2012 Leadership Institute, reinforced this point when speaking about the program and the relationship between behavioral styles and generational differences: “The Leadership Institute has been an integral part of my success the past three years as a manager in our dining program. Learning all about my leadership style and how to best adapt that style to fit any situation has been absolutely the best part of my NACUFS institute experiences, and one that I use every day. The same principles of understanding and then adapting to another’s energy and preferences can be applied to communicating with, managing, and resolving conflicts that arise in today’s age-diverse workplace. They key is in being able to listen and explore another’s feelings, experiences, and point of view even when you disagree with them.” Tom agrees and concludes, “the goal is to work hand-in-hand with others, without having to see eyeto-eye, whether that’s because of generational, gender, racial, cultural, or behavioral style differences. The world will be a better place when everyone gains that understanding.” u

The NACUFS Leadership Institute is an annual program that provides a comprehensive understanding of behavioral styles, equipping collegiate foodservice professionals with the awareness and skills needed to identify their own leadership style and to effectively get things done through others. Tom Champoux is the primary presenter for the six-day program, bringing a high level of expertise and his own personal energy to the program. The next Leadership Institute will be held June 16-21, 2013, at Nestlé Professional Customer Innovation Campus in Solon, Ohio. To learn more, go to www.nacufs.org/institutes.

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If you expand the definition of generational differences to include the life stages each generation is currently going through, you could expect to see a preponderance of one style over another in a particular generational group. “Since people in their early 20s are often idealistic and willing to have their voices heard for a cause they believe in, this could have the result of more Persuaders in the younger generations—more because of the life stage they are going through than the particular influences their generation has been exposed to,” Tom and his team conclude. “At the same time, in our 40s, things are different. We don’t have the same need to be the center of attention, and are more willing to help others shine, so we are likely to pick up more of a Stabilizer’s energy— supporting, helping, and focusing on others more than ourselves. Add further layers of gender, racial, cultural, or other differences and it gets even more complicated.”

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you overlay contemporary literature on how each generational group behaves, you can expect that there would be a correlation between behavioral styles and generations, since the events that shaped each generation’s lives and times would likely influence preferences in behavior. For example, Baby Boomers were born during or after World War II and were raised in an era of extreme optimism, opportunity, and progress. This could lead to a tendency to prefer a dynamic, changing environment more often than Veterans whose exposure to a more military-style of leadership could lead to a preference for a more stable environment.

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inspire

Her work transformed an industry.

the world

Photo by Rosalie Winard

Her story inspired the world. Cargill is proud to present Dr. Temple Grandin at the 2013 NACUFS National Conference, July 10-13, in Minneapolis, MN.

Her groundbreaking work in animal behavior and livestock handling has been so instrumental in improving animal welfare practices, that half the cattle in the U.S. and Canada are handled by equipment and processes she designed. Her ongoing commitment to advancing industry standards has resulted in countless published articles, books, appearances and awards. She was even honored as one of Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world in 2010. If it sounds like they could make a movie about her life, they did. But you can hear her story in person.

We look forward to seeing you.

Š2012 Cargill, Incorporated


Campus Dining Today | Spring/Summer 2013