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President Teeson Retires | Summer on the River: The Conrad Sailing Program | Morgan Haul Out

So much family fun stuff, we had to catalog it. Check out Mystic Seaport’s all new WindRose inside this issue of Mystic Seaport magazine, including member programs and trips, and a catalog filled with great programs and events. There’s something fun for everyone – and every age. To download registration materials, go online to mysticseaport.org/registration. Or register by phone at 860.572.5322.

CONTENTS

spring 12

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Heave ho! The Morgan is hauled

The Admiral Weighs Anchor

2009

WR1

sightings. ..........................

4

Summer on the River: The Conrad Sailing Program

WindRose: Now find all your favorite events, classes, trips and programs in one place

gardening by the sea.........

10

41° north........................... 5

calendar of events........WR2.

in the news........................

8

greenhand’s corner. ........

41

book nook..........................

9

by the numbers. ...............

43

sightings M

ystic Seaport. In my initial days of assuming the helm of this remarkable institution, I have come to appreciate ever so deeply the significance and importance of what those two words represent to all who know her. It is with this developing understanding that I earnestly approach my role as primary steward for our mission, our collection and our community.  It is truly an honor to assume the leadership of such a significant institution, and with this comes my commitment to assiduously fulfill our mission of connecting America and the sea in an engaging and memorable manner.  In the time following my appointment and before assuming the office, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that almost all with whom I spoke had some knowledge of the Museum, many with deep connections.  My move to Mystic follows a long career in education, most recently as Headmaster of Fay School in Southborough, MA, and it marks a return to my childhood roots on Maine’s Penobscot Bay. There I sailed on the family Friendship sloop, Sarah Mead, where I developed my love for all things maritime.  Combining these two perspectives gives me a compelling opportunity to purposefully address what our founders considered to be their primary objective: to be “educational in its purpose, national (and sometimes beyond) in its scope, and an inspiring force for the future.” While preservation is a key core value to Mystic Seaport, so too is inspiration, which must be central to all things educational.  These shall be my mantra moving forward.   The Charles W. Morgan project clearly has captured the attention and interest of the Museum community, locally and farther afield.  Beginning with the haul out in November and now with the restoration work well underway, the Henry B. duPont Shipyard is alive with significant activity.  The Morgan serves as an important icon for us and is an active symbol for the critical role the Museum plays in preserving important elements of America’s history while allowing the public to see such work in action. Please make sure that a visit to the shipyard is on your itinerary for the spring.  Over these initial days since my appointment, I have had the opportunity to read all sorts of Museum literature and to meet many members of the Museum community, including staff, volunteers, trustees, neighbors and friends. Their collective expertise, vision and dedication serve as an inspiration to me as I press forward to learn and then to lead.  Doug Teeson has been enormously helpful in providing insightful guidance and perspective, and a breakfast with former president J. Revell Carr in New Mexico served as a great history lesson.  Many thanks to them both!  As members of Mystic Seaport, you are critically important to the Museum’s future success, and I hope that you will return to Mystic Seaport again soon and be re-inspired! I look forward to seeing you. 

President and Director Stephen C. White

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic Seaport

The Museum of America and the Sea President and Director STEPHEN C. WHITE Vice President of communications Bob Potter Editor Anna F. Sawin contributors barbara Jarnigan JEAN KERR LEIGH KNUTTEL ERIN RICHARD DON TREWORGY Design Caspari McCormick Photography Judy Beisler Dennis Murphy nicki pardo photography Andy Price SUSANNAH SNOWDEN / OMNIA PHOTOGRAPHICS

cover Summer on the mystic river photo by nicki pardo

4 1 ° no r t h

5 4 1 ° no r t h

THE

morgan RISES

On November 1, 2008, the Charles W. Morgan was hauled ashore at Mystic Seaport’s Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. The 340-ton vessel was raised up on the Museum’s Hays and Ros Clark Shiplift in front of a crowd of more than 600 people. The vessel is undergoing a planned three-year restoration.

HOMEPORT

t h e a d m i r a l w e i g h s a nc h o r

6

The ADMIRAL WEIGHS ANCHOR

a President and Director a Doug Teeson Retires Douglas H. Teeson doesn’t just love history. “He lives history,” says Morgan McGinley, longtime friend of Mystic Seaport’s recently retired president and director. “He loves finding surprising stories that haven’t been reported before in a historical context.” What better person, then, to have led the Museum for the past seven years? “He was the right leader at the right time,” Susan Funk, executive vice president, says of Teeson’s work ushering Mystic Seaport into the 21st century. “He helped us think about and explore ideas for the future without losing the history of the Museum.” Since July 2001, when Teeson took the helm, Mystic Seaport has brought history back to life, getting antique launches on the water and people in them, and sharing stories through new educational programs. It has linked the past with the present in such exhibits as Frozen In, which provides background on the Inuit inhabitants of Hudson Bay, an area now in the spotlight due to global climate change. And the Museum has preserved history for the future, moving its vast library holdings to the secure, climate-controlled Collections and Research Center, and building a new shiplift that was instrumental in the current restoration of the Charles W. Morgan. “Museums use

objects to tell stories,” Teeson explains. “The installation of the lift is a huge step for the future of the collected ships.” Teeson, 65, who retired in January of this year, likens the teamwork of the Museum’s staff to that of the crew of a ship, where “everyone had to pull together or it didn’t work.” Coming to Mystic Seaport from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, where he served as superintendent, was not as radical a change in workplace or leadership style as one might think, he says. “I think people expected me to come here and bark orders.” But the Coast Guard works as a team, the retired rear admiral notes. “It’s an environment where ideas would bubble up from all levels, all corners. I came here with the same mindset.” *************************************************** Teeson, who grew up in Vermont, fondly remembers his first visit to Mystic Seaport, at age 8. At the time, the Museum consisted of little more than the Morgan, but that was enough to enchant a young boy from a landlocked state. “I fell in love with the place,” he remembers. Indeed, he fell in love with all things nautical, reading avidly about discovered shipwrecks in National Geographic, learning to sail from his

~ Phoebe Hall

Behind the Rigging “I came here thinking I knew the place,” Doug Teeson, a lifelong visitor of Mystic Seaport, recalls about becoming president and director in 2001, “but the first six months I kept saying, ‘I never knew…’”

Here are some of his most memorable discoveries: The depth of the Museum’s collection, such as the 500 watercraft in storage and the extensive library holdings, and the opportunities they present for exhibitions and online research. “The magic of the place”: Teeson especially loved hearing visitors’ memories about docking their boats at the Museum and exploring it after hours. The history of the site, such as the three houses owned by the Greenman brothers, who operated the shipyard where the Museum is now located and who were ardent abolitionists. “They were ahead of their time–outspoken citizens who inspire the future,” Teeson says. Best of all, the story of the Museum’s founders, who established Mystic Seaport in 1929, during the Depression, and then acquired the Charles W. Morgan as World War II loomed. “The Museum has a culture and history that’s indomitable,” Teeson says. “To know the odds were not in their favor and to forge ahead–it’s the same as the spirit of the whalers.”

All-Hands Appreciation For Our Members Being at the helm of Mystic Seaport for the past seven years, I’ve had the great fortune of working with so many dedicated staff members, volunteers, trustees and council members, each contributing to helping fulfill the vision of our founders. Their extraordinary commitment is only matched by the unstinting generosity of members like you. As Mystic Seaport sets its course for the future under the leadership of new President Steve White, I know the next leg of this exciting voyage will be guided in many ways by the great enthusiasm and support of our more than 18,000 members. As one of the Museum’s many members, you have helped create a lifetime’s worth of memories for me from my years at Mystic Seaport and on behalf of everyone at the Museum I thank you for all you do!

7 t h e a d m i r a l w e i g h s a nc h o r

grandfather and later matriculating at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT, just 10 miles away from Mystic Seaport. The Coast Guard took Teeson all over the country. He enjoyed moving to a new town and learning its history, particularly its sea history. Each new duty station, he says, made him “infinitely more aware of the importance of the sea” in America’s past and future. That curiosity characterizes Teeson to this day. “He always wants to learn more,” Funk says. “He’s so excited about inspiring stories.” Teeson’s career came full circle when, in 1997, he became superintendent of the Coast Guard Academy. Three years later, “as if by magic, the Mystic Seaport opportunity presented itself.” But he had to finish out his commitment at the Academy, so for six months he met weekly with interim president Jim English. “I never had more fun in my life,” English, a trustee emeritus, says of that time. Of Teeson he adds, “We had a lovely time…He’s a real Coast Guard admiral: kind, forthright, honest, honorable.” Other staff members were equally impressed. “He did everything he could to find out what he could before he started,” says Dana Hewson, Clark senior curator for watercraft and vice president for watercraft preservation and programs. Funk adds that Teeson’s work ethic is “remarkable. He sets very high standards, for this place and for individuals.” Characteristically, then, Teeson made no little plans for the Museum. The new Carlton Marine Science Center supports the Museum’s undergraduate maritime studies program in partnership with Williams College, but also inspires many other educational programs, from preschool to Elderhostel. He found new funding in tough economic times. And he spearheaded new projects, from the restoration of Roann, a 1947 eastern-rig dragger, to the concepts for a new indoor exhibition facility that will help make the Museum a year-round destination. His impact was felt in small ways, too. After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, he organized a memorial service, Hewson says. He made sure Mystic Seaport was a good neighbor, always taking time to meet with local residents. And his good humor and optimism did more than brighten the office; it was a powerful motivator as well. When he learned, for example, that the shiplift needed to be replaced at great expense, Funk recalls, “instead of showing any feeling of discouragement – ‘Oh, no, such bad news’ – it was more like, ‘Here’s an opportunity to invest for the future of the Museum.’” Though Teeson counts himself lucky to head “a place that I’ve loved since I was a kid,” he’s ready to retire. He plans to remain involved with Mystic Seaport, volunteering his fundraising skills. But he’s looking forward to visiting friends, traveling with his wife, Phyllis, and teaching his 5-year-old grandson to sail. He’s confident he’s leaving the Museum on a high note. “You want to leave a place better than you found it,” he says. The history of Mystic Seaport will show that Teeson met, and exceeded, that goal.

HOMEPORT

SHE’S GOT OUR VOTE

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OUR FORECAST LOOKS BRIGHT

i n t h e ne w s

Days before 2008’s presidential election, who took center stage in Connecticut? Mystic Seaport’s very own VIP, the Charles W. Morgan. America’s last wooden whaleship was hauled out of the water November 1 in front of nearly 600 people. Among those that have covered this ongoing restoration are New England Cable News, WFSB Channel 3 news, WoodenBoat magazine, River & Shore, The Day, The Mystic River Press, the Hartford Courant and the Norwich Bulletin. Whew! Pretty soon, the Morgan will need her own press secretary.

Senior Meteorologist Bill Evans from WABC-TV in New York made an early morning visit to Mystic Seaport at the start of last summer. The weatherman broadcast live hits from the Museum’s village and aboard the Charles W. Morgan, totaling 30 minutes of coverage, which aired throughout the tri-state area. Just a little more proof that Mystic Seaport is the place to be, come rain or come shine.

ONE COOL EXHIBIT An iglu in Connecticut? Only at Mystic Seaport. The 12-foot-round structure is part of the Museum’s ground breaking exhibition, Frozen In: Captain Comer and the Hudson Bay Inuit, which the New York Times noted in June as being “one of the most complete accountings of life in the Inuit villages.” Kudos, exhibition team. We can’t wait to see what you have planned next!

THE REAL DEAL Mystic Seaport was the only Connecticut locale spotlighted in “Getaways: Historic Sites That Keep It Real,” a travel article that ran in the Philadelphia Daily News last July. Featured prominently alongside America’s Historic Triangle in Virginia and Boston’s Freedom Trail was Mystic Seaport’s Preservation Shipyard, a place where “visitors can watch craftsmen build vessels using century-old methods.” Our question is, is there any other way?

model behavior Two hundred and fifty buildings, 30 ships and one river all inside one room? It’s possible, and it’s at Mystic Seaport. In the September/October 2008 issue, Yankee magazine honored Arthur Payne, the craftsman who began the Mystic River Scale Model in 1959, which he then continued to work on until he passed away in 2006. Yankee editor Mel Allen noted that Payne “had held time still with passionate precision.” We couldn’t agree more.

HOMEPORT

Book·Nook

The Unnatural History of the Sea by Callum Roberts (Island Press)

Y

cultural progressions, and scientific misunderstandings have rendered our oceans and rivers but sandy shadows of what they once were. Roberts, admittedly, focuses on the experience of Europeans and North Americans because of access to these resources. Yet he is still able to take us from medieval fish-eating habits in the British Isles to the hunt for seals in 19th-century Antarctica then on up to the coast of California, where in the mid-20th century spear-wielding fishermen dove for trophies. Roberts describes the modern hunt for deep sea tuna, which not only uses sonar and helicopters, but also deploys radio-tagged driftwood that attracts shoals of fish while the boat is hundreds of miles away. He examines the depletion of coral, oysters, alligators, abalone, salmon, seals, turtles, goliath groupers, rock fish, orange roughy (which might live 150 years) and dozens of other marine organisms, all interconnected in unexpected ways. The Unnatural History of the Sea is a superb and eye-opening read—even if you already know a thing or two about what is in the ocean. Roberts, who is a fisheries biologist and a professor of marine conservation in the UK, waits until the end to give an inkling of hope and a suggestion of what we can do to help. The depletion of the world’s fisheries is another inconvenient truth, told in a work that is as fascinating as it is a call to action.

Richard King teaches literature for Williams-Mystic and has articles forthcoming in Natural History, Sea History and Cruising World. He recommends you read this book, then get the “Seafood Selector” card for your wallet, put out for free by the Environmental Defense Fund (www.edf.org).

New and Noteworthy in the Museum Store Cape Cod Bay: A History of Salt & Sea Theresa Mitchell Barbo Author Theresa Mitchell Barbo’s skillful narrative weaves together the natural and cultural histories of the bay, from the drafting of the Mayflower Compact in 1620 to the establishment of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant 350 years later.

To order, call 860.572.5385 or shop online at www.mysticseaport.org/stores.

Quarterboards: A Unique Art Form Sharon L. Hubbard Quarterboards, often elaborately carved and bearing a ship’s name, were carried by sailing ships around the world. In this researched and elegantly photographed book, the evolution of quarterboards is documented for the first time.

The Flying Horses of Watch Hill Lynn Anderson Every summer children ride the famous Flying Horse Carousel in the seaside town of Watch Hill, RI. When summer ends, the families go home. But where do the horses go?

9 BOOK NOOK

ou’ve probably read accounts of the early explorers who said cod were so numerous that they scooped them up with baskets, and how with oars they fought off swarms of sharks that measured 20 feet long. We find these accounts amusing, if not preposterous. Fish stories. But here’s the thing: when we collect enough of these accounts together, and then start to examine archaeological finds and scientific modeling, the “preposterous” balloon begins to deflate. In The Unnatural History of the Sea, Callum Roberts shows how the fish stories of the past are not only more accurate than we thought, but the mere fact that we consider them absurd is indicative of a shift in our perception, an evolving change in what we assume to be the kinds and amount of creatures living in today’s watery spaces. Successive cultures slip unconsciously into what Roberts calls “a collective societal amnesia.” We can’t even believe the stories to be true because we’ve seen nothing comparable with our own eyes. This is not a book to pick up before a summer fish fry or a dinner out for sushi. The rapid and enormous loss of marine life is depressing. Our predecessors ignored warnings that came surprisingly early. Fishermen in England protested against the destructiveness of bottom trawling and small mesh nets as early as 1376. Centuries of technological advancements,

g a r d en i n g b y t h e se a

Rich Inheritance

FOOD FOR THOUGHT ABOUT GROWING “HEIRLOOM” VEGETABLES

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The kitchen garden at the Buckingham-Hall House has been planted with heirloom vegetables for many years. Serving as an educational and interpretive tool, the garden was constructed to be representational of a typical plot from the mid 1800s in a coastal New England town. Achieving as much authenticity to vegetable selections as is reasonable, there have been occasional gaps in the garden plan, when we have not been able to obtain or preserve all of the seed we would like. However, recent popular interest has helped to bolster the operations of several seed-saving suppliers. “Heirloom” is not an officially defined term, but generally refers to an open-pollinated variety that is more than 50 years old (pre-WWII is often considered a dividing line). Open-pollinated plants are pollinated without human intervention, except for isolation from other pollen sources, such as planting with distance between varieties. It is the oldest form of seed selection and ensures that gardeners can save seed from their own plants, and future generations will bear fruit that is similar to fruit of past generations. Slight variations of traits may be exhibited, and these plants may be either selected favorably or culled out. This process preserves and protects our horticultural heritage. Many of today’s commercial food crops result from planned technical hybridization and genetic engineering. These processes are utilized to produce crops that ripen uniformly, withstand shipping and respond to specific chemical input. Favorable traits, such as disease resistance are selected as hybrid vigor, but the hybridization or engineering must be repeated each year in order to produce the same qualities. New seed must be purchased each year.

The gourmet food industry and the Green “Buy Local Foods” movements have helped to raise the awareness of the value of heirloom vegetables. Corn salad (1820), upland cress (1700) and deer tongue lettuce (1740) are often listed as gourmet greens in mesclun and micro-green salad mixes. These, along with oak leaf lettuce and Black Seeded Simpson (mid-1800s) have been grown in the Buckingham Garden. These greens are adaptable to our New England climate and soils, and are relatively heat resistant and slow to bolt. Seeds for each are readily available from both conventional and seed-saving sources. Growing heirloom tomatoes can provide more challenges to the home gardener. In the early to mid-1800s, tomatoes were used mainly in conserves, and had not achieved the pinnacle of the perfect red globe-shaped fruit. Consequently, we grow yellow pear tomatoes at the Buck. This vigorous and sprawling plant produces small yellow fruit in great abundance through the latter part of the summer. The fruit is fine for salads, fresh eating and cooking. For gardeners in search of a larger tomato, careful attention should be paid to varietal descriptions in seed catalogs. Full sun, well-drained soil and an area large enough to allow for crop rotation are important for success. Many of the heirloom varieties lack the disease resistance of the F1 hybrids. They are often regionally specific and don’t produce as well when planted in areas with vastly different soils and weather. However, the reward of harvesting and eating the flavorful and often striped or irregularly shaped fruit from previous generations connects us to our past and provides a bridge to our future! ~ leigh knuttel

o

Gardening by the Sea columnist Leigh Knuttel is the Arboretum Horticulturalist at Connecticut College. She was the Museum’s supervisor of grounds for many years and is responsible for many of the fascinating plants at Mystic Seaport.

in the galley

MAINE SHRIMP: STUFFED TO THE GILLS One of the culinary highlights of the winter months is, for me, the tiny, sweet, delicate Northern shrimp, caught in New England waters from late December to April. Sadly, when poor catches kept native New England shrimp out of the markets for several years running, consumers became accustomed to their absence. Although the shrimp catch has improved, the demand for

Jean Kerr is the author of Mystic Seafood: Great Recipes, History, and Seafaring Lore from Mystic Seaport, as well as Union Oyster House Cookbook and the forthcoming Windjammer Cooking. She is the editor of Taste of the Seacoast magazine and co-owner of Smith Kerr Associates Publishing.

Looking for another shrimp recipe? Try Potted Shrimp, online at www.mystic seaport.org/recipes.

BAKED STUFFED MAI NE SHRIMP Although Maine shrim p are too small to “stuff ” as you would large bu they are tender, sweet tterflied shrimp, and delicious with this topping. 1/4 cup butter 2 tablespoons melted 1/2 teaspoon garlic sa butter lt 2 tablespoons sour cream 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup bread crumbs 1 pound cooked, shelled Northern shrimp 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup finely chopped on ion 1/2 teaspoon dried tar ragon 1. Preheat the oven to 350˚F. 2. Combine the 1/4 cup butter, garlic salt, and pepper in a shallow 8x Heat in the oven for 5 mi 8-inch baking dish. nutes or until the butte r is melted. 3. Arrange the cooked shelled shrimp in a sin gle layer in the melted 4. Lightly toss together butter. the onion, remaining bu tter, sour cream, bread tarragon with a fork. Top crumbs, salt, and the shrimp with the stu ffing mix and bake, covere foil, for 15 minutes. Re d with aluminum move the foil and bake for an additional 5 minu bread crumbs. tes to brown the Serves 2–4.

11 in the galley

them hasn’t fully recovered. That’s a shame, because native New England shrimp are one of the great delicacies of our cold northern waters. Although people have been catching Northern shrimp since the 1600s, there was no commercial fishery until sometime in the 20th century. These small specimens were used primarily for bait. It wasn’t until canned shrimp from the South became available that shrimp began to be a popular ingredient. Cookbooks from the early 1900s reveal little interest in shrimp. Amazing, considering the amount we now consume. And why not? Shrimp are low in calories, low fat, fast and easy to prepare, not to mention delicious.

su m m e r on t h e r i v e r

su m m e r on t h e r i v e r

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~ summer on the ~

River re making bo on the water kids a ries in atl o m mystic. oads of me

Seaport. A light breeze blows down the weathered pier, where 40 small sailboats are tied up at the dock, sails ruffling in the wind. Inside the Museum’s Youth Training Building, 40 preteens are receiving final instructions for their afternoon sailing session at the Joseph Conrad Sailing Program, a one-week residential summer sailing camp at Mystic Seaport. Holding up an elaborately drawn “treasure” map, sailing instructor Allie Ruel explains the plan. “If you couldn’t already tell, it’s Pirate Day. ‘X’ marks the spot,” she says. “The wind will push you out toward the buoys. So what will you do with your sail? You’ll let it all the Left Page: A warm summer day with a light breeze, perfect for a sail. Below: (Left) Instructor Allie Ruel keeps careful watch on her young sailors. (Center) Pirate Day calls for some serious sailing skills, (Right) Conrad campers listen intently to the afternoon sailing plan.

S u m m e r on t h e RI v e r

It’s a sunny August afternoon at Mystic

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Above: Camp Director Hallie Payne with Sailing Assistant Hunter Kodama. Right page: A young sailor using his newly-acquired skills.

su m m e r on t h e r i v e r

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...At what other camp would kids be able to climb the rigging on a

historic sailing vessel, the same one they sleep on

every night?

way out. Leave some buoy room. Figure out your relationship to the buoy and the other boats. Does everyone remember right-ofway rules? We practiced this during Quidditch on Harry Potter Day. Questions?” Treasure maps? Pirate Day? Quidditch? Isn’t this a sailing camp? Sailing instructor Andrew Houlihan, a senior at Ohio Wesleyan, laughs at the question. “Oh, we’ve had Animal Day, Olympics Day and Harry Potter Day, complete with a game of on-thewater Quidditch—you know, replacing brooms with boats,” he says. “The instructors had a lot of fun being the Golden Snitch.” Okay, so besides sleeping on a tall ship and playing nautical Quidditch, what is it about this New England summer tradition that keeps preteens and teens flocking to Mystic Seaport from around the country every year? “The Conrad program is a great experience, not only because it teaches, then perfects the skills needed to sail, but also because it provides a safe and fun environment for children away from home,” says Camp Director Hallie Payne. Ruel, a sophomore at the University of Pennsylvania, adds, “Well, at what other camp would kids be able to climb the rigging on a historic sailing vessel, the same one they sleep on every night? Other sailing camps might teach sailing the same way but not many teach the history of sailing, too.” The dedicated, experienced staff are another part of the successful mix. Payne knows what it’s like to be a Conrad camper—she was one. So were most of the instructors—Ruel logged her 10th summer on the Mystic River this year, while Houlihan spent his 12th. Experienced with preteens and teens, the staff is adept at teaching sailing while responding to the needs of a child away from home, possibly for the first time.

Programs

for whatever floats your boat. Lik e boat s , m a ki n g f ri e n d s a n d h avi n g f u n ? Come spend a week at the Joseph Conrad Sailing Program, living onboard the Museum’s historic tall ship

Joseph Conrad. Built in Denmark in 1882, it was originally used to train Danish boys for the merchant service. Its role today, hosting hundreds of young sailors each summer, harkens back to its original mission of sail training. Now,

(continued on page 16)

permanently moored on our waterfront, the Conrad is fitted out with bunks, flush toilets, showers, heat and electricity. During the six-day program, young people between the ages of 10 and 15 sail a fleet of Dyer Dhows and learn the skills of the sea. Each day starts early with morning deck chores. After breakfast, campers tackle the wind and current of the Mystic River, then break for lunch before an active afternoon with an activity—such as a down-river trip on the steamship Sabino—or more sailing. Evenings are filled with activities, as well as plenty of time to spend with new friends. Campers enjoy stargazing in our Planetarium, climbing the rigging of the Conrad or a lively sea music singa-long. Campers return year after year to perfect skills, reunite with camp friends and enjoy another summer at Mystic Seaport. Program enrollment is limited to 40 for each session— early enrollment is advised. To register, call 860.572.5322, email reservations.desk@mysticseaport.org or visit www. mysticseaport.org.

Sa i l i n g Ass i sta nt P ro g r am fo r T e e n s Sailing assistants are often former Conrad campers who return as junior counselors to work along side the full-time staff, assisting in the daily operation of the camp. The Sailing Assistant program develops leadership skills and can be a unique element of college and job applications. You must be 16 years old to apply for a sailing assistant position. Priority will be given to multiweek commitments; both single and multiweek assistant ships are available. More information and applications available online at www.mysticseaport.org/ sailingassistant.

15 su i nmtm heergon a l ltehy e r i v e r

Payne says, “A big part of my job as director is helping the parents through the separation as well as the children. Being a parent, I know that children need reminders for the little things, like putting on sunscreen and remembering to drink enough water. One of my sons attended this year, and he needed reminders! So I give an orientation session just for the parents, letting them know that we are there for those little things, as well as to keep their children safe, healthy and happy while they are away from family for a week.” “Truthfully,” says Payne, “the parents often have a tougher time than the kids. In this techheavy age we live in, it is hard to let your kids go with no regular communication for a week—we don’t have cell phones, texting or email at camp— instead, we encourage them to write a letter if they are missing home. And I always say to the parents, if you need to know how things are going, just call me. That’s what I’m here for.” Payne and her staff keep their campers busy in the absence of iPods, computers and TV—besides sailing and exploring the 17-acre Museum, the instructors teach seamanship skills like knot-tying and play board games and word games with the campers. Payne reports, “They often develop some brand-new interests to take home with them!” One of the best parts of the job, say many staff members is seeing the transformation in the campers

su m m e r on t h e r i v e r

16

in just a week. Some campers start the week unsure of whether they can overcome their homesickness. Ruel says, “They ask their parents ‘Do I have to stay?’ with a worried look on their face. At the end of the week those same children are asking ‘Do I have to leave? Are you sure I can’t stay another week?’ A week just feels so short, we love our kids and love to get to know them well.” Houlihan is no stranger to the emotions of a homesick child, either. “I resisted going to this program at first because I had never been away from home for a week before,” he says. “Little did I know then, two of the kids in my first week would be two of the people I would work with 10 summers later as a sailing instructor here.” Sailing Assistant Hunter Kodama is well on his way to being a Conrad “lifer” as well. “I did the Conrad program for five years, sailed on Brilliant and now I am a sailing assistant,” he says. The instructors say to the kids at the beginning of the week, ‘be yourself, have fun and learn to sail’ and I hope I help them do that. I had a great time as a camper and I want them to have a great time as well.” And for Ruel and Houlihan, as life beyond college beckons, summer after summer on the Mystic River is coming to an end. “The thing I will miss the most is the campers,” says Houlihan. “One of my favorite parts of camp is to see kids come back each year and seeing how they have all grown up.” He adds, “I will also miss spending time with campers during downtime on the deck of the Conrad and during night time activities, which are always fun. The daytime schedule is busy and full, but sitting down in a circle to play cards or other camp games gives you the opportunity to get to know everyone and just makes you appreciate this amazing camp.”

–Anna Sawin

Top: Instructor Andrew Houlihan on the water. Bottom: Climbing the rigging is a popular evening activity at camp.

Mystic Seaport magazine editor Anna Sawin was a Conrad camper,

Brilliant sailor and sailing assistant from 1985 to 1990. She hopes her boys will grow up to be Conrad campers, too.

Mystic Seaport Special Events & Program Guide NEW FORMAT INSIDE

Spring 2009

PIRATE DAYS &

PIRATE FILM

FESTIVAL Great high seas fun for your whole crew! page WR4

Look inside

for complete information on this spring’s educational programs, classes, trips and events.

Explore Rhode Island lighthouses p. WR6

Enroll in Community Sailing p. WR16 – 17

The 2008 – 2009 Adventure Series p. WR9

what’s happening at mystic seaport

March

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MARCH

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1

MARCH

MARCH

March 1

March 8

March 13

Children’s Museum Story Time

Children’s Museum Story Time

Sea Stars preschool program begins

March 2

March 9

Spring Garden Series

Museum closed

Museum closed

March 14

March 3

March 11

Inuit Craft Workshops

Diesel Engine & Support Systems Certification

Sea Squirts preschool program begins

Children’s Museum Story Time

March 7

March 12

Inuit Craft Workshops

Sea Squirts preschool program begins

Children’s Museum Story Time

March 15 Children’s Museum Story Time

March 16 Museum closed

13

MARCH

MARCH

27

MARCH

28

March 19

March 28

Adventure Series Vietnam: By Land and By Sea

Varnishing Techniques for Traditional Boats

March 21

Inuit Craft Workshops Children’s Museum Story Time

March 25

Introduction to Half-Model Construction

Maritime Author Series: Richard Ellis

March 27 Behind Locked Doors: The Bells & Whistles of Clock-Making

March 29 Children’s Museum Story Time

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WindRose Spring 2009

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

what’s happening at mystic seaport

APRIL

April

4

APRIL

24

17-18

APRIL

April 3

April 10

April 22

Homeschool spring sailing begins

Spring Garden Series

April 4

April 16

Maritime Author Series: David Macaulay

Members’ Bus Trip to New York City

Adventure Series: Pirate ship Whydah

Introduction to Coastal Navigation begins

April 17–18

Spring Community Sailing begins (Advanced, Racing)

Pirate Days

Marlinspike Seamanship

April 18

Weather for Sailors begins

April 24 Behind Locked Doors: The sand bagger Annie

April 25

The Art of Orienteering begins

April 4–5 Educators’ Weekend

April 5

April 17–19

Latitude by the Noon Sun

Pirate Film Festival

April 25–26 Members’ Provincetown Bus Trip

Spring Community Sailing begins (Beginner, Intermediate)

May MAY

2

19

MAY

MAY

23

May 2

May 15

May 23–25

New exhibit opens: Mapping the Pacific Coast

Spring Garden Series

Lobster Days

May 19

May 23

Members’ trip to Thimble Islands

Members’ Lighthouse cruise out of Newport

New exhibit opens: The Map Spot

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

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NEW! PIRATE FILM FESTIVAL Friday through Sunday, April 17–19 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Seamen’s Inne - River Room Movies about pirates don’t always tell the truth. And the old Hollywood films certainly took many liberties in their depiction of these villains, but they really are entertaining! See a different movie each day about pirates, followed by a short open discussion of the truth about who they really were. Kids are welcome to wear their favorite pirate costume to the afternoon showings. Evening showings are geared to adults with a special rum sampling. Start off the festival on Thursday by attending the April Adventure series with Barry Clifford, the explorer who discovered the legendary pirate shipwreck Whydah, see page WR 9.

Friday – Putting the “Arr” in Pi-r-ate: Treasure Island (Disney, 1950)

Arrrrrrrgh! Pirate days Friday and Saturday, April 17 and 18 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Arrrrrrrrgh! It’s pirate fun for the whole family during April vacation week! Join us for a pirate treasure hunt, discover how pirates navigated the high seas in a special Planetarium program and create your own special Pirate Days souvenir.

Pirate Treasure Hunt • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Follow the pirate’s treasure map for clues to find the treasure chest.

Pirate Souvenir Workshop • 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Baubles, bells and sailorman tales—create your very own unique pirate souvenir. For children ages 4–10.

High Seas Planetarium Show • 3 p.m. Learn how pirates of old navigated the high seas at our special Planetarium show.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of piracy and buried gold is brought to life in Walt Disney’s first-ever live-action film. If you’ve ever wondered where pirate speak came from, this is the film that st-arr-ted it all! Filmed in glorious Technicolor, it stars Bobby Driscoll as Jim Hawkins and Robert Newton as Long John Silver.

Saturday – Reasons to Turn Pirate: Captain Blood (Turner/Warner Bros., 1935) Condemned to prison for a crime he did not commit, Errol Flynn portrays English surgeon Dr. Peter Blood, who leads a revolt against his brutal captors. Blood and his fellow prisoners then turn to piracy to survive. Also starring Olivia de Havilland and Lionel Atwell.

Sunday – Swashbucklers of the Silver Screen: The Sea Hawk (MGM/UA, 1940) Swordplay at its best! After raiding the Spanish fleet for Queen Elizabeth I, Errol Flynn is captured and forced to escape! Co-starring Brenda Marshall and Claude Rains. Reservations strongly recommended. Call 860.572.5339 to reserve your seats. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Proceeds benefit Mystic Seaport.

Reservations strongly recommended, call 860.572.5339. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Members: $7 pp or $25 per family Non-members: $10 pp or $30 per family in addition to regular museum admission Program Code: #0030 WR

WindRose Spring 2009

Afternoon (1:30 p.m.) • $5 Members • $7 Non-members Evening (7:30 p.m.) • $10 Members • $12 Non-members Program Code: #0073

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

CRUISE The Great Lakes: North America’s Magnificent Inland Seas September 15, 2009 Nearly 15 thousand years ago, the last of the great glaciers retreated, leaving us with one of the great wonders of the natural world, the Great Lakes. The lakes are unique, for although they are called lakes, they are in reality vast inland seas that comprise one-fifth of the world’s fresh surface water. First used as a means of transport by Algonquin and Iroquois tribes, the lakes later became a thriving commercial hub and a heavily traveled waterway with the arrival of European settlers. More than 50 years ago, the Great Lakes were the busiest waterway in the world and North America’s treasured summer destination. Today, travelers are rediscovering the charms of the vast, sweet water. On the shores of Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior, welcoming towns have changed little since the 19th century—in marked contrast to much of the North American continent—and rustling breezes skim through the lush fall leaves of the woody, rocky coasts. Aboard the 100-guest Clelia II, with its combination of intimacy and elegance, the grandeur and pleasure of a classic Great Lakes cruise is revived. On this unique itinerary, sailing between American and Canadian ports, travelers will thrill to the thundering of Niagara Falls, witness Native American culture on Manitoulin Island, enjoy Mackinac Island’s bygone Victorian charms and revel in the pristine beauty of the Keweenaw Peninsula, one of North America’s most unspoiled regions. A highlight of the voyage will be transiting the many scenic waterways and locks that connect the Great Lakes as we sail the vast expanse between Lake Ontario and the western shores of Lake Superior. Experience the premier vacation spot we’ve forgotten—aboard the newly refurbished, all-suite Clelia II—all so close to home.

Prices start at $5,595/person in double occupancy. Call 860.572.5339 for details. Space is limited, so call now!

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

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travel

NEW! Lighthouse Cruise out of Newport Saturday, May 23 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Take a trip to scenic Newport, RI, and enjoy a private, Mystic Seaport, three-hour cruise as you get up close to the lighthouses of Narragansett Bay. Your vessel, Rum Runner II, is a 58' wooden boat built by Elco. It transported hooch from Canada across the Great Lakes into Chicago and Detroit before running liquor for two New Jersey mobsters to the Newport mansions during Prohibition. We will visit more than 10 lighthouses among the beautiful islands and passageways of Narragansett Bay, including Beavertail at the end of Jamestown, Castle Hill at the end of Newport and lovely Rose Island in the center of the harbor. Learn about the history of each lighthouse and the roles they played in the maritime history of Rhode Island. Be at Bannister’s Wharf in downtown Newport by 9:30 a.m. for our 10 a.m. departure. As an added benefit to Mystic Seaport members, we are including a sticker to cover free all-day parking (8 a.m. until midnight!) in the Gateway Visitors’ Center lot, just a 10-minute walk to Rum Runner II. Explore the many things to do in Newport or dine at the restaurant of your choice without any worries about parking spaces. Group size limited to 49 passengers. First-come, first-served.

Members: $75 • Non-members: $85 Program Code: #0074 Call 860.572.5339 to register.

Hidden Connecticut: The Thimble Islands and Shore Line Trolley Museum Tuesday, May 19 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Bring your picnic lunch and enjoy a two-hour narrated cruise of Connecticut’s Thimble Islands off Stony Creek, often described as “a piece of the Maine coast in Long Island Sound.” Hundreds of rocks in a three-mile radius make up the island chain, mostly populated with Victorian homes. Our tour aboard the 40' Volsunga IV is narrated by local expert Captain Bob Milne, who has navigated the islands for more than 20 years. After the cruise, we visit the Shore Line Trolley Museum, where we board an antique trolley from the early 1900s. As we travel by a salt marsh, the conductor explains the antique trolley’s electrical mechanisms and asks passengers to help “turn the seats” for the return trip. The visit also includes a guided tour of the many vintage trolley cars in the rail yard complex.

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WindRose Spring 2009

Limited to 45 participants Members: $50 • Non-members: $60 • Program Code: #0068 Call 860.572.5339 to register.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

travel

NEW! Bus Trip to Intrepid Museum and Boat Trip around Manhattan Saturday • April 4 • 7 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Visit New York City and explore the exciting new Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum located on Pier 86 in the heart of Manhattan—a dynamic adventure for visitors of all ages. See 30 restored aircraft, including the aircraft carrier Intrepid, a nuclear-deterrent submarine Growler and the fastest commercial aircraft built to date, the Concorde.

Members: $125 Adult and $90 Youth Non-members: $140 Adult and $105 Youth Program Code: #0075 Call 860.572.5339 to register.

You can also experience a real flight by taking a ride inside a Max Flight simulator, a 20-seat passenger thrill ride. Then relax on a three-hour narrated cruise around the island of Manhattan. Bring a picnic, enjoy lunch at the Museum or buy snacks on the boat.

NEW! Whales, Pirates and Lighthouses: A Weekend in Provincetown, MA Saturday and Sunday • April 25–26 • 7:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. It’s time to get out and breathe in spring with some fresh salt air at the end of Cape Cod! Our visit to Provincetown includes: • lunch at the town’s most unusual restaurant • a whale watch to the famed Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (guaranteed that you will experience a whale sighting or you get a free ticket on another trip) • a visit to Pirate Whydah Museum with a special talk by explorer and Adventure Series lecturer Barry Clifford, who found the pirate ship Whydah off Cape Cod

• dinner, breakfast and lodging at the lovely Provincetown Inn • a visit to the Pilgrim Monument and the Provincetown Art Association & Museum with its extensive collection of art, with time for lunch on your own and shopping in town • plus, a stop on the way home at Highland Light in North Truro

Members: $350 per person, based on double occupancy Non-members: $375 per person, based on double occupancy Single supplement: $75 • Program Code: #0076 Call 860.572.5339 to register.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

WindRose Spring 2009

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SERIES

Spring Garden Series Luncheon & Lecture Program Fridays: March 13, April 10 and May 15 12 noon – 2:30 p.m. Share your gardening stories and enjoy lunch at the Seamen’s Inne while you listen to master gardeners describe sustainable options for your own backyard.

March 13 Author Patricia Klindienst talks about her award-winning book, The Earth Knows My Name, a lyrical exploration of the power of gardens in transmitting culture. Hear her advice on feeding your family from your backyard without spending much money and while helping the environment.

April 10 Meet Kara Franco, the Museum’s dynamic new Supervisor of Gardens. She’ll describe the flowers and vegetables grown in our greenhouse for the Museum’s period gardens, and then she’ll bring you to the greenhouse to see the need seedlings and plants.

May 15 County Master Gardener Coordinator and author Susan Munger discusses the ease of creating sustainable landscapes with the use of rain gardens, a low-maintenance feature that allows surface water to return to the underground aquifer. Copies of her book on the botanical discoveries of Lewis and Clark will be available.

Members: $75 • Non-members: $85 Program Code: #0032 Call 860.572.5339 to register.

2009 Maritime Author Series Wednesday Evenings, G. W. Blunt White Building 5:30-7:30 p.m. Meet these acclaimed authors firsthand, hear the inside story of how each book came to be written, and socialize at a wine and cheese reception. One lucky raffle winner takes home a free copy of the author’s book!

Richard Ellis

March 25 Richard Ellis (The Book of Sharks, The Search for the Giant Squid) has long been a champion among writers of the sea and its creatures. His latest book, Tuna: A Love Story, describes the biggest, fastest, warmest-bodied fish in the world—which is fast disappearing.

April 22 Award-winning author and illustrator David Macaulay (Cathedral, Castle and Mosque), talks about Ship, in which he pieces together clues about a sunken ship and her tragic voyage. David will also talk about his most recent book, The Way We Work, where he creatively examines the human body.

Members: $15 per program • Non-members: $20 per program. Program Code: #0058 Call 860.572.5339 to register. WR8

Windrose Spring 2009

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

David Macaulay

SERIES

BEHIND LOCKED DOORS! INSIDER TOURS OF OFF-LIMITS MUSEUM TREASURES Fridays, 12 noon – 3 p.m. Enjoy lunch at the Seamen’s Inne and learn more about our hidden Museum treasures. An expert will then take you on a guided tour of special areas and let you get up close and understand how these artifacts impacted our maritime history and culture.

March 27: The Bells & Whistles of Clock-Making Mystic Seaport’s revered clock-maker Frank Murphy provides a fascinating history of clock-making. Learn how clock gears and frames were made for the general public, for high-paying customers and for ships as Frank demonstrates some of his favorite clocks. Luncheon choice: Cranberry-Soused Pork Chop or Warm Coastal Salad.

April 24 Join Quentin Snediker, director of the Museum’s Shipyard, for the remarkable story of the rebuilding and eventual sailing of Annie, the first boat in the Museum’s collection. Luncheon choice: Cobb Salad or Grilled Fillet of Salmon.

Members: $90 for the series; $35 per program Non-members: $100 for the series; $40 per program Program Code #0036 • (Single programs, specify date.) Call 860.572.5339 to register.

February 27: Paper Treasures & Maritime Traditions Curator of Collections Fred Calabretta discusses a colorful topic—how the sea has influenced everyday items. He focuses on paper in our collection, such as postage stamps, sheet music, currency and movie posters, to reveal the link between American popular culture and our maritime heritage. Choice of entree: Grilled Rosemary Garlic Chicken or Herb-Crusted Baked Scrod.

THE 2008–2009 ADVENTURE SERIES Our exciting series concludes in March and April with adventures from vastly different areas in the world. Learn about these first hand experiences at the afternoon program beginning at 1:30 p.m. or the evening program beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the River Room at Seamen’s Inne.

Sojourn in Beautiful Vietnam Thursday, March 19 Award-winning writer, photographer, and long-distance cruising sailor Bernadette Bernon explored Vietnam on land, learning about the hill tribes, the rice paddies and the markets—and then chartered a 38-foot sailboat to trace the country’s beautiful and unspoiled coast. Join Bernadette for stories of the people, the history, and the sailing, and get an intimate glimpse into the heart of a proud country.

Dive to a Pirate Ship: Expedition Whydah Thursday, April 16 Underwater archaeological explorer Barry Clifford discovered the legendary pirate ship Whydah off the coast of Cape Cod in 1984, the only solidly authenticated pirate shipwreck discovered so far in American waters. The ship is significant not only for her vast plunder from more than 50 captured ships, but also as a link to the notorious slave trade.

Afternoon 1:30 pm: $12 Members • $14 Non-members • $5 Student Evening 7:30 pm: $13 Members • $15 Non-members • $5 Student Program Code: #0001 Call 860.572.5339 to register.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

WindRose Spring 2009

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MEMBER GEAR Charles W. Morgan Umbrella Navy 42". Auto open. Folds to 15.5". Wind Reflex technology prevents frame damage if umbrella inverts. $15 • ITEM CODE #0011

baseball cap Canvas cap with member burgee logo. Leather strap. Mesh lining to promote cooling. Breton red, khaki or yellow. $23 • ITEM CODE #0016 (specify color choice)

flashlight Ocean blue, aluminum flashlight with member burgee logo features 17 white LED lights, a pushbutton on/off switch and convenient hand rope. Batteries included. $15 • ITEM CODE #0077

brilliant sport pack Black microfiber. 15"x12". Unique double-draw top/shoulder strap combination. Zippered gusset expands to 5" on the bottom. $15 • ITEM CODE #0023

TWO-BOTTLE COOLER TOTE Lightweight yet sturdy, two-bottle cooler tote, perfect for wine. Comes with a high-quality combination wood-detailed corkscrew/bottle opener. The front pocket and detachable padded bottle divider make this a perfect picnic or boat accessory. $35 • ITEM CODE #0069

burgee Durable 400-denier nylon. UV inhibitor to reduce fading. Anti-microbial coating to prevent mildew. No-fray bond. Two brass grommets. $32 • ITEM CODE #0012 • SMALL 12"X18" $42 • ITEM CODE #0013 • LARGE 16"X24"

Proceeds from the sale of these items contribute to the education and preservation efforts of Mystic Seaport. All prices include shipping and handling. Tax, where applicable, not included. Available exclusively at our Membership Office (860.572.5339) or visit www.mysticseaport.org/membergear to download order form.

MEMBER GEAR AND MEMBER PROGRAM ORDER FORM Member information

$5 off gift special

Name Address Phone

City

Email

PAYMENT information

Amex

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Membership ID#

Offer valid through 04/30/09 Visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org to order.

ORDER MERCHANDISE

Payment by check: make check payable to Mystic Seaport Payment by Credit Card Visa Mastercard

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give the gift of membership and receive $5 off and a free mystic seaport UMBRELLA

CODE

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specify (color) if applicable

QTY

UNIT PRICE

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Contact Membership Office for international rates prior to placing order.

CT deliveries and 6% sales tax baseball cap tax exempt

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MERCHANDISE TOTAL

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Signature

MAIL ORDERS Mystic Seaport Membership Office 75 Greenmanville Ave. Mystic, CT 06355-9990

order programs CODE

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NON-MEMBER

QTY

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specify (date) (youth or adult) (luncheon choice) if applicable

call-in ORDERS Membership Office Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 860.572.5339

PROGRAMS TOTAL

$

GRAND TOTAL WR10

WindRose Spring 2009

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

$

SUBTOTAL

america and the sea gala 2008

Thomas Crowley, 2008 America and the Sea award recipient

Thomas Crowley and Richard Vietor

America and the Sea Gala On October 29, 2008, 265 guests gathered in the Rainbow Room on top of Rockefeller Center in New York City to honor Thomas B. Crowley Jr. and Crowley Maritime Corporation at the Museum’s third annual America and the Sea Award Dinner.  Previously, famous yacht designer Olin J. Stephens II, and historian and author, David McCullough were given the Museum’s esteemed award honoring individuals who are at the top in their field of maritime endeavor. Crowley Maritime Corporation, Inc., was started by Tom’s grandfather, Thomas Crowley, who single-handedly rowed out to meet sailing ships at San Francisco’s Golden Gate.  Tom’s father led the company forward by expanding its range. Unfortunately, his early death led Tom Crowley Jr. to become CEO at the age of 27.  Tom now directs a company with more than $1.5 billion in revenues, with more than 4,000 employees and 210 vessels around the world.

Richard Vietor, Thomas Crowley, Linda (Fifi) Kampf and Molly Crowley

Dr. James T. Carlton, director of the Williams-Mystic Program, introduced Tom Crowley. He and Tom recalled with humor a memorable pancake breakfast featuring tugboat-shaped pancakes prepared for him by students in the Museum’s Williams-Mystic Program, of which Tom is a generous supporter. Tom spoke with characteristic humility as he thanked his supporters who attended, including the McAllister family, who own and operate tugboats in New York Harbor.  He also spoke of the importance of preserving maritime history and education. Other guests included Charles H. Townsend, president and CEO of Condé Nast Publications and Commodore of the New York Yacht Club; Laura Ingrassia of Tiffany and Co.; Dr. Robert McNeil, restorer of the yacht Cangarda; and Greg Matzat, President of Sparkman & Stephens.  Many Trustees, former Trustees and International Council members enjoyed the evening as well.

Above: William Forster, Robert McNeil, Linda Hart, Percy Chubb III and Doug Teeson Below: The Festive Rainbow Room filled with Mystic Seaport supporters for the America and the Sea Gala

Each year Mystic Seaport’s America and the Sea Award recognizes an individual or organization whose contributions to the history, arts, sciences or industry of the sea best exemplify the American spirit and character.  The award honors and celebrates those who embrace the scholarship, exploration, adventure, aesthetics, competition and freedom that the sea inspires. 

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Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

Programs For Kids & Families

Liberty Days at Mystic Seaport Ages 8–10 Spend your shore leave from school exploring how people in the 19th century amused themselves during the long winters, how the Inuit constructed their igloos and how you restore historic ships like the Charles W. Morgan. Visit exhibits and the Planetarium, make crafts, try your hand at sailors’ tasks and learn games from the Arctic Circle during this four-day, drop-off school vacation program for 8–10-year-olds.

DATES

TIME

COST

Tues, Feb. 17 - Fri, Feb. 20

9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

$290 / $260 (m)

Inuit Craft Workshops Learn about the unique relationship the Inuit have with their Arctic animal neighbors. Use modern materials to explore a variety of traditional Inuit crafts. Each one-hour workshop will include a connection with traditional crafts and plenty of time for creating a masterpiece. Pre-registration is required, $10 per member and $12 per non-member. Workshops include: scrimshaw, leatherwork, soapstone carving, beadwork or good luck amulets.

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WindRose Spring 2009

DATE

workshop

time

Sat., February 14

Scrimshaw

11 a.m. - Noon

Sat., February 14

Leatherwork

1 - 2 p.m.

Sun., February 15

Soapstone Carving

11 a.m. - Noon

Sun., February 15

Beadwork

1 - 2 p.m.

Mon., February 16

Leatherwork

11 a.m. - Noon

Mon., February 16

Scrimshaw

1 - 2 p.m.

Tues., February 17

Good Luck Amulets

11 a.m. - Noon

Tues., February 17

Scrimshaw

1 - 2 p.m.

Wed., February 18

Scrimshaw

11 a.m. - Noon

Wed., February 18

Leatherwork

1 - 2 p.m.

Thurs., February 19

Soapstone Carving

11 a.m. - Noon

Thurs., February 19

Beadwork

1 - 2 p.m.

Fri., February 20

Good Luck Amulets

11 a.m. - Noon

Fri., February 20

Scrimshaw

1 - 2 p.m.

Sat., February 21

Scrimshaw

11 a.m. - Noon

Sat., February 21

Leatherwork

1 - 2 p.m.

Sun., February 22

Soapstone Carvings

11 a.m. - Noon

Sun., February 22

Beadwork

1 - 2 p.m.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

Programs For Kids & Families

Birthday Parties

Sea Squirts and Sea Stars: Preschool Programs

Celebrate your ocean-loving child’s special day with a nautical-themed party at the Museum of America and the Sea. Choose from four party themes:

Spend a fun-filled hour each week at the Children’s Museum at Mystic Seaport. Our preschool programs offer different hands-on activities (music, crafts, stories and science) every week plus a “field trip” to one of the Museum’s tall ships or exhibits.

• It’s a Pirate’s Life

• Mermaids: Maidens of the Sea

• A Sailor’s Life

Sea Squirts

• Girls of Long Ago

Ages 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 with caregiver

You provide the birthday child and guests, and we provide the location, the fun, the crafts, the cake and even the favors. For children ages 3–10.

DATES

TIME

COST

Wednesdays, Mar 11 - Apr 15

9 - 10 a.m.

$75 / $60 (m)

Thursdays, Mar 12 - Apr 16

9 - 10 a.m.

$75 / $60 (m)

Shipsmithing, section 2

Classes meet for six one-hour sessions.

Sea Stars Ages 3 to 4 with caregiver DATES

TIME

COST

Fridays, March 13 - April 24*

9 - 10 a.m.

$75 / $60 (m)

Classes meet for six one-hour sessions.

Visit mysticseaport.org/birthdayparties for more information.

* No class on April 10.

This class offers continued learning from Section 1 but also welcomes new students. During the eight sessions in our historic Shipsmith Shop, experienced smiths offer individualized attention to allow students to progress at their own pace. Both modern and traditional blacksmithing techniques are taught. Kids 12 and over are welcome to register and participate with a parent!

DATES

TIME

COST

February 23 - March 18

6 - 9 p.m.

$295 / $265 (m)

Classes meet Mondays and Wednesdays, for a total of eight three-hour sessions.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

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Program Catalog

winter

SUMMER CAMP PROGRAMS

| spring 2009

Camp dates for ages 6–10

Mystic Seaport offers a number of summer day camp programs for children of all ages.

DATES

Camp type

Junior Explorers 4- and 5-year-olds

July 7-11

Girls of Long Ago

$310 / $275 (m)

July 14-18

Girls of Long Ago

$310 / $275 (m)

July 21-25

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions

$310 / $275 (m)

July 28-Aug 1

Mystic Seaport Sampler

$310 / $275 (m)

August 4-8

Mystic Seaport Sampler

$310 / $275 (m)

August 11-15

A Sailor’s Life

$310 / $275 (m)

This high-energy, fast-paced program features hands-on activities in exhibits and ships, unique games and fantastic craft projects! Travel the universe on Astronomical Planetarium Day, explore the ocean deep and the Mystic River on Sea Critter Day, discover the secrets of sailors and ships on Jack Tar Day and many more surprises.

Classes meet Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Drop-off starts at 8:30 a.m.

Junior Explorers (Five half-day sessions) 4- and 5-year-olds DATES

Camp type

COST

June 22-26

Mon.- Fri. mornings or afternoons

$250 / $200 (m)

June 29-July 3

Mon.- Fri. mornings or afternoons

$250 / $200 (m)

Classes meet Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Drop-off starts at 8:30 a.m. Also afternoons from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Drop-off starts at 12:30 p.m.

Mystic Seaport Sampler 6- and 7-year-olds Our Mystic Seaport Sampler combines active play and learning through art, music, crafts and games. Boys and girls get a kids-eye view of Mystic Seaport from our Planetarium, on the steamboat Sabino and along the riverfront.

Girls of Long Ago 8- to 10-year-olds Step back in time as you try your hand at 19th-century cooking, sewing and gardening. Make old-fashioned accessories for the home and enjoy girl talk with friends. Discover real stories of girls living aboard ships.

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions 8- to 10-year-olds Discover secrets, serpents and superstitions of the sea. Explore the facts and fiction of mermaids, ghosts and shipwrecks, based on survivors’ sightings and captains’ logbooks. Make fabulous art projects, have hands-on activities in exhibits and do a bit of investigating as well!

A Sailor’s Life 8- to 10-year -olds Discover the secret lives of sailors. Learn sailors’ arts and crafts, like scrimshaw and knots, practice seamanship skills on a tall ship and cruise the Mystic River on the steamboat Sabino. WR14

WindRose Spring 2009

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

COST

Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

JOSEPH CONRAD SUMMER CAMP An overnight summer sailing camp for boys and girls ages 10–15 Registration Open Now For 60 summers, young people have come to Mystic Seaport to sail the Mystic River and sleep on the square-rigged ship Joseph Conrad. Built in Copenhagen in 1882, the vessel was used to train young Danish men for the merchant service. Today, permanently moored on our waterfront, the Conrad is fitted out with bunks, flush toilets, showers, heat and electricity. During the six-day program, young people between the ages of 10 and 15 sail a large fleet of Dyer Dhows and learn the skills of the sea. Lifelong friendships are made through the spirit of teamwork that underlies the Conrad experience. Our staff includes a state licensed director and experienced sailing instructors, many of whom are past Conrad participants. Each day starts early with morning deck chores. After breakfast, campers tackle the wind and current of the Mystic River, then break for lunch before an active afternoon on the water. Evenings are filled with activities, as well as plenty of time to spend with new friends. Campers enjoy stargazing in our Planetarium, climbing the rigging of the Conrad or a lively sea music sing-a-long. Campers return year after year to perfect skills, reunite with camps friends and enjoy another summer at Mystic Seaport. Program enrollment is limited to 40 for each session. Financial aid is available.

Conrad Summer Camp Ages 10–11 Designed for students with little or no sailing experience, this session gives participants the proper instruction to begin a lifetime of sailing. Sailing is done with a partner.

Sailing Assistant Program for Teens Sailing assistants are often former Conrad campers who return as volunteer junior counselors to work alongside the full-time staff, assisting in the daily operation of the camp. The Sailing Assistant program develops leadership skills and can be a unique supporting element in college and job applications. You must be 16 years old to apply for a Sailing Assistant position. Priority will be given to multi week commitments, single and multi week assistantships are available. More information and applications available online at www.mysticseaport.org/sailing assistant after February 1, 2009.

Conrad Summer Camp Ages 12–13 This class is for youngsters who have had little to no sailing experience and are still in need of basic fundamental review before moving forward. Solo sailing is encouraged.

Conrad Summer Camp Ages 14–15 This class takes students to the next level of learning. Instruction is given to provide students with the opportunity to sail solo.

Conrad Summer Race week Ages 13–15 This “final” class in the series provides students with experience sailing solo, as well as participating in a racing regatta.

DATES

Level

COST

June 21-26

Ages 10-11

$790 / $735 (m)

July 12-17

Ages 10-11

$790 / $735 (m)

July 26-31

Ages 10-11

$790 / $735 (m)

June 28-July 3

Ages 12-13

$790 / $735 (m)

August 2-7

Ages 12-13

$790 / $735 (m)

July 19-24

Ages 14-15

$790 / $735 (m)

July 5-10 Race Week

Ages 13-15

$790 / $735 (m)

August 9-14 Race Week

Ages 13-15

$790 / $735 (m)

Overnight camps start on Sundays at 4 p.m and run through Fridays at 1 p.m. Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

WindRose Spring 2009

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Program Catalog

winter

Sailing Programs at Mystic Seaport

| spring 2009

Brilliant for Adults Two-day Sails

No matter your skill level, you will find sailing at Mystic Seaport an unequaled experience. Whether learning to navigate on the Mystic River or sailing away on Brilliant, your experience will be unforgettable. For more information or to register for any sailing program, call 860.572.5322.

Typically, we sail to Block Island (Rhode Island) or Shelter Island (New York) and usually lay to a dock in the evening when crew may go ashore. Each two-day sail begins at 9 a.m., returns at 4 p.m. the following day, and includes an overnight aboard.

DATES for adults

two-day sail fee

May 16 - May 17 SOLD OUT

$410 / $360 (m)

May 23 - May 24 SOLD OUT

$410 / $360 (m)

May 29 - May 30 SOLD OUT

$410 / $360 (m)

May 31 - June 1 SOLD OUT

$410 / $360 (m)

Experience the adventure and challenge of life aboard a classic schooner. You raise the sails, take the helm, help in the galley, stand watch and explore New England islands and towns with eight other shipmates aboard Brilliant, our famous 62-foot schooner.

June 5 - June 6 SOLD OUT

$410 / $360 (m)

Owned and operated by Mystic Seaport and certified for ocean sailing, schooner Brilliant is reported by WoodenBoat magazine as “one of the best maintained classic yachts in the country — if not the world.” Applicants must be physically fit, agile and competent swimmers to participate in this program. Need-based financial assistance is available.

Sail aboard the schooner Brilliant

Brilliant for Teens (Ages 15–18, co-ed) Five-day Programs Each five-day program begins and ends at Mystic Seaport. Typical ports of call are Block Island, Newport, Cuttyhunk Island and Martha’s Vineyard.

DATES for teens

Level

COST

June 15-19

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

June 22-26

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

July 13-17

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

July 20-24

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

August 10-14

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

August 17-21

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

August 24-28

Ages 15-18

$950 / $900 (m)

Each five-day session runs Monday through Friday.

Brilliant for Teens (Ages 15–18, co-ed) 10-day Program Our 10-day programs begin and end at Mystic Seaport. Participants may sail as far as Provincetown or Nantucket Island, subject to weather.

DATES for teens

Level

COST

June 29 - July 8

Ages 15-18

$1900 / $1850 (m)

July 27 - August 5

Ages 15-18

$1900 / $1850 (m)

Each 10-day session begins on Monday and ends 10 days later on Wednesday.

June 7 - June 8 SOLD OUT

$410 / $360 (m)

September 11 - September 12

$410 / $360 (m)

September 13 - September 14

$410 / $360 (m)

September 18 - September 19

$410 / $360 (m)

September 20 - September 21

$410 / $360 (m)

September 25 - September 26

$410 / $360 (m)

September 27 - September 28

$410 / $360 (m)

October 3 - October 4

$410 / $360 (m)

October 10 - October 11

$410 / $360 (m)

Brilliant for Adults Charters Invite your friends and family to join you in the Brilliant experience. Four-day charters may be created by combining adjacent two-day sails. If you charter Brilliant, we must have at least six able hands to run the boat safely in difficult weather conditions. Charters for two-day sails or longer are limited to eight adults. Charter fee, two-day sail: $2,900. Charter fee, four-day sail: $6,000

spring Community Sailing Spring Community Sailing, Adult (15 and up) type

Date/time

COST

Beginner

April 5 - May 17, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Intermediate

April 5 - May 17, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Advanced

April 4 - May 16, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Racing Series

April 4 - May 16, 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Classes meet Saturdays or Sundays, except April 11 and 12.

Homeschool Sailing Classes, Beginner (Ages 10–14) DATES

TIME

COST

April 3 - May 15

9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

$130 (m)

Classes meet Fridays except for April 10.

Homeschool Sailing Classes, Intermediate (Ages 10–14)

Brilliant for Teens (Ages 15–18, co-ed) Charter Programs Did you know you can charter Brilliant for a group of eight teenagers, plus a group leader, during our summer season? Call 860.572.5322 to learn more. WR16

WindRose Spring 2009

DATES

TIME

COST

April 3 - May 15

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

$130 (m)

Classes meet Fridays except for April 10.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

Program Catalog

winter

SUMMER COMMUNITY SAILING CLASSES Adult (Ages 15 and up) Adult Beginner In this two-day class, you’ll be introduced to the theory of sailing (why and how a boat sails), basic sailing and gear terminology, rigging and de-rigging a Dyer Dhow, equipment stowage and care, personal safety, knots, safety on the dock and on the water, points of sail, small-boat handling, right-of-way rules, and capsize and running aground procedures.

| spring 2009

Junior Intermediate (ages 11–14) DATES

TIME

COST

July 6-10

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 13-17

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 27-31

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

August 3-7

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

August 10-14

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day.

DATES

TIME

COST

Saturday & Sunday, July 11-12

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

DATES

TIME

COST

Saturday & Sunday, July 25-26

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

August 17-21

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Saturday & Sunday, August 8-9

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Adult Intermediate If you are comfortable sailing a small boat alone and have mastered beginner skills, this two-day course is for you. You’ll begin with a review of terminology and points of sail, then move to learning about safety, sail trim and advanced terminology. Class includes practice leaving and landing at docks, picking up moorings, man overboard, inland rules of the road, gear failure, wind and current, headers and lifters.

Junior Racing (ages 11–14)

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day

Family Community Sailing We’ll introduce you and your child (or children) to water safety, boat controls and basic sailing maneuvers through shore and on-the-water activities. Pick from two classes, one class is for the beginner parents or an intermediate class, where the parents feel comfortable in a boat.

DATES

TIME

COST

Saturday & Sunday, July 18-19

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Saturday & Sunday, August 1-2

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

DATES

TIME

COST

Saturday & Sunday, August 15-16

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

June 29-July 3

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

July 13-17

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

August 3-7

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

Junior Sailing (ages 8–14) Our junior programs are for beginner and intermediate sailors. Classes use Dyer Dhows or JY15s. All equipment, except foul-weather gear, is provided. If you have a PFD, please bring your own. Competent swimmers ages 15 and older may enroll in adult classes.

Family Sailing Classes — Beginner

Above pricing includes one adult and one youth. $25 for each additional child (up to two more). Each five-day session meets Monday through Friday.

NEW! Family Sailing Classes — Intermediate Junior Beginner (ages 8–11) DATES

TIME

COST

July 6-10

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 20-24

12:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 27-31

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

DATES

TIME

COST

July 20-24

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

August 17-21

12:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

Above pricing includes one adult and one youth. $25 for each additional child (up to two more). Each five-day session meets Monday through Friday.

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day.

Junior Beginner (ages 12–14) DATES

TIME

COST

June 29-July 3

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

August 10-14

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day. Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

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Program Catalog

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PLANETARIUM PROGRAMS

| spring 2009

NEW! Weather for Sailors

Since early times, navigators have used the heavenly bodies to determine their ship’s position at sea. An exhibit in the entry of the Planetarium presents the basics of celestial navigation. Daily programs in the Planetarium illustrate the night sky for visitors, while classes offered by the Planetarium provide an in-depth look at navigation and astronomy. Classes for ages 15 and up except where noted.

Fair or foul, weather means everything to a sailor. Learn the basics of how to read the weather and respond to weather emergencies from a Coast Guard–certified deep-sea sailor. Participants will benefit from theory and first-hand knowledge.

DATE

TIME

COST

Wednesdays, April 22, 29, May 6

7 - 9 p.m.

$65 / $60 (m)

Classes meet for three two-hour sessions.

Basic Celestial Navigation This course will guide you through the modern procedures of this ancient art. Cover such topics as the noon sight of the sun (a tradition of the navigator), the use and adjustment of the sextant, time keeping, the Nautical Almanac, sight reduction and plotting lines of position. Star identification and basic theory will be covered. Plan on up to six hours of homework each week. A certificate will be awarded to each student who demonstrates proficiency with a sextant and passes a final exam typical of a day’s work at sea.

DATES

TIME

Feb. 17 and 24, March 17 and 31, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. April 7, 14, 21 and 28, May 5 and 12

COST $200 / $180 (m)

Classes meet Tuesdays for 10 two-hour sessions.

Learn how to find your geographic location in this in-depth orienteering course. Course includes introduction to tools and methods used to estimate distance; how to take a bearing using a compass, read a map, navigate by combining compass and map skills; also, the use of sun and stars for directions and more. Great family activity for children ages 12 and up, children must be accompanied by an adult. Materials Required: An orienteering compass. Suunto A-10 Compass recommended.

DATE

TIME

COST

Saturdays, April 18 - May 16

2 - 4 p.m.

$110 / $100 (m)*

* Adult and Child (ages 12 - 18) combo $175 / $160 (m) Classes meet for five two-hour sessions.

Introduction to Coastal Navigation This workshop will provide an introduction to latitude and longitude, nautical chart symbols, hands-on use of navigation tools with the plotting of courses and bearings, the magnetic compass, magnetic and true directions, determining the state of the tide and tidal current, sailing with tidal currents, and some basics of electronic navigation. Navigation instruments will be available for use during the workshop, and charts will be provided. If you have your own instruments, by all means bring them. If you do not have any, do not purchase any until after the first class.

DATES

TIME

COST

Saturdays, April 4 & 18

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.*

$110 / $100 (m)

NEW! The Art of Orienteering: Beginners Learn how the compass works, learn basic map reading and how to navigate on land in this summer orienteering session. Course includes introduction to tools and methods including estimating distance traveled; how to use a compass for taking bearings, read a map and use compass and map together for basic techniques of land navigation. Great family activity for children ages 12 and up, children must be accompanied by an adult.

DATE

TIME

COST

Wednesdays, June 24 - July 8

5 - 7 p.m.

$65 / $60 (m)*

* Adult and Child (ages 12 - 18) combo $110 / $100 (m)

*Including a 90-minute lunch break and two 15-minute breaks.

Classes meet for three two-hour sessions.

Latitude by the Noon Sun Using a Sextant

Basic & Intermediate Essentials of Marine Meteorology

Learn how to adjust and use a sextant and use the Nautical Almanac to determine latitude. This was done aboard the Charles W. Morgan and is the activity portrayed in Winslow Homer’s famous painting “Eight Bells.” This will give much insight to teachers of history and geography and it is a useful back-up procedure for those on ocean going vessels. We supply all tools and materials for you to use during the workshop.

DATE

TIME

COST

Saturday, April 25

10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

$70 / $60 (m)

Course minimum six students, maximum 12 students.

WR18

NEW! The Art of Orienteering

WindRose Spring 2009

An excellent preparation for the Marion to Bermuda Race beginning June 19, 2009. This course consists of an introduction on Friday evening followed by 16 hours of instruction during the Saturday-Sunday period. This is an intensive course on the essentials of basic meteorology with specific applications for mariners and those that live on the coast, suitable for high school seniors and older. Topics include an introduction to Earth’s weather system and what drives it, how to interpret cloud patterns, temperature and pressure readings made on shipboard.

DATE

TIME

COST

Friday, April 3

6-9 p.m.

$350 / $315 (m)

Saturday and Sunday, April 4 and 5

8 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

Anchor Watch An Overnight Program for Youth Groups Connect your youth group to the traditions of America and the sea during a fun-filled overnight adventure at Mystic Seaport. You’ll sleep aboard the 1882 square-rigged training ship Joseph Conrad after an evening of maritime activities. Rise and shine the next morning for a hearty breakfast, then join in a group activity led by Museum staff. Afterward, you’re free to spend the day exploring Mystic Seaport on your own. The program runs Fridays and Saturdays from mid-March through mid-May, and mid-September through mid-November. Call for available dates.

Special Group Planetarium Programs Have a specific topic in mind? Gather a group and let us know what you would like to learn. We seek to support your curriculum or special interests. Here are a few course possibilities: Stars of a Voyage to Freedom (Amistad), Stars and Navigation of the Great Explorers, Stars and Constellations of the current season’s sky. To discuss program content possibilities, please call 860.572.5302, ext. 5151, or email planetarium@mysticseaport.org.

Cost: $75 per person includes overnight accommodations aboard the training vessel Joseph Conrad, pizza snack, evening activities, craft materials, breakfast, a Mystic Seaport patch and two days of admission (the day of arrival and the following day).

Group Size: The group size is a minimum of 20 participants, maximum of 45. One supervising adult is required for every 10 children. You may combine small groups from your area. Groups with fewer than 20 participants will be charged $1,500.

Education Eligibility: Open to all youth groups, ages 6–14.

Homeschooling Programs Mystic Seaport is pleased to offer ongoing classes designed for the needs of homeschooling families.

For more information: call Central Reservations at 860.572.5322. Dates available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Classes run through May 2009, and take place on the third Thursday and Friday of each month. Each program is a two-hour hands-on experience with visits to various Mystic Seaport sites based on the themes below.

DATES

Class

TIME

Feb. 19 and 20

Picton Castle — lessons in world geography

1 p.m. - 3p.m.

March 19 and 20

Cargos Around the World

1 p.m. - 3p.m.

April 16 and 17

19th-Century Shipbuilding and Preservation 1 p.m. - 3p.m.

May 21 and 22

Participants’ Design

1 p.m. - 3p.m.

Age Groups: 4–7-year-olds – 8 participants, 1 adult chaperone 8–13-year-olds – 10 participants, 1 adult chaperone Each age group will study the same theme, but the activities will be age appropriate and may vary accordingly. Parents with additional children younger than four will be encouraged to explore the Children’s Museum and Playscapes with them while the older children are doing the program. Cost: $42 for the series, plus the required purchase of a family membership ($85). Interested in homeschool sailing classes? See page WR16.

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

WindRose Spring 2009

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Program Catalog

winter

John Gardner Boat shop Courses Named in honor of the boatbuilder, educator and author who founded Mystic Seaport’s boatbuilding courses more than 30 years ago, the John Gardner Boat Shop continues to research, document, replicate and teach the craft of traditional boatbuilding.

| spring 2009

Traditional Boatbuilding Classes meet Saturday through Tuesday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Learn by doing! Gain hands-on experience in nearly every phase of construction of a traditional plank-on-frame, smooth or lapstrake-planked boat. Using traditional hand tools, learn and practice lofting, steam bending, edge-tool sharpening, cutting a stem rabbet, carvel planking, lapstrake planking, and fastening and caulking. Discussion topics include wood types and sources, books and periodicals, and necessary tools. This comprehensive course will prepare you for any boatbuilding project. No previous experience is necessary.

DATES

TIME

COST

February 7 - 10

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$850 / $800 (m)

October 10 - 13

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$850 / $800 (m)

Marlinspike Seamanship This new class explores the dos and dont’s of rope. A one-day class to give a basic understanding of making, knotting, splicing and maintenance of three-strand rope.

Introduction to Half-Model Construction

DATE

TIME

COST

April 4

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$200 / $150 (m)

Create your own half model of Brilliant, Mystic Seaport’s Sparkman & Stephens 62' schooner yacht. Learn the basics of half-hull construction by carving your own model of a classic sailboat. Following a demonstration of the basic techniques used to build a waterline-lift model, you’ll begin working on your own model. Discussions of techniques, materials, tools and finishes continue throughout the day as you work to complete your project. At the end of the course, you’ll go home with a new family heirloom! Class size is limited to six students (minimum five).

DATES

TIME

COST

March 21

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$300 / $250 (m)

June 13

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$300 / $250 (m)

September 5

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$300 / $250 (m)

November 14

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$300 / $250 (m)

Varnishing Techniques for Traditional Boats So, now that you have your new or restored traditional boat, how do you protect it and keep it beautiful for years to come? Our full-day finishing class begins with discussions of appropriate materials, tools and surface preparation. Then, you’ll begin hands-on practice on sample boards in various stages of completion. This varnishing class focuses on techniques for bleaching, staining and varnishing. All materials and your own badger-hair brush are included. Class size is limited to seven students (minimum five).

WR20

DATES

TIME

COST

March 28

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$220 / $170 (m)

September 26

9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

$220 / $170 (m)

WindRose Spring 2009

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

AMERICAN BOAT & YACHT COUNCIL COURSES For further information and registration, please visit www.abycinc.org or call 410.990.4460.

Diesel Engine & Support Systems Certification This four-day program is designed for the experienced marine diesel engine technician and is intended to supplement factory-sponsored engine-specific courses and certifications with an industry-recognized generic certification of knowledge for troubleshooting and engine and drive installations. This course will cover diesel engines cooling systems, electrical systems, fuel systems, ventilation systems, exhaust systems, control systems, fuel injection, and drive systems. Additionally, extensive coverage of ABYC Standards that apply to diesel engine installations will be provided. At the time of registration, each student is sent a course Study Guide that should be previewed. The class concludes with a 200-question ABYC certification exam. You will need to bring your Study Guide and your copy of the ABYC Standards manual to the course.

DATE

TIME

COST

March 3-9

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

$1130 / $885 (m)

ABYC Standards Certification This three-day course will provide the student with a comprehensive and focused look at the key ABYC standards. Class discussion will address specific compliance issues relevant to engineers, installers, compliance inspectors and marine surveyors. Common non-compliance areas will be discussed and how to address these issues in both the factory and field environments. Where it is relevant, U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) will be reviewed as they relate to ABYC standards. The course is followed by a 100question exam for standards accreditation.

DATE

TIME

COST

May 5-7

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

$770 / $525 (m)

EDUCATION Undergraduate Williams-Mystic: The Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport Three-quarters of the earth is covered in water; doesn’t it make sense to spend 1/8 of your college career exploring 3/4 of your world? Williams-Mystic, the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport offers undergraduates a hands-on, interdisciplinary semester focused on the world’s oceans. Classes requiring original research and writing are conducted at Mystic Seaport in maritime history, marine sciences, environmental policy and literature of the sea. Students also learn traditional maritime skills hands-on from Mystic Seaport’s expert artisans and sailors. Taking hands-on learning even farther, Williams-Mystic students explore America in a way unlike any other — from a sailing voyage on a tall ship and traveling both the Pacific and Gulf coasts on three extended field seminars. Sophomores, juniors and seniors from any accredited four-year institution may apply for a fall or spring semester. Admission is competitive. Students earn a full semester of credit and transcript from Williams College. Need-based financial aid is available. For an application or to learn more, please visit us online at www.williams.edu/williamsmystic or call 860.572.5359, ext. 2.

Mystic Seaport Summer Internship Program The Mystic Seaport Internship is a 10-week program centered on museum education and interpretation, independent research and field seminars. Interns may receive credit through Trinity College. Interns work in a department of the Museum three days a week, such as Museum Education, Interpretation, or Exhibitions and Collections. One day a week is set aside for taking field trips to other museums and one day a week is set aside for assigned reading, seminars and to complete research for accent papers. The program runs June 8 – August 11, 2009. Interested applicants may send a résumé and cover letter to: Human Resources ATTN: Internship Program Mystic Seaport 75 Greenmanville Avenue PO Box 6000, Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

WindRose Spring 2009

WR21

Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

GRADUATE

HOW TO REGISTER

Munson Institute Summer Graduate Programs

When registering by fax, mail or email, all registration forms can be found on the web at: www.mysticseaport.org/registration.

Maritime history as it is taught at the Munson Institute embraces a broad range of subjects, including the rise of seaports as unique communities and the role of minorities and women in them, social and cultural aspects of the seaman’s world and how maritime commerce has linked Americans to the world beyond. During six weeks in residence in 19th-century housing, Munson Institute students can take a survey course, a seminar or complete independent research. The Munson Institute is open to teachers, graduate students, advanced undergraduates, auditors and all others interested in immersing themselves in maritime history.

American Maritime History Survey

BY PHONE: Call 860.572.5322 Registering for a membership program? Call 860.572.5339 or register online. Registering for an ABYC program? Call 410.999.4460.

BY FAX: 860.572.5398 BY MAIL: Reservations Mystic Seaport PO Box 6000, 75 Greenmanville Avenue Mystic, CT 06355

BY EMAIL:

DATE

TIME

COST

June 22 - July 31

9:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.

$1,200 for credit, $ 600 to audit

To register by email, visit us on the web for a registration form. The forms can be emailed to: reservations.desk@mysticseaport.org. Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Payment is due in full at the time of registration.

Meets Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Scholarships available.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION Maritime History Seminar

• In the event of extreme weather, Mystic Seaport may cancel a class and a full refund will be issued if the participant cannot be rescheduled.

DATE

TIME

COST

June 22 - July 31

Begins at 1:30 p.m.

$1,200 for credit, $ 600 to audit

Meets Mondays and Thursdays. Scholarships available. For more information, call 860.572.5359.

• Occasionally, Mystic Seaport photographs or videotapes visitors while on the grounds for use in a variety of publicity and promotional materials and to advance our educational mission. We thank you for your cooperation and support.

Cancellation Policies PLANETARIUM, COMMUNITY SAILING, SHORESIDE TRADES AND JOHN GARDNER BOAT SHOP COURSES Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of a course will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. Cancellations made 15 to 29 days prior to a class will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 50% of the course cost. No refund will be given if cancelled within 14 days of the course.

HOMESCHOOLING Homeschooling courses are purchased as a series only and there are no refunds.

SCHOONER BRILLIANT ADULT AND TEEN SAILS AND JOSEPH CONRAD PROGRAM Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of courses will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. The administrative fee will be 50% for Brilliant charters. No refund will be given for cancellations made within 30 days of any Brilliant or camp courses. Mystic Seaport program prices are subject to change without prior notice. WR22

WindRose Spring 2009

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

Program Catalog

winter

| spring 2009

EVENT

INDEX SPRING 2009 PAGE

EVENT

AGES

DATES

TIME

WR13 WR13 WR13 WR13 WR14 WR14 WR14 WR14 WR19 WR19 WR19 WR19 WR14 WR19 WR14 WR14 WR14 WR12 WR14 WR17

Sea Squirts Preschool Program Sea Squirts Preschool Program Mystic Seaport Birthday Parties Sea Stars Preschool Program Junior Explorers Summer Day Camp Junior Explorers Summer Day Camp Junior Explorers Summer Day Camp Junior Explorers Summer Day Camp Homeschooling Series Homeschooling Series Homeschooling Series Homeschooling Series Mystic Seaport Sampler Summer Day Camp Anchor Watch Overnight Program Girls of Long Ago Summer Day Camp Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions Summer Day Camp A Sailor’s Life Summer Day Camp February Vacation Program Mystic Seaport Sampler Summer Day Camp Junior Community Sailing: Beginner

Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages Ages

March 11-April 15 March 12-April 16 By advance reservation March 13- April 24 June 22-26 June 22-26 June 29-July 3 June 29-July 3 Feb. 19/Feb 20 March 19/March 20 April 16/April 17 May 21/May 22 July 28 - Aug 1, 4-8 Spring & fall dates available July 7-11, 14-18 July 21-25 August 11-15 Feb 17-Feb 20 August 4-8 July 6-10

9-10 a.m. 9-10 a.m.

WR17

Junior Community Sailing: Beginner

Ages 8-11

July 20-24

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

WR17 WR17 WR15 WR15 WR15 WR16 WR16 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR15 WR15 WR13 WR18 WR18 WR15 WR15 WR15

Junior Community Sailing: Beginner Junior Community Sailing: Racing Joseph Conrad Summer Sailing Camp Joseph Conrad Summer Sailing Camp Joseph Conrad Summer Sailing Camp Homeschool Sailing Classes: Beginner Homeschool Sailing Classes: Intermediate Junior Community Sailing: Intermediate Junior Community Sailing: Intermediate Junior Community Sailing: Intermediate Junior Community Sailing: Intermediate Junior Community Sailing: Intermediate Joseph Conrad Summer Sailing Camp Joseph Conrad Summer Sailing Camp Shipsmithing 2 Art of Orienteering Art of Orienteering (Beginners) Joseph Conrad Summer Sailing Camp Joseph Conrad Summer Race Week Camp Joseph Conrad Summer Race Week Camp

Ages 8-11 Ages 8-14 Ages 10-11 Ages 10-11 Ages 10-11 Ages 10-14 Ages 10-14 Ages 11-14 Ages 11-14 Ages 11-14 Ages 11-14 Ages 11-14 Ages 12-13 Ages 12-13 12 & up with adult 12 & up with adult 12 & up with adult Ages 14-15 Ages 13-15 Ages 13-15

8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Six-day residential Six-day residential Six-day residential 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m Six-day residential Six-day residential 6-9 p.m. 2-4 p.m. 5-7 p.m. Six-day residential Six-day residential Six-day residential

WR16

Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program

Ages 15-18

WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR16 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR18 WR18 WR18 WR18 WR18

Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Schooner Brilliant Teen Sailing Program Spring Community Sailing: Beginner Spring Community Sailing: Intermediate Spring Community Sailing: Advanced Spring Community Sailing: Racing Series Spring Community Sailing: Racing Series Summer Community Sailing: Beginner Summer Community Sailing: Beginner Summer Community Sailing: Beginner Summer Community Sailing: Intermediate Summer Community Sailing: Intermediate Summer Community Sailing: Intermediate Basic Celestial Navigation Introduction to Coastal Navigation Latitude by the Noon Sun Using a Sextant Weather for Sailors Basic & Intermediate Essentials of Marine Meteorology

Ages 15-18 Ages 15-18 Ages 15-18 Ages 15-18 Ages 15-18 Ages 15-18 Ages 15-18 Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+)

July 27-31 August 17-21 June 21-26 July 12-17 July 26-31 April 3 - May 15 April 3 - May 15 July 6-10 July 13-17 July 27-31 August 3-7 August 10-14 June 28-July 3 August 2-7 Feb 23-March 18 April 18-May 16 June 24-July 8 July 19-24 July 5-10 August 9-14 June 29-July 8 July 27-Aug 5 June 15-19 June 22-26 July 13-17 July 20-24 August 10-14 August 17-21 August 24-28 April 5-May 17 April 5-May 17 April 4-May 16 April 4-May 16 April 4-May 16 July 11-12 July 25-26 August 8-9 July 18-19 August 1-2 August 15-16 Begins Feb. 17 April 4 &18 April 25 April 22, 29 & May 6 April 3-5

2 1/2 - 3 1/2 2 1/2 - 3 1/2 3-10 3-4 4-5 4-5 4-5 4-5 4-7/8-13 4-7/8-13 4-7/8-13 4-7/8-13 6-7 6-14 8-10 8-10 8-10 8-10 8-10 8-11

PROGRAM CODE

9-10 a.m. 9-12 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 9-12 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 1-3 p.m. 1-3 p.m. 1-3 p.m. 1-3 p.m. 9-3 p.m. 2 days, 1 night 9-3 p.m. 9-3 p.m. 9-3 p.m. 9-3 p.m. 9-3 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

10 days on board ship Five days on board ship Five days on board ship Five days on board ship Five days on board ship Five days on board ship Five days on board ship Five days on board ship 9-12 p.m. 1-4 p.m. 9-12 p.m. 2:30-5:30 p.m. 2:30-5:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 7-9 p.m. 6-9 p.m., 8 a.m.-10 p.m.

Index continued on page WR24 Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

WindRose Spring 2009

WR23

EVENT

INDEX SPRING 2009

Continued from page WR23

EVENT

AGES

DATES

TIME

WR20 WR20 WR20 WR20 WR21 WR21 WR4 WR6 WR13 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR17 WR4 WR4 WR8 WR9 WR8 WR8 WR8 WR9 WR9 WR9 WR9 WR9 WR9 WR9 WR5 WR7 WR10 WR10

Introduction to Half-Model Construction Introduction to Half-Model Construction Varnishing Techniques for Traditional Boats Marlinspike Seamanship ABYC: Diesel Engines Certification ABYC: Standards Certification Pirate Days Newport Lighthouse Cruise Inuit Craft Workshops Family Community Sailing: Beginner Family Community Sailing: Beginner Family Community Sailing: Beginner Family Community Sailing: Intermediate Family Community Sailing: Intermediate Pirate Film Festival (afternoon) Pirate Film Festival (evening) Thimble Islands/Trolley Museum Bus Trip/Boat Trip: NYC Maritime Author Series Maritime Author Series Spring Garden Series Adventure Series Adventure Series Adventure Series Adventure Series Behind Locked Doors Behind Locked Doors Behind Locked Doors Great Lakes trip Provincetown Weekend Spring Garden Series Spring Garden Series

Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) Adult (15+) All ages All ages All ages All ages All ages All ages All ages All ages Adult/Youth Adult/Youth Adults/Youth Adult/Youth Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult Adult

9 a.m.-5 p.m. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Times vary, see listings 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 7 a.m.-9:30 p.m. 5:30-7:30 p.m. 5:30-7:30 p.m. 12-2:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 12-3 p.m. 12-3 p.m. 12-3 p.m.

WR16

Schooner Brilliant Adult Sailing Program

Adult

March 21 June 13 March 28 April 4 March 3-9 May 5-7 April 17-18 May 23 Feb 14-22 June 29-July 3 July 13-17 August 3-7 July 20-24 August 17-21 April 17-19 April 17-19 May 19 April 4 March 25 April 22 May 15 March 19 March 19 April 16 April 16 February 27 March 27 April 24 September 12–19 April 24-25 March 13 April 10 Spring dates for ADULT program sold out, see availability for fall or call to charter.

Questions? Want to register? To register for any event with a program code, please call the Membership Office at 860.572.5339 or register online. To register for all other Mystic Seaport programs and events, please call Central Reservations at 860.572.5322. To register for an ABYC program, call 410.999.4460. For more information about all upcoming events and programs at Mystic Seaport, go to www.mysticseaport.org.

WR24

WindRose Spring 2009

keep in touch

PAGE

Learn more online at www.mysticseaport.org

7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 12-2:30 p.m. 12-2:30 p.m.

PROGRAM CODE

#0030 #0074

#0073 #0073 #0068 #0075 #0058 #0058 #0032 #0001 #0001 #0001 #0001 #0036 #0073 #0036 #0076 #0032 #0032

General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.5315 toll free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888.973.2767 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.0711 central reservations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.5322 Museum Stores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.5385 Maritime Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.5388 Membership Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.5339 Volunteer Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 860.572.5378 membership@mysticseaport.org | www.mysticseaport.org

GR E E N HA N D ’ S C O R N E R

Imagine your father, a whaling captain, just announced that your family would be spending the next four years traveling the seas with him on his ship. What would you do with your beloved pets? Bring them with you, of course! Dogs were wonderful companions for sailors and the captain’s family. They also make great exploring buddies when the ships would pull into exotic ports. Cats are always nice to have aboard, they are small, and catch their own food-mice! They are also considered good luck to have aboard by many sailors. Eight year old Laura Jernagan had a black and white kitten and her little brother Prescott had a pet pig that would follow him everywhere when they were on the whaler Alice Knowles in 1870. In 1914, young Reginald Hegarty had a goat that he trained to pull

by Barbara Jarnigan

paws on

deck 41 g r een h a n d s co r ne r

a wooden wagon around the racecourse of the deck. Alice Rowe went on a voyage on her father’s whaler, Roman, when she was a teenager. The ship was almost the same size as the Charles W. Morgan. Her father was fond of collecting exotic animals whenever they pulled into port. At one point, they had 22 monkeys, five parrots, two cats, the family dog, Jess, and an anteater! Alice got along with all of the animals, except the anteater, which liked to chase her, climb up her dress and stick its long tongue down the back of her dress looking for ants. Annie Crocker was on the full rigged ship William Wilcox when she acquired a pet monkey. Unfortunately, he was quite mischievous, and would steal treats from the galley and the sailors’ personal belongings from the fo’c’sle. When the ship stopped in Calcutta, the sailors exchanged her monkey for some pigeons. Some ships brought livestock with them as well, for fresh meat, including pigs, sheep and chickens. The seafaring children learned early on not to become too fond of these animals.

all

b y t h e nu m be r s

By the Numbers: A look at wind, weather and the Mystic Seaport Planetarium Number of distinct stars shown by the Planetarium star projector: 750 Number of trips around the walkway of the Planetarium dome to equal one statute (regular) mile: 49.44 Height of the Planetarium dome, in feet: 30 For sailors of long ago and even today, stars can be a lifeline on a boundless sea. And in the Planetarium at Mystic Seaport,

Number of visitors who have attended Planetarium programs, approximately: 2,100,000

you can get a lesson in celestial navigation

In miles, the approximate distance from Earth to Sirius, the brightest star in our winter night sky: 50,568,000,000

using the stars, planets and heavenly bodies of

In knots, the wind speed of 115 statute miles per hour:100

exhibit on 19th-century navigation. The Planetarium was designed in 1960 and Planetarium Director Don Treworgy arrived

Number of miles per inch when representing distances between planets in the Orrey Scale: 14,000,000 Approximate number of email weather forecasts and updates sent by Planetarium Director Don Treworgy to date: 1,095,000

as an intern in 1961. He has been sharing his infectious and exuberant approach to the endless connections between heavens and seas with millions of Museum visitors since then.

Known number of Mystic Seaport friends’ vessels to be hit by lightning and lose all their electronics while at sea: 37 Number of those sailors glad to possess celestial navigation skills: all

To learn more about Planetarium programs for this spring and summer, turn to the WindRose section of this issue, or go online to www.mysticseaport.org/planetarium.

~ Information compiled by Planetarium Director Don Treworgy

b y t h e nu m be r s

the season or enjoy the permanent lobby

43

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The Charles W. Morgan is the last wooden whaling ship in the world, an icon of America’s seafaring past. As historian David McCullough says, “The Morgan powerfully represents a rousing chapter in American history.” t

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join us in preserving the

Charles W. Morgan

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Your generous donation will keep this national treasure ship-shape for future generations. Just call (860) 572-5365. Or email development@mysticseaport.org.

SPRING 2009

And thank you, as always, for your support!

75 Greenmanville Avenue PO Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Dated Material Do not hold

Nonprofit organization US postage PAID Mystic Seaport, Inc


Mystic Seaport Magazine 2009 Spring