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LESLEY STAHL JOURNALISM AT ITS BEST

THE INFLUENCERS THE MILLENNIUM PROJECT + FASHION FOR NEAR AND FAR

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The 52 | 101 |

INFLUENCE ISSUE

A CONVERSATION WITH LESLEY STAHL When Lesley Stahl was hired as part of affirmative action policies in 1972, it solidified her role in the history of journalism.

THE INFLUENCERS M&V highlights female game-changers, whose accomplishments and passions are igniting women's potential. Meet our innovation agents.

108 | 121 |

A WOMAN'S WORLD Exotic Morocco. Whether stateside or globe-trotting, these looks will translate near or far.

THE MILLENNIUM PROJECT The future is bright for Gen Y women, but it will take support from older female role models to break through today's remaining gender biases.

MUSES & VISIONARIES MAGAZINE magazinemv.com

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JOURNALISM AT ITS BEST

THE INFLUENCERS THE MILLENNIUM PROJECT + FASHION FOR NEAR AND FAR

Subsc ribe and sa ve

$6.95US JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2014

57% off single issue price

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INSPIRE

INFORM 64 | BIG PICTURE

19 | THE GOODS

News from around the world

Carefully curated wish lists

24 | 28 | 30 | 40 |

70 |

EYES AND EARS

A cultural roundup of new releases

72 |

INDULGE OR NOT

On-the-go business necessities

MAKING WAVES

Health-conscious retreats

Pg. 23

Pg. 82

BUSINESS UNUSUAL

Crowdfunding spurs businesses

76 |

ON THE EDGE

78 |

ROOM FOR DEBATE You decide: MBA

Area women to watch

UNPLUGGED

MASTER CLASS

Gabrielle Bernstein on New Age therapy

New ground in the construction industry

Pg. 132

Pg. 83

Pg. 102

Pg. 21

IMPACT

NURTURE

124 | RAISE YOUR GLASS

82 | PROJECT ME

Storytelling with Edwidge Danticat

Bright ideas for a better you

84 | 89 | 94 | 96 |

AT HOME

Gatherings with Lulu Powers

LITTLE ONES

Easy lunches for the wee ones

ON THE COUCH

Answers to life’s dilemmas

GROWING PAINS

Tween love in the tech world

Pg. 19

126 | R.S.V.P.

Highlights and happenings

Pg. 19

132 | VISIONS

Annie Leonard takes on waste ON THE COVER LESLEY STAHL SHOT ON LOCATION AT A CBS STUDIO IN N.Y.C. PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEN PAO MAKEUP BY JARRETT BRANDON ARTISTRY.

MEET THE TEAM

ROY ASSAD

LOLA THÉLIN AMY LAGAE

ERIN ROSSITTO

SASHA JOZEFCZYK MOLLY GREENE

NICOLE FAHRENHOLZ

Publisher ERIN ROSSITTO Editor in Chief AMY LAGAE Creative Director MOLLY GREENE Managing Editor LOLA THÉLIN Marketing Manager SASHA JOZEFCZYK

+ Contributing Editor JULIA CHAPLIN Copy Editors TRACY de la FEUILLIEZ, ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL Contributors JO AARON, NICO CASSANETTI, TESS GHILAGA, ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL, ANNIE LEONARD, CHRIS PAIGE, LULU POWERS, STYLIANA RESVANIS, TRÉMENE TRIPLETT Photographers ANDREAS ORTNER, KEN PAO, RENATO PETEIRA, MAGGIE STEBER

+ Chief Operating Officer ROY ASSAD 561.515.4552 ext. 800 roy@magazinemv.com Operations Manager NICOLE FAHRENHOLZ 561.515.4552 ext. 805 nicole@magazinemv.com Senior Account Managers

MAE FERGUSON 561.515.4552 ext. 814 mae@magazinemv.com LEANNE FIELDS 561.515.4552 ext. 815 leanne@magazinemv.com KRISTA GENTILE 561.515.4552 ext. 812 krista@magazinemv.com NATALIE LAMBERT 561.515.4552 ext. 813 natalie@magazinemv.com CHRISTOPHER MUSCO 561.515.4552 ext. 807 christopher@magazinemv.com

+ For editorial or advertising correspondence: Muses & Visionaries Magazine 201 S. Narcissus Ave. Suite 2 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 e-mail editorial@magazinemv.com phone 561.515.4552 magazinemv.com

CONTRIBUTORS MAGGIE STEBER is a highly-awarded documentary photographer whose work has appeared in major international newspapers, magazines and book anthologies as well as exhibitions worldwide. She is a regular contributor to National Geographic Magazine. She has worked in 63 countries specializing in telling the stories of underrepresented people. Steber has worked for 25 years in Haiti and published a book entitled Dancing on Fire: Photographs from Haiti. She has received the Ernst Haas grant, the Alicia Patterson Foundation grant and the Knight Foundation grant. Her work has been exhibited internationally in one-woman shows, including at Visa Pour L’Image and the Pingyao International Photography Festival in China and is included in the Library of Congress.

JULIA CHAPLIN is a New York-based journalist/designer who covers travel, art and lifestyle for The New York Times, Travel & Leisure, ELLE and W Magazine. She has written two books Gypset Style and Gypset Travel (Assouline.) She runs the website www.gypset.com and designs a clothing line called Gypset.

KEN PAO has been published internationally in magazines such as ELLE, Harper's Bazaar and L'Officiel, and commercially with clients such as Sephora, Target, CoverGirl, MAC and L'Oreal. A photographer for eight years (and counting), he is based out of N.Y.C. Before living in N.Y.C., Pao studied photography at the Miami Ad School in South Beach where he still misses the beach and the warm weather. 

ROBIN BRADLEY HANSEL is a South Florida freelance writer “rooted and grounded in a love of words.” As owner of Green Treehouse Media, LLC, Hansel’s passion for environmental conservation and her background as a licensed physical therapist and Pilates professional are reflected in many of her published articles. All the women Hansel interviewed for her article on millennials were an inspiration but Lisa Bloom’s advice particularly resonated with her: “Seek out mentors; work hard, but also let your superiors know what you've achieved (toot your own horn); ask for more responsibility; make yourself indispensable to the company.”

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Letter from the Editor

When I think of influential people in my life, I count those who have changed my views, made me stop and think, and helped me through something I couldn’t otherwise do alone. Those names are less familiar to the world, but they mean everything to me and have shaped the woman I am today. The remarkable women we celebrate in this issue make an impact every day on the world around us. From politics to health care, from Broadway to Brazil, our choice of influencers may not affect you directly, but I assure you, they are changing the world we live in and the world our children will inherit. It is lovely to meet women who have so much belief in their chosen fields that they dedicate their lives to promoting and bettering their industries. I hope their stories (page 101) motivate you to support their endeavors or even launch your own. The Millennium Project (page 121) takes a look at Gen Y women and how today’s female influencers can support tomorrow’s leaders. Lola Thélin’s cover story on Lesley Stahl (page 52) provides an intimate look at the career of the broadcasting icon. Stahl reported on Watergate. She was also the first woman to report live on the night of a presidential election. She has been a CBS "60 Minutes" correspondent since 1991. Through research, intellect and bravery, she not only changed the face of broadcasting, she has inspired a generation of journalists to follow with the same grace and integrity. It is my hope that our articles on Lesley Stahl and M&V’s featured influencers remind us of our own potential and responsibility to the world around us. May we leave it better than we found it. Enjoy this special influence issue. With gratitude,

INSPIRE

“Overcome the notion that you must be regular. It robs you of the chance to be extraordinary.”

Uta Hagen

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INSPIRE

The GOODS “Marrakech conjures the exotic and magical, and Moroccan style is a Moorish architectural marriage of symmetry and ornamentation. It is fascinating how the geometry and shapes of these traditional style elements are perennially modern. Fashion designer Lyn Devon’s spring collection typifies ‘Marrakech Mod’ and captures the understated elegance with a decidedly Berber flair.” Creative Director Molly Greene

Nicholas Liu Grid Stacked Ring $2,100 shoplatitude.com

Leather Grid Charm Bracelet $460

Chloé Transparent Sunglasses $275 barneys.com

THE INSPIRATION Lyn Devon New Bell Coat $1,495 lyndevon.com

Grand Bazaar Turquoise Tassel Necklace $200 shoplatitude.com

Rauwolf Brutalist Clutch $2,645 barneys.com

Z Gallerie Casablanca Lanterns Chrome $9.95 and $24.95 zgallerie.com

Jonathan Adler Leather Moroccan Poof $275 jonathanadler.com

John Robshaw Caspian Duvet $275-$360 johnrobshaw.com

Moroccan Bazaar Fuchsia Babbouche Slippers $60 shoplatitude.com

Justin Orton Moroccan Mod Table $2,500 justinorton.com

The Petite Pear Navy Moroccan iPhone Case $35 society6.com

J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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I N T E R I O R D E S I G N // 5 2 1 1 B O N I TA AV E N U E / D A L L A S , T E X A S 7 5 2 0 6 / T . 2 1 4 . 8 2 6 . 8 2 0 0 B R E C K I N R I D G E TAY L O R . C O M

INSPIRE

The GOODS “French visionaries Catherine Deneuve, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy and Audrey Tautou embody a classic, effortless-seeming style, but Parisian chic is a look that can be achieved by every woman. Mix affordable pieces with high-fashion splurges and accessorize for an insouciant coolness. Don’t forget that French confidence.” Editor in Chief Amy Lagae

By Terry Rose Balm $60 barneys.com

THE INSPIRATION Armand Diradourian Travel Blanket $495 barneys.com

Maison Moreau Bregançon Open Tote $2,890 barneys.com

Chance Signature Boatneck $68 chanceco.com

Freds Double Wine Tote $24 barneys.com

Peter Pilotto Farah Wrap-Effect Crepe Skirt $1,175 net-a-porter.com

Conner Coral Card Set $85 barneys.com

Valentino Rockstud Leather Headband $245 net-a-porter.com

En Soie Navy Porselli Ballet Flats $220 ensoie.us

J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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THE ONLY NAME YOU NEED TO KNOW IN REAL ESTATE PA L M B E AC H | W E S T PA L M B E AC H W W W . S A M F I S C H . C O M

INSPIRE

The GOODS “Gypset Travel is about all those semi-secret bohemian towns peppered around the globe that have the perfect high-low balance of being both raw and luxurious. But more than anything Gypset is an approach to life—a point of view that’s equal parts glamorous, experimental and a bit jet-lagged.” Contributing Editor Julia Chaplin

THE INSPIRATION

Dezso Shell Ring $1,770 dezsosara.com

Gypset Travel $45 gypset.com

Lightningbolt Surfboard lightningbolt-usa.com

Missoni Collection Spring 2014 missoni.com

West Elm MIAC Whirlwind Jute Rug $169 westelm.com

Scholten & Baijings t.e. Cushions $270 yliving.com

Gypset Coco Dashiki Weekender $300 gypset.com

Tori Praver Swimwear Kalani Top and Violet Bottom in Indian Wells Guava Top $99, Bottom $101 toripraverswimwear.com Burton Drifter Roller Travel Bag $165 burton.com

Soludos Rhomba Raffia Black Natural $65 soludos.com

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Untitled Š Carrie Mae Weems

Eyes & EARS

CARRIE MAE WEEMS: Three Decades of Photography and Video is presented by the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. Weems, born in Portland, Oregon, in 1953, explores gender, race and class inequality, and uses art to shed light on the experiences of marginalized communities. She is recognized as an important influence for many young artists. Her work of 30 years invites viewers to contemplate identity and history through the lens of the African American experience. The exhibition, supported in part by The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, is on show January 24 to May 14, 2014.

INSPIRE Afro-Chic © Carrie Mae Weems

Award-winning novelist Nicholas Shakespeare delves into narrative nonfiction in his latest book, Priscilla: The Hidden Life of an Englishwoman in Wartime France. Prompted by the discovery of a trunk full of his late aunt’s personal belongings, Shakespeare began to unravel a hidden past of the beautiful and enigmatic aunt he remembered from his childhood. Family wisdom held that Priscilla was a member of the Resistance and survived internment and torture by the Germans. The author learned a far more complex truth that he lays bare in this retelling of Priscilla’s story. (HarperCollins, January 7, 2014) In Spirit Rising: My Life, My Music songstress and Grammy Award-winner Angélique Kidjo recounts her journey from the west coast of Africa to international acclaim as the definitive queen of African music. Beloved for her commitment to Africa and its heritage and sought after by the most respected names in contemporary music, Kidjo gives voice to experiences of hardship and bigotry, as well as the bonds of family and country that contributed to her meteoric rise. The pages are rich with stories, pictures and lyrics that illuminate her passion for music. (HarperCollins, January 7, 2014)

A Tire D'Aile, Georges Braque

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he Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) has the distinction of being the sole U.S. venue for Georges Braque: A Retrospective. The show premiered at the Grand Palais in Paris this past September to mark the 50th anniversary of the artist’s death. Braque was profoundly influenced by the work of Paul Cézanne and famously collaborated with friend Pablo Picasso to essentially create the language of cubism. MFAH will display 75 of Braque’s defining works spanning his career, from early Fauvism-inspired pieces through his contributions to modern art and ending with the abstract still lifes and landscapes of his later years. Georges Braque will be on view from February 16 to May 11, 2014.

Compotier et Cartes, Georges Braque; images © 2013 Artists Rights Society/ADAGP

A Broad and Expansive Sky--Ancient Rome ©Carrie Mae Weems

Thirty-four-year-old Claire Byrne reinvents herself following the death of her renowned, somewhat older, sexologist husband whose demise involves a New York City sidewalk and a falling sculpture. Carole Radziwill’s witty debut novel, The Widow’s Guide to Sex and Dating, is a tantalizing ride through the ups and downs of self-discovery that accompany love and loss. The book’s heroine, the quirky and charismatic Byrne, shares some rules to live by along the way. (Henry Holt and Co., February 11, 2014) The Parthenon Enigma, a work of historical nonfiction, upends the world’s long-held belief that this most famous of ancient Athenian buildings should be revered as the birthplace of democracy and modern civic values. Author Joan Breton Connelly, a classical archeologist, suggests an alternative hypothesis for the purpose of the Parthenon, which was built in the 5th century B.C. This new hypothesis is based on a lost Euripides play discovered on a papyrus, which was wrapped around an Egyptian mummy. Using text and visual evidence, she argues for a darker interpretation that includes cult ritual and human sacrifice. (Knopf, January 28, 2014)

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INSPIRE

Eyes & EARS

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eart-soul revivalists Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings have had fans waiting for the release of Give the People What They Want, which was delayed due to Jones’ diagnosis with cancer. After two years of touring, the soul singer and the 11-piece band reconvened to work on this 10-song album. This fifth album is seasoned with soul and provides a fresh take on the performance and songwriting. Riddled with dark up-tempos, danceable funk grooves, sweet hooks and arrangements, the album is certainly the answer to the long wait. (Daptone Records, January 14, 2014)

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clandestine relationship between two young Afghanis in Kabul is at the heart of the drama An Afghan Love Story, an official selection of the 2013 Cannes International Film Festival and winner of the Sundance Screenwriting Award. When Wajma, played by Wajma Bahar, reveals the outcome of her liaison—an accidental pregnancy—to her suitor and her middle-class family, cultural expectations and commitment to family collide. Despite its title, this narrative is less a romance than a commentary about women’s role and rights in modern-day Afghanistan. Filmed in Persian with English subtitles. Visit filmmovement.com for release dates.

An Afghan Love Story

riter/director Shana Betz shares a vivid part of her childhood W in the indie drama film Free Ride. The story follows an abused single mother, Christina Milland (Anna Paquin), who moves from

Free Ride

Was it difficult to find financial support for Free Ride? M&V:

SHANA BETZ: This project was 10 years

in the making. I went through 26 different drafts of the script. I took it around town, and no one wanted to make a film about a single mother, especially not a drug-running one. They felt it was unsympathetic. They wanted a stronger male presence and more about the  cocaine war. Fortunately, we found private financing though a group outside Hollywood that believed in the story I wanted to tell.

There is an underlying story about the sisters, correct?

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Ohio to South Florida to start fresh with her two daughters in 1978. Paquin’s character secures a housekeeping job, which turns out to be a front for a marijuana cartel. The movie depicts a mother struggling to do what is best for her kids but whose actions lead to a disapproving life. Betz, whose character is played by Ava Acres, was only seven years old when her mother’s controversial choices threatened to tear her family apart. Free Ride releases in New York City, Los Angeles and on video on demand January 10, 2014.

This film is meant as a love letter to my sister. People are shocked that I didn’t kick into the sensational side of the drug war in the film, but the story was never about that. It is my way of giving back to my sister and to let her know that I recognize what she did for me. She allowed me the ability to retain the innocence that I use today in my storytelling. She was my sister, mother figure and caretaker. She did what she did out of love for me. This girl is amazing; she is a saint.

Is there a life lesson? I am saddened by how people want to perceive mothers in the media. When people think of someone selling drugs, they

envision a guy wearing a hood on a dark corner. I’m sure that person is out there, but I can tell you from my own life experience, in addition to  working inside the California prison system with The Actors’ Gang’s Prison Project (Tim Robbins’ L.A.based theater company), there is a different face to the drug system, and it’s a single mom.

How does your family feel about the exposure? They've been so supportive. My family is not embarrassed. They know how hard it was to transition from that world to the world that I am in today. They’re happy for my success. ■

INSPIRE

Indulge OR NOT

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oday’s modern-day woman needs to pack her items in the morning knowing that she may not return until late in the evening. From the office to the soccer field to dinner with a client, there are errands to run and people to see. A few vital accessories allow a woman to operate her business and household efficiently. M&V took a not-so-scientific look at our favorite keepers of laptops, business cards and the ever-important pen, items that help women organize their lives.

HIGH

LOW

VALEXTRA ZIP AROUND BRIEFCASE $2,990 BARNEYS.COM

TUMI VOYAGEUR MACON LAPTOP CARRIER $225 TUMI.COM

BOMBATA CLASSIC LAPTOP BRIEFCASE $51.76 BOMBATA.IT

TIFFANY & CO. STITCH CARD CASE $100 TIFFANY.COM

KATE SPADE CHERRY LANE HOLLY $58 KATESPADE.COM

MOCHI THINGS GOLD RIBBON CARD CASE $10.95 MOCHITHINGS.COM

MONT BLANC MEISTERSTÜCK $930 MONTBLANC.COM

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CARTIER BALLPOINT FOR CARTIER NOTEBOOK $340 CARTIER.US

PARKER URBAN PREMIUM METALLIC WHITE $45 PARKERPEN.COM

Making WAVES

NATHALIE CADET-JAMES

JANA CRUDER

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By Tess Ghilaga

athalie Cadet-James lights up any room with her style. As the founder of Luxe Fête Event Planning and Design Studio in Miami, she inflects her flair into unforgettable celebrations and parties. After the birth of her first daughter in 2007, Cadet-James, who is of Haitian descent, left a thriving law career to channel her creativity into the launch of Luxe Fête. “Among my group of friends, I was always the go-to person for transforming dinner parties and weddings,” said Cadet-James. Making the leap into a career in event planning was a no-brainer but the move took considerable moxie.

Corporate events, weddings, birthdays and baby showers are some of the creations Cadet-James masterminds for her international patrons, a roster brimming with VIP Floridians, Brazilians, Russians and Caribbeans. Each event reflects her personal aesthetic—an organic authenticity that steers clear of pretense—while allowing the client’s personality to shine through. For discerning clientele, this mix provides a unique blend of comfort and derring-do. Case in point: A recent client desired an intimate familial wedding and suggested either a chic hotel or her childhood estate for venue options. Cadet-James produced a rustic, elegant dinner and reception under the stars, overlooking Miami’s Intracoastal Waterway. “We created a fire pit on their beach to offer up a sense of kinship. It was all about the experience. Guests stayed hours past the last song, just like family.” From idyllic to modern, Cadet-James’ aesthetic takes cues from her far-flung travels, fashion and interior design. She admires Chanel for its timelessness and relevance. The sensual, structural lines of Frank Gehry’s New World Center in Miami Beach, imbued with light and air, is her favorite venue. On the forefront of the Miami culture scene, Cadet-James is the director of Friends of New World Symphony, the young patrons group. “Miami is transforming right before our eyes. It’s wonderful to be a part of shaping the city’s future,” she said.

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INSPIRE

Life of the Party

A sophisticated spirit hardly detracts from her philanthropic accomplishments. Cadet-James’ Haitian roots inspire her to give back. She spends her time mentoring young Haitian women and exploring ways in which commerce and philanthropy can help local artisans compete in the global marketplace. Though she produces eight to 10 major events a year, Cadet-James’ two daughters and marriage are her top priorities. Truly, this Miami gem is both event guru and queen of her castle. ■

PHOTOS BY OZZY GARCIA PHOTOGRAPHY

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954.200.6006 | 3330 E Oakland Park Blvd. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308 |

thasostaverna.com

MY JOB IS TO SUSTAIN YOUR INCOME

SO YOU CAN SUSTAIN YOUR LIFESTYLE

THE LYMAN GROUP CREATING FINANCIAL STRATEGIES TO PROTECT YOUR FUTURE Let’s talk… JOANNE ROBIN 561.207.6399 | 866.837.0999 www.HighTowerAdvisors.com HighTower Securities, LLC, member FINRA, MSRB and SIPC & HighTower Advisors, LLC a registered investment advisor with the SEC

INSPIRE

Making WAVES

BEVERLY RAPHAEL

Grace Under Fire

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ashington Irving wrote, “There is in every true woman’s heart a spark of heavenly fire, which lies dormant in the broad daylight of prosperity, but which kindles up, and beams and blazes in the dark hour of adversity.” Indeed this quote is true for Beverly Raphael, president and CEO of RCC Associates, a Deerfield Beach-based general contracting firm. In 1998, after losing her husband, Richard, to inoperable brain cancer, Raphael joined her late husband’s premier commercial general contracting firm, assuming the job as president. “We don’t know our capabilities under extreme pressure,” Raphael said. “But I had this inner strength I didn’t know existed.” As she took control of the wheel at RCC, Raphael went to great lengths to master every detail of the business, while fostering trust and inspiration in the company’s staff. The construction industry comes with a litany of challenges wholly distinct from her former fashion representative business, Bev Raphael & Associates, which she founded in 1983. Raphael’s prior experience in sales and marketing, along with a dedicated staff that had been with the company for several years, were key factors in growing revenues at RCC.

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By Tess Ghilaga Women working in construction are few and far between. “But don’t underestimate the power of a woman. RCC’s competitors saw an opportunity to poach clients during this trying time, but much to their surprise people were rooting for us,” said Raphael. Over the years the firm has garnered a stellar reputation for building dynamic, high-quality retail spaces, hotels and spas in South Florida and nationwide. Marquee restaurants include Zuma, Del Frisco’s, Yard House and The Cheesecake Factory. Boutiques include an array of brands, such as Chanel, Christian Dior, Diane Von Furstenberg, Versace, Louis Vuitton, Tiffany & Co., H&M, Victoria’s Secret and Bath & Body Works. The Raphael women have turned the business of RCC Associates into a family affair. Raphael’s oldest daughter, Lindsay Raphael, Esq., oversees the company’s legal matters, and her younger daughter, Robyn Raphael Dynan, is the director of project management. Donning a hard hat may be part of her attire, however, Raphael’s style credo remains thoroughly ladylike. “Having spent 15 years in the fashion industry, I believe that you must dress for success,” Raphael said. Next time you are shopping or dining out, chances are Beverly Raphael was there from the ground up. ■

“Buzz worthy.” NY Post

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“Best Chef.” Palm Beach Post & Broward New Times

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“Where to eat.” Esquire

small plates, big flavor 350 S o u t h C o u nt y Roa d

Palm Beac h

561.8 33.3450

w w w.b ucc anp almb eac h.co m

INSPIRE

Making WAVES

Ladies, Start Your ENGINES DEBORAH HUTCHISON GUTSY GAL HONOREE KATHY IRELAND & HUTCHISON

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eborah Hutchison grew up in a generation where a career path for a girl typically meant a road into the teaching profession. However, after a brief stint in education, she charted her own course, leveraging her talents and aptitude for business to become an author, filmmaker, speaker and entrepreneur. “We all need to be clear with our intentions. As for business, there is no glass ceiling, especially if you own it,” said Hutchison.

When just starting out, Hutchison’s father, an accomplished lawyer, was skeptical of his daughter’s ambitions, especially with regard to her leaving behind a ‘respectable’ career in education. In a moment brimming with triumph and irony, she cast her father and his colleagues in a sleazy lawyer courtroom scene in Thief starring James Caan.

The spirit of empowerment flows through Hutchison’s creative endeavors. The determined Chicago-born impresario launched Gutsy Gals Inspire Me® in 2009 to entertain, educate and inspire through stories of positive female role models as examples for the next Gutsy Gal generation. Hutchison wrote, produced and co-directed the animated short film, The Improbable Journey of Berta Benz, which is about the female force behind the most fabled automobile in history. Her animated short received rave reviews at international film festivals and won awards from L.A. Women’s International Film Festival and the Career and Technical Education Equity Council.

Hutchison’s foray into entertainment resulted from a dearth of teaching jobs in the Windy City. After answering an ad searching for ‘extras’ for The Blues Brothers, the renowned comedy featuring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd and shot on location in Chicago, Hutchison noticed a gap in the marketplace and created a local casting company to fill it. “Look for a niche,” she said. “If you can solve a problem, solve it.”

Hutchison went on to cast parts for more than 35 films and TV shows, including Weird Science, Code of Silence, Doctor Detroit, Things Are Tough All Over, Skokie and Grandview, U.S.A. A prolific writer and creative force, Hutchison co-wrote Put It in Writing!: Creating Agreements Between Family and Friends with Divorce Court’s Judge Lynn Toler, and she wrote the do-it-yourself billing kit  Bill Your Ex to help navigate mounting divorce paperwork. Despite her success, Hutchison is not one to rest on her laurels. You can expect to see her at more inspirational speaking engagements or taking The Improbable Journey of Berta Benz on the road to women’s organizations and girl-themed events. This newly-minted West Palm Beach resident is truly ready for her close-up. ■ J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Nevis, West Indies Montpelier is pure laid-back chic. A 300 year-old sugar plantation that now happily embraces effortless luxury. The rooms all offer stunning sea views and the private beach is complete with hammocks, cabanas and the beach bar. The poolside restaurant Indigo lets you kick back and feel the island rhythm. Restaurant 750 has stunning views of St Kitts and offers fine dining. The Mill Privée is an experience that blends understated surroundings with the excitement of an imaginative, intricate take on French-influenced island cuisine. Montpelier invites you to be active, be sunsoaked, discover waterfalls, explore centuries old ruins or simply enjoy tropical island life in the West Indies. Live fully. 

Visit www.montpeliernevis.com or call (869) 469-3462

Montpelier Plantation and Beach P.O. Box 474, Nevis, West Indies T: +1 869 469 3462 F: +1 869 469 2932 E: info@montpeliernevis.com W: www.montpeliernevis.com Montpelier live fully

Non-Fat, Half Caff, Mocha Tall Americana with A Splash Of Cream Double Espresso with One Cube and a Twist Decaf, Caramel Macchiato, No Whip, Extra Shot Grande, Iced, Sugar-Free, Vanilla Latte with Soy Milk Half Caff, 1/2 Half & Half Triple, Cinnamon, Soy, No Foam Latte Decaf, Soy Latte with an Extra Shot and Cream Medium Black Coffee With Two Extra Shots Grande, Half Caff, 10 Pumps Vanilla, Extra Whip Medium Mocha, Quad, Non-Fat, One Pump, No Whip Almond Milk Latte with Sugar-Free Hazelnut Syrup Tall Non-Fat Latte, 2 Percent Foam Iced Hazelnut Latte With Chocolate Whip Iced Coffee, Soy Milk, One Sugar, One Sweetner Iced, Half Caff, 1 Pump Sugar-Free Caramel, Two Pumps Sugar-Free Vanilla, Non-Fat Cappuccino Large, Vanilla, Soy Latte with Caramel Drizzle Over Whip Decaf Grande, Non-Fat, No Foam, 170 Degree Latte

www.onlibeverages.com • 855- the-onli Publix • Whole Foods Market • epicure

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LIFE-ENHANCING VACAYS

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ith the New Year comes the obligatory health resolution. How about a twist on that promise to be healthier? Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re already on the road to Wellville and need a reboot, or if this is the year for a new healthy lifestyle, approach healthful living and a sound mind and body with these inspirational retreats. By Lola ThĂŠlin

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INSPIRE

MONTPELIER PLANTATION & BEACH NEVIS, WEST INDIES

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t Montpelier Plantation & Beach, the property and view alone inspire relaxation. Week-long yoga retreats are an added bonus. Yoga and meditation classes are held amidst a tropical landscape. Days start with morning meditation and power yoga. In the afternoon, choose from restorative or beach yogas, a guided hike up Nevis Peak or a healthy cooking demonstration led by the executive chef. Nights conclude with more meditation and Vino and Vinyasa (a yoga class and dinner featuring the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s extensive wine list). During free time, guests are encouraged to discover the nearby, unspoiled environment. Explore Charleston, the capital city of Nevis, and learn about the history behind the colonial homes. Truly, there is healing energy among nature. Still clamoring for more? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a new yoga studio in the works. 869-469-3462, info@montpeliernevis.com, montpeliernevis.com

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Un plugGed ASCLEPIOS WELLNESS & HEALING RETREAT EL CACAO DE ALAJUELA, COSTA RICA

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sclepios Wellness & Healing Retreat, named after the Greek god of health, features 12 solar-powered rooms and a holistic spa nestled among 12,500 acres of rainforest. The restaurant’s dishes are prepared from ingredients sourced from the on-site garden. Programs require a minimum one-week stay and include three meals per day, a daily oxygenation session, fitness activities and use of the water therapy suites. The Revitalize & Rejuvenate program is designed to stimulate the immune system and enhance the body’s vital energy with organic meals, raw juices and smoothies. The Purifying Journey is a detox cleanse that incorporates a light diet with vegetable juices and therapies, such as acupuncture and yoga. Anti-stress and weight management programs are available. 506-24-33-16-68, info@asclepioscr.com, asclepioscr.com

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his serene getaway, with its Mediterranean architecture and two miles of white sand, provides plenty of spa services and gorgeous meals. CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa caters to the active traveler with a full, weekly schedule of complimentary yoga, boot camp, Pilates and beach body circuit training. The Venus Spa, one of the largest free-standing spas in the Caribbean, focuses on detoxifying and cleansing with body treatments. Its Healing Waters, a specialized pool therapy, employs a combination of fresh water and revitalizing mineral sea salt specially formulated to match the healing mineral content of the local seawater for maximum therapeutic benefits. Meals are sourced from the property’s 18,000-square-foot hydroponic greenhouse farm, which is home to lettuce ponds and vine crops full of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and herbs. 264-498-2000, cuisinartresort.com

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CUISINART GOLF RESORT & SPA RendezvouS, ANGUILLA, caribbean

INSPIRE THE RESORT AT LONGBOAT KEY CLUB LONGBOAT KEY, FLORIDA

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xercising can be a social endeavor. If that rings true for you, then The Resort at Longboat Key Club is your place. Paddle boarding, beach boot camps, Tai Chi, nature trails, biking, nutrition classes, personal training sessions and tennis matches are some of the activities organized by the resort. The mind and motion studio hosts an impressive variety of classes (yoga, spinning, step, body sculpting, meditation, Pilates, BOSU and HIIT interval training), all of which are available to club members and resort guests. In addition, there’s a lecture series on nutrition and other topics (laughter yoga, anyone?) and a new seven-day detox program that aims at making detoxing more simple and doable. Check out Jet Away for the Day, a partnership between Aura Jets and The Resort at Longboat Key Club, where guests can fly to and from any Florida airport to the resort to experience destress at its best. 888-237-5545, 888-908-0391 (Jet Away for the Day), longboatkeyclub.com

SIVANANDA ASHRAM YOGA RETREAT NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE, BAHAMAS

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ivananda Ashram Yoga Retreat’s white sand beach, blue waters and lush tropical gardens beckon, but there’s a catch—a 10-day cleanse and detox program. Across the bay from Nassau, Bahamas, Sivananda highlights yoga classes on outdoor platforms facing the Caribbean Sea and optimum cleansing and health through a mix of raw food, herbal supplements and fruit and vegetable juice fasting. In between yoga and meditation sessions, take the free shuttle boat to Nassau, or stay local and participate in snorkeling, massage therapy and lectures. The cleanse program is offered multiple times a year, beginning on January 4-13 and February 7-16, 2014. The Sivananda welcomes families through its year-round, yoga vacation program that features a week of outings, activities and special family yoga classes.

866-559-5167, nassau@sivananda.org, sivanandabahamas.org

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INSPIRE CANYON RANCH HOTEL & SPA MIAMI BEACH, florida

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anyon Ranch Hotel & Spa creates a sense of security and tranquility. Health-minded packages focus on the guest’s complete state of being, with every program led by a team of health professionals. Programs are specifically designed to address the guest's health history, lifestyle choices and goals. There are plans for smoking cessation, chronic pain and optimal living. With the doctor always ‘in’ at Canyon Ranch, guests can schedule an annual state-of-the-art health assessment. The tender love and care doesn’t stop with check out; guests leave with a personalized take-home plan. The view and other amenities are noteworthy as well. The hotel is oceanfront, with a 70,000-square-foot spa, four pools and a two-story indoor rock wall. 305-514-7000, canyonranch.com/miamibeach

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Enter the Stylish World of Gil Walsh Interiors.

523 Northwood Rd. West Palm Beach, FL 33407 561.932.0631 â&#x20AC;˘ gilwalsh.com

WHERE SIMPLICITY AND ARTISTRY DINE TOGETHER NIGHTLY

UPSCALE ITALIAN TAPAS, PIZZAS, AND WINE BAR

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN CLASSIC DISHES PAIRED WITH AN AWARD-WINNING WINE LIST IN A CONTEMPORARY SETTING WITH EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE

GATHERING PLACE WHERE FRIENDS CAN ENJOY SMALL PLATES, GREAT AND AUTHENTIC ITALIAN PIZZA IN A VIBRANT ATMOSPHERE

Coming soon to Coral Springs! 1201 North Federal Highway Fort Lauderdale | 954.564.1234

4215 North Federal Highway Oakland Park | 954.561.7300

171 East Palmetto Park Road Boca Raton | 561.996.1234

1370 Weston Road Weston | 954.306.0037

Atlantis Paradise Island, Atlantis | 242.363.3000 www.casa-d-angelo.com

16950 Jog Road Delray Beach | 561.381.0037 www.dangelopizza.com

WORK IN STYLE The inspiration, namesake & birthplace of M&V MAGAZINE Muses & Visionaries is a coworking space shared by female entrepreneurs and businesswomen from across industries and fields. The downtown West Palm Beach location provides a chic destination for collaboration and community building. www.musescoworking.com

Concierge Medicine and Personal Care Attention to holistic wellness and modern medical care from an experienced physician

DR NATALIE W. GEARY, MD INTEGRATIVE PEDIATRICS - HOLISTIC WELLNESS - ALLERGY & NUTRITION - FAMILY CARE

PRIVATE PEDIATRICS OF PALM BEACH 340 ROYAL POINCIANA WAY SUITE 5C PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33480 561.650.0803

INFORM

“Change will lead to insight far more often than insight will lead to change.” Milton Erickson

“I’m Lesley Stahl” WHEN THE UNITED STATES LAUNCHED ITS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT MEASURE, IT OPENED DOORS FOR MANY. AS AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION HIRE, LESLEY STAHL NEVER SAW ANY LIMITS. BORN WITH A NATURE TO PERSIST, STAHL PROVED HERSELF IN A MALE-DOMINATED WORLD AS ONE OF THE TOUGHEST LEADING INTERVIEWERS IN JOURNALISM. By Lola Thélin Photography by Ken Pao

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PHOTOGRAPHY: KEN PAO

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ews enthusiasts are born with an inherent passion for the “who, what, when, where and why.” There is a desire to build knowledge, a deep admiration for history, an insatiable appetite for facts, and of course, a curious nature. This is especially true of journalists. Enter Lesley Stahl, one of America’s most respected and experienced broadcast journalists and a “60 Minutes” correspondent since 1991. “I’ve always thought that there was a journalistic way. We get the nub of things. Generally speaking, we prefer to watch than to be the leaders. We like to know what’s going on. We want to be close but not the ones in the Oval Office,” said Stahl, who describes herself as the most traditional of all journalists. Every morning she begins with a thorough scan of The New York Times, Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal. Staying faithful to her ritual, Stahl arrived for the morning M&V photo shoot with a stack of newspapers and pen for underlining and note taking. Stahl was bitten by the journalism bug in her late twenties, although clues lurked early on that she would land in the news arena. She majored in history at Wheaton College and had an appreciation for politics, a quality that came from her father. Initially, Stahl attended grad school at Columbia University to study zoology, in anticipation of a career in medicine. It wasn’t for her. She later accepted a job on Mayor John Lindsay’s speech-writing staff and befriended the press office next door. Discovering what went on in the press office was her “ah-ha” moment. Stahl joined the NBC election unit as a researcher in 1967, before becoming a reporter at Boston’s WHDH-TV. Finally, she was picked up by CBS as part of affirmative action policies in 1972. She had the title of reporter but was more of a self-described apprentice, which was fine for her as she was able to make and learn from her mistakes without a huge audience. One of Stahl’s very first stories was Watergate. “Nobody the night of the break-in thought it was a story. That I was sent out to cover it was a measure of how insignificant everybody thought it was. I was the newest hire.

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It was a throw-away assignment but I got to stay on the story.” Stahl solidified herself as a competitive field reporter, went on to become a correspondent in 1974 and then the CBS News White House Correspondent. She covered the presidencies of Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush. “When I would get a clean scoop, I was on top of the world at the White House,” said Stahl. “I was on the convention floor and broke the story that Reagan had chosen Bush to be his VP. That was lovely.” Stahl switched gears in 1983, when she became the moderator of “Face the Nation,” which she did until May 1991, when she joined “60 Minutes.” Her first story was about Romanian babies on the black market. “60 Minutes” was a different beast, requiring more in-depth reporting, but Stahl was a wellformed journalist by then. She had figured out the industry on her own. “There was value with slugging it out myself. One of the things that we all have to do in every career, in every walk of life—mothers and fathers too—is gain confidence. If you do it yourself, it gives you more confidence.” This can-do attitude was partly instilled by her mother. Stahl admits she was her mother’s marionette but that she was dependent on her mother’s suggestions. “She would call me almost daily with instructions. If I were on television, I’d call her. Mike Wallace used to tease me about it. ‘Talking to Mommy again?’ I wasn’t ashamed of it. ‘Yes, I am.’” Wallace was one of the original “60 Minutes” correspondents and offered advice to Stahl. “He would say you have to learn to ask a question and not be embarrassed by it. Ask a tough question without letting the audience know that you have any qualms. If you are going to ask a guy if he beats his wife, you have to learn to do that without squirming,” said Stahl. That advice held true. Stahl has conducted her share of interviews with irate interviewees, even heads of states have lost their cool. Former President of France Nicolas Sarkozy stormed off the set after she asked him about his then-wife Cécilia. She was correct to inquire; the French couple made their divorce public two weeks later. 

“When I discovered journalism, it was a love affair”

INFORM

Copyright © 1974 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. Credit: CBS Photo Archive

Copyright © 1980 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. Credit: CBS Photo Archive

Copyright © CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. Credit: CBS Photo Archive

TOP LEFT TO RIGHT: Election Night '74 (October 8, 1974). Lesley Stahl standing in front of the White House May 23, 1980. Stahl with Charles Kuralt. BOTTOM: Stahl with Mr. Jimmy Carter.

INFORM

© 1980 CBS Broadcasting Inc. CBS Photo Archive

TOP TO BOTTOM: Lesley Stahl at the Republican National Convention, Detroit, July 15, 1980. Stahl with Mark Zuckerberg. Stahl with Mr. and Mrs. George H. W. Bush. Stahl with Steven Spielberg.

“There was value with slugging it out myself. One of the things we all have to do in every career is gain confidence.” This 2013-2014 season marks her 23rd year as a correspondent on the broadcast that is a fixture in so many American homes on Sunday evenings, and Stahl, who is 72, has no plans to retire. The “60 Minutes” team also includes Morley Safer, Steve Kroft, Bob Simon, Scott Pelley, Lara Logan, Anderson Cooper and Dr. Sanjay Gupta. Many of today’s news shows have integrated flashy signs and modern music into their sets, but the iconic “60 Minutes” set is here to stay. The concept for “60 Minutes” was Don Hewitt’s—the father of modern television news. Hewitt was fired from the evening news and was looking to reinvent himself. His idea was to bring LIFE magazine to television by creating a weekly show with three documentaries, each cut down to roughly 20 minute segments. The set is relatively the same since its debut, although the stopwatch is modernized periodically. “Our audience seems to like the reassurance of the way it’s always been, and we like doing our journalism that way,” said Stahl. “I’ll tell you something: Almost every broadcast journalist I know talks about how lucky we are to be doing the old-fashioned shoe leather, whistle-blowing kind of journalism.” Stahl’s mother instilled a great work ethic in her daughter; she always told her “to have a career, not a job.” She suggests that her mother’s ambitions for her perhaps came from being bored of her suburbia-housewife-life. Whatever the inspiration, it worked. Stahl has received numerous awards, including the 2003 Lifetime Achievement Emmy. She married writer Aaron Latham in 1977, had a daughter and continued to work. “My mother encouraged me to not stop working. I think a lot of women get a different signal from their mothers. Their mothers are instilling guilt in them for not being home. My mother went the

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other way,” said Stahl. Latham’s at-home office also helped. “If anything happened, he was right there. It was comforting.” When her daughter left for college, Stahl penned her book Reporting Live (1999). There’s a new book in the works but Stahl wouldn’t drop hints, only that she writes a few pages during free moments. Two years ago, Stahl became a grandmother. “I always wanted to be a grandmother but I didn’t expect the wallet of emotion that I felt. It hit me with such intensity; that was so unexpected. It’s central in my life.” Another strong reinforcement: her girlfriends and colleagues. “She is inspired, indefatigable and insatiable. What makes her so very good at what she does are those very things. There is pure joy for her in the hunt for truth,” said Susan Zirinsky, senior executive producer of “48 HOURS,” who worked alongside Stahl in Washington, New York, overseas, at the White House, in politics, presidential campaigns, conventions and specials. “Nothing is more satisfying for Lesley than to be the journalist who reveals a secret—explains the unexplainable—and records history. Lesley’s brand of journalism is to take the viewer someplace they may have never been before.” While Stahl’s own reputation is formidable, she lists Barbara Walters as the pioneer. “She was the first to do serious interviews and cover governing politics. Before I got to CBS, we had one woman in the Washington bureau and she covered the First Lady and parties. It changed after my little group, but up until then, women were not assigned hard news, and Barbara started that.” As for her role in the field, Stahl says she hasn’t thought much about it. “The honest truth is I like what I do. We provide a service to the public. I don’t think about legacy. I think I am very lucky,” said Stahl. “When I discovered journalism, it was a love affair.” ■

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Big picture NEWS AND REPORTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Girls Not Brides Committed to Ending Child MarriagE

MEDICAL NEWS

GRAHAM CROUCH

 New England Journal of Medicine published a study that revealed eating nuts regularly may prolong life. Data was collected on nearly 120,000 people over 30 years and showed that those who ate a handful of nuts daily reduced their risk of death from various causes by up to 20 percent.

T

he prevalence of child marriage throughout the world is astounding. Each year an estimated 14 million girls are married before they turn 18 with some child brides as young as eight. In many places where it is practiced, poverty is acute. Giving a daughter in marriage is viewed as a way to reduce family expense. The problem crosses borders, cultures and religions. Girls Not Brides is a global partnership that brings together more than 300 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) worldwide to challenge and bring an end to the practice of child marriage. Girls Not Brides was founded in 2011 by The Elders, a group of independent leaders—among them Nelson Mandela, Ela Bhatt, Kofi Annan and Jimmy Carter, who use their experience and influence to advocate for human rights around the globe. The partnership identifies child marriage as a critical issue that violates girls’ rights to health, education, security and personal choice. Members in five continents include both grassroots organizations and international NGOs. Without intervention, the outcomes for child brides are bleak. Pregnancy and childbirth put them at risk of serious injury and death. Girls who give birth before the age of 15 are five times more likely to die in childbirth than women who are in their 20s. Children of child brides are 60 percent more likely to die in their first year of life than children born to mothers over 19. Girls Not Brides provides its member organizations with multi-pronged plans for ending child marriage with strategies from mobilizing and educating communities to enacting and enforcing laws that protect girls.

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 Exercising during pregnancy may help your baby’s brain development. According to a study by the University of Montreal, pregnant women who moderately exercised at least 20 minutes three times a week beginning around 13 weeks had babies whose brains were more mature than babies born from women who stopped exercising completely. The researchers tested the eight- to 12-day-old babies’ brain activity with low and high frequency sounds. The babies whose mothers exercised had a more mature response.  A study conducted by researchers at University of California, San Francisco, Duke University School of Medicine and Third Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, China, found that women who have taken oral contraceptives for three or more years are twice as likely to suffer from glaucoma.  Lack of sleep can contribute to delinquent behavior by adolescents, according to a Florida International University study published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence. Prior research has shown that self-control is a trait developed in childhood, influenced by genetics, socialization and other developmental factors. The study suggests sleep deprivation can reduce self-control well after childhood and ultimately result in delinquent behavior among teenagers.  French manufacturer HRA Pharma warns its emergency contraceptive pill may not be effective for women over a certain weight. While conducting research on another topic related to its emergency contraceptive Norlevo, scientists discovered Norlevo lost its effectiveness in women who weigh about 165 pounds and showed an absence of effectiveness at about 176 pounds. The FDA is reviewing available and related scientific information on this issue to determine if USA brands will need label changes.

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✈ Female Global Community takes on Climate Change

F

or decades there has been growing recognition that women around the world are playing a larger role in issues of environmental sustainability. When it comes to climate change, women in developing countries are especially vulnerable as they are the primary growers and gatherers of food and water for their families. Alarmingly, the United Nations estimates that by 2030 the world will need 50 percent more food and 30 percent more water. Women can take the lead in their communities in addressing the impacts of climate change. That is the premise behind Momentum for Change: Women for Results, a program of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). With support from The Rockefeller Foundation, Women for Results provides grants to projects that demonstrate concrete results. For example, women farmers in Guatemala are planting trees to sequester carbon and prevent erosion for improved crop yield and diversity. The Ghana Bamboo Bikes Initiative creates employment opportunities for women, uses far less energy than the production of steel bikes and addresses the country’s traffic congestion problem at the same time. One Million Women in Australia is building a movement of women pledging to take small steps in their daily lives that save energy, reduce waste, cut pollution and lead change. “Not only are these activities tackling climate change, they are also generating health, financial and social benefits in the communities where they take place. They are true beacons of hope, demonstrating what happens when innovation and passion come together to address the biggest challenge of our time,” said UNFCCC Executive Secretary Christiana Figueres.

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ids move out of sight quickly. The Amber Alert GPS product combines GPS and smartphone apps to allow parents to track children. The tracking portal weighs 1.5 ounces. Children can carry it in a pocket, backpack or attach it to clothing. The system allows parents to receive up-to-date location alerts. They can set up safe zones and receive a text message or e-mail alert whenever the child enters or exits a zone. Children can press the call button, which sends an alert that the child is trying to connect with the parents.

Via athletes

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e sure to support your country in the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Sochi, Russia. The Winter Olympics, hosted February 7-23, 2014, features 15 disciplines from seven winter sports: biathlon, bobsleigh (bobsleigh and skeleton), curling, ice hockey, luge, skating (figure skating, short track speed skating and speed skating) and skiing (alpine, cross country, nordic combined, ski jumping, freestyle and snowboard). Stay on top of results with Twitter @Olympics. The Paralympic Games will host events in alpine skiing, biathlon, cross-country skiing, ice sledge hockey and wheelchair curling on March 7-16, 2014. ■

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INFORM

GABRIELLE BERNSTEIN

G

abrielle Bernstein has built a circle of trust that stretches far and wide. As an international speaker, Bernstein provides spiritual life coaching and helps guide women and men, mainly in their 20s and 30s, to self-actualization. “My purpose is to crack people open to their intuition and help them establish a spiritual relationship of their own understanding,” said Bernstein, who is a New York Times best-selling author of three books, Spirit Junkie, Add More ~Ing to Your Life and May Cause Miracles. She is also the founder of HerFuture.com, a social networking site for women to inspire, empower and connect. She serves on the advisory board for New York University’s Of Many Institute for Multifaith Leadership and Feminist. com’s “Our Inner Lives” religion and spirituality project. “We must empower everyone to work together to help elevate the consciousness of the world,” said Bernstein.

Need more peace-inducing mentoring? Bernstein’s new book Miracles Now (Hay House) is out April 4, 2014. The book focuses on 108 spirit-based principles, meditations, and practical, do-them-in-the-moment tools to combat common problems such as fear, anxiety, burnout and fatigue. “[In this book] I put more emphasis on the action than on personal reflection. In addition, my hope for this book is to really help people reduce stress and become more aware of their energy,” said Bernstein.

❶ Be Willing To Change When we have the slightest willingness to change, we awaken our consciousness to receive guidance. For instance, the moment you decide that you’re ready to get back into exercising, you immediately start to notice deals on gym memberships. Your willingness to change raises your awareness of the possibilities for changes that are around you. 

❷ See your obstacles AS opportunities for growth Every difficult circumstance in our life offers us an opportunity to grow and learn. No matter how hard the challenge may be, take a moment to ask yourself, “What can I learn from this?” When you focus on what you can learn, you can move out of a victim mentality and move into an empowered place. 

❸ Set daily intentions to receive guidance in your process FOR creating positive change Each morning when you wake up say to yourself, “I am willing to be guided to change.” This affirmation will keep you committed to the intention to create positive change in your life. Your daily commitment will keep you on track and support you in creating long-lasting change. Free guided meditations are available at gabbyb.tv. J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Business UNUSUAL

The in C R O W D

  By Styliana Resvanis

Crowdfunding is an increasingly effective way for start-ups to raise money, helping entrepreneurs draw support from the masses and turn ideas into businesses. 72

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INFORM

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or Natalia Rodriguez, crowdfunding bridged the gap between brainstorming an idea and breathing life into a company. Crowdfunding, a new online business strategy, pools money from a large group of people to help fund a project or business. In return for funding, donors receive goods or services, in lieu of equity or interest payments. Without the practice, Rodriguez may never have become an entrepreneur, and not just because of the finances.

It’s not just used by start-ups and no-name individuals either. Musicians, authors and actors, such as James Franco and Zach Braff, have joined the sea of hopeful fundraisers. Actress Kristen Bell used Kickstarter to fund the Veronica Mars movie. The goal was $2 million; the outcome was $5.7 million. One of the most successful campaigns, operated by video game company Ouya, raised $8.5 million to fund an open source gaming console in 2012. “That’s what I love about crowdfunding. There are no barriers,”

“I don’t know if I would’ve had the running type of attitude,” said Rodriguez, 23, who co-founded the Miami-based company Jiva Cubes with Allen Gomberg. “[Crowdfunding] helped me with that first push of confidence.” The Florida International University student heard about crowdfunding and turned to Kickstarter, a popular crowdfunding platform, to raise capital for distribution and packaging of instant coffee cubes made from Colombian coffee beans and unrefined sugar in 2012. With more than 500 sites for crowdfunding, the practice lends itself to virtually any cause, from funding prototypes of an invention or university research, to raising money for college or weddings, to paying for student loans, medical expenses, cosmetic procedures or adoptions. In fact, the first “crowdfunded baby”—an infant whose parents created a campaign to finance fertility treatments— was born in Florida in 2011.

(ABOVE) NATALIA RODRIGUEZ IN COLOMBIA; (CENTER) JIVA CUBES PRODUCTS

project and created a second campaign, raising more than $20,000 beyond their $1,000 goal, thanks to almost 700 backers. Later, Rodriguez and Gomberg created a third project to fund a machine that would speed up production to match the product’s growing popularity. This time, they raised upward of five times their $15,000 goal. Aside from the capital the projects raked in, Rodriguez added that the campaigns also provided product validation, customer feedback and marketing opportunities. “Most people think the number one perk is getting the money, but I actually find that the marketing buzz that people get during their campaigns can sometimes far exceed the value of the money they attract,” explained Outlaw, author of crowdfunding how-to book, Cash from the Crowd. She listed feedback for product development and customer acquisition as other major benefits.

said Sally Outlaw, co-founder and CEO of the South Florida-based, crowdfunding site Peerbackers and author of numerous articles and a book on the topic. Although several crowdfunding methods exist, perks-based and equity are two of the more common methods in entrepreneurship. Equity crowdfunding gives backers stake in the companies they support, while perksbased crowdfunding gives backers products, services or acknowledgments in exchange for donations. Some platforms take an allor-nothing approach, which means projects with unmet goals lose all funding, while others take a keep-what-you-raise stance, with campaigns pocketing the funds regardless of whether they reach their goal.

In addition to these perks, crowdfunding platforms raised $2.7 billion in 2012 (an 81 percent increase from 2011) and successfully funded more than one million campaigns, according to a Massolution report released in June. Massolution predicts global crowdfunding will have raised $5.1 billion in 2013. The 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act allows private companies to circumvent Wall Street and publicly offer equity options through Internet tools, such as crowdfunding and social media. 

Rodriguez and Gomberg proved unsuccessful at their first attempt on Kickstarter, due to its all-or-nothing nature, raising less than $4,000 of the $15,000 goal. They researched necessary elements for a successful

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Business UNUSUAL

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lthough crowdfunding’s specific origin remains cloudy, many people helped set the stage, according to John Paul Warren, an international public speaker and adjunct professor of finance at Palm Beach Atlantic University. Examples include Jonathan Swift’s lending of small loans to low-income Irish families in the 18th century, Bangladeshi professor and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Muhammad Yunus’ cultivation of self-employment opportunities through loans to the poor in the 1970s and ArtistShare’s mission to give fans a platform to fund albums in the early 2000s. Today Kickstarter and Indiegogo are some of the top reward-based industry sites for the general population, but several platforms are geared toward entrepreneurs. Newcomers like Plum Alley and MoolaHoop target female entrepreneurs specifically. In the next few years, crowdfunding will likely become

more of a niche market with platforms defining their end users and pulling them from bigger groups, according to Warren. However, backlash from niche funding can erupt on both the equity side and the reward side. If the majority of crowdfunded businesses fail, there is the possibility that the public will lose faith in this type of platform. On the reward side, there is the possibility of fraud and failing to fulfill perks in a timely manner. “Internet transparency and backing from familiar contacts help self-police crowdfunders,” Outlaw said. “It’s harder to not do what you say you’re going to do if it’s your own social circle you have to face.”

SALLY OUTLAW SHARES THREE TIPS TO LAUNCHING A SUCCESSFUL CROWDFUNDING MISSION.

➾ 1. PRIME TIME Before you start a campaign, identify your crowd. If you don’t have one, find a community around your business or cause that parallels your mission. Then build your social media presence to draw that crowd to your campaign. Crowdfunding is not a “post and forget it” proposition. Treat your campaign like a full-time job, checking and updating your page regularly and promoting it online and offline.

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Warren said that other issues with this type of fundraising include questions of intellectual property and patent ownership. Ultimately, though, he said that crowdfunding helps put budding entrepreneurs and their innovations on the map, especially those who may not have otherwise had access to funding or venture capitalists. “Crowdfunding is all about [establishing] your project, taking it to the multitudes and releasing that inner entrepreneur,” Warren said. “How are you going to get to the heart of the people? The Internet. This is the people’s business—people are finding the power of the crowd.” ■

➾ 2. VIDEO KILLED YOUR CROWDFUNDING PROJECT An un-engaging video can hurt your chances of success. Communicate a compelling story and make your entrepreneurial vision, personality and passion shine through.

➾ 3. DON’T FORGET ABOUT THE PRICE TAG Devise compelling rewards to motivate people to open their wallets, and price those rewards correctly in perksbased crowdfunding. Overpricing perks may leave backers feeling ripped off if the product sells for much less than they’ve contributed.

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The construction industry has historically been a male-dominated profession, but WOMEN are

REDEFINING the face of building and signing on as laborers, engineers + managers.

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On the EDGE

BREAKING GROUND

A

man sporting a utility belt, hard hat and neon vest is the typical image of a construction worker, but it’s time to change that impression. Sources show women in construction are becoming more common. In 2010, women comprised nine percent of workers in the construction industry, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This figure includes all occupation sectors in construction, like sales and office jobs, where women make up 76 percent of the sector. Nine percent is a small percentage in comparison to other industries, such as retail (46 percent), finance (54 percent) and public administration (45 percent).   “There still aren’t that many women who are in what you would call a nontraditional field,” said Jo Moore, environmental director at Ranger Construction Industries, Inc. in West Palm Beach, who has worked in the construction industry since 1976. “It is still a man’s world industry. There’s a hesitation for women to step into this field. The jobs themselves pay better—a job running the dozer is $15

By Nico Cassanetti an hour; a job as a maid in a hotel is $7.52. They don’t know where to get the training, and the disparity now is that jobs women choose to do pay less because of it.”   Although construction has been hit hard with the recession, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics states that it is still one of the largest industries in the nation. “As this job market turns around, companies are looking for women to meet the needs. There were a lot of men who retired when the markets went bad, and when construction was suffering, many men went to different vocations,” said Dede Hughes, the executive vice president of The National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC), an organization founded in 1953 to advance the causes of all women in construction. Colleges are now offering programs specifically geared toward helping women break into the field. Arizona State University’s Del E. Webb School of Construction has a current female enrollment of 18 percent. Its Women in Construction program pairs female students with women in the industry

to get firsthand knowledge of what it takes to be successful in the business. “You have to put out a positive force so that young women can see this is a viable industry,” said Hughes. In the meantime there are day-to-day obstacles to overcome. For example, as minorities in the industry, women encounter improperly fitting protective equipment, such as hard hats and harnesses, and lack of access to sanitary facilities. In August 2013, NAWIC signed an alliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)—a partnership that has been in the works for more than two years— petitioning for the safety and protection of women in the field.    “Every day I hear about young women who have just graduated from college and are going into engineering, but stopping through a construction business before doing so,” said Jennifer Sarmiento, co-owner and founder of Classic Renovation Company in Washington, D.C. “More and more of my inspections are done by women, so I think that is a good indication that the female community here is growing.” ■

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UNLEASH YOUR ENERGY Laura Robbat CPC, ELMP lrobbat@hcgnow.com

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YAY?

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MBA

By Treméne Triplett

&

Some say that a Master of Business Administration (MBA) is still the best way to earn a position in senior management and upward mobility in corporate America. Diane P. O’Connor began working at Xerox in 1977 with a master’s in chemistry and completed her MBA in 1983. “I believe that in many cases having an MBA is a ticket to the dance,” said O’Connor. “Women have to position themselves to compete across the population. It doesn’t get you to the top of the house alone, but teaches you the breadth of business. It’s not the book learning. It’s the critical thinking, strategic thinking and application of teamwork.”

O’Connor went to night school and finished her MBA in three years; Xerox provided tuition reimbursement. “It was an enabler for me to move out of the labs,” she said. “I can see a vision of where we need to go, and I can get other people to see it. Not only do they see it, they work toward achieving it.” Some 30 years later, O’Connor remains at Xerox and is the vice president of environment, health, safety and sustainability, after many promotions and management positions in engineering, quality, purchasing and supply chain operations. Her responsibilities today include managing employees in Europe and North America and the strategic management for health, safety and environmental sustainability for Xerox’s operations, suppliers and customer offerings.

In 2012, Forbes reported that the number of women pursuing MBAs is on the rise, and one-third of all MBA candidates are women. Many seasoned corporate women attribute it to competition. “Harvard Business School receives about 9,000 applications per year and admits 900 from the applicant pool. Forty-one percent of the 2015 class is women,” said Jim Aisner, Harvard Business School director of media and public relations.

“Rising to upper level management without an MBA? The competition would be greater,” said Sharon Owens, who retired from CenterPoint Energy as vice president of corporate community relations in 2012, after 35 years with the company. “It’s still the good ol’ boy system out there. Women are given director positions. Men get VP titles.” Although Owens did not earn an MBA, she has advised many aspiring women toward one. “If you have an opportunity to be on a job where they will pay for it, you need to try to take advantage of it,” said Owens.

Continue the debate. SHARE your opinion at magazinemv.com/talk/roomfordebate

A recent trend has women in business opting for workplace experience and on-the-job training to springboard their corporate careers, instead of pursuing a Master of Business Administration (MBA). Pamela Cotton, 48, has been vice president of member services at Austin Telco Federal Credit Union for eight years. Her 2005 advancement to VP followed earlier promotions to director and assistant vice president from 1995-2005. In her current role as VP, Cotton oversees the membership department transactions for 22 credit union locations in Austin, Texas. She manages the insurance departments and legal documents review, like powers of attorney, while serving as the co-compliance officer responsible for ensuring conformity with federal regulations. Cotton’s very accomplished career came without an MBA. She started as a part-time teller while an undergraduate, and she worked her way up. “I did not see a degree as a key for advancement,” said Cotton, who has been with the company for 26 years. “I was able to be there and prove what I was capable of. It was more about what I did on the job, and not the degree or letters that came after my name.” Two of the top 10 women from Fortune’s 2013 “50 Most Powerful Women in Business” do not have MBAs—IBM’s chairwoman, president and CEO Virginia Rometty, ranked number one and Yahoo’s president and CEO Marissa Mayer, ranked number eight. They have climbed to the top of their respective careers, gaining impressive titles, experience and net worth. Research by Marianne Bertrand, Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz, which was reported in “Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Corporate and Financial Sectors” (National Bureau of Economic Research, 2009), found that 15 years post-MBA, the gender gap in earnings occurred largely due to differences in career interruptions and in weekly hours worked. At the 10-year mark, women were 22 percent more likely than men to have experienced career interruptions, largely attributed to family issues, like childbirth or elder care. As a result, many have concluded that women should bypass the financial and time investment of an MBA and opt for longer hours and more challenging positions. “It was [more than] $50,000 in 2001 to return back [to school],” said Cotton. “Why would I spend that much when it was not all of a sudden going to push me to a higher level at my job? I had already proven myself there.” J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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“The thing that is really hard, and really amazing, is giving up on being perfect and beginning the work of becoming yourself.”  Anna Quindlen

Project ME CARVE OUT TIME FOR YOURSELF.

U

ntil now, the answer to enhancing hair color has been limited. Options were an expensive hair dye at a salon or a box color from the pharmacy. eSalon is an online, professional DIY hair color service. Customers go to eSalon.com to fill out a color profile and upload a photo. Then master colorists blend a semi-permanent or permanent hair color formula unique to each client. The colorists confirm customer satisfaction and make changes to the hair formula if necessary. “Our goal is to offer the color experience that you would get in a salon at a fraction of the price. eSalon’s colorist formulated hair color is mixed with professional-grade dyes and is less than $20,” said eSalon CEO Francisco Gimenez. Another perk: the chemicals and blends are created stateside. esalon.com

M&V’s

ROUNDUP OF IDEAS & PRODUCTS FOR SELF-CARE.

M

eet Aromaflage, the substitute for stinky and sticky bug repellent. The fragrance with a function is the brainchild of Michael and Melissa Fensterstock. While on a trip in Southeast Asia, the Fensterstocks discovered a botanical fragrance that doubles as a bug repellent. Instead of a product laden with toxins like DEET, Aromaflage’s secret is vanillin, a crystalline compound found in vanilla beans that has been proven to be highly effective at repelling mosquitoes. It also has orange peel and cedarwood, which gives the perfume a sweet aroma. Aromaflage is available in a 50 mL bottle ($65) and an 8 mL purse size ($30). aromaflage.com

U

nfortunately, violent crimes against women are a reality. What actions can be taken for protection? R.A.D. Systems of Self Defense is a national organization with a holistic approach to self-defense education. “The [female] program is about creating an opportunity that exposes women to information and techniques that assist them in developing a plan that is right for them,” said Kathy Wright, director of R.A.D. women’s programs. “It is likely you will be on your own if something is to happen. A good portion of the R.A.D. program is about awareness, risk reduction and avoidance strategies.” R.A.D. has a variety of programs including a basic physical defense program that is at minimum nine to 12 hours long. Once a graduate from the program, R.A.D. offers a free lifetime return and practice for all students. rad-systems.com

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ife is full of little blunders: a wine stain on an ivory dress, a chipped nail, bad breath. Pinch Provisionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Skinny Minimergency Kit ($24) is the quick fix to lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hiccups. The limited-edition, chameleon slender clutch packs a punch with 22 essentials to help prevent a meltdown. The kit includes breath freshener, earring backs and clear nail polish, just to name a few items. Kits for men and weddings also are available. pinchprovisions.com J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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At HOME

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he phrase “lean in” is a concept that encourages women to pursue their ambitions and achieve their goals. We can all use some of that guidance; the beauty is how we individually interpret it. After reading Sheryl Sandberg’s inspirational book, Lean In, I decided to put her advice into action and find a way to help motivate and encourage the women in my life. Lean in to me is sharing, listening, learning, laughing, crying, getting and giving advice or paying it forward. I started with gathering a group of five friends together once a month with the sole purpose of leaning in. For us, leaning in together is catching up on our individual projects: new business ventures, existing ones, family matters, philanthropic visions and everything in between. The key to the evening is that we have a code of silence between us and everything discussed at the table stays at the table. We give each other sound advice, truthful insight and friendly constructive criticism as needed, while staying true to Sandberg’s call to create a place where women are more likely to aspire and succeed. Sounds like a great plan but I realized quickly that the challenge in making this happen is exactly the reason to have it happen: All of us are extremely busy. We truly don’t have time to entertain. We put so much of our energy and resources into work and family that there’s very little time to be the happy homemaker. In my profession, I am very often asked, “How can I have people over if I don’t have time to cook?” The answer is simple: I’ve learned how to “entertain” with a collection of secret weapons I’ve found over the years that save me a lot of trouble. • Costco or any large area supermarket is a great first stop. Most grocery stores have a variety of items that are already prepared, or easy to put together that make a fitting starter. The cheese section is the best place to begin. Nothing makes a bigger statement than displaying a big hunk of cheese, beautifully cut fruit and a fresh baguette. For my evening, I like to serve blue cheese with agave and mounded pecans on the top, with an assortment of sliced cheese.

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• Did you know popcorn can be chic? Mix popped popcorn with dried cranberries and a little rosemary. I call this “taking it up a notch.” Get out a beautiful serving bowl and use a large spoon and small cups to serve this fancy popcorn. • Nuts are another easy item you can make gourmet in five minutes. Pick up some marcona almonds, truffle oil and again add some rosemary. It can also be a great snack for an impromptu guest. • Another divine bite is salmon with Boursin cheese on a pretzel. It’s extremely easy to prepare: spread the Boursin on a pretzel and place a slice of salmon on top. • For dessert, purchase brownie bites and spice them up with a dollop of crème fraîche and sprinkled cocoa. Voilà a bite-size evening that won’t disappoint! • If you want to get fancier, call your favorite restaurant. Most places will answer the SOS and help out. My husband recently sprang four guests on me last minute. No panic attacks here; just a quick call to our favorite place for a selection of appetizers I can pop in the oven. • If ‘meatier’ items are needed…think ahead! Most baked dishes can be prepared a day or so in advance and kept refrigerated until baking time. I have a lasagna dish that is always a crowd-pleaser. I make it the day before so that all I need to do on the day of is preheat the oven and pop it in. • Of course, no evening is complete without a “sneeky”! I love the apple martinis served at Norman's at The Ritz-Carlton Central Park West in N.Y.C. I concocted my own version that my girlfriends love. I hope these tips inspire you to host your own lean in evening.

NURTURE

At HOME

MAKE-AHEAD BUTTERNUT SQUASH LASAGNA This recipe is broken into three parts: the vegetables, sauce and lasagna. All of it can be made one-two days ahead of time and put in the refrigerator until needed for baking. INGREDIENTS

Vegetables: 1 butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt 1 onion, halved and sliced Sage Sauce: 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 10 sage leaves 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 4 cups whole milk Pinch of nutmeg (freshly grated or from the spice aisle)

Lasagna: Unsalted butter (for the baking dish) 1 cup (about 4 ounces non-grated) grated fontina cheese (I have also used Gruyere and Emmentaler.) 1 cup grated low-moisture mozzarella cheese (I use Sargento from the milk section.) 1 cup grated parmesan cheese 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour Lasagna noodles

DIRECTIONS Make the vegetables first. You can do this up to two days ahead of time. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Toss the squash and onion with olive oil on a baking sheet; season with salt. Roast, rotating the baking sheets once until the vegetables are tender, 18 to 20 minutes; set aside. The sage sauce should be made when you are ready to put the lasagna together. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the sage and cook 1 minute. Whisk in the flour until smooth; continue adding while whisking until the flour is lightly golden but not brown, about 2 minutes. Gradually whisk in the milk until smooth. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the nutmeg. Assemble the lasagna. Again, you can do this up to two days in advance. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Toss the cheeses and the flour in a bowl; set aside 1/2 cup for topping. Evenly coat the bottom of the dish with 1/2 cup of the sage sauce. Lay three noodles side by side on top. Cover with one-third of the remaining sage sauce. Sprinkle with half of the remaining cheese mixture, then top with half of the vegetable mixture. Arrange three more noodles on top and repeat the layers (sage sauce, cheese, vegetables). Top with the remaining three noodles, then cover with the remaining sage sauce; sprinkle with the reserved 1/2 cup cheese. Loosely cover the dish with foil and bake until bubbly, about 45 minutes at 350 degrees. Turn on the broiler. Uncover the lasagna and broil until browned, about 2 minutes. Let stand 15 minutes before serving. If I’m feeling fancy, I save some sage leaves and bake some asparagus spears. Place the asparagus on the plate first then a piece of the lasagna followed by a sprig of sage. It makes for a beautiful presentation.

GREEN APPLE MARTINI “SNEEKY” Serves 2

Ice 4 oz. vodka 2 oz. sour apple liqueur, such as Sour Apple Pucker 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice Agave syrup to taste Fill a shaker three-fourths full of ice. Add all ingredients. Shake, strain and pour into your favorite martini glasses. Garnish with a thin slice of a Granny Smith apple.

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NURTURE

Little ONES

Think Outside the Lunch Box The holidays are officially over, and children are dragging their feet back to school with those mundane meals in hand. Liven up lunch with these adorable lunch gadgets and appealing recipes that are easy for parents and encourage children to eat their meals.

GRAZE ORGANIC tote bags ($29.95) are constructed from sturdy organic canvas and zero plastic linings. Featuring a hook and loop tab closure, the totes have a water-based silkscreened graphic and are machine washable and dryable. grazeorganic.com J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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H H HHH “

Daily News

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NURTURE

Little ONES LAPTOP LUNCHES Bento Kit 2.0 ($38.99) and Bento System 2.0 ($39.99) are insulated totes with waterproof and removable containers for versatility and a zippered pouch for drinks on the side. laptoplunches.com

Stop the BROWN-BAGGING CYCLE. These reusable lunch bags are THE trendiest totes around town. The modern felt lunch tote ($20.99) by LUNCHBOTS is designed to hold up to three reusable stainless steel bento containers ($16.99-$20.99), which are available in one to four sections. lunchbots.com

These laminated, cotton canvas lunch sacks by SUGARBOOGER ($18) feature full insulation, an interior card for ID information and a convenient handle strap. They are easy to wipe clean and air dry. oreoriginals.com J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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Little ONES

Lunch boxes arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complete without these handy accessories. Chimpsticks by FRED AND FRIENDS (prices vary by location) are washable, food-grade silicone. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost as fun as eating with your hands. fredandfriends.com

On a scale from one to 10, how good are your lunch skills? Created by June Pfaff Daley, the official lunch survey allows kids to give feedback on their lunches as well as their day.

Say goodbye to plastic bags. These 100-percent organic cotton, reusable sandwich and snack bags by GRAZE ORGANIC ($39 for set of five) are ideal for lunch boxes. grazeorganic.com

Made from durable plastic and BPA- and phthalate-free, Freezer Packs by POTTERY BARN KIDS ($9 for set of 2) keep lunchtime super cool. potterybarnkids.com

DOWNLOAD THE SURVEY at magazinemv.com/issue2/ lunchsurvey. www.junepfaffdaley.com * For personal use only

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NURTURE Best Lunch Box Ever: Ideas and Recipes for School Lunches Kids Will Love (Chronicle Books, $24.95). Author Katie Sullivan Morford, a Parents are raving about

registered dietitian and mother of three, solves the dilemma of clever and healthy lunch recipes. Quick and simple to prepare, these 65 recipes are winning lunch ideas for parents and kids.

DECONSTRUCTED CAPRESE The deconstructed caprese is a sandwich on a skewer, featuring crusty bread, mozzarella cheese, tomatoes and basil. While it looks sort of fussy, it’s actually a snap to pull together and its colorful presentation looks quite smashing in a lunch box. Small mozzarella balls, also known as bocconcini, measure about an inch across and are sold in the specialty cheese section of many supermarkets. Pack the skewers with small sides of olive oil and balsamic vinegar for lunchtime dipping. For bigger appetites, increase the recipe by 50 percent, which will make three skewers instead of two. Makes 1 serving 6 cherry tomatoes 4 small mozzarella balls 2 10-inch wooden skewers

2 large basil leaves, torn in half 4 1-inch cubes of herbed focaccia bread or Italian bread

DIRECTIONS: • Thread a cherry tomato onto a skewer followed by a piece of basil, a mozzarella ball, and a bread cube. • Repeat so that the skewer has two of every item. Add a third cherry tomato on the end of the skewer. • Snap the pointed end off the skewer and discard. Repeat with the remaining ingredients. • Pack the skewers in a reusable container for best transport. • Can be made a day ahead and stored in the refrigerator.

OODLES OF SESAME NOODLES This recipe will work with whatever vegetables you have on hand that are good eaten raw. Just chop them up, toss them with leftover noodles, and then coat them with a lip-smacking, Asian-accented peanut sauce. Yum! If peanut butter is off-limits, use cashew butter instead. On days you don’t happen to have leftover pasta, look for cooked Asian noodles such as soba and udon in the refrigerated section of your supermarket, usually near the tofu. Makes 2-3 servings 1 tsp. soy sauce 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil 1 tsp. seasoned rice vinegar 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. natural unsweetened peanut butter 1 tsp. honey 1 tsp. water 2 cups leftover cooked noodles 2 green onions 1/2 cup chopped raw crunchy vegetables (any combo) 1/2 cup cubed baked tofu or 1/2 cup cooked shelled edamame

DIRECTIONS: • In a bowl, whisk together the sesame oil, peanut butter, soy sauce, rice vinegar, honey, and water until creamy and smooth. • Using tongs, add the cooked noodles to the bowl and toss until evenly coated with the sauce. Add the raw vegetables, tofu and green onions, and toss again until coated with the sauce and evenly distributed. • Divide the sesame noodles between two or three containers. • Can be made a day ahead and stored in the refrigerator.

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On the CoucH

&A

Q I

with

Chris Paige, LCSW

get the sentiment that ‘it takes a village’ when it comes to raising children, but my parents provide more criticism than actual support about how my husband and I are raising our kids. How do I tell them to stop offering this unsolicited advice without insulting them? 

I

t’s important to clarify the difference between criticism and help. Do you think your parents are interested in helping or just armchair parenting? Is there any truth in what they are saying even though the message might not be delivered in a helpful way? I would affirm the importance of maintaining this relationship and listening to the village. You could say, “I am grateful you want to help. Sometimes it makes me uncomfortable because the help is unsolicited, and it takes me by surprise. I want to hear your opinion and appreciate your love.” Additionally, I would ask them specifically to pitch in with your kids like possibly watching the kids for the weekend. By inviting them to spend more time with the kids, they can better understand each child’s individual needs and maybe gain some understanding of why you parent the way you do.

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y 25-year-old daughter needed my help to purchase a car. I cosigned but now am regretting it because her payments are always late. I need to do something about the tardiness but don’t want to nag her. How do I approach the topic and emphasize the importance of paying on time?

T

he challenge for parents is creating new boundaries as their children grow that are more in line with the age of the child. Understandably, you do not want your credit score or relationship with your daughter to suffer. Since we can’t turn back time, I would recommend creating an agreement with your daughter about what will be expected moving forward. Explain to her that while you were happy to help with the car, she needs to treat you like a lender or bank. Tell her you expect that payments will be sent promptly so there is no resentment on your end. Her irresponsibility can greatly jeopardize your ability and desire to help her in the future. By being clear, it can reduce any disagreements or arguments about what is expected.

S

ettle an age-old argument for me once and for all: What is romance and why is it important? I love date nights, flowers and a little kissing. My husband thinks now that we are married, what’s the point? Are these acts trivial?

T

his is a common dilemma in marital relationships. Your husband’s position is not unlike many men and women after settling into a relationship. However, you are correct in your assessment of what you need for the marriage to flourish. Gestures like flowers, affection and small gifts of gratitude are the oxygen of any healthy relationship. One of my favorite relationship concepts comes from Stephen Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People where he describes an emotional bank account between partners. Like any account, if we are not making deposits we can quickly go into arrears or bankruptcy. Making deposits or fueling love is a necessity. Attending to the small things is exactly what you are describing that you want in your relationship. It is these little actions that contribute to the larger whole of the marriage and keep the bank account funded.

I

have had a lot of hurt in my life, including the loss of loved ones due to both divorce and death. Even with the passing of time, I’m unable to speak of these hurts without crying. It feels like a setback every time it happens. How do I conquer my flood of emotions and tears?

I

t sounds like you are not having a setback but are continuing to re-experience the losses as if they are occurring presently. This is the nature of grief and why the feelings are so strong and fresh. Traumatic memories are stored in the present. When an event is too distressing or upsetting, the brain struggles to adequately process the memory. It can feel like the movie Groundhog Day, in that we feel trapped in a repetitive experience of emotions, thoughts and sensations of our loss each time we remember or are triggered. My favorite treatment for these types of memories is called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). It was created by Francine Shapiro, Ph.D., in the late 1990s. EMDR is an effective means to process the past so that it no longer interferes with the present. To find a qualified EMDR therapist, go to www.emdr.com or you can get a feel for how EMDR can help by reading Shapiro’s book Getting Past Your Past. This is a great primer and provides at home exercises to help you heal.

Submit your questions to editorial@magazinemv.com

Chris Paige, LCSW, has practiced psychotherapy in Palm Beach County for more than 20 years. He specializes in emotional traumas, anxiety and depression. J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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DATING IN A DIGITAL WORLD WITH SOCI@L MEDIA AT THE FOREFRONT, TWEENS, TEENS & PARENTS ARE ENTERING A NEW DATING DOMAIN THAT REQUIRES RESPECT FOR T E C H N O L O G Y . By Jo Aaron

I

f you have a tween or teen, get ready to see a few more gray hairs on your head as your adolescent enters the world of dating. Eight out of 10 teens use social media, like Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Vine and Snapchat, not only to check in with their friends, but also to check each other out. “Technology has really changed the face of dating for teenagers,” said Jessica Sheets Pika, a spokesperson for The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. Due to digital advances, teens are forced to look at the long-term consequences of dating and breaking up online. The technology that exists today is uncharted territory for teens and parents. According to Sheets Pika, parents need to remind teens that when it comes to issues like sexting—or anything else that’s potentially inappropriate online—digital footprints can never be erased.

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In addition, there are now social media sites geared specifically toward dating, meeting people and more. Sites such as Skout, Tinder, Badoo and MeetMe are nicknamed hookup apps. These apps allow users to create photo profiles and to find each other for the purpose of developing online relationships, sexting or even meeting up for an in-person hookup. For instance, Tinder shows photos of singles nearby, then asks the user to “like” or say “no” to a potential match, while Badoo finds nearby users who share common interests.

Tweens and teens need direction when deciding what they should share and keep private about their relationships.

“[Online actions are] nowhere near what you say and do in real life. You can’t erase things as easily as you think you can. Educate your kids in a non-scary and non-threatening way about what consequences can occur in the virtual world, the same way you would in the real world,” said Sheets Pika.

With easy multimedia access, it seems a huge feat for parents to have influence with their children as they navigate on and offline relationships. However, experts like Pinero and Sheets Pika agree that parents who let their kids know that the lines of communication to discuss dating, sex and relationships are open help kids determine healthy boundaries.

“Parents should help kids negotiate healthy boundaries. [Talk about] what is important to publicize; those general discussions help your kids recognize that they are allowed to set boundaries in their relationships,” said Brian Pinero, co-director for loveisrespect. org, a project of the National Domestic Violence Hotline that offers peer-to-peer relationship information for teenagers.

NURTURE

“Sex, love and relationships are an 18-year long conversation. Start talking about dating, love and sex with children when they’re very, very young in age-appropriate ways. The same goes for the way they conduct themselves online. Opening the lines of communication at an early age lets teens feel comfortable coming to Mom or Dad when the time comes to talk about teenage dating issues,” said Sheets Pika. Pinero said if you don’t want the dating rules in your family to be blurry then discuss dating as a family. There will be no confusion when the time comes. To start the conversation, parents can turn to multimedia for assistance. Ask kids questions about what they see in the media and online. “If you’re watching a show about teenage pregnancy, ask your child, ‘Have you ever thought about what you would do if you got pregnant?’ It doesn’t have to be a heavy conversation, but it allows your child to be aware that her mom or dad is perfectly willing to have a non-judgmental, non-argumentative conversation about the issue,” said Sheets Pika. There will be awkward times but parents should not be afraid to approach any issues. Never tell a teen that a topic is inappropriate because of their age. “You don’t want to stifle your children asking you questions because if they don't go to you, they’ll go somewhere else. Dr. Google is available 24/7, and they will find answers to questions whether they are correct or not,” said Sheets Pika. Instead, consider your values. Kids rely on parents’ experiences and look to them for answers. If you panic, you run the risk of not being invited to the next conversation. At the end of the day, the greatest gift you can give your child is to be a good role model. Talking to your kids about the highlights of your own relationship is helpful, but showing them is an even more powerful way to help them incorporate your positive actions into their own relationships. ■ J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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"It’s all about the Subtleties in designing a smile. Teeth are not perfect naturally; I create the perfect “imperfect” smile. That’s what makes a smile look amazing and natural."

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THE INFLUENCERS Choosing M&V's female game-changers was no easy feat. Our choices are a mere snapshot of the many accomplished women launching ideas in fresh and exhilarating ways and giving new meaning to impactful careers. These women share an ability to recognize opportunities, elucidate challenges and work toward solutions. Many are pioneers in their fields. They are shifting ideas across sectors and industries from education to public health to fashion. They are influencing what we know about the world and how we experience it, blazing a path for future generations.

★ M ar i n Al so p ★

Conductor

M

arin Alsop is the first lady of music in more than one way. “It’s shocking to me in the 21st century there are still ‘firsts’ for women. I’m very proud, but with it comes great responsibility. The issue of women’s equality is not singular to my field. I have the chance to talk about this issue and to try to make the future different.” Born in New York City, Alsop grew up in a musical family, attended The Julliard School and studied under composer/conductor Leonard Bernstein. It was during a Young People’s concert she attended with her father at the age of nine that she decided to be a conductor. In 2007 Alsop became the first woman to be named music director of a major American orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Alsop is also the principal conductor of the São Paulo Symphony Orchestra. Recognized around the world for her innovative approach to music programming and for her deep commitment to education and to the development of audiences of all ages, Alsop still provides tutelage to Taki Concordia Conducting Fellowship (TCCF), a program she launched in 1992 offering opportunities for young women conductors to immerse themselves in the art and business of performing classical music. One of the opportunities provided through TCCF is practicing in front of an orchestra. “In music, conductors very seldom get the chance to practice their skills before getting in front of an orchestra. The way I learn best is by making mistakes. You can’t move forward without making mistakes.” Alsop strives “to make classical music as inclusive and accessible as possible” with outreach programs in both South America and Baltimore. “It’s your job to make a difference if you can,” said Alsop.

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The influencers ★ Rha G od d e s s ★

R

GASTON PHOTOGRAPHY

Tra nsfor m at i ona l Spe a ker

ha Goddess has stood on many platforms: She is an artist, social entrepreneur, lyricist, creative organizer and the list goes on. No matter the stage, she is churning out wisdom, inspiring listeners to do more and to do better. “I use my creative talent to uplift, ignite and empower the kinds of social, political and economic change that supports a universe where we can all thrive,” said Goddess. Her lectures focus on racial justice, health issues such as mental illnesses, and women. “I want women to give themselves the space to dream about what it is that they most aspire to do in the world, to be themselves. I also [encourage them] to take one action every day that moves toward their vision, and then to engage in one practice every day that reminds them that they are worthy of it.” Goddess has been at the forefront of change for years. She was the 2008 recipient of the National Voting Rights Museum and Institute’s prestigious Freedom Flame Award and a 2009 recipient of the Alpert/Hedgebrook Prize. She founded Move the Crowd, an entrepreneurial training company in N.Y.C. in 2010, dedicated to helping the next generation stay true, get paid and do good. The company works with entrepreneurs who are interested in building ventures that incorporate values, profitability and social impact. “The recession was a pivotal point; so was the environmental front—hurricanes, tsunamis, tornadoes. All of these things have shaped us to ask, what’s important? What do I really want to be doing with my life? We all want to be a part of something bigger, and we want to bring our best self to that party.”

★ V er a C o r d eiro ★

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ccording to the World Health Organization, one-third of all deaths each day are caused by diseases associated with poverty. For Vera Cordeiro, that statistic is unacceptable. “The diseases are curable; it’s poverty that kills children.” After 20 years working as a doctor at a hospital in Rio de Janerio, Cordeiro found it more and more heartbreaking to experience the suffering of children due to poverty. She wanted to “change the way people saw health in the world.” She started by selling everything she owned, living a simpler lifestyle and giving what she didn’t need to the poor. She realized this change would never be enough, and in 1991, she founded Saúde Criança (Brazil Child Health), a nonprofit organization that began as an idea of bringing simple healthcare, such as treating pneumonia and influenza, to impoverished families. The organization starts in the home by coming up with a Family Action Plan that helps restructure lives and includes core areas of health, vocational training, housing, education and citizenship. “And so, the dream comes true…to bring dignity to the poor and miserable,” said Cordeiro. Today, Saúde Criança has transformed the lives of more than 40,000 families, reduced hospital stays by 60 percent and produced a 35 percent increase in family income to those who have gone through the program. The Global Journal voted it the “Best NGO in Latin America” for a second year in a row in 2013. According to Cordeiro, these statistics and recognition prove that the vicious cycle of poverty can be broken. It also proves her favorite quote by Margaret Mead: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

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P u b l i c h ealth i n n ovato r

IMPACT ★ Sheryl W u D u nn ★

Jour na l i s t

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ords have power, and Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide certainly proves that sentiment. The book, written by wife-husband team Sheryl WuDunn and Nicholas Kristof, picked up steam after its 2009 release and became a multi-media project that included a documentary series for PBS and a Facebook adventure game app. It stirred a much-needed awareness about worldwide abuse, discrimination and exploitation of women and girls, all of which contribute to the 60 million females that are missing from the current global population. “We certainly didn’t start the conversation. There were people and organizations already there. We were writing about what people were saying in the industry, what people were doing and what we saw,” said WuDunn, a business executive, lecturer and best-selling author. “We did it in a way that was more accessible to people and that’s what we were able to contribute to the dialogue.” Currently, WuDunn works at an investment banking boutique in N.Y.C. and also works with entrepreneurs in socially driven for-profit businesses. She and her husband covered the Tiananmen Square protests in China and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1990 for the reportage. During that time, she learned that 30 million baby girls were ‘missing’ in the Chinese population. This fact planted a seed that many years later inspired the book. The challenges facing women around the globe are monumental; for now, the key is conversations about these issues. “I have no expectations that this will be solved anytime soon. It’s about greater awareness. Once there’s more awareness about the issue, then people can start discussing ways to approach the problem and come up with solutions. That’s what is happening now.”

★ F r an W ei ssl er ★

B r oad way P r o d u c er

E

verything has its season. Everything has its time,” sings the title character of the Tony Award-winning musical Pippin, produced by wife-husband team Fran and Barry Weissler. And so goes the team’s creative process after fate brought them together over 40 years ago. “I never knew it was my calling. A girlfriend asked me to fill in for her one night at the box office of our local theater in New Jersey. Barry happened to be the producer and star of the show that was playing that night. We met and the rest is history,” said Weissler. The business of Broadway is traditionally a male-dominated field, and Weissler understands her success is groundbreaking. “It has been a long time coming, but times they are a-changin’! Along with television and film, we are seeing more stories about women told from a strong, female point of view. Female directors like Diane Paulus, Susan Stroman, Anna Shapiro and Marianne Elliott are leaders in our business.” The duo’s projects have earned them seven Tony Awards and four Drama Desks, mainly in the revival category. “Barry and I always shy away from the word revival. People tend to associate that word with something ‘old’ or ‘dated.’ We approach each production as if it is a new work, like we are introducing a play or musical to an audience for the first time.” Next up, another dream come true. “We are working on a musical adaptation of the independent film, Waitress. It is a strong female driven story, and we have a tremendous creative team on board with lots of talented ladies in the room.”

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The influencers ★ Dylla n M cGe e ★

Filmm a k e r

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yllan McGee is the ultimate storyteller. The executive producer at Kunhardt McGee Productions made history when she called on the country’s most extraordinary league of women to be featured in Makers: Women Who Make America, a 2013 PBS docu-series that McGee founded and produced. The idea evolved when McGee asked Gloria Steinem if she could do a film on her life for HBO. “[Steinem] said ‘no’ but suggested a documentary on the women’s movement. She was right; you can’t tell the women’s movement through the story of one person. You can tell 12 stories in an hour documentary, but how could we stop there? We flip-flopped the model.” Makers.com was the answer, an AOL and PBS initiative that aims to be largest online video collection of female trailblazers ever assembled. “That’s where the next generation is and how they consume media. We are building a brand and empowering women. I always knew it was going to be important. Our traffic on Makers.com is half men,” said McGee. A hundred new Makers videos are in the works for the Web. McGee is working on another six Makers documentaries, which will focus on industry specifics, and global Makers, which are slated to air June and September 2014 on PBS. Don’t forget The Makers Conference, February 10-12, 2014, in California, which will focus on setting the agenda for the next 50 years for women and work. The team also is launching a storytelling mobile app so that everyone can make his or her own Makers story. Is there a consistent message with these featured women? “I would say that when you pour it all together—and it sounds so cliché—but it’s believe in yourself. That is the one piece of advice that transcends what everyone is saying,” said McGee. “Mine is ‘Love what you do.’ When you find your passion it changes everything.”

self-described entrepreneur, Susan Harmsworth launched her beauty business at the age of 21. Nearly 30 years of passion, experience and research later, she founded U.K.-based ESPA, the world’s first total spa company in 1992, specializing in the innovative design, development and management of five star spas across the globe. In the early 1980s, Harmsworth recognized that change was coming. “The word ‘spa’ hadn’t evolved yet. The choice in personal care was either ‘medical’ or ‘beauty.’” Women were entering the work force in droves, dealing with more stress and wanting to keep themselves physically viable longer. With that in mind, Harmsworth created spaces where women could escape, relax and care for their skin and bodies with all-natural products, which was another trend she saw coming before the competition. “I saw the damage to women’s skin from aggressive procedures and products.” Her ‘eureka moment’ led her to create her first product line while serving as spa director at Turnberry in Scotland. This product line quickly sparked her goal of designing the actual spa spaces as well, creating the environment, products and services to work together. Today, Harmsworth is known worldwide as the foremost innovator in the spa industry. ESPA’s portfolio includes more than 350 spas in 55 countries and all ESPA products are, on average, 99 percent natural and free from synthetic color, fragrance and parabens. She lectures frequently at the London Business School where she delivers both wisdom and support to tomorrow’s leaders. “Entrepreneurs are born, not made. You have to have a passion, an idea you firmly believe in, and remember that nothing happens overnight,” said Harmsworth.

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★ Su san H ar m s worth ★

en t r ep r en eu r

IMPACT ★ Am y Dac ey ★

P o l i t i c al Str ateg i s t

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he Democratic National Committee’s new CEO is no stranger to the political process. In fact, Amy Dacey was born for her latest role. Before she even hit double-digits she was helping her dad’s school board campaign, attending Democratic Party meetings and circulating political literature. Nevermind that her peers were spending their weekends in vastly different ways, Dacey was hooked. “I realized that I actually loved it…and what my parents were instilling in me is that elections matter.” Prior to her DNC appointment, Dacey served as the executive director of Emily’s List, an organization connecting women and electing women to make progressive change. During her three-year tenure she grew the membership from 500,000 to 3 million. Dacey describes her career trajectory as “almost an embarrassment of riches” due in part to the many notable public figures she has worked alongside. She cites N.Y. Representative Louise Slaughter and Secretary (then Senator) John Kerry as two influential figures who helped frame her own work in politics, operating from the shared belief that public service matters and is an honorable undertaking. Dacey also draws upon her experience in the labor movement and in positions with the Democratic Senatorial Campaign and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Dacey will lead the DNC, alongside Chair Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, with the intention of capitalizing on the institution’s history while looking for ways to bring it into the future. At the top of her list: encouraging voter participation and promoting the principle that “a strong voice in the electoral process matters.”

★ D eb o r a Spar ★

Ed u c at o r and Au thor

AP PHOTO/PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS

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he beauty of Debora Spar is she happily admits she can’t have it all and that’s OK. She would love for you to know and believe that too. While a glance at her resume—leading thousands of women in her role as the seventh president of Barnard College, author of three books and former professor of business administration and senior associate dean for faculty research and development at Harvard Business School—might suggest otherwise, Spar does live true to her words. Her most recent book Wonder Women: Sex, Power and the Quest for Perfection helps women embrace their imperfections. The book is based on extensive research and her own experiences as a mother of three children, wife and careerist. “Feminism was meant to remove a fixed set of expectations; instead, we now interpret it as a route to personal perfection. Because we feel we can do anything, we feel we have to do everything,” wrote Spar in an Op/Ed piece. It’s a worthy message. Why hang on to an attitude that makes women feel inadequate? Women should instead accept there’s only so much they can do. Other helpful tips: Pick a job that makes you happy and stay close to your family. ■

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Your Next Great Meal Is In Our Hands

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LA PERLA JACKET NECKLACE BY BEN-AMUN WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS MICHAEL BY MICHAEL KORS SHOES SKIN JEWELRY BY GOLD SIN JEWELS RING BY FLIP MUNICH

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WOMAN'S WORLD

STRENESSE SHIRT DIMITRI PANTS JEWELRY BY CALEIDOSCÓPIO WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS SKIN JEWELRY BY GOLD SIN JEWELS

DOLCE & GABBANA GLASSES DIMITRI DRESS MICHAEL BY MICHAEL KORS JACKET SKIN JEWELRY BY GOLD SIN JEWELS

SUSANNE WIEBE DRESS NECKLACE BY MANISH ARORA WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS

LA PERLA BUSTIER SUSANNE WIEBE PANTS

GLAW DRESS FLIP MUNICH BELT

GLAW VEST LA PERLA DRESS JEWELRY BY KOMPLOTT WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS MICHAEL BY MICHAEL KORS SHOES

GLAW DRESS TURBAN BY ALIDA BRACELET WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS FLIP MUNICH RINGS

ILSE JACOBSEN DRESS MANIK MERCIAN BRACELETS WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS MICHAEL BY MICHAEL KORS SHOES

BRIAN LICHTENBERG/ FLIP MUNICH TUNIC NECKLACE BY GERARD YOSCA WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS SKIN JEWELRY BY GOLD SIN JEWELS

LA PERLA DRESS CUFFS BY BEN-AMUN WITH SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS Photographer: Andreas Ortner Production/Styling: Petra Wiebe Hair/Makeup: Norbert Cheminel Model: Anna Rudenko Location: Riad Mumtaz Mahal, Essaouira, Morocco

IMPACT THE

MILLENNIUM PROJECT

GENERATION Y IS ON THE CUSP OF GREATNESS, YET EVEN WOMEN FROM THIS INNOVATIVE GENERATION ARE FIGHTING FOR THEIR DESERVED OPPORTUNITIES. WHAT WILL IT TAKE FOR THEM TO BE EQUALLY REPRESENTED AND PUSH THROUGH GENDER BIASES? ONE SOLUTION IS THE AVAILABILITY AND INFLUENCE OF POSITIVE OLDER FEMALE ROLE MODELS AND MENTORS FOR TOMORROW’S LEADERS. By Robin Bradley Hansel

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midst the typical concern about who will run the world tomorrow, one generation has stepped up to the plate. Known as millennials or Generation Y, these young adults are collectively the most achievement-oriented, optimistic and cooperative group in history. More than any other generation to date, millennials have fully embraced their access to advanced technology and higher education. These teens, college-aged students and young adults born during the 1980s and 1990s, tend to embody a heart for social activism, global service and environmental conservation.

The United States ranks 90th in the world in terms of women representatives serving in national legislatures. Women hold less than 19 percent of U.S. Congressional seats despite the fact that they are 51 percent of the population. They comprise a mere three percent of Fortune 500 CEOs and occupy only three percent of the clout positions in mainstream media. Women account for only 34 percent of all physicians and surgeons. In the legal profession, 47 percent of law students are female, but at law firms only 15 percent of equity partners and five percent of managing partners are women.

The 2006 Cone Millennial Cause Study explored what this generation looks for in their careers. Of the 1,800 individuals surveyed, 79 percent reported they wanted to work for companies that care about their impact on society. Thirty percent indicated a specific desire to have a profession that helps to make the world a better place. Underneath all of that positive news, women still do not hold their fair share of seats at decision-making tables. Talented females in this compassionate generation are under-represented in positions of leadership in their schools, communities and professional settings.

Without a stronger female influence across all sectors, is it any wonder that issues of gender discrimination persist despite the progress made over the years? Can women of older generations help encourage young millennials? M&V consulted an expert panel of best-selling authors, educators, industry leaders, speakers, filmmakers and young millennial innovators to help explore these questions and discuss possible solutions. Lisa Bloom is a prominent attorney and award-winning legal analyst for NBC, CBS News, CNN and HLN. She is also the best-selling author of Think: Straight Talk

for Women to Stay Smart in a Dumbed-Down World. She would like to see women ages 30 and older modeling and mentoring the millennial generation, emphasizing confidence, decisiveness and courage. “One of the biggest problems we still face is the cultural pressure to be physically attractive and the rewards young women get from that compared to using their brains. We must push back and insist on being judged on our talents, ideas and achievements,” said Bloom. Jennifer Siebel Newsom encountered just that type of unevolved thinking from her agent, someone who should have been looking out for her best interest. Newsom is the writer, director and producer of the 2011 Sundance documentary film Miss Representation, which explores the effects that media, marketing and advertising can play on the objectification of women. “My first agent didn’t take me seriously and went so far as to request that I take my Stanford MBA off my resume—he didn’t want me to seem too threatening,” said Newsom, also a speaker, former actress and advocate for women, girls and their families. That type of behavior doesn’t surprise Dr. Elisabeth Kelan, associate professor of the department of management at King’s College 

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London and author of Rising Stars: Developing Millennial Women as Leaders. “Younger women today view gender as relevant for their grandmothers and mothers but surely not for them,” Kelan said. “However, on closer inspection, it is noticeable that gender inequality still exists, but it is more subtle than before. Younger women need to have the right tools in their toolkits to deal with it.” A 1984 silver and two-time bronze Paralympic ski medalist, former White House official, corporate leadership expert and best-selling author, Bonnie St. John concurred. “Now that gender inequality is often more subtle, more structural and more unintentional, one of the biggest barriers is a lack of awareness. When millennial men and women get complacent about equality and assume the work has all been done, it seems as if the tide turns backward.” St. John and her daughter, Darcy Deane, a University of Pennsylvania freshman, co-authored the book How Great Women Lead: A Mother-Daughter Adventure Into the Lives of Women Shaping the World. “My daughter tells me that men and women on campus often don’t see the way men can dominate meetings with their height, size or deep voices,” said St. John. “Inadvertently, men may be sexually harassing the women who must work beside them in organizations and yet no one calls ‘foul.’ The same young men and women who would espouse gender equality and volunteer to make change in Third World countries are often unaware of how thousands of small decisions and actions on a day-to-day basis can result in women being held back. It is crucial that millennials talk about gender inequality and make themselves more conscious.” Unfortunately, there is a lack of dialogue, even among women, about barriers for female students and ways to empower them as leaders. “Many female millennials tend to perceive gender inequality as an off-campus issue rather than a pressing problem for college students. Although there is nothing I feel any less qualified to do because I am a woman, my future aspirations are daunting in the face of such widespread lack of awareness surrounding gender inequality among my own generation,” said Deane. Does this limited discussion translate beyond college campuses and into the workplace? Is it possible that gender discrimination obstacles

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can be so very subtle that women of this generation tend to miss it or even blame themselves? Kelan, who researched the topic for her book, encountered this situation time and time again: younger women failing to recognize when gender subtext played a key role. One example is of a young woman assigned to administrative roles in her team despite her interest in strategy. “She thought that this was her individual problem because she simply did not have the right skills. Only later did she realize her boss had assigned her this role because he unconsciously made the assumption that women are good at clerical tasks. She talked with her boss about her ambitions, and her boss from then on gave her strategic roles that helped to foster her career. It goes to show how powerful it is to expose unconscious biases,” said Kelan. So how can young women of the millennial generation better understand and overcome some of these workplace obstacles? By recognizing the issue at hand. Books like Bloom’s Think and Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead can help smart and hardworking women become more assertive and ambitious, which might not be inherent for all women. A subconscious thought pattern also fuels this issue, according to Laura Lehmann, the founder of 20to30.com, an independent transmedia project that shares stories from global thinkers and shapers about their lives during their 20s and 30s. Think of a doctor or a police officer. Is the physician white? Is the officer a man? “Being aware of our individual subtle mental filters—present in each one of us—is one step toward opening up the conversation around discrimination, whether racial or sexual,” said Lehmann. “People tend to promote people like themselves. As most companies are run by white men, it’s hard for women and people of color to break through the glass ceiling. But there is a lot more consciousness now that diversity is not only necessary but profitable for companies. Once they reach a certain number of women at the top, companies perform better,” Bloom concluded. Lehmann, who is in her 20s, brings up another point. The men and women she interviewed are not less interested in leadership positions. They do not want to mold themselves to predetermined roles but craft their own leadership visions. One of the main issues is the current corporate and political structure and the lack of progress in matching employee needs in the 21st century, such as technology allowing for flexible work hours or working from home for new mothers.

IMPACT

Laura Lehmann

“Being aware of our individual subtle mental filters—present in each one of us—is one step toward opening up the conversation around discrimination, whether racial or sexual.” - Laura Lehmann “One of the biggest challenges for young women today is that they look at the array of male-dominated leadership options and do not want to try to fit in or compete in that arena,” said St. John, who took her daughter, Deane, along when she interviewed women like orchestra conductor Marin Alsop, Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and stay-at-home mom Cathy Sarubbi for How Great Women Lead. Deane got a firsthand look at women leading as role models in all aspects of life and work, while maintaining their unique identity. Another way millennials and women of all ages can support one another is through professional networking and mentorship. Femfessionals brings professional women together in a positive and uplifting way to support each other in business, community and life. The organization has thousands of members throughout North America and is developing programs on collegiate campuses and for teen groups. But successful mentoring relationships need not always be exclusively with women.“I advise younger women to have a portfolio of role models whose traits, characteristics and behaviors they can combine with their own authentic selves. However, mentors are not enough. Recent research has shown that sponsors—individuals who can strategically influence your career by being power brokers—are even more vital than mentors for millennial women,” said Kelan. When working on the film Miss Representation, Newsom relied on the help of female friends, mentors, a few good men and a lot of hard work, passion and collaboration. It goes to show what committed individuals can accomplish. The truth is women are capable of anything, but it can take a push from a mentor. “We, as women, often need someone to tell us to aim higher and to see ourselves as the star in our field. Upsizing your goals can often improve your life balance because you get more choices and more help,” said St. John. ■

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Raise Your Glass

Edwidge Danticat BY THE BOOK By Lola Thélin Photography by Maggie Steber

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he art of storytelling is born in homes, on front porches and around kitchen tables, with aunts, uncles, cousins and grandparents telling tales of way back when. Family members who gather learn about the importance of storytelling—how tales pass down from generation to generation, how stories change lives and how legends make a person feel like part of a greater being. By listening to her family, novelist Edwidge Danticat learned how to construct words into stories, and on her own, stories into novels. The written word is Danticat’s comfort zone and career. Her words are a lasting impact for her children and the millions who enjoy her book. “Stories are ultimately all we leave behind. I write to bear witness. I write stories for myself to remember to go deeper into a subject,” said Danticat, a 2009 MacArthur Fellow. “It’s sad in a way, but it’s my life’s passion and my life’s work. It’s probably the most essential part of myself that I can share with people. When I’m gone, aside from my children, that’s all I’m leaving behind are my stories.”

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Danticat was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in 1969. She was raised by an aunt and uncle in Haiti and rejoined her parents in New York at the age of 12. It was a hard transition. Danticat, a shy child, was teased at school because of her accent, and her Haitian traditions set her apart. And so she sought solace in writing. Danticat’s stories, published by New Youth Connections, a citywide magazine written by teenagers, were the beginning of how the novelist embraced storytelling. She wrote about how a Haitian family spends Christmas in New York and her first year in the United States. “I found that writing is a way of breaching silence, of communicating thoughts without having to raise your voice, of sharing ideas, stories and sentiments and learning more about [one another],” explained Danticat, who graduated from Barnard College (1990) and received an MFA from Brown University (1993).

IMPACT Her stories have won accolades: Brother, I’m Dying won the National Book Critics Circle Award; Breath, Eyes, Memory is an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak! is a National Book Award finalist; The Farming of Bones won the American Book Award; and The Dew Breaker is a PEN/Faulkner Award finalist and winner of the inaugural Story Prize. “I keep hoping the work gets better and better. As you get older, you’ve lived more. There are more layers and experiences to my life. You have to inhabitant someone else’s life to write conventionally about it.” The writer recently released the fiction story Claire of the Sea Light (Random House). Currently, Danticat lives in Miami with her husband and two daughters, ages eight and four. They settled in South Florida 11 years ago. “Being a mother is the one situation where you love someone more than you love yourself. All of those thoughts were not available to me as emotions before,” said Danticat. “The most wonderful thing is watching their personalities emerge.” Claire of the Sea Light was a long time coming, as the first words were written in 2005. The story is about a girl in Haiti whose father, a widowed, poverty-stricken fisherman, is contemplating giving her away to be raised by a local shopkeeper. Claire of the Sea Light stands

KERVIN-SELDOR/FOTOKONBIT

out in Danticat’s long list of books for many reasons. It is her first book since she has become a parent; her concerns about parenthood and loss filtered into the story. It is her first work of fiction since the earthquake in Haiti. A grand reason for Danticat’s success is that she writes about what she knows and believes in. Haiti is the glue in her books. Each story is grounded in Haiti’s cultural and complex history. The stories are told through the lives of ordinary Haitians with themes about family, isolation and community. They also give readers a taste of the country and hopefully, a desire to learn more about Haiti. “Haiti is not one kind of place. It is poor and rich at the same time. It’s a place that has a lot of sadness but also a lot of beauty. One of the ways these things are captured is the art. Art is our silver lining. Art is the best way to show the multiplicity of a place like Haiti, but art is not the first thing that people think of. They think of disaster.” The country is also worth a trip. “You’d have to go to the city for a sense of your grounding, but I’d recommend that you leave it as soon as possible. You have to go off the beaten path and find your own Haiti. There’s a lot to discover.” There are the beautiful beaches in Port Salut. The historical city Jacmel boasts

JOCENEL-DESAMOURS/FOTOKONBIT

an artistic center. Cap-Haïtien is home to Sans-Souci Palace. Danticat is involved with FotoKonbit and 10x10’s Girl Rising. FotoKonbit is a social photography nonprofit founded in 2010 that empowers Haitians to tell their stories through photography. Based in Port-au-Prince, the organization hosts workshops for adult and children throughout Haiti. Children learn about creative expression and adults receive technical training. Some of those adults have started photography businesses. FotoKonbit also prints and sells the images, and the photographers receive the profits. Presented by 10x10, a social action campaign, Girl Rising is a documentary featuring the stories of nine girls from nine countries, written by nine celebrated writers and narrated by nine renowned actresses. Danticat contributed the story of Wadley, a young Haitian girl determined to get an education. The novelist is already working on her next written project—a young adult book based in Miami about twins. This new project doesn’t mean she is done with Haiti. At home, Haiti is everywhere. “We go to Haiti. We eat Haitian food. [Our lives are] a mixture of [Haitian and American] cultures without trying too hard.” Haiti and Danticat will never go out of style. ■

LAURA-DULCINE/FOTOKONBIT

Danticat is on the advisory board for FotoKonbit, which empowers Haitians to photograph their reality. Photos above are by students and for sale at FotoKonbit.org. J A N U A R Y / F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 4 M&V

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R.S.V.P. Muses & Visionaries Launch Party. More that 1,000 attendees celebrated the DEBUT issue on November 1, 2013, in West Palm Beach, Florida.

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AMY LAGAE, VENUS WILLIAMS MAUREEN O’SULLIVAN, ROY ASSAD, MARK HEIMANN BRAM MAJTLIS, NICK GOLD ANDY COLEMAN, LOIS FRANKEL, BRUCE SUTKA, BORIS JOBRE CHAD LABONTE, ERIN ROSSITTO STEPHANIE KANTIS, MOLLY GREENE, MICHELLE FARMER, KATHERINE LANDE MERIDETH HOREN, WILLIAM EUBANKS, COURTNEY DUDEK, BEN STILETTO STEIN

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IMPACT

8.  ADAM LIPSON, AVERILL CONLEY 9. KAREN HOLLOWAY, DIANA ALAVA, JO DUBOIS, SASHA JOZEFCZYK 10. BERT BURLINGAME, CHRISTINE DIROCCO   11. TREMÉNE TRIPLETT, LOLA THÉLIN 12. CASSI FRIELICH, THAI LE, LAURA DALE, TERESA CAVALIERE 13. KIM & DAN TANENBAUM

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13. PHOTOS BY LILA PHOTO

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R.S.V.P. The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) hosted its VIP opening reception at Art Basel featuring "Tracey Emin: Angel without You" in Miami Beach on December 3, 2013.

1. KEVIN SPACEY, TRACEY EMIN 2. FRANCESCO ZAPPACOSTA, SHAILA FREYER, DANIEL NOVELA 3. RAMEET CHAWLA, BROOKE WADE MURPHY 4. DIANE AND ALAN LIEBERMAN 5. JANICE AND ALAN LIPTON 6. TAMMY COTTON-HARTNETT, MICHELLE DE METZ 7. MIGUEL AND VERONICA MARTIN 1.

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IMPACT 8. ROSS KENNETH URKEN, MONIKA MARROQUIN, AGUSTIN CASSE 9. DANIEL LECHNER, CAT MCLAUGHLIN 10. ALEJANDRO MIYAR, ALEXIS CHRISTIE  

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Celebrating the 24th Edition of Miami’s Premier International Contemporary and Modern Art Fair and Second Edition of Art Miami’s Sister Fair Dedicated to Emerging and Mid-Career Cutting-Edge Art and benefiting the Pérez Art Museum Miami

1.  NICK KORNILOFF, AMBASSADOR EARLE MACK, PAMELA COHEN 2. MARCO GLAVIANO, CINDY CRAWFORD, RANDE GERBER 3. JORGE AND DARLENE PÉREZ

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3. GETTY IMAGES FOR ART MIAMI

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R.S.V.P. Grand Champions Polo Club hosted the 2013 Beluga North America Cup on Saturday, November 9, 2013, in Wellington, Florida where the Beluga team was defeated by Equine Law Group in the opening game, and defending champs Audi beat out Casablanca in the 20-goal tournament.

1. STACEY NAVARRO, TIFFANY ROSEN 2. PATRICIA RESTIVO, NATHAN SCHELL

3. CHARLIE ROSENBURG, CRISTINA OSORIO, ALBERT GUILARTE 4. JENNIFER RIELLY MCGRATH, SCOTT VELOZO, PENELOPE KOLEOS WILLIAMS

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4. PHOTOS ©JASON NUTTLE, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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IMPACT

Visions ANNIE LEONARD

YES! MAGAZINE

ANNIE BY YES! MAGAZINE

IT ALL STARTED WITH A VISIT TO THE DUMP. I grew up in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. In the summer we’d drive up to the mountains to go camping. I watched as every year the subdivisions and malls reached farther from the city, while the forests shrank. I wondered, “Where are all the trees going?” Some years later, I found the answer in New York City. My college campus was on West 116th, and my dorm was on West 110th. Every morning I trudged those six blocks, staring at the mountains of trash—mostly paper—on the sidewalks; at the end of the day, those same sidewalks were magically clean. So that’s where the trees were going. From the forests of the Cascades to the streets of New York to...where? I had to know. So I took a trip to the now-closed Fresh Kills Landfill— five square miles of trash on Staten Island, with peaks of garbage higher than the Statue of Liberty.

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Talk about shock and awe. As far as I could see were couches, appliances, clothes, plastic bags and other discarded stuff. I’d been raised by a single mother whose credo was—use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without. Needless consumption and waste just weren’t part of our lives. The mountains of stuff at Fresh Kills made no sense to me. It was wrong. I couldn’t understand it. I had to know more. My quest took me around the world. As a waste trade campaigner for Greenpeace, I saw not only dumps but mines, factories and slums. I kept asking, why? Why are dumps full of hazardous materials? Why are they usually in poor, minority communities? Why are electronic gadgets cheaper to replace than repair? I became an expert on the materials economy. The more I learned, the deeper I went into the world of waste geeks. We spoke a language incomprehensible to ordinary folks. I wanted to

reach people who didn’t think about supply chains, toxicology or externalized costs. Six years ago I went on a retreat with other changemakers who were also trying to get better at explaining their passions. They kept telling me my message was too technical, too dense. Frustrated, one day I tacked some paper to the wall and started drawing cartoons to show how all the issues around stuff are connected by the take-make-waste system that’s trashing the planet, destroying communities and threatening our health. From that moment was born The Story of Stuff, an online film that’s been viewed 25 million times and translated into dozens of languages. We’ve made eight more films—check them out at storyofstuff.org—which have catalyzed a community of hundreds of thousands who want to build a better future. We’d love you to join us. ■

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Muses & Visionaries magazine No2