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PLAY LIKE A GIRL: Softball team breaks even against Cameron University in series at Mustangs Park, closing season at 44-8.

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Wednesday n May 4, 2011

OPEN FOR INTERPRETATION: Graduating art students will show off their masterpieces Friday at the B.F.A. Senior Exhibition.

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thewichitan

your university n your voice

Students react to death of Osama bin Laden Brittney Cottingham Features Editor

Levi Gibbs could hardly believe news reports announcing that the world’s most wanted terrorist, Osama bin Laden had been killed by American forces. When Gibbs heard the news that the world’s most wanted terrorist, Osama Bin Laden, was killed by American forces, he

didn’t believe the reports at first. “After the president’s speech and much of the news coverage began to spread, I celebrated,” Gibbs said. “It was definitely news that I, along with the rest of the nation, had been waiting 10 years to hear.” Gibbs, who has spent three years on the Texas Army National Guard, thinks the death of Bin Laden is definitely a mo-

rale booster, especially for people with military ties. “It shows that we’ve made progress,” Gibbs said. “The only negative aspect I can think of would be from those individuals who, now that bin Laden is dead, will expect the military to pull out of Afghanistan. Our job there is not done, but we have definitely come across a major milestone.”

The criminal justice major is currently a Specialist in the 36th Infantry Division. Being in the military has changed the way he views a lot of things, including the War on Terror. “To me, it’s not about the political nonsense that has surrounded both Iraq and Afghanistan,” Gibbs said. “My only concern is for the men and woman who wear a military uniform

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and making sure they all come home.” Like Gibbs, Alex Reveles was skeptical when a friend texted him the news. “(bin Laden’s death) has definitely given Americans a new sense of hope and reminded them of the patriotism that lifted our nation up from the tragedy of 9/11,” Reveles said. “Like many political analysts have stated this

‘Parkour’ athletes jump for joy Sarah Kate Allsup Brandon Groppi For the Wichitan

Tracy Chaddock’s chin-length hair was tied back by a white bandanna as he walked confidently toward his next obstacle. “I bet I could do a trick off of that,” he said. Chaddock has an interesting hobby that keeps him fit.

It’s called parkour. Parkour practitioners, or “traceurs,” practice gymnastics and running in urban areas to keep themselves in shape. “I’ve had no gymnastic experience and I’ve never done martial arts before,” Chaddock said. “All this was self-taught.” When Chaddock was 6 years old, he would line up pillows on the floor and try to do front hand-

springs. Link, a character from “The Legend of Zelda,” was his inspiration. “I would see Link roll when he landed and I thought that was cool, so I started doing that,” said Chaddock. He also learned a few other tricks – by the time he got to high school Chaddock found out that what he was doing had a name.

See PARKOUR on page 8

Autism program could lose state funding Chris Collins Managing Editor

The MSU Autism Support Program, a residential, student-driven support system for autistic students, is in trouble of going down the drain if it can’t find funding for the Fall 2011 semester. The Autism Support Program (ASP) was awarded a $100,000 special items grant in August 2008 that paid for the utilities at a home for the program, a director, peer mentors and a van, said Debbie Barrow, director of board and government relations in the president’s office. The money was given to the ASP by the Texas legislature partly because of its status as a “start-up” program. But af-

ter running smoothly for two years, MSU officials could no longer pigeonhole the request as “start-up funding.” At this point, the special item stimulus money is as good as lost. “We knew it was going to be tough to get that money again,” Barrow said. She said it’s still possible the Texas Senate could O.K. funding for the program, but it’s highly unlikely. “There’s just too many needs and not enough money,” she said. But the problems don’t stop there – the program will lose its director in Jessica Dunn this August, who is moving to the metroplex to pursue new career opportunities. Even if the program staff

had the money to pay a new director, they would still have to find one first. Currently, Dunn holds weekly one-on-one sessions with students in the program to keep tabs on them and help them with problems they may face. They use the time to discuss how students are performing in classes and how well they are handling themselves in social settings. Provost Dr. Alisa White fears that other autistic students at MSU won’t get the support they need if funding for the ASP is lost. It may also steer prospective students with the behavioral disorder away from MSU. She said she thinks the best thing to do now is to help the students who are currently in

the program and plan for the future. “We need to keep the students we have and get them through the pipeline,” White said. “One problem is that we won’t be able to give students the same support we gave them at the beginning.” Six people participated in the program when it began two years ago, according to a paper Dunn drafted and sent to MSU President Dr. Jesse Rogers this year. It included three students with Asperger’s Syndrome (a mild form of autism) and three “nuerotypical” (meaning “normally functioning”) peer mentors. Now the program has grown to six students with autism spectrum disorder, four peer mentors and three program

staff members. Dunn oversaw the addition of a “sensory room” to the program’s house, as well as the adoption of Calli, a trained therapy dog. Dunn said she’s unsure about the fate of the home and the dog if they can’t find another source of funding for the program. Dunn has been instructed to begin charging a $3,000 nominal fee per student in the program if new funding cannot be found for the ASP. The problem is that some students simply can’t pay this price. “The program’s founders believe these highly intelligent students deserve an opportunity to attend an insti-

See FUNDING on page 3

See OSAMA on page 5

Museum fundraiser falls short

Chris Collins Managing Editor Expenses for food served at a lavish Greekthemed fundraiser at MSU’s Museum of Art ate up more than half of the revenue raised at the April event. Records obtained by The Wichitan show the event billed as Greek Fortnight ended up almost $3,500 in the hole. Although it brought in $35,520 in donations, gifts and exhibition income, it paid out $38,997 in expenses, $24,711 of them food-related. Aramark, the agency contracted to provide meals to the MSU cafeteria, catered the April 9 “Party at the Parthenon,” charging $15,658 for a spread of lamb, moussaka and Greek white wine. Aramark charged an additional $5,512 to serve the food along with $2,000 to rent chairs, tablecloths and glassware. An outside chef from The Traveling Bistro & Catering Company billed $1,540 for his services. Jane Spears, museum advisory board chair and MSU Board of Regents member, said the museum was not obligated to use Aramark for the catering. Michael Clifton, director of dining services, said that the museum actually was required to use Aramark by contract. This is the case with all university functions, Clifton said. He also said that the company broke even on the party. According to records, 173 people paid $125 each for dinner tickets, bringing the per person food- and beverage-related bill to $142. Museum records list three sources of income for the event: donations and gifts ($3,625), exhibition income ($31,895) and maintenance/ operation budget ($5,000). According to Gail Ferguson, controller of the MSU business office, the maintenance/operation budget should not have been included in the revenue figures. Spears said she did not know why this figure was added in. Greek Fortnight was the first major fundraiser held at the museum since MSU took ownership of the property in 2004. Spears, however, said the recent event wasn’t a fundraiser. “We never hoped to raise several million dollars,” Spears said. “We were happy to break even. I was a little disappointed in some aspects to the response to some of the lectures, but other than that I was very pleased.” She said the primary goal was not actually to raise funds. Instead, it was intended to create a “signature event” for the museum. “This is to bring the community back in and raise awareness of the museum,” she said. “We didn’t have any expectation of raising money. In years to come, it will be a fundraiser.” In the March 30 Wichitan, Spears said she hoped the event would produce enough funds to complete several crucial museum projects, such as redesigning and relocating the museum entrance and making the restrooms ADA-compliant. Spears said at one point she had hoped the event would raise as much as $10 million, but that goal was scaled back due to the recent economic downturn. Printing, which included brochures, newsletters and programs cost $5,575. Renting Greek columns and statues from a Dallas decoration company cost the museum $2,760. Entertainment cost $450. Spears said that she isn’t currently aware of any pending donations as a result of the event, but she hopes more people will contribute funds to the museum.

treet Tracy Chaddock performs a tic-tac-toe roll off of Bea Wood Hall. Chase Nuding flips through the air, defying gravity. (Photos by Hannah Hofmann)

is a message that our determination, while it may have faltered, is stronger than ever.” Reveles comes from a strong military background. He has a retired Navy grandfather, retired Air Force uncle and a cousin who was wounded in Iraq while serving in the Army. Reveles is the first Marine in his family, and has served three years in the

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campusvoice

thewichitan

nour view

Yes, students cheat

While impending exams have forced most students’ social lives to grind to a screeching halt, some of our ethically challenged peers are planning to cheat their way through finals week. We’ve all seen them. Sitting in the computer lab, a female student writes on the inside of her calf with a ballpoint pen, copying notes out of her intro to Biology textbook onto her skin before she rolls her jeans back down to hide the evidence until she needs to sneak a peek. A graphically inclined student prints out a mock-up of a Dr. Pepper bottle label with formulas and facts in place of nutritional values. It’s easier to cheat than ever before. Cell phones make it easy to text test answers, and YouTube videos offer detailed tutorials about revolutionary cheating methods. Sometimes, it seems like cheaters put as much effort into academic dishonesty than their studious peers put into legitimate test-prep. Whoever said “cheaters never win”

was lying. Cheaters do win, and they win often. Relatively few students are ever caught in the act, but a Duke University survey reports that 70 percent of college students admitted to some form of serious cheating. If 70 percent were willing to come out and admit it, then a lot more are probably keeping their bad behavior a secret. Students are under more pressure than ever to get high marks. Grades shouldn’t be the most important element of a college education, but they are important. A few extra GPA points can help a grad stand out in an overcrowded job market. Unfortunately, cheaters aren’t learning anything. But telling students to “just be honest” isn’t going to inspire them to turn over a new leaf. MSU’s honor code hasn’t eliminated the cheating problem, and If it’s easy to cheat without getting caught, there are always going to be individuals who are willing to take advantage of the opportunity for an easy A.

May 4, 2011

3410 Taft Blvd. Box 14 n Wichita Falls, Texas 76308 News Desk: (940) 397-4704 n Ads: (940) 397-4705 Fax (940) 397-4025 n E-mail WICHITAN@mwsu.edu

Professors can do a lot to discourage cheating, but not without increasing their own workload. Student’s cant use a cheat sheet to pass a test that actually forces them to prove their understanding of a subject instead of just regurgitating facts. Unfortunately, in larger classes, especially at the freshman and sophomore levels, coming up with this type of assignment and finding the time to grade them in a timely fashion could prove problematic. In the end, it all comes down to integrity. Cheaters might make a few good grades, but they also run the risk of getting caught. If a professor doesn’t manage to identify their clever methods, their lazy, dishonest habits will come back to bite them in the future. Try explaining to your boss that “yes, that was part of the curriculum in my undergraduate program but… I never actually learned it. I just cheated my way to an A.” We doubt they’ll be impressed.

editorial board

nEditor in Chief: Brittany Norman nManaging Editor: Chris Collins n FEATURES/ A&E Editor: Brittney Cottingham nOp-Ed Editor: Cameron Shaffer nSports Editor: Andre Gonzales nPhoto Editor: Hannah Hofmann nAdvertising manager: Rachel Bingham nCopy editor: Kaja Salsman nadviser: Randy Pruitt nReporter: Orlando Flores nPhotographers: Kassie Bruton, Damian Atamenwan

Copyright © 2011. The Wichitan is a member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association. The Wichitan reserves the right to edit any material submitted for publication. Opinions expressed in The Wichitan do not necessarily reflect those of the students, staff, faculty, administration or Board of Regents of Midwestern State University. The Wichitan welcomes letters of opinion from students, faculty and staff submitted by the Friday before intended publication. Letters should be brief (350 words or less) and without abusive language or personal attacks. Letters must be typed and signed by the writer and include a telephone number and address for verification purposes. The editor retains the right to edit letters.

nSocietal Floss

The siren call of diversity continues to wail on

Diversity and multiculturalism have become some of the key buzzwords of our generation and even our campus. Being pro-diversity and flaunting not just a tolerance but also an eager embrace of multiculturalism has become the politically correct thing to do. The motivations behind protecting and promoting diversity and multiculturalism appear to be well intentioned and pure of heart, and perhaps they are; however, there is an element of that embrace that kills individualism and true diversity. “Diverse” literally means “varied” or “very different or distinct from one another.” When was the last time you looked at a person and thought, “He is so diverse!” Probably never, because there is one person, and that one person cannot be varied or distinct from himself. Multiculturalism is understood as the integration of a diverse person (or a varied person, who does not exist) into society. How often does anyone look at an individual and think that she is so multicultural (not in the sense that a person appreciates and enjoys multiple cultures, but that person is an expression of multiple cultures). Rarely, if ever, because such a person is incredibly rare. You will never find a person that varies from herself, and as an individual is not a diverse integration. Individuals transcend diversity because diversity only applies to groups. You have to look at a group of people to notice that is composed of diverse individuals, people who vary from each other. Multiculturalism only works when a group is being integrated into a larger cultural setting. Diversity sees groups of people, not individuals. While racism, some intolerance, and ignorance need to be combated, and defending and promoting diversity and acceptance of groups within the United

Cameron Shaffer Opinion Editor States and specifically Midwestern State University, is a good and noble thing, it does a massive disservice to individuals. To be more precise, it does a disservice to those individuals whom advocates of diversity most want to promote and get the general cultural to accept. This is done when we start to think of anyone from outside the United States as first off, an international student. They are that for sure, but they are not that first. When we at Midwestern being to lump all students from Africa together, regardless of ethnic background and national origin, and see them as “African students” first, we lose sight of them as individuals and as specific, real people. Students need to be thought of as Reuben and Tomi first, way before they are thought of as international students. Placing a massive emphasis on diversity, which requires to people to think in terms of groups rather than individuals, moves those international students farther away as specific people in the minds of the rest of society. Thinking of people in terms of race or national origin can be damaging to not just international students, but also American citizens. Politically, African-Americans have overwhelmingly voted Democratic since the 1930s. The last several na-

tional elections have seen African-Americans who turn out vote 88% and higher for Democratic candidates. Most people assume then that their African-American peers vote Democratic, whether or not they really are. Statistics mean nothing to the individual. It is not only foolish to apply what a group does to an individual no matter how likely, but also continues to encourage thinking of people as just components of block, rather than as individuals. But when we think in terms of diversity, that is what happens. An emphasis on multiculturalism also devalues the dominant, mainline cultural and becomes overly defensive of cultures and beliefs that do not deserve that defense. All cultures and societies are not equal. Some are horrific. How many people think pre-Civil War and pre-Civil Rights act Mississippi is as good a culture as the one there now? Mississippi, is probably the least racist state, currently leading the country in inter-racial marriages. No one with a half-decent sense of morality is going to say those two state of affairs are equal. People can debate for ages on how great American culture really is, but Cubans get on cardboard boats to get to Miami and yet there are no Americans willing to risk everything trying to get to Havana. When an emphasis is placed on multiculturalism and trying to accommodate every culture, every culture gets accommodated in the way we think, even if it should not. When the value is on groups instead of people, groups receive unwarranted promotion from the vanguards of diversity. As students of higher education, we need to make sure we see people as people first, and not just as elements of a larger group.

Editor reflects on lessons learned

For the past four years, The Wichitan office has been my second home every spring and fall semester. By the time you read this, I’ll have cleared out eight semesters worth of legal pads filled with illegible interview notes, sticky notes that might have been relevant at one time or another, long-forgotten essays from freshman (and sophomore and junior) English classes, and other assorted clutter. Most of it will end up in the trash, tossed out like last week’s Wichitan and every issue before that one. The products of my time here – this newspaper in front of you is the 100th issue I have contributed to at Midwestern – are temporary by nature. News is only relevant at a certain point in time; after that, events and controversies that might have seemed momentous are forgotten But I don’t regret the 100 Tuesday nights (that often bled into the early hours of Wednesday mornings) I spent in the newsroom writing articles, laying out pages and correcting errors in a publication that our target audience – the student body – never seemed to care too much about. It was almost never easy. There were weeks when I wanted to throw in the towel and hand in my imaginary editor’s badge, but I didn’t. Instead of quitting, I learned how to cope with conflict. Becoming editor in chief as a second-semester freshman exposed me to a set of challenges that many people don’t face until long after commencement. I have interviewed and hired pro-

Brittany Norman Editor in Chief spective staffers and fired individuals who, for one reason or another, just didn’t work out. I have tackled controversial issues in the interest of informing the audience, and stood behind other reporters when their work drew criticism. I have written good articles as well as bad ones, and I learned that the moment you can no longer stand up for what you’ve written, it’s time to admit you were wrong. I’ve made mistakes – probably a lot more than I know of – but I think those slip-ups were just as valuable as the successes. I learned more from the things I did wrong than from my successes. Regret is a powerful teaching tool. I may not remember the individual stories I covered, but I will take the big lessons with me when I leave the newsroom. There are things you can’t

pick up in a classroom alone. A badly-written essay in an undergraduate class will earn a poor grade, but an irresponsible article could result in a libel suit. Even though The Wichitan’s readership is small, the printed word can have a significant impact on individuals and the community. Student journalists must still be responsible and ethical, because their product is more than a class project. It’s an information source for the campus community. More than anything else, I think I learned how to think for myself. While working on an article, especially a controversial one, there is noise coming from all directions. People on all sides of the story are protecting their own interests. Sometimes, outsiders will offer suggestions on how best to handle a certain topic or situation. All of that matters. You have to consider the potential pros and cons of every paragraph you write, because at the end of the day, you’re the one who has to stand behind the product you place on the newsstands. True accountability is a strange thing for a college student to adjust to. I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to operate without a safety net. Without the risk of failure, my successes wouldn’t have seemed quite as meaningful.

news

May 4, 2011

The Wichitan n 3

Sim Center recieves grants for improvements campus briefs Brittney Cottingham Features Editor

On April 22, the MSU nursing program received a substantial grant of $350,000 from the J.S. Bridwell Foundation and the United Regional Health Care System (URHCS) According to Marcy Beck, codirector of the Simulation Center, United Regional has been a longterm supporter of the College of Heath Sciences and Human Services, providing clinical opportuni-

ties for many students in the MSU health professions programs. “The hospital, along with Vernon College, is a partner in the operation of the Regional Simulation Center, and together, the hospital and MSU have collaborated in various programs and grants over the years,” Beck said. The J.S. Bridwell Foundation also contributed funds toward the purchase of the Regional Simulation Center building. The $350,000 will be used to de-

fray the cost of purchasing the new Simulation Center on Midwestern Parkway,. At the Simulation Center, students are offered the opportunities that they may not have at regular clinical setting. “One of the reasons the nursing program has grown is because of the Simulation Center,” Beck said. “When the nursing program received a Nursing Innovation Grant from the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board in 2005, the in-

tent was to increase enrollment.” The nursing program has grown rapidly, increasing approximately 49 percent, and donor money is very important to the program, Beck said. In the future, there are a few elements of the Simulation Center Beck would like to add including increasing educational opportunities to the healthcare providers in Wichita Falls and the surrounding communities and research in using simulation as a learning strategy.

funding...................................................................................................................................continued from page 1

tution of higher education at no additional cost for the special services they receive because of a disability with which they were born,” Dunn said in the paper to Rogers. She said President Rogers encouraged ASP staff to continue planning for the future of the program as if it would still be funded in the fall. “If you go on like you’re about to be cut, you’re going to get cut,” said Samantha Spangler, an MSU student with Asperger’s who has been with the program since its inception. The program has made a vast difference in Spangler’s university life, changing her from a mostly antisocial person to someone who can hold conversations with perfect strangers and speak at events with hundreds of attendees. “I don’t know where I would be without this program,” Spangler said. The ASP currently pays for her housing in Sunwatcher Village. Though her life is less structured than it was at the home dedicated to the program, she still

has some supervision – a mentor lives in the apartment with her. The program has three phases: dependent, semi-dependent and independent. Each has varying degrees of mentor supervision. Spangler is in the “semiindependent” phase right now, though her progress socially, academically and emotionally has made her a candidate to begin the “independent” stage. For Spangler to get the nod to pursue independent life at MSU, she’ll need a recommendation from the program’s staff and an advisory committee, which is made up of counseling center staff and counseling professors. One student in the program has already reached the independent level and one more is in the second phase with Spangler. All three live in Sunwatcher apartments. Still another has been approved to begin phase two of the program. Spangler said that although she knows she has made progress, sometimes it’s hard to gauge how much she has made. “I think because I’m with me every day it’s hard to tell,” she

said. She said, however, that it’s easy for old friends and family to spot the changes in how she behaves around other people. “They say it’s very interesting to see the differences in me when I come home,” she said. Spangler even has started working for the Phone-a-Thon at MSU, which means she calls previous university donors and asks them if they would like to give money to the school. She simply would not have been able to handle the work when she entered the program. “In situations like that I would have been thrown a few years ago,” she said. “I wouldn’t have known what to say. I would have stammered. But now I just take it in stride.” Spangler said she is worried about her academic performance in lieu of the program. She said she doubts her success as a student if she is forced to enroll in another university. “I don’t really know what I’m going to do,” she said. Spangler said the support system set up by the program has

been one of its biggest advantages. “It helps to have a place to go and having people there for me,” she said. “People I can go to.” She said she fears for autistic students who may need the program’s services in the future but won’t be able to get them. “I look at the coming fall semester with just a little dread,” she said. “Honestly, I try not to think about it. I don’t want it to happen. I sincerely hope they find funding this summer. This program has made me who I am.” Only two students still live in the house donated to the ASP by the university. If new funding for the program can’t be found for the fall, those students will still have a place to stay, said Dr. Keith Lamb, MSU associate vice president. Dunn said she foresees the formation of a student organization to support autistic students on campus as an outgrowth of the ASP. She also thinks a scholarship program might be able to fund the peer mentors. She said a handful of students have already

n today: VALIC Representative: For Colored Girls. CSC Apache Wewdnesday and Thursday n tHURSDAY: Finals Frenzy: A Cinco de Mayo Fiesta! In CSC Fifth Annual Mother’s Day Ceramics Fundraiser: Fain Fine Arts Ceramic Studio. 8 a.m. TACT: Retirees’ Luncheon: Pasqual. Noon. Annual Tree Planting. The Quad. 3 p.m.

approached her, expressing interest in helping n FRIDAY: out with Fifth Annual Mother’s Day mentor ing Ceramics Fundraiser: Fain Fine next semesArts Ceramic Studio. 8 a.m. ter. When Opening Reception: Student “nuerotypical” (meanJuried and Senior Exhibition: ing “normal Juanita Harvey Art Gallery at thinking ”) 6 p.m. students Student-Produced One Act work with Plays: Bea Wood Studio Theautistic stuatre. 7:30 a.m. dents, the results are b e n e f i c i a l n Saturday: for both Final Exams Begin parties. “With each person n Sunday: Mozart’s Requiem who is involved with this, the better than not ever having the advocacy and awareness oppor- program to begin with. tunities increase exponentially,” “We are definitely in a better Dunn said. “The fire is spread- place now than we were before ing.” we started,” Dunn said. “Not Dunn said she likes to look only has awareness been raised, on the bright side of the situa- but there are people here who tion – having this program for have a desire to support our stutwo years and losing funding is dents.”

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  

 



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  

 

    

  

 

   

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 

                  

      

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news

The Wichitan

May 4, 2011

White House suppiles details on bin Laden’s death Margaret Talev and Saeed Shah MCT

terrorism adviser John Brennan in an on-camera White House briefing Monday, were made in “great haste,” Carney said, in an effort to tell Americans quickly as much as possible as details came in. Obama did see photos confirming bin Laden’s death, a senior administration official confirmed Tuesday night. A decision on whether to make any photo public is expected in “several days” said the official, who couldn’t be named

13, saw him being killed. She was one of eight or nine children and two women in the compound who were left behind after the raid, said an official with Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence spy agency. He spoke only on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue. “We have no independent confirmation of Osama bin Laden being there or dying there, except what we got from the daughter,” the official said, add-

of Defense to set the record straight, said that: —Bin Laden wasn’t armed when he was shot. —A wife of his was shot in Osama bin Laden wasn’t the leg, not killed as originally armed when U.S. forces hunted reported. him down and killed him, the —Bin Laden didn’t use her as chief White House spokesman a shield before he was shot. She said Tuesday. rushed at a U.S. attacker but she That was but one of several wasn’t armed. details that press secretary Jay —Two helicopters were used Carney corrected in the public in the raid. account of Monday’s breath—The raid lasted 40 minutes. taking raid on a compound in —In addition to bin Laden Pakistan where the long-sought and some of his family members, two other families were at the compound in Abbottabad, about 35 miles from the capital of Islamabad. One family was in a separate structure. Another was on the first floor of the main building. —On the first floor, two al-Qaida couriers were killed, as well as a woman who wasn’t bin Laden’s wife and who apparently was caught in the crossfire. —Bin Laden and his family were on the second and third floors. His wife was A sign and flags appear on California srtreet on Monday, after it was annouched that the matermind of the in the room with 9/11 terrorist attack, Osama bin Laden had been killed on Sunday by U.S. Navy Seals. (Photo courtesy) him. She was shot first, then he was ing that those left behind said shot and killed. leader of the terrorist group al- as a matter of policy. Separately, Pakistani officials that bin Laden had been there —U.S. forces were operating Qaida was hiding. under a “capture or kill” order for The initial accounts of the in Abbottabad, the site of the for some months. Carney, relying on a written bin Laden, not shoot-to-kill, acraid released by administration raid, said Tuesday that bin Ladofficials, including counter- en’s young daughter, age 12 or narrative from the Department cording to Carney and the De-

fense Department narrative. Carney said bin Laden resisted capture, but he declined to specify how. He said “resistance does not require a firearm” and that others in the compound were armed and there was a firefight. Carney said the U.S. assault and killing of bin Laden was appropriate. “He was enemy No. 1 for this country and killed many, many innocent civilians,” he said. “No apologies.” Whether to make photographic evidence of bin Laden’s death public is under review. Carney said officials were weighing whether it would serve or harm U.S. interests to release the photographs, given their “gruesome” nature and the prospect that they “could be inflammatory” in the Muslim world. Carney wouldn’t discuss which officials have reviewed the photos nor confirm that the president had reviewed them. Leon Panetta, the director of the CIA, told NBC anchor Brian Williams that some photographic evidence of bin Laden’s death will be made public. “The government obviously has been talking about how best to do this, but I don’t think there was any question that ultimately a photograph would be presented to the public,” Panetta said in an interview broadcast Tuesday night. As for the “kill or capture” question, Panetta said that “the authorities we have on bin Laden are to kill him. And that was made clear.

But it was also, as part of their rules of engagement, if he suddenly put up his hands and offered to be captured, then they would have the opportunity, obviously, to capture him. But that opportunity never developed.” Although the White House was connected to real-time information during the raid, neither President Barack Obama nor Panetta saw bin Laden’s shooting as it happened, Panetta told PBS in a separate interview taped Tuesday. Instead, Panetta said, there was a 20- to 25-minute period as the raid was under way in which it was impossible to follow the exact developments. Not until Vice Adm. William McRaven, the head of the Pentagon’s Joint Special Operations Command, notified Washington that he had heard the code word “Geronimo” did they know the forces had gotten to bin Laden. According to the narrative made public Tuesday, the U.S. forces flew in a helicopter to the USS Carl Vinson in the North Arabian Sea. Bin Laden’s body was washed and placed in a white sheet, following Islamic custom. The body was then put in a weighted bag. A military official read religious remarks that were translated into Arabic. The body was placed on a board that was then tipped, and the body was “eased into the sea.”

Coming this summer: The enhanced MSU Campus Card It’s your campus ID and a Visa® debit card*

& D I t n e Stud ebit card Visa d

Find out more about the enhanced MSU Campus Card at Campus Card Services Clark Student Center, Information Desk

*Terms and conditions apply. See a banker for details. The enhanced MSU Campus Card is a Visa debit card issued by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

© 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC.

4 n

news

The Wichitan

May 4, 2011

White House supplies details on bin Laden’s death Margaret Talev and Saeed Shah MCT

terrorism adviser John Brennan in an on-camera White House briefing Monday, were made in “great haste,” Carney said, in an effort to tell Americans quickly as much as possible as details came in. Obama did see photos confirming bin Laden’s death, a senior administration official confirmed Tuesday night. A decision on whether to make any photo public is expected in “several days” said the official, who couldn’t be named

13, saw him being killed. She was one of eight or nine children and two women in the compound who were left behind after the raid, said an official with Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence spy agency. He spoke only on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue. “We have no independent confirmation of Osama bin Laden being there or dying there, except what we got from the daughter,” the official said, add-

of Defense to set the record straight, said that: —Bin Laden wasn’t armed when he was shot. —A wife of his was shot in Osama bin Laden wasn’t the leg, not killed as originally armed when U.S. forces hunted reported. him down and killed him, the —Bin Laden didn’t use her as chief White House spokesman a shield before he was shot. She said Tuesday. rushed at a U.S. attacker but she That was but one of several wasn’t armed. details that press secretary Jay —Two helicopters were used Carney corrected in the public in the raid. account of Monday’s breath—The raid lasted 40 minutes. taking raid on a compound in —In addition to bin Laden Pakistan where the long-sought and some of his family members, two other families were at the compound in Abbottabad, about 35 miles from the capital of Islamabad. One family was in a separate structure. Another was on the first floor of the main building. —On the first floor, two al-Qaida couriers were killed, as well as a woman who wasn’t bin Laden’s wife and who apparently was caught in the crossfire. —Bin Laden and his family were on the second and third floors. His wife was A sign and flags appear on California srtreet on Monday, after it was annouched that the matermind of the in the room with 9/11 terrorist attack, Osama bin Laden had been killed on Sunday by U.S. Navy Seals. (Photo courtesy) him. She was shot first, then he was ing that those left behind said shot and killed. leader of the terrorist group al- as a matter of policy. Separately, Pakistani officials that bin Laden had been there —U.S. forces were operating Qaida was hiding. under a “capture or kill” order for The initial accounts of the in Abbottabad, the site of the for some months. Carney, relying on a written bin Laden, not shoot-to-kill, acraid released by administration raid, said Tuesday that bin Ladofficials, including counter- en’s young daughter, age 12 or narrative from the Department cording to Carney and the De-

fense Department narrative. Carney said bin Laden resisted capture, but he declined to specify how. He said “resistance does not require a firearm” and that others in the compound were armed and there was a firefight. Carney said the U.S. assault and killing of bin Laden was appropriate. “He was enemy No. 1 for this country and killed many, many innocent civilians,” he said. “No apologies.” Whether to make photographic evidence of bin Laden’s death public is under review. Carney said officials were weighing whether it would serve or harm U.S. interests to release the photographs, given their “gruesome” nature and the prospect that they “could be inflammatory” in the Muslim world. Carney wouldn’t discuss which officials have reviewed the photos nor confirm that the president had reviewed them. Leon Panetta, the director of the CIA, told NBC anchor Brian Williams that some photographic evidence of bin Laden’s death will be made public. “The government obviously has been talking about how best to do this, but I don’t think there was any question that ultimately a photograph would be presented to the public,” Panetta said in an interview broadcast Tuesday night. As for the “kill or capture” question, Panetta said that “the authorities we have on bin Laden are to kill him. And that was made clear.

But it was also, as part of their rules of engagement, if he suddenly put up his hands and offered to be captured, then they would have the opportunity, obviously, to capture him. But that opportunity never developed.” Although the White House was connected to real-time information during the raid, neither President Barack Obama nor Panetta saw bin Laden’s shooting as it happened, Panetta told PBS in a separate interview taped Tuesday. Instead, Panetta said, there was a 20- to 25-minute period as the raid was under way in which it was impossible to follow the exact developments. Not until Vice Adm. William McRaven, the head of the Pentagon’s Joint Special Operations Command, notified Washington that he had heard the code word “Geronimo” did they know the forces had gotten to bin Laden. According to the narrative made public Tuesday, the U.S. forces flew in a helicopter to the USS Carl Vinson in the North Arabian Sea. Bin Laden’s body was washed and placed in a white sheet, following Islamic custom. The body was then put in a weighted bag. A military official read religious remarks that were translated into Arabic. The body was placed on a board that was then tipped, and the body was “eased into the sea.”

Coming this summer: The enhanced MSU Campus Card It’s your campus ID and a Visa® debit card*

& D I t n e Stud ebit card Visa d

Find out more about the enhanced MSU Campus Card at Campus Card Services Clark Student Center, Information Desk

*Terms and conditions apply. See a banker for details. The enhanced MSU Campus Card is a Visa debit card issued by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

© 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC.

May 4, 2011

news/feature

The Wichitan n 5

Student escapes tyranny in Tunisia Josh Hayter

So the policeman told him to give his ID and follow him to for the wichitan the police station.” Not one person from the large Mohamed Belhedi isn’t afraid to take a stand – not even when crowd that had gathered spoke it might result in him being up for the man. Belhedi said he was shocked. He could not acbeaten, tortured or worse. These were the punishments cept that a man who stood up in store for citizens who dared for beggars was being punished. contest or criticize Tunisia’s for- He stepped in front of the crowd mer president, Zine el-Abidine and raised his voice so everyone Ben Ali, or any official in his re- would hear. “It’s either you take all of us, or gime. Belhedi is a 26-year-old MSU you don’t take anybody because graduate student from Tunis, the we’re all against this!” Mohamed capital city of Tunisia. For the shouted. The officer stopped in his past five months, he’s watched his country protest against its tracks. Slowly, he turned to face repressive government, topple the silent crowd. Belhedi, showits autocratic ruler and spark up- ing no fear, stood waiting for risings across North Africa and the inevitable. The officer took a the Middle East. Belhedi knows pompous step forward, grabbed firsthand what it’s like to live un- him by the belt and dragged him to the police station. der a dictator. “Usually, in a democracy, it’s “There’s so much risk to talk and speak out that you develop police who protect you. But once your own policeman inside,” police are corrupted, you have he said. “You start controlling nobody to protect you,” Belhedi yourself. You become autocratic said. “Once you’re on bad terms toward yourself and try to avoid with the police, that’s it. They’re talking about anything prohib- going to beat you up. They’re goited. It’s really awful. It’s some- ing to torture you. Your life is thing that never leaves your over.” But Belhedi suffered no physimind.” But a person can only take so cal abuse that day. When policemuch self-censorship, he said. men were distracted, he slipped Belhedi risked his life four years away from the police station unago when he spoke out against noticed, without so much as a police officers harassing Tunisian scratch. What he did leave with, however, was an overwhelmcitizens outside a mosque. “It was the Friday prayer,” ing desire to escape from the Belhedi said. “I was leaving the tyranny he was born into – the mosque and I found police- corrupt government prohibiting men hitting poor people who him from speaking his mind. His desire became a reality were begging. They were beating them. One guy stepped up and when he arrived in the Unitsaid, ‘Why are you doing that?’ ed States in May 2009. After

(Photo courtesy)

spending two years in the states, democracy became more than a concept. It became his way of life. “I used to talk a lot about freedom with my friends (in Tunisia),” Belhedi said. “They considered me a special or crazy person to talk about that concept.” He said they would ask him, “‘What would you do with freedom of speech? If I gave you five minutes of freedom of speech right now, what would you say?’” “‘It’s not about the five minutes,’” Belhedi told them. “‘Freedom of speech is made for people to put pressure on the government when they see something is going wrong. If you give me, by myself, five minutes, I can’t do anything. But if you give the whole country, everybody, give them their freedom of speech, they will go in the streets and say it’s wrong and they will get it fixed. That’s what freedom is.’” The voice of his people was heard loud and clear when young people around the country took to the streets, demanding political change in January 2011. Mohamed Bouazizi, a 26-year-old Tunisian fruit vendor, set himself on fire after being slapped by a policewoman. His friends and family began protesting in the streets and before long, millions of protestors shouted in opposition to the tyrannical, 23-yearlong government of President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. Belhedi was road tripping on the U.S. East Coast when the protesting began. But when word of the Tunisian protests first broke, the road trip was over – he was glued to his laptop, watching Internet newscasts. Facebook and other social networking sites allowed people all over the world to share the latest updates on the revolution. “I would say that a large part of the revolution happened virtually,” he said. “I was 100 percent a part of that.” Belhedi said it wasn’t until he started calling friends and family and seeing them in videos protesting that the uprising truly became a reality to him. Burning tires blocked roads. Masked protestors hurled stones at police officers. Tear gas flowed through streets. While police beat protestors with sticks, sporadic gunfire could be heard all

throughout the capital city. “I started realizing that it’s chaos,” he said. “There was no more police, only army in the streets. Helicopters and hummers (were) everywhere. It was very exciting.” One night, Belhedi sat alone in the Dillard building, watching the news. Though he had been involved with the protests virtually and emotionally, he sat, frustrated about being so far away from everything. He said he worried about his older sister who had joined Tunisians on the street during the largest riot in front of the Minister of Interior. She had been hit with tear gas, making it difficult for her to

to hear: “Ben Ali is out!” The dictator wasn’t coming back. Belhedi’s people were free at last. “I was the only one at the Dillard building at 1 a.m.,” he said. “I was following the news and (when) they said Ben Ali is out, I was screaming out loud and dancing and jumping by myself. It was just crazy. I can’t describe it. It’s just the best feeling ever.” Ben Ali’s fall marked the first time that street demonstrations had toppled an Arab autocrat. After hearing the news, Belhedi called his father. “I thank God that I lived until this day. Now I can die peacefully and happily,” his father said.

He wants to use the master’s of business administration degree he’s working to better his country. He said he’d like to find a way to use the revolution to improve people’s lives. Unemployment is rampant. He’d like to help create jobs. His decision to return home or stay in the United States depends on Tunisia’s stability when he graduates in December 2011 – after tasting freedom and democracy, he’s not sure he can live in his home country again. “What is sure is that I have a lot of good intentions and energy that I want to spend for the good of my country,” he said. “But if I will physically be there, I don’t

Mohamed Belhedi. (Photo by Josh Hayter)

breathe. He watched videos of friends on the frontline, hurling rocks at police and dodging bullets. It was real life – and he was missing it all. He sat at MSU, thinking of all he would be doing if he were there. “I would be up front,” he thought. “I would have been one of the leaders writing tags on the streets and walls, being part of it 100 percent.” “That’s how I know myself,” he said. “But since I’m not there I can’t claim anything.” That night on the news, though, he heard what he longed

“It’s just a huge impact,” Belhedi said. “You can’t feel it until you live it.” An interim, “unity” government is currently being nursed to life in Tunisia, although small facets of the old regime persist. The concept of democracy has been absent from Tunisia for decades. Although it took less than a month to topple the dictatorship, Belhedi said, it will take some time for people to respect each other and relearn the system. Right now, civility is missing in the culture. People are impatient. But Belhedi hopes things will improve.

know.” He knows that change is a long process. It isn’t going to happen in a few days or months. But he hopes not to see the same old regime reborn. “They feel that since they got Ben Ali and his family out, it’s over,” he said. “But it’s just the beginning.” “People should go back and try to fight against oppression,” Belhedi said. “Fight against the remainings of the old regime and against the torture because it’s not over. It’s not done. The revolution is still going on.”

OSAMA..........................................................................................................................................................................................................continued from page 1 Marine Corps. Before he enlisted, Reveles had reservations about the US invasion of Iraq. He said Afghanistan made more sense to him. After spending years in the military, he sees things differently. Soldiers all know what they signed up for whether they like the war or not, Reveles said. They had a choice. “If my boss tells me I’m going (to war) then it’s time to start packing,” Reveles said. “They instill a level of confidence in you that helps you look past politics of a situation to where it’s just another day in the office. You do your best, finish your work, and

if you do what you’re supposed to then you move on the next day.” Junior Erica Dinsmoore, whose father recently retired from the Air Force, found out about Bin Laden’s death on Facebook. “I was so happy that the victims of 9/11 finally have the sense of justice that they have long deserved,” Dinsmoore said. “So far it seems his death has left a positive impact, raising our patriotism again.” Ian Latham, MSU ROTC member, was relieved that the U.S. finally succeeded at tracking down bin Laden, but he believes the news will fade from

the headlines. Latham has plans to join the military, just as his father did, after graduation to support and fight for his country when needed. “If the country celebrates too long, then it may backfire and provoke another attack,” Latham said. “No one knows.” Despite political stances, bin Laden’s death has reignited many students interest in American news. “If you threaten American lives there is nowhere for you to hide,” Reveles said. “It gave everyone a sense of accomplishment. But we can’t allow ourselves to think this made us completely safe. The cost of success is a factor most people would probably rather not think about, but it’s a fact, and there are still people out there that are going to try and hurt us the way bin Laden did.” (Photo courtesy)

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a&e

The Wichitan

May 4, 2011

Artistic Affair

B.F.A. Senior Exhibition showcases graduating art seniors final work, displaying artist expression Anatasia Reed For the Wichitan

Four graduating art students will feature their senior exhibition artwork at the Juanita and Ralph Harvey School of Visual

Arts on Friday 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Loren Jones, BriAnna Satterfield, and Sarah Stillson will be exhibiting a variety of art pro-

duced while attending Midwestern State University. Each senior will demonstrate the skills they have acquired

Loren Jones

while attending MSU through their artwork. The exhibition will run from May 6, 2011 to July 29, 2011 and is free to stu-

dents and the public. The gallery is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Sarah Stillson Sarah is a long admire of cartoons,

“These sculptures echo a time when we were more in touch with nature than electronics. I use steel because of its durability and high resistance to corrosion. It’s comforting for me to know that my work will continue its life beyond mine.” -Loren Jones

fascinated with their simplicity of line and limited range of colors. For her part of the show she has created a series of cartoons from her own imagination that is devoid of words.

BriAnna Satterfiled

“To transport these journeys from the land of impossibility and into the world of waking they are manifested using oil and aryclic paintings.My work is a journey into the subconscious mind where the dreamer is no longer bound by the rationality of the pshyical world.” - BriAnna Satterfield

Sharol Batey-Rickman Sharol’s work is sculpture composed of metal, wood and found objects expressing her love for life, nature and time. Curves, textures and larger than life pieces divulge a light-hearted and in-depth appreciation for simplicity.

B.F.A Senior Exhibition Who: Sarah Stillson, Loren Jones, Where:Juanita and Ralph BriAnna Satterfield, and Sharol Harvey School of Visual Arts Rickman

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sports

The Wichitan

May 4, 2011

Chase Nuding and Tracy Chaddock jumping from wall to wall at Sunwatcher Plaza. They’re practicing the unique sport of parkour, an activity they both enjoy. (Photos by Hannah Hofmann)

PARKOUR.....................................................................................................................................................................................................continued from page 1 Parkour, or “free-running” as it is sometimes called, is a physical and mental discipline invented in France. Parkour is based on the mental ideas of self-preservation and the ability to help others as well as improving your physical fitness. Sebastien Foucan was the founder of the interesting sport and now is a motivational speaker residing in the U.K., “Freerunning is the art of expressing yourself in an environment with no limitation,” said Foucan. Chaddock has similar ideals about the free-running hobby. “The idea of parkour is ‘I’m here

and I want to get to that spot, I want to know the fastest and most efficient way to do it using the least amount of energy and time.’” He starts running and leaps over the bench like a gazelle. He soars through the air and prepares his body to make contact with the hard ground below. He lands with a roll while quickly returning to his feet ready for the next obstacle to scale. When Chaddock got to MSU from Henrietta fate led him to meet a few others with his unique hobby. He randomly met MSU radiology student Chase Nuding

in the Pierce Residence Hall. “We had both heard about each other and wanted to meet each other anyways. We’ve been bros ever since,” said Chaddock. Nuding grew up on 18,000 acres of ranch land. As a boy, he climbed trees, hopped fences and got around in an unconventional way. His parents didn’t question or disapprove of this behavior at all. “When you have a cow chasing after you in a ranch you had better know how to get over that fence,” Nuding said with a chuckle. Today, Nuding still works on

Eddie Sefko MCT

After the free throws had pushed them ahead, Kobe Bryant, who had a strong offensive night, missed a 3-point try that would have won it. Terry tapped out the rebound as the horn sounded. It was a remarkable comeback for the Mavericks, who trailed by 16 in the third quarter. In the end, the Mavericks were down only a point late in the game, but Bryant and Lamar Odom scored to make it a 90-85 LA lead. Nowitzki sank a jumper and the teams traded baskets, leaving the Mavericks down 92-89 with 2:12 to go when the Lakers called timeout. The Lakers misfired twice, then the Mavericks got a Shawn Marion bank shot. Bryant responded with a short jumper, but Nowitzki maneuvered through the paint for a short jumper that was all net. When Bryant penetrated, his pass out was intercepted by Terry, who quickly was fouled by Derek Fisher. The Lakers were not in the penalty yet, so the Mavericks inbounded with 20.3 seconds left

and a golden chance to win. On the inbounds play, Nowitzki was fouled by Pau Gasol. His first free throw rolled around the rim tantalizingly before falling through. He swished the second and the Mavericks had a 95-94 lead, their first since the second quarter. With Jason Kidd dogging Bryant, the Lakers turned the ball over on the pick and roll and Kidd was fouled, but he hit just one of two free throws to make it 96-94. When Bryant missed, the Mavericks had stolen homecourt advantage. Nowitzki led the Mavericks with 28 points and 14 rebounds. Terry had 15 points, Tyson Chandler had 11 and Marion 10. Bryant led all scorers with 36 points, going 14-of-29 from the field. Earlier, it looked like there was little or no chance of that happening. The Mavericks survived early mistakes and escaped the first quarter with a 25-23 lead. They had only one turnover in the quarter, and that came in the final second. The Mavericks were on their way to a rock-solid first half until things went haywire in the final 2:30. They were up 42-39, but were

his moves constantly, trying to keep his body in top physical condition. He said he wants to get the word out about parkour. Climbing on MSU benches and walls has never gotten Chaddock in trouble, but Nuding wasn’t as fortunate. “One time my buddy Chase got caught and was told not to do it anymore, but we justify it with not doing the exact thing he got told not to do anymore,” Chaddock said. Chaddock and Nuding even tried to make a group for Parkour on campus. “It didn’t really fail so much,

the problem was we had a lot of people interested. But when it came to practice and training sessions we had very few people dedicated to wanting to do stuff,” said Chaddock. The club would be for experienced free-runners and beginners wanting to get involved. Nuding stresses one thing about parkour the most: confidence. “ If you are not confident in a trick then don’t even attempt it yet. Try it on gymnastics pad, make sure you have a spotter watching out for you and just be careful,” Nuding strongly advised. Nuding and Chaddock prac-

tice their skills at Gymnastics Sport Center. Nuding has suffered injuries practicing parkour, “Luckily for me I haven’t sustained anything too bad [knocks on wood).” The worst thing he has seen was someone breaking his wrist by landing on it, other than that nothing too serious. Parkour is a graceful and exciting feat to behold. Doing back flips off of walls and going over obstacles with such ease and precision. It truly is pushing the limits of what the body can do and Nuding and Chaddock push those limits every day.

Mavericks take over Lakers 96-94 in first playoff game In most NBA playoff series, Game 1 is important. In this series, it was beyond crucial. The success of the Los Angeles Lakers in the playoffs when they start with a 1-0 lead is becoming legendary. Those are some odds that the Mavericks no longer have to worry about. Overcoming a mid-game drought that threatened to bury them, the Mavericks got a big defensive play by Jason Terry and two clutch free throws by Dirk Nowitzki to take a 96-94 victory Monday night in the opener of their best-of-7 Western Conference semifinals. The Lakers are 49-2 in the playoffs when winning Game 1. But Phil Jackson’s record is even better. Going back to his Chicago days, his teams are 48-0 when they go up 1-0 in a playoff series. The Mavericks didn’t want to have to buck that trend. So they made sure they won’t have to.

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outscored 14-2 the rest of the way. That stretch started with a 10-0 LA run. Then after Nowitzki scored to make it 49-44 with three seconds left in the half, Jason Terry committed a hideous foul on a 60-foot heave by Lamar Odom, giving Odom three free throws. Combined with a technical foul on Nowitzki, the four-point play made it a nine-point lead for LA. That final play, with 0.7 showing on the clock, ruined an otherwise stellar first half for Terry, who had 13 points before halftime. By chunking the ball away three times to start the third quarter, the Mavericks fell behind 60-44 and were a couple of more fumbled passes away from being dead. Then, Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle slid seldom-used Corey Brewer into the game, and the Mavericks instantly perked up. They outscored the Lakers 20-6 to get within 66-64. Brewer had five points in that stretch. Early in the fourth quarter, the Mavericks were hanging tough with the Lakers clinging to an 86-85 lead. But Bryant was just returning to the game after his early fourth-quarter rest.

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sports

May 4, 2011

Sports On Deck

The Wichitan n 9

Lady Mustangs remain at no. 3 seed

n Wednesday: may 4 golf: men’s ncaa division ii super regional tournament @ georgetown, ky. all day

n thursday: may 5 softball: vs. texas women’s durant, okla. noon

@

softball: vs. tba @ durant, okla. 2:30 p.m.

n tuesday: may 17 golf: men’s ncaa ii championships all day

n wednesday: may 18 golf: men’s ncaa ii championships all day

Senior outfielder Alyson Reynolds at bat setting the hit. Left: Sophomore infielder Carey Campbell prepares to throw out an opponent. (Photos by Hannah Hofmann)

Andre Gonzalez Sports Editor The no. 3 ranked Midwestern State Mustangs came to a shared conclusion on Saturday afternoon after challenging Cameron University in two games at Mustangs Park. The day consisted of two games played, MSU losing the first to the Aggies in a 5-0 contest. Leslie Martini, a sophomore centerfield for

Cameron served as the game’s elite player when she drilled in her 13th home run of the season and drove in four runs, leading the Aggies to victory. Senior pitcher Brittney Tanner fell to 26-6 after yielding a season high of four earned runs in the loss. In the third inning, Cameron loaded all bases on a hit and a pair of singles before Tanner drove Martini to force in a run to push the Aggies up, 2-0.

In the fifth inning, Martini hurt MSU once again on a two run double to the right gap to push the lead 4-0. The Mustangs gathered to lead all bases with two outs in the fifth and sixth innings. Mustang players, Elena Bennett, Courtney Bingham and Alyson Reynolds made for MSU’s three hits. In the second game, MSU tasted sweet revenge when they defeated the Aggies, 8-0.

Junior third base Mallory Mooney clinched her 10th home run of the season and drove in four runs. Senior pitcher Kristina Gutierrez limited Cameron to only one hit, a one out single by Jessica Orr in the fourth inning. The limit notched her 11th shutout, allowing her to improve 18-2 on the season. Gutierrez also marked five strikeouts and a single walk. In the first inning, the

Mustangs jumped in with the lead after Bennett reached on a single and stole second base helped Mooney set off to center field for a 2-0 lead. Senior utility Amanda Potysman claimed a RBI double to left field. On a bunt single, sophomore outfielder Megan Chartier plated a single run. Senior infielder McKenzie Sickler striked a two-bagger to the left field gap. Bennett worked re-

liever Anna Hudson to a walk right before Mooney notched a two run single, pushing the game to 8-0. Sunday’s games were cancelled due to weather conditions and will not be rescheduled. With the victory, MSU claimed a part of the North Division title and earned the division’s top seed in the LSC Championship tournament, which is set to take place May 5-7 in Durant, Okla.

Athlete Spotlight Jeremy LeGuen Golf • Fired his best round of the season at the NCAA tournament. • Education major from Highland Village, Texas.

Kendra Whittley Golf • Finished 20th at NCAA II Super Region 4 Championships. • Marketing major from Wall, Texas.

‘Qdoba’ and ‘Qdoba Mexican Grill’ are registered trademarksof the Qdoba Restaurant Corporation ©2010.


May 4, 2011