Issuu on Google+

Beyond pizza WEEKEND | 20

JULY 4, 2014 VOLUME 22, NO. 23

www.MountainViewOnline.com

650.964.6300

MOVIES | 23

Deal reached to save Milk Pail COUNCIL DELAYS SAN ANTONIO PROJECT, WANTS TO ADD HOUSING By Daniel DeBolt

requirements for the Milk Pail market to stay in business past ilk Pail Market owner 2016, when its current parking Steve Rasmussen and agreement expires. developer Merlone “For the past several days my Geier announced Tuesday night team has been working furiously that they had reached a last- on an agreement to allow the minute deal to save the Milk Pail, Milk Pail to remain in business before City Council members where we have always been,” Rasultimately decided mussen said, addto delay the second ing that it would phase of Merlone apply only “if and ‘Communities Geier’s Village at when phase two is San Antonio Cen- are being broken approved.” ter development in Merlone Geiup by this order to replace er’s second phase half the office development at jobs-housing of space in the project the San Antonio with housing. shopping center is imbalance.’ Addressing a slated to replace major communi- EDIE KEATING OF PENINSULA Ross and BevMo at ty concern while San Antonio Road INTERFAITH ACTION bolstering support and California for a controversial Street. It includes project, Mike Grehl of Merlone a 167-room hotel, a large public Geier said it was his pleasure to square, 109,000 square feet of invite Rasmussen to the podium retail space, a 50,000-squareto announce the agreement in foot movie theater and a six-level front of those who packed the parking garage with just over City Council chambers Tuesday, 1,300 parking spaces, and an July 1. The agreement grants office garage with 1,174 spaces. Milk Pail customers access to 11 “The length of the term is parking spaces in a nearby parking garage, enough to meet city See MERLONE GEIER, page 6

M BRANDON CHEW

Zack Gospe, a singer-songwriter who graduated from Los Altos High School, is about to release a professionally recorded EP.

From the basement to Hollywood LOCAL TEEN USES CROWD FUNDING TO CUT A PROFESSIONALLY RECORDED EP By Cooper Aspegren

S

inging into a microphone in a vocal booth at Through the Air Studios in Hollywood definitely represented a change of pace for Los Altos singer-songwriter Zach Gospe. Then 17 years old and

more accustomed to recording his songs in front of a camera in his bedroom, Gospe found that keeping himself stationary and his pitch as precise as possible was demanding. “You can’t move your head away from the microphone and you can’t breathe into it in cer-

tain ways,” Gospe said. “There are a lot of very specific things because you want to have a very good vocal take that is close to the melody.” It was a challenge that Gospe, who turned 18 in June, learned See MUSICIAN, page 12

City to create paid parking downtown RESIDENT PERMITS, PAID LOTS TO HANDLE DEMAND ON LEVI’S STADIUM EVENT DAYS By Daniel DeBolt

I

n anticipation of events at the new Levi’s Stadium starting in August, on Tuesday City Council members approved a plan to charge drivers to park beyond normal time limits in downtown park-

INSIDE

ing lots, and to ticket drivers who park on nearby residential streets without a permit. It is estimated that 500 to 600 drivers will park in Mountain View and take light rail to the 49ers’ new stadium in Santa Clara, since the VTA promises to run a large number of express

light rail trains to events and stadium parking will be limited and expensive. There are now 17 events scheduled through April 2015 on weekends and weeknights. Expected parking demands have also forced the city’s huge farmers market to move to a new

VIEWPOINT 18 | GOINGS ON 24 | MARKETPLACE 25 | REAL ESTATE 27

parking lot behind City Hall on game days. Council members voted 6-1 in favor of the one-year pilot program, which institutes a three-hour time limit during event days for parking in the neighborhoods surrounding the train station, including the Jackson Street and Willowgate Street neighborhoods north of the expressway, and downtown Mountain View out to Shoreline Boulevard, Calderon Avenue and

El Camino Real. Households in those areas will each be given two free permits allowing them to park as long as they like on residential streets in the area, and more may be available with proof of residency and a good reason, city staff said. Stadium-goers and anyone else wishing to park downtown beyond the common two-hour parking lot time limits would See LEVI’S, page 6

JUDY

SHERI

CINDY

650. 207.2111 judytanigami@gmail.com CalBRE# 00298975

CalBRE# 01060012

CalBRE# 01918407

BOGARD-TANIGAMI

BOGARD-HUGHES 650. 279.4003 shughes@apr.com

BOGARD-O’GORMAN 650.924.8365 cbogardogorman@apr.com

ConsultantsInRealEstate.com

NG I M ON O C SO

565 Cherrywood Drive Sunnyvale Fabulous Home Near Las Palmas Park This fabulous SummerHill home is only 19 years old and beautifully located in a wonderful neighborhood just one block from Las Palmas Park. It boasts an award-winning, two-level floor plan with an eat-in kitchen, and island, that opens to the family room with an enchanting wood burning fireplace. Vaulted ceilings and expansive windows throughout brighten this lovely home. Built with many extras, this 1,786 sf home includes central vacuum, security system, ceiling fans, cable connections in family room and all bedrooms, and is pre-wired for speakers in living and family rooms. The ground floor also features one bedroom, full bath, a finished garage, living room, and dining room. A spacious master suite with vaulted windows, bedside lights, and walk-in closet highlights the second level. Also noteworthy is a built-in desk and extensive cabinetry in one of the upstairs bedrooms with mirrored closet doors and sufficient space for a day bed. The private backyard, with lush lawn, is beautifully landscaped and includes a large patio and built-in barbeque area framed by beautiful Magnolias, Japanese Maple, and citrus fruit trees. This home has a highly desirable location — just one block from Las Palmas Park, Dog Park, and Sunnyvale Tennis Center as well as being less than one mile from Cumberland Elementary School and Fremont High School. Close proximity to the library, Community Center, Apple, Linked In, and commercial establishments and restaurants. It is also only about one mile from downtown Sunnyvale and Caltrain. al

Call Cindy Bogard-O’Gorman for information 650-924-8365 2

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

Offered at $1,388,000

7PJDFT A R O U N D

Get Your Brighter, WhiterSmile

T O W N

*%#$ ) &*$ ( 

Asked in downtown Mountain View. Photos and interviews by Brandon Chew

Zoom Whitening Special!

What is your best Fourth of July memory?

$

395

    

Includes: 2 Hour Whitening Session, Custom Made Bleach Trays, One Tube of Bleach

“Sitting on the grass as a kid looking at the fireworks displayed overhead. This would have been back in State College, Pennsylvania, where I grew up.�

Offer valid for current & new patients. Call for details. Some restrictions may apply.

$

Laurel McClure, Mountain View

99

New Patient Special!

Includes: Exam, Digital X-Rays & Cleaning



$+ 

Offer valid for new patients only. Second opinions welcome. Call for details. Some restrictions may apply.

“When I was younger, my family and I would go to Shoreline and sit on the grass and watch the fireworks go off.� Lucas Popp, Palo Alto

“When I was a kid we used to have street parties and we used to do a lot of fireworks and sparklers. The whole neighborhood got together and celebrated.� Kayla Swanson, Omaha

“I went over to Shoreline ... went up on the hill and kicked back and watched the Fourth of July fireworks and listened to the concert for free.� David Gatto, Mountain View

(#$$#%$$1 (#!!&. "&1 (*"$  100 W. El Camino Real, Suite 63A Mountain View ( Corner of El Camino & Calderon )

---%#$ ) &*$'%0  

Larry’s knows Volkswagens. (& Audi & BMW too!)

You know you are dealing with experts when ‌ U Technicians are Nationally CertiďŹ ed Masters U Technicians receive over 4o hours of specialized training every year U They are certiďŹ ed environmentally friendly U All repairs are guaranteed in writing for 3 years/ 36,000 miles — no other shop does this! U Each technician is a specialist on the vehicle they service.

“Excellent service at a reasonable price. They go over all the needs of your car and help you reach your goal within the limits of your budget. Louie is a great service writer and shop manager.�

2013

“Larry’s is one of the best places around to take your car for service. The staff is so helpful and informative, it’s a pleasure to be a customer.� – Anne H. from Los Altos Fabian

– Phil R. from Mountain View

“A special moment for Fourth of July is the fireworks and then the next day is my little sister’s birthday.� Mi

Hours: Mon – Fri 7:30 am - 12:30 pm, 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm

2526 Leghorn Street, Mountain View

650-968-5202 | Autoworks.com

dd

lefi

S an

Anton io

Charleston

e ld

Leghorn St Old Middlefield

Rengstorff

Leslie Serrano, Mountain View

&,( /

Approved Auto Repair

Have to editor@mv-voice.com editor@mv-voice.com Have aa question question for forVoices VoicesAround AroundTown? Town? E-mail Email itit to July 4, 2014 â–  Mountain View Voice â–  MountainViewOnline.com â– 

3

-PDBM/FXT NCRIMEBRIEFS

ASSAULT ON CALTRAIN CONDUCTORS

July 2014

Community Health Education Programs For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/education.

Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real Mountain View (650) 937-7380

Birds and the Bees: Talking to Children About Sex 2014 Dr. Marvin Small Memorial Parent Workshop Series July 8, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Torrey Mandell Freeman, M.S. Certified Parenting Educator This workshop discusses effective ways to provide your kids with age-appropriate answers to those uncomfortable questions about our bodies and sex. We will cover when to have the talk, how to prepare for it, and why this kind of open communication is beneficial.

An unruly passenger was arrested in Mountain View after she physically assaulted two Caltrain conductors Saturday night, a Caltrain spokeswoman said Sunday. At about 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 28, San Mateo County sheriff’s deputies responded to a report that a rowdy passenger had physically assaulted two train conductors on a southbound train, Caltrain spokeswoman Christine Dunn said. Deputies arrived at the station and learned that a female passenger had been acting drunkenly and yelling profanities while aboard the train. When train conductors asked the passenger to quiet down, she refused, according to Dunn. The conductors then asked the passenger to get off the train at the San Antonio Station. When the passenger exited the train and reached the platform, she swung her bag at a female conductor, striking her in the head several times, Dunn said. A male conductor then approached the passenger and he was also assaulted in the same way, according to Dunn. The suspect, identified as 22-year-old Mountain View resident Maria Posada-Valderrama, was transported to a hospital for an evaluation before being booked into Santa Clara County Jail for the felonies, assault with a deadly weapon and assault on transit personnel, the Caltrain spokeswoman said. Dunn said the train was stopped for almost 30 minutes before service resumed toward San Jose. The female conductor was later transported to a hospital for a head injury she sustained as a result of the assault. She has since been released, according to Dunn. Bay City News Service

NPOLICELOG BATTERY

Aug., Sept., and Oct.

Upcoming Lectures and Events

Mountain View Center

The Aging Eye Aug. 12, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Yichieh Shiuey, M.D., PAMF Ophthalmology

Palo Alto Center

Don’t Turn Green, Live Green! Aug. 12, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Barbara Erny, M.D., PAMF Health Education

Palo Alto Center

Medicare Updates and Changes Aug. 27, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP) community educator

Mountain View Center

Sleep and Your Child Sept. 9, 6:30 – 8 p.m. Nancy Zises (Barnett), M.D., PAMF Pediatrics

San Carlos Library

500 block View St., 6/25 200 block Castro St., 6/28 400 block Chiquita Av., 6/29 1500 block Lilac Lane, 6/29

700 block Mariposa Av., 6/26 700 block Continental Cir., 6/27 700 block Continental Cir., 6/27 700 block Continental Cir., 6/28

SHOPLIFTING

COMMERCIAL BURGLARY

1000 block El Monte Av., 6/25

200 block N. Bernardo Av., 6/27 500 block Clyde Av., 6/28

SPEED CONTEST OR EXHIBITION

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE CAUSING INJURY

California St. & San Antonio Rd., 6/27

STOLEN VEHICLES

GRAND THEFT

400 block Castro St., 6/25 1400 block Latham St., 6/29 300 block Escuela Av., 6/30

2400 block W. El Camino Real, 6/25

VANDALISM

RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY

1100 block Castro St., 6/25

N. Shoreline Blvd. & Stierlin Rd., 6/25

200 block Higdon Av., 6/26

The Mountain View Voice (USPS 2560) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Periodicals Postage Paid at Palo Alto CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free upon request to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.

Don’t Turn Green, Live Green! Sept. 22, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Barbara Erny, M.D., PAMF Health Education

Sunnyvale Public Library

Supplements, Vitamins and More Sept. 23, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Ravin Agah, M.D., PAMF Internal Medicine

Support Mountain View Voice’s coverage of our community. pamf.org/education 4

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

SupportLocalJournalism.org/MountainView

-PDBM/FXT MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Fighting summer hunger THREE SITES IN MV PROVIDE MEALS TO LOCAL YOUTH WHILE SCHOOL’S OUT By Kevin Forestieri

S MICHELLE LE

WhatsApp is slated to move into this new building at Villa and Bryant streets. The developer provoked upset when he proposed changing a ground-floor cafe space into an employee break room.

City delays decision on WhatsApp building DEVELOPER SEEKS TO USE GROUND-FLOOR SPACE, SLATED FOR RETAIL OR RESTAURANT USE, AS EMPLOYEE BREAK ROOM By Daniel DeBolt

O

n June 25, Zoning Administrator Gerry Beaudin delayed approval of an office developer’s controversial request to allow Facebook-owned WhatsApp to put an employee break room in a space originally slated for a cafe, shop or restaurant. After public outcry over the request, architect Bud Kobza requested the delay, as his group was “taken by surprise that the item was removed

from the consent calendar” and made a public discussion item at the meeting. “We need a little more time to prepare ourselves,” he said. City staff have yet to announce the date of the next meeting on the request. Several residents attended the 4 p.m. meeting on June 25 to oppose the request that the 932-square-foot ground-floor space on the corner of Villa and Bryant streets be used as break room, which would mean removing what they said was

a major selling point for the controversial project: a pedestrian-friendly cafe space on the ground floor. Developer Roger Burnell said that in over a year and a half of seeking a tenant for the space, “we didn’t receive a single offer from a coffee shop or coffee shop chain, and we went to all of them. It was considered, one, too large for that kind of location not along a thoroughfare. Two, the parking wasn’t See WHATSAPP, page 10

ummer may give kids a few months of reprieve from homework, math problems and essays, but for many students it means losing two daily meals. With a continued school food program through July and nonprofits hosting summer food programs, however, the local community is taking steps to keep kids from going hungry. Last year, nearly 2,000 students in the Mountain View Whisman School District qualified for free or reduced lunch — 41 percent of the student population. Tom Myers, executive director of Community Services Agency, said this causes a real problem during the summer months. “It’s a huge problem,” Myers said. “We have kids who depend on those free and reduced lunches, and it’s an increasing hardship for families.” The school district is offering free breakfast and lunch through July 25 at Castro Elementary School. The program will help kids who rely on school meals throughout the school year, but is open to anyone under 18 years old. The district’s summer lunch program serves 400 meals each day — up from last year, according to Terese McNamee, chief business officer for the school district. The uptick is still down from

meals served in 2008, however, when the district hosted summer food programs at two sites — Graham Middle School and Castro. At the time, the district provided 600 meals a day. The district downsized the summer school program in 2009 to cut costs, leaving only one summer food site. And that one site is open for only an hour for each meal, starting at 7:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. But there are other options. Cindy McCown, vice president of programs and services at Second Harvest Food Bank, said there are two other summer meal sites for youth in Mountain View that are open through Aug. 15: the YMCA camp at Monta Loma Elementary and the Moffett Clubhouse, which also have food available to kids 18 or younger. McCown said these are “open sites,” meaning that anyone can get food there regardless of whether they’re enrolled in on-site programming. Despite the limited locations and hours, McCown said the city’s food services have “pretty good coverage” thanks to yearround pantry programs like CSA’s Food and Nutrition Center. Community Services Agency is a regional nonprofit that provides social services for people See SUMMER HUNGER, page 14

City finds new police chief in-house CAPT. MAX BOSEL TO TAKE OVER MOUNTAIN VIEW POLICE DEPARTMENT IN AUGUST By Kevin Forestieri

A

fter weeks of searching, City Manager Dan Rich announced Friday that Max Bosel will take the place of Scott Vermeer as Mountain View’s police chief. Bosel, who now is a captain, has worked at the department for almost 20 years. He joined the force in 1995 after six years with the Millbrae Police Department. He rose to the rank of captain in 2007, and has since served as an interim deputy police chief and

interim assistant city manager. A resident of Mountain View, Bosel received a bachelor’s degree in Max Bosel m a n a ge me nt from Saint Mary’s College, and a master’s degree in public administration from Notre Dame de Namur University. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy. Bosel will assume his new posi-

tion on Monday, August 4, with a salary of $242,000 — roughly the same as Vermeer’s current salary. Among other things, Bosel has worked as a patrol officer, a training sergeant and a detective, and has spent 10 years on the SWAT team. He said of those positions, detective work was the most challenging — and the most interesting. Fol low i ng Ve r me e r’s announcement that he would See POLICE CHIEF, page 14

VOICE FILE PHOTO

Children laugh together as they eat a meal at one of Mountain View’s programs to address summer hunger. July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

5

-PDBM/FXT LEVI’S

MERLONE GEIER

need to pay an attendant for a permit or possibly buy one online. Stadium-goers are expected to have to pay $10, unless Caltrain raises its parking fees, which would trigger the city to match the Caltrain rate. Most downtown residents supported the program but a few were opposed to having to get permits to park in front of their own homes. “My mother is 94 years old and caregivers come and go,” said one resident. “Birthday parties, anniversary parties, any family gathering, we’d have to plan so far in advance. Why should we suffer?” Council members said residents might suffer even more with stadium attendees parking in front of their homes. Council member Mike Kasperzak defended the pilot program as a way to protect downtown residents. The council had proposed it only two weeks earlier, causing city staff to scramble to put it together. Some residents said they prefer the city manager’s previously proposed “wait and see” approach, reserving several downtown lots for unlimited parking, in case it turned out that there wouldn’t be much demand for downtown parking. Resident Steve Sommerstein said it was “a slide towards paid parking for everyone,” which Kasperzak has advocated for the downtown area in the past. Member John Inks opposed the one-year pilot program after criticizing its impacts on the city budget. City staff said in order for the program to pay for itself, it would require charging a $25 parking fee. Revenue generated by 500 cars at $10 a car would be $50,000, though some downtown garage revenue has to be shared with other local government agencies in a deal created by the ending of the downtown revitalization authority, a special tax district. Costs for the $85,000 program will be split between downtown parking district revenues and general fund reserves. That includes the cost of signs and paying attendants to collect fees at downtown parking lots.

substantial and that would allow us to be around for quite a long time,” Rasmussen said. Grehl had previously said any further delays would kill the project, but was amenable when members voted 6-0 to delay the project and to study a compromise for more housing. It would remove one of two proposed sixstory office buildings and replace it with what city staff said might be 115 housing units within the same footprint.

Continued from page 1

Email Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com 6

Continued from page 1

Inks can’t vote Council member John Inks had to leave the dais — the California Fair Political Practices Commission said that, even under new conflict of interest rules, Inks must continue to recuse himself from the project. Inks owns property within 500 feet of the San Antonio precise plan area, but Merlone Geier representatives sought a clarification of the rules in hopes that Inks could vote on the project. The FPPC determination was made just an hour before the meeting, clearing up confusion and concern that Inks would be a swing vote to approve an unpopular iteration of the project. Housing needs Residents of the 330 apartments in the first phase of Merlone Geier’s development spoke in favor of phase two, but most people who packed the meeting called attention to the area’s housing shortage and how adding as many as 2,500 office workers to the city in the two proposed office buildings would speed up the area’s gentrification. “There are a lot of beautiful things about this project, then there’s this jobs-housing imbalance thing, and I can’t not think

MICHELLE LE

about that,” said Edie Keating of Peninsula Interfaith Action. “The jobs-housing imbalance distorts so many things in our community. It creates traffic jams and it breaks up families. In our church we see young folks and retirees leave our area. Communities are being broken up by this jobs-housing imbalance. It affects everyone, whether you are a renter or a homeowner. You’ve got a great project, you need to make it morally right by substituting the office for housing.” The group leading the effort to remove office space and add housing to the project isn’t satisfied with the compromise proposed by Mayor Chris Clark to replace only half of the office space with housing. Merlone Geier said that removing all of the office space and replacing it with housing would trigger a lengthy delay to study the impacts and comply with the California Environmental Quality Act. “We would like more than the compromise offers,” said Lenny Siegel of the Campaign for a Balanced Mountain View.

“There are still too many jobs proposed.” Referendum threat Siegel said that the group has yet to decide on a way forward, but said in an email that it seemed “unlikely” that a referendum petition would be circulated to gather over 3,400 signatures to put the project up for a public vote. The group had planned to put a referendum on the ballot if the project is approved before the San Antonio precise plan comes up for discussion to consider housing and other needs for the San Antonio area. Grehl touted the $7 million in public benefits that would come with the Merlone Geier project, including a protected bike lane along California Street, a $300,000 monument to the birthplace of Silicon Valley at 391 San Antonio Road, new bike lanes on San Antonio Road and $750,000 toward a pedestrian tunnel under Central Expressway at the San Antonio train station, to which other developers in the area would contribute, according to Plan-

COURTESY CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW

One of two office buildings could be replaced by housing units in a compromise the City Council is seeking with developer Merlone Geier at San Antonio Center.

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

Steve Rassmussen chats with a customer at his Milk Pail Market, which faced an uncertain future due to its lack of required parking spaces.

ning Director Randy Tsuda. Grehl added that the project would bring $2.5 million to the city in the form of property taxes and sales tax revenue. An estimate of how much revenue would be created if the project were killed was not included; Merlone Geier has said it would alternatively build a two-story, 175,000-square-foot retail project along the southern half of the site, which the council had already approved with phase one several years ago. There would also be $5.3 million in belowmarket-rate housing fees, which council members said would pay for only about six subsidized homes for low-income residents. “I want Mountain View to stay a diverse community,” said resident Joan Bradovsky. “The only way to increase housing is to build it. Even if you build more and it’s not affordable, at least it would take some pressure off (older housing stock). I hope you do that, you have the authority to do so.” “While I benefit from the housing-jobs imbalance on paper, I just think it’s wrong,” said longtime resident and homeowner Paul Davis, referring to how his property value is rising. “I agree it’s a moral issue. The city has failed to address the housing-jobs imbalance and that’s something I urge you to do ... so that our community can be whole.” Council members said they wished residents had been such advocates for controversial housing projects that they scaled back or killed in the past following public opposition, and they encouraged the public to continue their advocacy for housing. They said they would finish making most major decisions on the San Antonio precise plan — including whether to make housing a higher priority — at a July 8 study session to be held at the Senior Center. Email Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

-PDBM/FXT

Parades, festivals, rodeo celebrate the Fourth By Tiffany Lam

T

hose looking for a way to celebrate Independence Day need look no further than local communities, where lots of activities, including parades, festivals, fireworks, and even a rodeo, will be held. Mountain View The San Francisco Symphony will give its annual concert at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View at 8 p.m. on Friday, July 4. There will be music from the movies and American symphonic favorites leading up to a fireworks show. Limited areas of the golf course and driving range will be open for the public to view the fireworks. Shoreline has limited parking space that fills early in the day. One access point will be available from Garcia Avenue where city staff and volunteers will guide the public to safe viewing locations. Both the Stevens Creek Trail and Permanente Creek Trail hours will be extended on July Fourth. Go to tinyurl.com/Shore-704 or call 967-4040 for more information and tickets. Los Altos The “Glorious Fourth” family event features food, games, a bounce house, a reptile display and live music by Ye Olde Towne Band from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Friday. The free event is put on by the Los Altos Community Foundation at Shoup Park, 400 University Ave. Go to losaltoscf. org or call 650-949-5908 for information.

Palo Alto The city of Palo Alto will hold its 33rd annual Summer Festival and Chili Cook-off to celebrate Independence Day. Chefs will make a variety of chili dishes for the competition from noon to 5 p.m. There will be music and kids activities. The event is free and takes place at Mitchell Park on 600 E. Meadow Drive in Palo Alto. Go to tinyurl.com/Chili-704 or call Ali Williams at 648-3829 for more information. Menlo Park Locals are invited to decorate bikes, wagons, golf carts and floats and parade down Santa Cruz Avenue to Burgess Park on July Fourth. The parade begins at 11:45 a.m. at the parking lot behind Wells Fargo bank on Chestnut Street at Santa Cruz Avenue. At the park, there will be music, food trucks, games, jump houses, crafts, face painting, climbing walls and more until 2:30 p.m. Musical group Mustache Harbor will perform. The event is free. For some activities, a $7 wristband is required, and can be purchased at the event or in advance at the Arrillaga Family Gymnasium from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call the Community Services Department at 330-2220. Woodside rodeo More than 100 young people from around California will test their skills at the Woodside Junior Rodeo on July Fourth. Events will include roping,

JAMES TENSUAN

Fireworks light up the sky over Shoreline Amphitheatre at the annual Fourth of July concert.

women’s barrel racing, and bull riding. For the family, there are pony rides, pig scrambles, a petting zoo and more. There will also be concessions for food and beverages. The event is located on the Mounted Patrol Grounds at 521 Kings Mountain Road in Woodside. Gates open at 8 a.m. and the main event begins at noon. Ticket prices are $15 for adults, $10 for children, and free for kids 6 and under. There is a pre-rodeo dinner and dance at the Mounted Patrol Grounds at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, July 3. Go to mpsmc.org/rodeo or call 851-8300 for more informtion.

in the upper parking lots on the campus at 4200 Farm Hill Blvd. The main entrances on Farm Hill Boulevard and Canada Road will allow cars, bicycles, and pedestrians. Barbecuing, cooking, alcohol and fireworks are not allowed. Redwood City “Through the Eyes of a Child” is the theme of the 76th annual Independence Day Parade in downtown Redwood City. The parade begins at 10 a.m. at the corner of Winslow and Marshall streets in downtown Redwood City. After the parade, there is the 28th annual Independence Day Festival with booths located

throughout the downtown area. The event takes place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The festival has arts and crafts booths, food and beverages, and other entertainment. Go to parade.org for more information. The San Mateo County History Museum at 2200 Broadway in Redwood City is hosting an old fashioned Fourth of July event, where children can hand-crank homemade vanilla ice cream and make traditional Independence Day crafts. The event takes place July Fourth from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There is an admission fee of $2.50 for adults and $1.50 for students and seniors. For more information, call 299-0104.

Woodside fireworks Canada College in Woodside is opening its parking lots for the public to view fireworks displays on the Peninsula. The free viewing begins at 6:30 p.m.

Wyatt Redamonti placed first in the senior boys bull-riding contest at the 2013 Woodside Junior Rodeo.

Celebrate Our 3 year Anniversary Saturday, July 12 FREE Yoga All Day. 6pm Community Potluck, Raffles, and Entertainment Time

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thu

Fri

X

X

X

X

X

8:15 AM

X

X

X

X

6 AM 8 AM

X

Sat

Sun

X

X

X

10 AM

X

12 PM

X

X

8:15 4pm PM

X

X

X

X

4:30 PM

X

X

X

X

X X

X

6:30 PM

X

X

X

X

8:15 PM

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

£™£äÊ7°Ê Ê >“ˆ˜œÊ,i>Ê-ÌiÊ ]ʜ՘Ì>ˆ˜Ê6ˆiÜÊÊUÊÊÈx䰙ÈǰәÈnÊÊ E: info@bikramyogamountainview.com http://www.bikramyogamountainview.com MICHELLE LE

July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

7

-PDBM/FXT

Foothill grad earns degree entirely online By Chris Kenrick

A

COURTESY AMY BETH SISSON

Seen Around Town Mountain View fire fighters put out a car fire on Saturday, June 28, at Loreto Drive after being called at about 8:30 p.m. by the car’s driver. The driver had heard the car make an unusual noise, and reported that, upon pulling over, the car began to smoke. No injuries were reported. Voice reader Amy Beth Sisson spotted the flames and sent in this photo.

Berkeley-bound student who earned his associate’s degree entirely online is among nearly 1,000 students who graduated from Foothill College June 27. From his home in Mendocino — or occasionally sitting in a Mendocino café or library — James Sommermann completed 23 online classes in music, English, statistics, Spanish, psychology, anthropology and geology. He will enter the University of California at Berkeley this fall with hopes of double majoring in music and English. Foothill offers all-online associate’s degrees in 18 subjects as well as an array of all-online “certificates of proficiency.” College officials said they have no way to track the number of students earning all-online degrees but that online classes accounted for about 27 percent of last quarter’s enrollment. Many students take a combination of traditional classes and online classes. But Sommermann needed to stay close to home in Mendocino, where he’s been helping with driving and house-

hold chores for a family member who has health problems. “I’m not going to say it’s ideal because I’d rather go to in-person classes to be honest, but it was really just not possible for me at that point,” he said. He’d never taken an online class before enrolling at Foothill and said he first considered it “kind of a weird idea.” He stumbled on Foothill — which he’d never heard of before — while helping a friend search for an online music class. Then he decided to try it himself. “I ended up really enjoying it, for the most part,” he said. Over 18 months as a Foothill student Sommermann met “very few” of his professors in person but “talked to them a lot through email,” he said. While he missed the camaraderie of in-person classes, he said professors tried to make up for it by welcoming electronic contact. “They return emails very quickly and they encourage you to communicate with them,” he said. “If you don’t understand something you ‘talk’ to them. Some of them you get to know pretty well — at least as well as you can know anybody through

email. “A few of them even asked me where I’m transferring to and stuff.” Sommermann “met” his fellow students online, including a partner in a Spanish class with whom he regularly recorded conversations for review by the professor. “You have to record it in real time, so you’re talking over the computer like it’s a phone, or a video chat without the video,” he said. “The professor listens to it and grades it.” In twice-weekly online conversations, Sommermann got acquainted with his Spanish partner online but still could not say where the partner actually, physically lives. “I assume it was close (to Foothill) because I think he took in-person classes too,” Sommermann said. “He works a lot, so that’s why online classes were good for him.” He also used specialized software that enabled him to enter musical notation for assignments in his music theory classes. He met other remote classSee FOOTHILL GRAD, page 15

SILICON VALLEY’S ULTIMATE REMODELING DESIGN WORKSHOPS Trends in Design

WEDNESDAY, JULY 16

6:30-8:30pm Registration & light dinner at 6:15pm. Whole House Remodels and Additions

SATURDAY, JULY 26

9:30-11:30am Registration & light breakfast at 9:15am. Register online or call us at 650.230.2900 1954 Old Middlefield Road, Mountain View, CA 94043

harrell-remodeling.com

We never forget it’s your home® Most classes are held at the award-winning Harrell Remodeling Design Center and are all taught by industry experts. Our class topics are designed to share our experience and knowledge of the remodeling process. We will provide you with the educational tools you need to get started on your successful remodel or custom home project. C Learn about the permit and planning process before you get started. C Gain some color courage! Learn how your paint/stain, flooring, cabinet, fixtures, and countertop finishes can transform even the smallest spaces, inspire and energize, soothe and calm or simply transform the ordinary into extraordinary. License B479799

8

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

C Get answers you need about design, space planning and learn a few secrets to create a home that fits your lifestyle, today and everyday. C Get excited about your home remodel as our designers take you through a journey of ideas, photos, materials and product options available to transform your home today!

-PDBM/FXT

Don’t let aging uproot you. COURTESY OF MATHBREAKERS

Two girls play the Mathbreakers video game side-by-side at a Tech Museum event on Sunday.

Learning through gaming INTERACTIVE VIDEO GAME TEACHES KIDS MATH

T

rying to get kids into math, even in the age of STEM, can be like pulling teeth. But a local group is looking to change that with a math-based video game that balances fun and learning. Over the last few years, a team of three self-proclaimed math nerds and gamers has been working on a 3D educational video game that will teach kids math in an entertaining and interesting environment. The team is based in Mountain View and started at Hacker Dojo. Through their recent Kickstarter campaign, the Mathbreakers team hopes to tap into local Bay Area classrooms with a game they call immersive, addicting and educational. Charlie Van Norman, one of Mathbreakers’ founding members, grew up playing video games. He stayed up late into the night playing interactive games like Half-life and Doom, which were a thrill compared with educational games. He said many standard educational games at the time were more or less interactive worksheets, and in some cases literal worksheets. “I never stayed up till 5 a.m. playing an educational video game,” Norman said. After college, Norman abandoned his career in real estate and started developing an educational math game, which would later become the alpha version of Mathbreakers. He teamed up with Vivian Tan, who dropped her career in law to do game development, along with Morgan Quirk, who had formal training in game design. The game itself is a series of

3D interactive puzzles where players manipulate bubble-like numbers to reach their goal. Tools to change numbers include the division sword, which slices numbers in half, and a “wave gadget,” which multiplies numbers in front of the player. But players have to watch out for “spikey balls,” enemies with a set numerical value that actively pursue and sabotage the player’s numbers and can be vanquished only when the player zeros them out. “The game teaches you that the better you are at math, the more powerful you are,” Norman said. “And as you get powerful, you start getting bigger numbers.” Based on the feedback from kids who played Mathbreakers, Norman said they’re going to try to add a cooperative mode for the game so they can play with and help each other. He said he also wants to add a “versus” mode where kids can duke it out with numbers — which some teachers are a little less thrilled about. He said it would be great to lose against someone not because they’re better at video games, but because they’re better at math. Teaching math through a video game has some advantages. Norman said it’s a lot easier to represent ideas and mathematical concepts with visuals in a 3D environment than in a textbook. For example, there are hoops in the game that multiply or divide numbers that go through them, depending on which direction they went in. Norman said these hoops are a visual representation that multiplication and division are the inverse of one another, and one operation can undo the other.

It wasn’t always easy, though. Tan said one of the harder concepts to represent was rotations, degrees and radians, which they tried to do with pies. Unfortunately the word play between pi and pie was a real pitfall, and the more they distanced themselves from pie analogies the easier things became. Mathbreakers is currently designed for second- through sixth-grade math, but Norman said they encourage kids to move freely around depending on their progress. They plan to expand the game into higherlevel math, and won’t shy away from adding things like collegelevel calculus. The game is split up into lessons where every interaction is aligned with the new Common Core State Standards for math. Norman said they’re in the process of adding a feature that will adjust the difficult and make “smart” adjustments based on how the player is performing, similar to computer-adapted testing for Common Core. Norman said they hope to get Mathbreakers into classrooms across the Peninsula, and have contacted school districts in Redwood City, Los Altos and Santa Clara. While there were only a few uninspired educational games in the past, Norman said the landscape is very different today. He said the game development industry is in the early stages of a boom in educational games, with new programs being developed every day and math games comparable to Mathbreakers raking in millions of downloads. E-mail Kevin Forestieri at kforestieri@mv-voice.com

Who says you have to leave your home just because you’ve gotten older? Avenidas Village can help you stay in the home you love. Join us for a Coffee Chat June on Thursday, June 24 at 10 am.26 at 10am Call (650) 289-5405 or visit www.avenidasvillage.org. STYLE MEETS FUNCTIONALITY

By Kevin Forestieri

Your life, your way, in your home

Wallbeds “n” More Showroom

Sale! Save 300 OFF

$

a wallbed

Our Wallbeds Are: ✔ Price Match Guarantee! ✔ Stylish ✔ High Quality ✔ Comfortable

8* ,/Ê 6 ÊUÊ-1* ,",Ê+1/9Ê Ê- ,6

MOUNTAIN VIEW 650.477.5532 (Call for appointment)

www.wallbedsnmore.com July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

9

Inspirations

-PDBM/FXT

YMCA executive to head Abilities United

a guide to the spiritual community LOS ALTOS LUTHERAN Bringing God’s Love and Hope to All

Children’s Nursery 10:00 a.m. Worship 10:10 Sunday School 11:15 a.m. Fellowship Pastor David K. Bonde Outreach Pastor Gary Berkland 460 South El Monte (at Cuesta) 650-948-3012 www.losaltoslutheran.org

To include your Church in

Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View - Office Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189

By Sue Dreman

C

harlie Weidanz, longtime head of the Bay Area YMCAs, will take the helm of Palo Alto nonprofit Abilities United, the organization has announced. Weidanz began his new position as executive director on June 30, replacing Lynda Steele, who officially retired the same day after serving as executive director since 1993. The organization helps children and adults with developmental and other disabilities in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties to live independently and to gain community acceptance. Weidanz brings more than 30 years of nonprofit leadership experience to the job, having served as the executive director at organizations across the United States. He spent 24 years as executive director of Bay Area and East Coast YMCAs. He has a personal passion for supporting those with disabilities, and has been an innovator in inclusive programs throughout his life, Abilities United’s board of directors said in a statement.

WHATSAPP

Continued from page 5

adequate for drive-by or pull-in parking. Three, is the concern of parking congestion in that area.” He added that it was written into the project’s conditions that he could pay fees to get out of the requirement. Downtown resident Max Hauser, who pens a newsletter on the local restaurant scene, said over that same year and a half, more than 17 new restaurants, cafes and tea shops had opened downtown. “Half of these 17 are similar or smaller-sized properties to what we have here,” Hauser said. “I have a hard time crediting the argument that there is a lack of tenants of this kind. I also feel that the owner of a property like this, in setting terms of occupancy, has some control of the

“We are thrilled to have someone as experienced as Mr. Weidanz to take over leadership of the agency,” said Karen Moore, president of the board of directors. “His non-profit leadership skills, expertise in programmatic areas for children and adults, including aquatic services, and demonstrated commitment to Charlie inclusion, are a Weidanz great match for Abilities United.” Weidanz’s immediate areas of focus will include continuation of future redevelopment plans and the completion of the organization’s “United for the Future” fundraising campaign, which is currently underway, Moore said. As a senior executive, primarily with the YMCA, Weidanz has worked in a variety of communities including Milpitas, San Francisco, New York City, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. He prides himself in creating a collaborative culture at all levels, according to the statement. His

skills include financial management, fund development, program creation and execution, and staff development, the statement reads. “This highly respected agency and the passion and commitment of the staff, volunteers, donors and partners greatly impress me,” Weidanz said in a statement. “I am excited to build on Abilities United’s strong foundation and to bring my experience to benefit the organization and position it for its future. We will continue to adapt to the growing and emerging needs of our community. “My goal is to further develop and enhance our lifetime of services for people with disabilities, their families, and all community members who can benefit from them. I proudly take the reins as we strive to make Abilities United a lead agency that drives the true inclusion of people of all abilities.” The organization plans to post on its website, abilitiesunited. org, a series of opportunities for the public to meet the new executive director. Email Sue Dremann at sdremann@paweekly.com

situation and in holding up his end of the bargain.” Resident Thida Cornes said Burnell’s proposal of groundfloor retail was “the reason why I didn’t object to the project,” which involved tearing down the historic Pearson House. “I’m basically tired of developers going back on their agreements. I think they are just taking the easy way out because they have a major business moving in that wants a break room.” While city staff originally pushed for the retail space to be included in the project, they recommended approval of Burnell’s request to use the groundfloor space as an employee break room. “This small retail space will improve the pedestrian friendliness of the building,” wrote a city staff member in a July 2012 City Council report for Burnell’s project, which provoked contro-

versy for years because it sought to replace a historic home on the site, and led to fears that it would tower above Chez TJ, the neighboring gourmet restaurant. The report adds that the applicant provided this area, designated a “commercial/restaurant space,” at staff’s request. It also allowed Burnell to have an exemption from providing required parking spaces, according to city documents, which add that “parking in-lieu fees” must be paid if the space is not occupied by commercial, retail or restaurant use. Critics say an increasing amount of ground-floor office development in downtown Mountain View is slowly eating away at what’s considered to be a key component of a vibrant downtown: ground-floor retail space. Email Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

Good G ood ffor or B Business. usiness. Good for You. Good for the Community. The online guide to Mountain View businesses 10

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

Visit ShopMountainView.com today

-PDBM/FXT

Local Whole Foods markets implicated in pricing violations By Sue Dremann

A

statewide investigation of pricing irregularities by Whole Foods Market, including at its Los Altos store, has resulted in an $800,000 court settlement in penalties and investigative costs, according to the Santa Monica District Attorney’s Office, which led the investigation. The city of Santa Monica launched the year-long investigation after the Los Angeles County Department of Weights and Measures reported pricing violations. Consumers were paying for the weight of the packaging as well as the food they purchased when products were weighed, along with other violations, said Adam Radinsky, Santa Monica’s head deputy city attorney. The investigation spread to 10 counties, he said. Santa Clara County Weights and Measures inspectors investigated six stores and found violations in 41 percent of inspections. The stores included Palo Alto, Los Gatos, Campbell, Los Altos, Cupertino and San Jose, said Stan Toy, deputy sealer for the county. Two out of five inspections at the Palo Alto store failed price accuracy, he said. The investigation uncovered widespread pricing violations throughout Whole Foods’ California stores. Inspectors found that Whole Foods was charging more than the advertised price for a wide variety of food items. The problems included failing to deduct the weight of containers when ringing up charges for self-serve foods at the salad bar and hot bar; giving less weight than the amount stated on the label for packaged items sold by the pound; and selling items by the piece instead of by the pound as required by law, such as kebabs and other prepared deli foods, Radinsky said. The statewide investigation began in 2012. Weights and measures departments in San Diego and Los Angeles found the same problems as in the Santa Monica stores. The problem was widespread and involved inconsistency, with one store having one system and another store a different system for tracking measurements, Radinsky said. Attorneys for the three cities filed a civil consumer-protection case against the supermarket

chain on behalf of the People of the State of California. Whole Foods agreed to a five-year court injunction prohibiting all of its 74 California stores from inaccurate pricing, he said. Whole Foods Market California, Inc., which controls the northern California stores, and Mrs. Gooch’s Natural Foods Markets, Inc., in southern California are bound by the judgment. In addition to the injunction, the stores are required to: ■ Appoint two “state coordinators” to oversee pricing accuracy at stores throughout California ■ Designate an employee at every store in the state who will be responsible to ensure pricing accuracy throughout the store ■ Conduct random audits at each of its stores four times per year, to ensure that all prices are accurate and that proper weight is being deducted for all containers ■ Charge accurate prices and provide the advertised weight on all items. The companies will also pay $798,394 in penalties and costs, including $630,000 in civil penalties, $100,000 paid to a statewide weights and measures enforcement trust fund, and $68,394 in investigative costs. “Consumers have a right to accurate pricing and the right to pay for only what they bought,” Radinsky said. By adding the weight of containers and packaging — especially on higher-priced, perpound items like seafood and meats, and even prepared food — the subtracted amount of actual product can add up fast and be hidden from consumers, he said. “If you’re paying $30 a pound for exotic fish, even a handful of ice can put you back a few dollars,” Radinsky said of prepackaged products. The city attorneys’ offices hope the case will serve as a wake-up call to supermarkets and other food retailers to make sure their per-pound charges are accurate, he said. Consumers should always pay close attention to their purchases and make sure the store deducts the weight of all packaging and containers, he added. Inaccurate measurements are a common consumer problem. Some stores don’t know they

“Freedom has its life in the hearts, the actions, and the spirit of men and it must be daily earned and refreshed else, like a flower cut from life-giving roots, it will wither and die” - DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER 34th President of The United States

We Celebrate the efforts of those, present and past, who worked and fought hard to earn and refresh our freedom.

 Happy Independence Day July 4, 2014

The Cusimano Family Colonial Mortuary 96 W. El Camino Real Mountain View, CA (650) 968-4453 FD1041

www.cusimanocolonial.com

See WHOLE FOODS, page 15 July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

11

-PDBM/FXT MUSICIAN

Continued from page 1

to conquer as he recorded “New Horizons,” his first professionally produced extended play (EP). Gospe and his best friend and manager, Riley Soward, are now promoting this seven-track endeavor ahead of its scheduled July 10 release. The prospect of recording the EP came by chance when Gospe and Soward attended the West Coast Songwriter’s Conference at Foothill College last September. At the conference, Soward recognized Mark Mazzetti, the head of Record Company in a Box and an A&R executive. Soward introduced himself to Mazzetti and gave him a copy of “Live at Midnight,” an EP that Gospe recorded live at his home. Mazzetti, who has worked with John Mayer and Elton John, came away impressed by Gospe’s songwriting ability and distinctive voice. “I loved the freshness of the songs and the way he was constructing the songs,” Mazzetti said. “He didn’t sound like anybody else.” Shortly after meeting Soward, Mazzetti contacted Gospe, and they began to discuss the prospect of recording an EP in a professional studio. Gospe and Soward needed $10,000 to make it happen. They turned to Kickstarter, the fundraising web service. “There are

only a couple of paths you can take when you’re 17 years old and you need $10,000,” Gospe said. “Kickstarter seemed very streamlined and seemed like the best way to go.” They raised more than enough funds to record the EP. During the Kickstarter campaign, which ran from early November to early December, Gospe began working with Mazzetti to write lyrics and craft melodies. Over Skype, Mazzetti advised Gospe to try to maintain his personal style and appeal to mainstream listeners at the same time. “It’s a very tough balance to see when you’re just one person, so I’m very grateful that Mark was there to help me with that,” Gospe said. As the Kickstarter campaign reached its conclusion, Mazzetti began helping Gospe arrange the instrumentation of his songs. Gospe’s previous work involved only a guitar and vocals; Mazzetti felt Gospe’s songs could use additional instruments. “We thought he should have a band sound except when he didn’t need it,” Mazzetti said. “Once he wrote those songs, they all seemed to me and Zach and Riley like they needed support.” They occasionally substituted a piano for Gospe’s preferred guitar; Mazzetti felt that change, combined with Gospe’s soft, relatively high-pitched voice, cemented a strong simi-

Riley Soward listens as Zack Gospe plays guitar in his basement studio. Soward acts as manager for his friend Gospe.

larity between Gospe’s work and that of what he called “a young Elton John.” The process culminated in February with a week-long recording session in Hollywood, where Gospe, Mazzetti and others finished up the arrangements and recorded Gospe’s vocals along with other instruments. Four months later, Gospe, Soward and Mazzetti have begun to market the EP. Gospe’s work is already gaining notice. Two songs from the EP,

lead single “Whatever Happens” and “Alleyways,” earned airplay on University of California at Berkeley’s official radio station, KALX; the former song, the EP’s lead single, has already received a nomination for Best Pop Song from the Hollywood Music in Media Awards. Soward has been pushing to establish a greater online presence for Gospe. “We’re trying to get on as many social platforms as possible and have his music available on as many

Zack Gospe says singing at a recording studio in Hollywood was a big change of pace from the basement studio in his family’s Los Altos home.

12

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

streams as possible,” Soward said. He said he hopes Gospe’s EP garners interest from music industry professionals who can provide further opportunities. Gospe recently held an acoustic concert at his house for his Kickstarter donors, briefly touching on his past songs before moving on to new tracks from the EP. Attendees noted the strides Gospe made over the course of his EP’s development and compared him with established stars. “Zach’s new music is livelier, and the meaning of the songs is more apparent,” neighbor Estella Bonifacio said. “He reminds me of a young James Taylor before he lost all his hair.” Others, like Laura Mori, likened his music to that of Jason Mraz. “I think Zach has such an original voice,” Mori said. “I like his songs.” Both Gospe and Soward graduated from Los Altos High School in early June. This fall, Gospe will head to Nashville to attend Tennessee’s Vanderbilt University, more than 1,000 miles away from Soward’s school of choice, Boston College. Gospe and Soward plan to maintain their musician-manager partnership, but they aren’t certain how deeply they’ll pursue careers in the music industry. “A lot of it depends on how well this EP does,” Gospe said. “At this point we’re just going to do as much as we possibly can now and see where it goes.” Gospe’s next performances will be at 9 p.m. Tuesday, July 15, at Angelica’s Bistro at 863 Main St. in Redwood City, and at 6 p.m Friday, July 25, at the Crowne Plaza hotel at 4290 El Camino Real in Palo Alto. More information is at zachgospe.com. V

-PDBM/FXT NCOMMUNITYBRIEFS

COUNCIL RACE GETS CROWDED Nine residents have indicated that they will run for the Mountain View City Council this fall, and the official filing period hasn’t even opened yet. After serving eight years on the council, Jac Siegel, Ronit Bryant and Margaret-Abe-Koga will step down due to term limits in December. The election may bring a significant shift on housing policies as the trio was elected during a time when many residents were protesting new housing developments in their neighborhoods, and the three members have often opposed housing development during their terms, including a plan for 1,100 units for Google employees in North Bayshore. As council members noted last week, public opinion has shifted toward a growing concern about gentrification and a lack of housing for the city’s rapidly expanding workforce. In recent weeks three residents have said they’ll join the race: longtime county official Ellen Kamei, attorney Mercedes Salem, and bike and pedestrian committee member Greg Unangst, who has spoken in favor of more housing growth in the city. The filing period for council candidates to officially join the race begins July 14 and ends Aug. 13, which includes the five-day extension for open seats with no incumbent running. Those who previously declared an intent to run include planning commissioners Helen Wolter and Lisa Matichak, human relations commissioner Ken Rosenberg, and former planning commissioner Patricia Showalter. IT administrator James Neal and environmental planning commissioner Margaret Capriles said they will run again after coming up short in the 2012 council election. —Daniel DeBolt

DUI CRACKDOWN Santa Clara County’s Avoid the 13 DUI Task Force and the California Highway Patrol announced plans to crack down on drunken driving over the Fourth of July weekend. The task force will assign so-called “DUI roving saturation patrols” to Mountain View on Saturday, July 5. In addition, the CHP plans to deploy all available officers to every freeway, county road and unincorporated road in the county from 6 p.m. Thursday, July 3, to 12 a.m. Monday, July 7. “This Fourth of July holiday, you can show your patriotism by helping to make the roads of Santa Clara County safer for everyone,” said Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith. “For everyone’s sake, don’t drink and drive or you will be targeted for arrest.” According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), more than 10,000 people died nationwide in drunkendriving crashes in 2012, accounting for roughly a third of all drivingrelated deaths. Over the course of the Fourth of July weekend in 2012, 78 people died in alcohol-related crashes — around 44 percent of crash fatalities during that period. According to statistics from the FBI, over 1.28 million drivers were arrested in 2012 for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. It is against the law to drive with a blood alcohol concentration above 0.08 in California. —Cooper Aspegren

NASA AMES ‘LIVING MUSEUM’ The NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field will celebrate its 75th anniversary this year with a 17-piece “living museum.” In partnership with the cities of Mountain View and Sunnyvale, NASA Ames will put 17 exhibits on display throughout both cities to show off engineering and scientific endeavors from the past and present at the research center. The original aeronautics laboratory was built at Moffett Field in 1939. Named after Joseph Ames, an architect of aeronautical science, the research lab will turn 75 on Dec. 20 this year. The living museum will include CheMin, a chemistry and mineralogy instrument that was used on the Mars rover “Curiosity” to analyze soil samples and look for signs of life, according to a NASA Ames website. The instrument won an award for Invention of the Year in 2013, and will be on display at the Odd Fellows Hall in Mountain View. There will also be a robotic aircraft exhibit at the Tied House and test models of components for a new Space Launch System and crew capsule at the Dana Street Roasting Co. Other locations include Mountain View City Hall, Red Rock Cafe and Yoga Belly. The living museum runs the entire month of July and will be accessible during business hours. A map of all the locations can be found at www.nasa.gov/ames/75th-anniversary-living-museum/ —Kevin Forestieri

NOTICE OF ELECTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Gubernatorial General Election will be held in the City of Mountain View on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, at which there will be submitted to the voters the following offices: Three (3) Members of the Mountain View City Council for full terms of four years each Nomination papers must be obtained from the City Clerk’s Office, located at City Hall, 500 Castro Street, Third Floor, Mountain View, during the filing period beginning Monday, July 14, 2014, at 8:00 a.m. and ending Friday, August 8, 2014, at 5:00 p.m. during normal business hours (Monday-Wednesday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Thursday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) Section 501 of the Charter of the City of Mountain View states: “Eligibility. No person shall be eligible to be nominated for or to hold office as a member of the council unless that person is and shall have been a resident and a registered voter of the City of Mountain View at the time nomination papers are issued to the candidate and that the person shall remain a resident and a qualified elector of the City of Mountain View or of territory annexed thereto, as defined in the California Elections Code.” If no one or only one person is nominated for an elective office, the City Council may make an appointment for each vacancy. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that a Gubernatorial General Election will be held in the City of Mountain View on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, at which there will be submitted to the voters the following Charter Amendment Measure: Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters shall conduct the election for the City of Mountain View ballot measure ________ (letter to be assigned by the Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters on August 8) to be voted on at the November 4, 2014 Gubernatorial General Election: Measure to be voted on: Ballot Question: Should the City of Mountain View amend Section 503 of the City Charter to set the base salary of City Council at $1,000 per month, with an automatic annual adjustment, to become effective on January 1, 2015? Yes ______ No ______ The City Council of the City of Mountain View hereby submits to the registered electors of the City for their adoption or rejection in consolidated Gubernatorial General Election to be conducted by Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, the following proposal to amend the City of Mountain View’s Charter. “Section 503 Compensation. Each member of the city council shall receive as salary, each month, that sum which has been established by the electorate as of November 4, 2014, as the base-line salary amount of one thousand dollars ($1,000) per month with automatic annual adjustments based on the lesser of the San Francisco Bay Area Consumer Price Index for urban wage earners or the average cost-of-living adjustment granted to the miscellaneous city employee bargaining groups and not to exceed five percent (5%) per year. The mayor shall receive as salary, each month, that amount as calculated for a councilmember above, plus an additional twenty-five percent (25%) of said sum. Any amounts paid to a councilmember for retirement, health and welfare, and federal Social Security benefits shall not be included for purposes of determining salary pursuant to this section provided the same benefits are available and paid by the city for its employees. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the city council shall have no power to increase its salary by ordinance, resolution or motion. If a member of the city council, or mayor, does not attend all regular meetings of the city council called on order of the city council and held during the month, that person’s salary for such month shall be reduced by the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) for each regular meeting not attended unless that person is absent with the consent of the mayor or for official city business.” The Deadline for the above Measure has been established as follows: Argument:

July 25, 2014

End of 10-Day Public Inspection:

August 4, 2014

Rebuttal:

August 1, 2014

Impartial Analysis (City Attorney):

August 1, 2014

End of 10-Day Public Inspection:

August 11, 2014

The proposed revised Ordinance and the Guide to Writing Arguments, Rebuttals, and Analyses for Local Measures is available upon request, and at no cost, in the City Clerk’s Office, ϖ(650) 903-6304, and posted on the City’s website at www.mountainview.gov. The polls will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. LORRIE BREWER, MMC, CITY CLERK

July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

13

% '

-PDBM/FXT &"*

&'&*

!



#,.4C. ,8-:";.30<=;,

%!'"!%' '& !(!

Dinkelspiel Auditorium Saturday, July 5

   &, &,.3,7), &,. . , ,77 ),<,9/,94 ,<, , / /, ,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;PMO is evolving the Latin big band sound of the past into a sizzling Salsa sound of the future.â&#x20AC;?

   '30+077:@5,.60=< '30+0 +077: 7:@ :@ @5,.60 60=<

  09,0%: 0 , 0 : :<0 <0<492< < 2< 2< &34;70 &34;70A:;9 70A 0A:;9



!/>2>';  

!/>2>';4: ';4:

 0,=3;:   0,=3;:< :<

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All About Jazz

 %>=3,?40<7>0<!4=0  ;0/0;<.3';4: @4=3:0:>4<*,760;  099A>;;077$>,;=0=  ,;;A:;A077 :8-,A,BB

 ',A7:;42<=4 >74,9,20

 ,.605:390==0';4: @ ,;;4<:9:7=;,90

 34.6:;0,



     

Sunday, June 29

 0:;20,-70<7A

     

%!%"&"$ $#

Friday, July 11

 Saturday, July 12

<=,91:;/5,BB10<=4?,7:;2:;.,77   

STANFORDJAZZ.ORG or 650-725-ARTS (2787)

    

Sunday, July 13

SUMMER HUNGER Continued from page 5

in Mountain View and Los Altos, and receives food from Second Harvest for distribution. Jim Boin, the CSA developmental director, said they provided about 532,000 pounds of food last year to thousands of families through their Food and Nutrition Center. Boin said they get about 800 to 900 people a week, almost 200 a day, coming in for food supplements. The Food and Nutrition Center is a bit more sophisticated than your typical pantry program. Myers said they prioritize high-protein foods such as eggs, milk and cheese to make sure kids are getting enough protein in their diets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just handing out a can of peaches and a loaf of broad,â&#x20AC;? Myers said. The program also includes workshops to teach people about nutrition and healthful eating, including how to shop on a limited budget and how to shop for more healthful foods. Though the program does not cook or serve meals, as the summer food sites do, Boin said they provide recipes for turning the food theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bringing home into a meal their families will want to eat. Myers said 40 percent of the clients who benefit from the Food and Nutrition Center are children. One of the challenges facing these food programs is outreach. Myers said there are a number of options out there, but people have to know about them first to benefit from them. CSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outreach campaign includes its nutrition programs as well as fliers and ads with information to get the word

POLICE CHIEF Continued from page 5

be stepping down, the city managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office looked at internal candidates for a replacement. Bosel said the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other two captains had recently been promoted following two retirements, and he had the tenure and experience required to be the next police chief. When Rich offered Bosel the post, Bosel said, he accepted without hesitation. The position, he said, is â&#x20AC;&#x153;both a privilege and an honor.â&#x20AC;? Bosel said he has big shoes to fill following Vermeer, whom he called an exceptional leader. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermeer did an excellent job with administration, and I think we can always improve,â&#x20AC;? 14

â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013;  July 4, 2014

out to as many people as possible. Second Harvest posts a list of locations and addresses for summer meal sites on its website, shfb.org, as well as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;food connectionâ&#x20AC;? hotline for people to find out about summer meal programs and pantry programs, and whether they are eligible for food stamps. The toll free number is 1-800-9843663. McCown said Second Harvest is also running a summer initiative to get family doctors and pediatricians, especially in low-income communities, to let their patients know about food service options in the area. McCown said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the most effective ways to get the word out. Despite the improving economy, the number of people in need of food services remains high. The number of meals served and pounds of food are holding steady from 2008 levels across most food service agencies in Mountain View. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Bay Area, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re rebounding economically, which is a good thing,â&#x20AC;? McCown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But families are still having trouble, especially with rental prices being so high.â&#x20AC;? According to Boin, the economy is improving, but not for everyone. He said there are still plenty of families in the Bay Area that are living paycheck to paycheck, or are being displaced from their homes because they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford the high cost of living. He said theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re even providing food for people who are using food stamps to bolster their diets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything we can do to contribute,â&#x20AC;? Boin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every little bit helps.â&#x20AC;? Email Kevin Forestieri at kforestieri@mv-voice.com

Bosel said. As police chief, Bosel said he will adopt a â&#x20AC;&#x153;collaborativeâ&#x20AC;? style of leadership and listen to the men and women in the police force as well as the greater community for input. Vermeer, who spent 12 years as chief of police, announced his retirement from the force earlier this month to become a director at Security Industry Specialists. In an interview following his announcement, Vermeer said the department had a great leadership team to draw from in searching for the next police chief. According to city officials, Bosel has shown exceptional operational and leadership abilities during his career in public safety. E-mail Kevin Forestieri at kforestieri@mv-voice.com

-PDBM/FXT WA R N IN G:

FOOTHILL GRAD

Summer Session Enrolling Now!

Continued from page 8

mates through online forums. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For most classes there would be like a discussion board. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d post introductions so we could actually talk to each other a bit, to make it more social. Some people have their picture on it,â&#x20AC;? he said. Sommermann had to physically travel to the Los Altos Hills campus to take exams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;some of them, not all of themâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and also to participate in a week-long program called Pass the Torch, during which he learned how to tutor fellow students. His stellar performance at Foothill earned him the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Medal, the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highest academic honor, as well as admission to UC campuses at Berkeley, Davis, Riverside and San Diego. He chose Cal because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too far from Mendocino and because, he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always kind of wanted to go to Berkeley.â&#x20AC;? Though he loved his online classes, Sommermann said he can understand the view of skeptics of online learning. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard people say you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learn the same way online as you can in person, or that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier or something, which I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really tell you because I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t taken the actual class in person. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personally I loved (online classes) ... but I could see why

WHOLE FOODS Continued from page 11

are supposed to deduct the weight of the container, but large companies such as Whole Foods do know the law and can get sloppy, he said. Whole Foods spokeswoman Beth Krauss said the company takes its obligations to its customers â&#x20AC;&#x153;very seriously, and we strive to ensure accuracy and transparency in everything we do.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We cooperated with the city

YOUR CH ILD

CO U LD BEC OM E

CR A Z Y A BO U T

M ATH

Yes, YOUR Child Could Become Crazy About Math! James Sommermann got his associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree entirely online through Foothill College. CHRIS KENRICK

someone might say otherwise. College has always had this really traditional aura â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it seems caught up in a traditional culture and they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be so accepting of online classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m definitely looking forward to going to Berkeley where I can actually be there.â&#x20AC;? From its first graduating class of 37 students in 1960 Foothill has grown to serve some 14,000

students each quarter. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduates include 520 earning associate in arts degrees and 355 for associate in science degrees. An additional 61 students will graduate under a new program in collaboration with the California State University system that guarantees admission to CSU with junior standing. Email Chris Kenrick at ckenrick@paweekly.com

attorneys throughout the process, and based on a review of our own records and a sampling of inspection reports from various city and county inspectors throughout California, our pricing on weighed and measured items was accurate 98 percent of the time. While we realize that human error is always possible, we will continue to refine and implement additional processes to minimize such errors going forward,â&#x20AC;? she said in an email. Santa Clara County performs routine inspections for scale and

pricing inaccuracies, and various products are tested to determine if adequate tare weight â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the weight of the empty container â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is taken off the product, Toy said.

Mathnasium of Mountain View-Los Altos 2510 W. El Camino Real, Ste. #4 Mountain View, CA 94040 650-941-MATH (6284) mountainviewlosaltos@mathnasium.com www.mathnasium.com/MountainViewLosAltos 1ST - 12TH GRADES Š HOMEWORK HELP Š SUMMER PROGRAMS

Follow us on Twitter

twitter.com/mvvoice

V

www.demartiniorchard.com 66 N. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos Open Daily 8am-7pm Prices Effective ff 7/2 thru 7/8

650-948-0881

Fa Farm Far arm Fresh ar Fres Fr ess h and Always A Al lw lw lwa wa a ys y s th t h e Bes the B Be Best es est st st

99 39 BLUE- $ 00 RAINIER$ 99 BERRIES 2 6 CHERRIES 4 SAN JOSE GROWN - FRESH DAILY L

WHITE CORN

NORTHWEST GROWN

¢ BING

EARS FOR

99 3 CHERRIES $

NORTHWEST T 91/2 ROW

NORTHWEST T 11 OZ OZ. PKG FOR

ORGANIC C LOCAL

STRAWBERRIES ss

www.danceacademyusa.com

3TEVENS#REEK"LVD 3UITEs#UPERTINO

.OW%NROLLINGFOR$ANCE3EASON

3)'.504/$!9

RIPE SWEET TASTY

LB.

NOW IN SEASON

3

ORGANIC C

GREEN BEANS CS TENDER BLUE LAKE

ORGANIC SPECIALS L

99 9 B 2 3 CHARD99 9¢ K

PADRON PEPPERS GREEN ¢ RED BUN. MARION BERRIES LACINATO ALE T ES 1# PKG. MOMOTARO TOMATO BUN. W ATERMELONS LOCAL EETS FOR $ 00

99

$

WITH SEEDS

GRAPES REEN BLOSSOMS G RED CRANBERRY Y BEANS RAINBOW HAMPAIGN

99 1 Your Everyday Farmers Market

$

LB.

QUASH

LB.

BUN.

Online at www.DeMartiniOrchard.com July 4, 2014 â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013; 

15

Thank you for making the

DeLeon

Team

#1

in Silicon Valley and

#5 in the Nation. * Wa l l S t re e t J o u r n a l / R e a l Tre n d s

(650) 488-7325 | www.deleonrealty.com | CalBRE #01903224

16

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

List your home with

DeLeon Realty

Call for a free information kit!

DeLeon Realty will cover all of the following att no n additional charge: • Staging* • Property Inspectio ction • Pest Inspectio tion and more! *Includes: Desig sign, Installation, 1 Month of Furniture Rental and d Removal R

w w w . d e l e o n r e a l t y . c o m | 650.543.8500 | CalBRE#01903224

July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

17

7JFXQPJOU Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F EDITOR Andrea Gemmet (223-6537) EDITORIAL Associate Editor Renee Batti (223-6528) Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt (223-6536) Kevin Forestieri (223-6535) Intern Cooper Aspegren Photographer Michelle Le (223-6530) Photo Interns Brandon Chew, Natalia Nazarova Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Ruth Schecter DESIGN & PRODUCTION Marketing and Creative Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Design and Production Manager Lili Cao (223-6562) Designers Linda Atilano, Colleen Hench, Rosanna Leung, Paul Llewellyn, Peter Sorin ADVERTISING Vice President Sales and Marketing Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Advertising Representatives Adam Carter (223-6573) Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Email news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com Email letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales  t   fax (650) 326-0155 Email Classified ads@MV-Voice.com Email Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. ©2014 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum. Town Square forum Post your views on Town Square at MountainViewOnline.com Email

your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if letter is to be published.

Mail

to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405

Call

the Viewpoint desk at 223-6507

18

â&#x2013;  EDITORIAL â&#x2013;  YOUR LETTERS â&#x2013;  GUEST OPINIONS

A front-row seat watching the city boom

A

s I retire from the Voice and reflect on the remarkable way the Chamber of Commerce and the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s firefighters and police Kate Wakerly went about establishing an independent unions should endorse candidates. Another story covered Demonewspaper for Mountain View, it is easy to see why the cratic state Assembly candidate Sally Lieber, a former City Council paper has been so well-received over the last 22 years. member who was being attacked by Republican Stan Kawczynski Starting in her basement with co-founder Carol Torgrimson, for calling herself a â&#x20AC;&#x153;councilwomanâ&#x20AC;? on the ballot. Kate published the first edition of the then-monthly Voice in the Beyond the campaign issues, City Manager Dugganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shoreline fall of 1992. Coincidentally, that was also the year I began my own business strategy was to issue long-term leases to Google and other 22-year run with Embarcadero Media by becoming editor of the high-tech companies that today bring in more than $5 million a year Palo Alto Weekly, then editor and publisher of The Almanac in to the city. It was also Dugganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idea to reinvigorate the Shoreline Menlo Park, and then, in 2002, editor and publisher of the Voice. special tax district and use funds generated to build the golf course Kate and Carol had a vision for a quality comand a host of other amenities there. Today, the city munity newspaper that needed more resources shares a portion of the Shoreline districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax revFAREWELL than they could provide, so in 1994 they turned enue with local schools. A similar redevelopment TO TH E VOI CE to Embarcadero founder Bill Johnson for help. district helped refurbish and enhance the downBill enthusiastically took on the Voice, converted town area. By Tom Gibboney it to a weekly and hired a staff to work with Kate, Not far from Shoreline sits Hangar One, a major who remained on as publisher. It was a formula landmark and remnant of the brief period when that worked until 2002, when Kate, who had been diagnosed the dirigible USS Macon flew out of Moffett Field to hunt with breast cancer, passed the publisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role to me, beginWorld War I enemies in the Pacific. But shortly after arrivning a run of 12 years guiding the Voice through a period of ing in Mountain View, the Macon crashed at sea, leaving intensive growth and development in Mountain View. the giant hangar empty. After many years the hangarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toxic Along the way I have had the good fortune to serve with siding finally had to be removed, and when NASA took many talented journalists and watch the city blossom over Moffett Field from the Navy, disagreements arose over under the guidance of then-City Manager Kevin Duggan, who was responsible for cleaning up toxic debris from the who arrived in 1990 when much of Shoreline was taken PHOTO BY MICHELLE LE/ hangar. It was a huge and ongoing issue covered in depth by THE ALMANAC up by a pig farm and landfill. the Voice. Finally, the Navy stripped the siding off Hangar Tom Gibboney It was this young city managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision and luck to conOne but refused to recover the structure, leaving its skeleton nect with Google early on, which began the high-tech has been editor exposed to the elements in recent years. Thankfully, a deal and publisher boom that defines the city today. Kevin was a quiet leader, of the Voice was struck and Google has agreed to refurbish the huge treating employees fairly and staying out of the thicket of building and will park some of its executivesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; planes there. since 2002 local politics. He also made sure that the city kept Voice As I depart, it is comforting to know that Embarcadero reporters and other media representatives in the loop Media is firmly behind the Voice, which survived the Great about the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business. His door was always open if we had a Recession and is profitable. Andrea Gemmet, who has been proquestion or concern. moted to Editor, is an experienced journalist and will continue to Luckily, I was able to work alongside Kate for a time before make day-to-day decisions on coverage. Renee Batti, a longtime she stepped down. I learned about her passion for schools, civil editor at the Almanac, our sister paper, will serve as the new associliberties and many charitable causes, including the St. Joseph the ate editor and handle the Viewpoint pages, write editorials and help Worker Center, now simply called the Day Worker Center. with editing. It was a sad day for everyone at Embarcadero and the entire MounAs for me, I look forward to remaining in the area and to staying tain View community when Kate lost her battle with cancer and died active in retirement by volunteering or consulting for organizain 2004. Her Mountain View legacy lives on as her husband, John, tions whose missions I support. With kids who are now both done and her three children continue to support the Voice Holiday Fund with graduate school and embarking on their own careers, it feels every year with a gift through the Wakerly Family Foundation. like the right time to begin the next chapter in my life. No recap of my years at the Voice would be complete without I want to thank all the friends and acquaintances I have made acknowledging the great work of many writers and editors who over the years. I have been extremely lucky to have started as pubhave passed through our doors. Justin Scheck, named managing lisher with Kate and to have watched the city through such a foreditor in 2001, wrote extensively about the toxic solvent TCE, mative period. I enjoyed every minute. which some early computer chip manufacturers threw out the back door, contaminating the underground aquifer in a wide area of northeast Mountain View. The Voice won awards for Justinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coverage, and has continued to cover issues surrounding the lingering TCE plume. Stories written by Daniel Debolt in the Voice this year about TCE helped win an award for general excellence, the highest honor bestowed by the state newspaper association, a first place in environmental reporting. After a stint as a staff writer, Candice Shih was named managing editor in late 2003. She served during a period of intense growth in the city and at El Camino Hospital. Don Frances came next. He stayed on top of the school beat and El Camino Hospital as the public tried to figure out the hospital districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complicated governing structure and high executive salaries. When I came in August 2002, the Voice front page carried stories about the upcoming campaign for City Council, school board and hospital board seats. Eleven candidates declared for the council race, a near record, perhaps drawn in by the hot-button issue of whether

â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013;  July 4, 2014

V

July 4, 2014 â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013; 

18

7JFX1PJOU NLETTERS VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

TWEAK VILLAGE PLAN TO INCLUDE MORE HOUSING Having lived in Mountain View for many years, I’ve watched our city evolve from a nice comfortable place to live, to being bumped around by massive shuttle buses on city streets, to looking at high-rise buildings going up and surrounding our environment. The longtime residents here are constantly talking about the cost of housing, especially for the many new employees of these new companies, seniors, workers who serve us in restaurants, yard maintenance workers, office cleaners, etc. They can’t afford to live here! Where would they live? Perhaps the City Council should rethink their ideas for high-rise apartment buildings with excessive rents and all these new companies. Obviously, we need the precious land we have left to develop, to solve these housing deficiencies in our city. Bigtime developers have swayed our council members and Planning Department with all the wonders they can provide. Do those city workers and elected council members even think of renting apartments for $2,000-plus for a oneroom apartment? Mountain View needs housing for single and married employees, who work for all these companies. In place of the proposed hotel and offices, how

many units could be built in attractive studios with common areas for visiting and socializing? Many of these same employees have meals provided and workout rooms at their workplaces. The San Antonio Center already offers many restaurants and a fitness center, fresh produce, grocery store with pharmacy, hair and nail salons. Reasonably priced studios are a very attractive alternative to what has been proposed. Other economical SROs could be built elsewhere in the city for the many people who take buses, ride bikes to their daily jobs and keep those big beautiful buildings cleaned and landscaping pristine, work in their cafeterias cleaning tables, washing dishes and cleaning restrooms! Wake up, elected council members! Mountain View needs a few SROs to serve our under-served! Perhaps this developer could tweak his plans a bit to leave his footprint as is, but reconfigure the hotel and office units of the two large buildings into attractive studio apartments. This could be an answer to much-needed housing. Before the council votes on Phase II at San Antonio Center, please consider some of these ideas and include them in your precise plan, which also needs immediate attention. Stop the insanity! Kay Boynton Moorpark Way

VILLAGE PROPOSAL REPRESENTS ‘DEVELOPMENT DONE RIGHT’ We have been watching the development of the Village at San Antonio Center. Among other businesses, the Village offers delicious restaurants (such as Pacific Catch and The Counter) and nice amenities (like the dog park). Phase 1 is completed, and they’re hoping to proceed with the next phase, which includes a hotel, movie theaters, offices and more. We think this could work. The buildings are not too high and they are visually appealing. We attended an information session on the next phase, and were impressed with both the details and their concern for the community. We’re not big fans of development, but we do appreciate development done right! Mark and Laura Robichek Sunnyvale

THE VILLAGE: HERE’S WHAT’S NOT TO LIKE I wonder where Susan Hamilton got her information about the San Antonio Phase II project of Merlone Geier Partners (MGP)? The PR department of MGP couldn’t have written a better puff piece. What is missing from her letter to

the editor are some of the not-so-good features of the project. It will significantly increase the building density (FAR) over existing zoning, and will set a precedent for other high-density development. It will bring in about 2,500 employees, with parking for only a small fraction of these, and a few hundred hotel guests, and will provide no additional housing — the 300 apartments in Phase 1 aren’t going to accommodate 2,500 people. The project by itself will degrade the traffic at the El Camino Real/San Antonio intersection to a LOS (level of service) F rating (gridlock), and some of the mitigation measures (improvements to the intersection) will only bring the intersection back to a LOS E rating, but these are cited as “significant public benefits” that are used to justify the higher FAR requested for the project. It also should be clear that MGP never had any intention of accommodating the Milk Pail; it only took MGP leasing 11 parking spaces in their huge parking lot to the Milk Pail, but they are unwilling to take this tiny step to keep the Milk Pail there — they want the land for their own development, having gotten rid of everyone else, and don’t care about a Mountain View institution — they care about how much money they can make from this project. David Lewis Oak Street

July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

19

8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ RESTAURANT REVIEW ■ MOVIE TIMES ■ BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT

N R E S TA U R A N T REVIEW

DOWNTOWN PALO ALTO’S PIZZERIA DELFINA OFFERS TASTY ITALIAN DISHES, FULL BAR

BEYOND

PIZZA

Story by Sheila Himmel // Photos by Natalia Nazarova

P

sst. Three-month-old Pizzeria Delfina is popular and noisy. At lunchtime or any night after 6:30 p.m., write your name on the chalkboard out in front and feed your anticipation with a crowd of fellow trendsters. It’s fun to be around so many people having a good time, especially out on the 65-seat patio, where trellises, wisteria, Japanese maples and a wall of ivy cool the summer nights and heat lamps await for chillier weather. If you sit in the sleek 46-seat dining room at peak times, good luck talking. Even outside the noise level can get high, what with lots of children, large celebratory parties and a full liquor license featuring inventive Italian-inspired cocktails. If you are most interested in romance, conversation and wonderful service, mid-afternoon is the ticket. It offers the same menu from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Pizzeria Delfina comes to us from Annie and Craig Stoll, who founded the restaurant Delfina 15 years ago in the newly hip Mission District of San Francisco. They added two Neapolitan-style pizzerias in San Francisco and one in downtown Burlingame before reaching out to Palo Alto. Refreshingly, they treat Palo Alto like a special friend rather than a suburban dolt. It is the only member of the Delfina Restaurant Group with a full bar and the only one with a spacious patio. Everybody gets thin, perfect bread sticks and a little plate with grated Parmesan, red chile flakes

Left: Sous chef Gonzalo Guerrero prepares a napoletana pizza at the downtown Palo Alto Pizzeria Delfina. Above: the pizza Margherita.

20

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

8FFLFOE and dried oregano to chew on while perusing the menu. Feel free to ask about all those pesky Italian words. Delfinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Neapolitan 10-inch pizza crusts have swirly ridges on the bottom, like the Indian flatbread, naan, and puffy edges. The crusts arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too thick or too thin. As for toppings, the classic Margherita ($13) sings with a simple tomato sauce. For me, it could use a few more leaves of basil. Know that you need to eat it right away, or the slabs of mozzarella gum up. Same with the 4 formaggi ($14.50). Eight regular pizzas range from the napoletana ($11.75) to the prosciutto pie ($17). There are two daily specials, great choices for vegetarians, and a variety of add-ons from anchovies ($3) to prosciutto ($6). Pizzas are good, but Delfinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uniqueness comes with its creative use of market vegetables and its salads, thoughtfully composed but not fussy. Try the tuna conserva salad ($10), with fat and creamy butter beans, crisp watercress and meaty housecured tuna. In the same vein, the Monterey Bay calamari and ceci salad ($10) is dominated by garbanzo

Maxim Belyakov slides a pizza into the oven at Pizzeria Delfina, the southernmost outpost of the San Francisco-based restaurant group.

Continued on next page

PENINSULA

%BJMZ -VODI 4QFDJBMT BNUPQN .PO'SJ

7PUFE ²#FTU#VSHFS³ GPSZFBST JOBSPX

Discover the best places to eat this week!

BTSFQPSUFEJO UIF.UO7JFX7PJDF

#SFBLGBTUPO8FFLFOET 0QFOEBZT GPS-VODI%JOOFS .PVOUBJO7JFXÂ&#x2026;8&M$BNJOP3FBMÂ&#x2026;  

AMERICAN CHINESE

Armadillo Willyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com ITALIAN

New Tung Kee Noodle House 947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

Cucina Venti Teaching Piano to Generations of Children and Adults

254-1120 1390 Pear Ave, Mountain View www.cucinaventi.com INDIAN

We Offer 4 Programs: Habits: Beginning Players: Intermediate Mastery: Competition and Performance Adults: Private lessons, pay as you go

Janta Indian Restaurant 462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

powered by:

Call us today to schedule an orientation!

650. 292.0573 or info@peerymusic.com 221 Bryant Avenue, Mountain View www.peerymusic.com July 4, 2014 â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013; 

21

8FFLFOE Continued from previous page

NDININGNOTES

Warm marinated olives are flecked with herbs and peppers.

beans (ceci), but the squid’s flat body and squiggly tentacles are tender, served on arugula with amazingly good half-inch cubes of just softened zucchini. “Today’s market vegetables” could be tempura-fried fava or green beans ($7) to demolish immediately with well-balanced aioli. A handful of non-pizza entrees include the beloved chicken alla diavola ($16.75) and meatballs in sugo ($14.75). One day they featured a foot-long curl of narrow fennel sausage, mild but flavorful with sweet-and-sour onions and olive oil, baked in a gratin dish. One oily crostino didn’t add value. Attention to detail is evident in other areas. An order of iced tea ($3) gets you a carafe with a disc of lemon, a glass with a lemon slice and fresh Ceylon black tea. Food-friendly wines by the glass start at $8. On a busy evening, pacing was problematic. Green beans came before wine, and were followed too closely by salad and pizza. The hot dishes are better hot. The gelato-based dessert menu features six flavors “made right here,” which means they do run out. We wanted brown butter and mint stracciatella, but cleansed our palates with chocolate and vanilla (two scoops, $5). The front room is long and narrow, lined by blond wood

Pizzeria Delfina 651 Emerson St., Palo Alto 650-353-2208 pizzeriadelfina.com/paloalto Hours: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily Reservations: Credit cards: Children: Outdoor dining: Private parties: Parking:

street and city lots

Alcohol:

full bar

Noise level:

high

Restroom cleanliness:

excellent

tables and a full-length, skyblue banquette on the window side with cooks and a dining counter on the other side. Exposed beams give the room a more open feel, bright where the previous restaurant in this location, the Empire Tap Room, was dark. Toward the end of the Tap Room’s 21-year-run, the patio was its main draw. Culinary archaeologists will remember that the “secret garden” also was the best thing about Le Meursault, a crepe-focused restaurant. Lesson to Palo Alto: Treasure your restaurant patios. V

Above: The napoletana pizza comes with anchovies, capers, olives and hot peppers. Top: The tuna conserva salad is made with watercress, butter beans and house-cured tuna.

22

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

8FFLFOE of life, but can war be averted if people won’t come to terms? As with the previous installment, the film functions as a comingof-age story, with this chapter focused on earning leadership and loyalty through earnest self-improvement. DreamWorks Animation ups the ante visually (under the sharp direction of Dean DeBlois, who also penned the script). The flight scenes are truly wondrous, especially the quieter ones — though scenes of dragon races and high-flying battle are certainly spectacular.

The character acting has also leaped and bounded over the uncanny valley, helping this sequel to be surprisingly emotional. Rated PG for adventure action and some mild rude humor. One hour, forty-two minutes. — P.C.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley

NMOVIETIMES 22 Jump Street (R) (( Century 16: 10:45 a.m., 1:40, 4:40, 7:45, 10:30 & 11:50 p.m. (No 11:50 p.m. on Sun) Century 20: 12:05, 2:45, 5:25, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m. America (PG-13) Century 16: 9:30 a.m., 12:05, 2:40, 5:15, 7:55 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:35 & 10:10 p.m. COURTESY DREAMWORKS ANIMATION LLC.

Jay Baruchel voices Hiccup in “How to Train Your Dragon 2.”

NMOVIEREVIEWS

THIRD PERSON -Oscar-winning screenwriter Paul Haggis (“Crash”) raises navel-gazing to an art form with “Third Person,” a borderline trashy entry in the genre of global interlocking stories. Those who scoffed at “Crash” will have even more to sniff at here. Haggis also directs and produces. Holding the film’s center is Liam Neeson, as Pulitzer-winning fiction writer Michael. Having recently split with his wife Elaine (Kim Basinger), Michael carries on with journalist Anna (Olivia Wilde) in his Parisian hotel suite, even as he struggles with exploiting the lives of his loved ones (and himself) for his art. In Rome, sarcastic small-time businessman Scott (Adrien Brody) plays the part of ugly American, seeking comfort food at the “Cafe Americano.” There he befriends — or becomes the mark for — a beautiful Roma woman named Monika (Moran Atias), who eventually spills that she’s desperate for cash to ransom her 8-year-old daughter from traffickers. In the New York story, former soap actress Julia (Mila Kunis) takes her last shot at resolving a child custody case hinging on an allegation of child abuse. The father of her 6-year-old child, ex-husband and aspiring artist Rick (James Franco) won’t give an inch to Julia or her sympathetic lawyer Theresa (Maria Bello). Did I mention that Scott and Michael also have (or had?) young children? The stories all rhyme in circumstances and themes, in ways that will drive some viewers up the wall. At times, Haggis’s stylistic choices feel cliched, from the faux-Philip Glass of the opening montage to the slo-mo and Euro-accordion that introduce Monika. But it’s also possible it’s all part of Haggis’s game in a film that immediately begs the question “All right, what is he playing at?” The puzzle-piece structure eventually makes a picture, or at least reveals the gimmick. But the tasteful austerity of style and solid performances can’t overcome a script that stands between emotional humanity and the viewer. Rated R for language and some sexuality/nudity. Two hours, 17 minutes. — P.C.

JERSEY BOYS --1/2

“Jersey Boys” has never been high art. The jukebox musical about Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons ran on hit songs and ample corny shtick in nominally telling the act’s story. Now, it’s all been folded into a

Clint Eastwood film that’s neither theatrical fish nor cinematic foul. John Lloyd Young reprises his Tony-winning role as Valli, the boy with the golden whiny falsetto and the friends who are “bad influences.” Local tough guy Tommy DeVito (Vincent Piazza) first ropes the 16-year-old into a crime and then into performing with his band. When Bob Gaudio (Erich Bergen) comes along with a head for musicianship and business, the act reaches a new level. Soon, the Four Seasons — rounded out by Nick Massi (Michael Lomenda) — are a sensation. The film, scripted by the playwrights, Marshall Brickman (“Annie Hall”) and Rick Elice, alternates between musical numbers such as “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” and drama that compactly explains the band’s origins, challenges and resolution. The film is least interesting when it feels like an impressionist’s act complete with put-on mook accents and more interesting when it captures the dynamics of a group with strong egos and competing concerns. The “group argument” scenes — one refereed by Joe Pesci (played by Joey Russo), who grew up with the Four Seasons guys, and the other by mobster “Gyp” DeCarlo (Christopher Walken) — offer the clearest signs of life. Lovers of “Jersey Boys” and its music will no doubt appreciate the film, which benefits especially from the practiced performances of Young, Bergen and Lomenda, all veterans of the stage play. It’s unclear whether the corny gloss of the play would have worked any better than Clint’s lower-key grasp at realism (probably not), but there’s a release when Eastwood stages a full-cast curtain call under the closing titles. No movie can’t be improved by Christopher Walken doing a shuffle. Rated R for language throughout. Two hours, 14 minutes. — P.C.

OBVIOUS CHILD --1/2 Aside from every indie filmmaker’s affinity for Paul Simon, the title of “Obvious Child” refers to its heroine, another protagonist suffering from severely arrested development. When in trouble, wine-swilling New York comic Donna Stern (Jenny Slate) habitually crawls into the arms of her best friend Nellie (Gaby Hoffmann) and her gay friend and colleague Joey (Gabe Liedman), or back into the cradle of her funny and supportive dad (Richard Kind) or her micromanaging but loving mother (Polly Draper). When a nice-but-square one-night stand Max (Jake Lacy) knocks up Donna, her trips around her circuit of support intensify. But this is a problem only she can solve, which forces Donna kicking and screaming into a stronger sense of self. “Obvious Child” deserves credit for being just what

Begin Again (R) Aquarius Theatre: 1:45, 2:30, 4:15, 5, 7, 7:45, 9:40 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:20 & 10 p.m. Chef (R) Century 20: 10:35 a.m., 7:45 & 10:25 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1:20, 4:15, 7:20 & 10 p.m. (No 10 p.m. on Sun)

it is: an urban romantic comedy that deals matter-of-factly with the situations of pregnancy and abortion. And it’s terrific to see Slate own a film in the starring role (she recently has acquitted herself as the horrific Mona-Lisa Saperstein on “Parks and Recreation”). But “Obvious Child” is just good enough to make you dearly wish it were better. Director Gillian Robespierre announces her lack of preciousness or pretension by laying fart sounds under her credit, but too often she resorts to these jokes. “Obvious Child” has a pleasantly prevailing wryness (Donna schedules her abortion for Valentine’s Day) but few quality jokes (at its best Donna’s stand-up feels like a knockoff of Sarah Silverman). The picture can also be eye-rollingly obvious, as in the packing scene in which Donna literally puts herself in a box. Donna’s choices will naturally be divisive, both on the question of reproductive choice and how she fumbles emotional responses, including to her lingering relationship with the sweetly clueless father. But Robespierre has conceived something you don’t see every day: a feminist rom-com that unapologetically allows its flawed protagonist to let it all hang out. Rated R for language and sexual content. One hour, 24 minutes. — P.C.

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 --A good children’s film doesn’t talk down to kids; it tells a story that’s palatable to adults, while serving as training wheels for kids to move on to yet more challenging fare. The animated adventure “How to Train Your Dragon 2” fits this bill. Five years have passed since the events of 2010’s “How to Train Your Dragon,” in which inventive 15-year-old Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) waged peace between his Viking village of Berk and dragonkind, represented by Toothless. Hiccup and Toothless are still joined at the hip, practicing new flying stunts as they explore and map outlying regions. Hiccup still faces pressure from dad Stoick (Gerard Butler), who lovingly wishes for his son to become chief. Then trouble arrives — in the form of dragon trappers who don’t share Berk’s enlightened view of living with the fire-breathers. Pompous, all-bark-no-bite Eret (Desmond Harrington) turns out to be merely a lackey to the fearsome Drago Bludvist (Djimon Hounsou), who has history with Stoick. The bigger shock comes when Hiccup discovers a hidden dragon sanctuary watched over by someone with even more significant history with Hiccup’s family: the guarded Valka (Cate Blanchett). Hiccup again casts himself in the role of peacemaker, now protecting a hard-earned new way

Deliver Us From Evil (R) Century 16: 10 a.m., 1, 4, 7:20, 10:20 p.m. & midnight (No midnight on Sun) Century 20: 11:10 a.m., 12:40, 2, 3:30, 4:55, 6:25, 7:50, 9:20 & 10:40 p.m. Earth to Echo (PG) Century 16: 9, 11:25 a.m., 1:50, 4:15, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:40 a.m., 1:05, 3:30, 5:50, 8:10 & 10:30 p.m. Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 9, 11:45 a.m., 2;30, 5:15, 8 & 10:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m., 2:25, 5;10, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m. The Fault in Our Stars (PG-13) Century 20: 1:25 & 7:30 p.m.

Century 16: 12:45 & 10:35 p.m.

How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG) ((( Century 16: 9:10, 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:35 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 10:50 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7 & 9:35 p.m. (No 1:40 p.m. on Sun) Ida (PG-13) Century 16: 9:35, 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:15 & 9:35 p.m. (No 2:20 p.m. on Sun) Jersey Boys (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 9 a.m., 12:15, 3:30, 7:10 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 1, 4:05, 7:05 & 10:15 p.m. Maleficent (PG) (( Century 16: 9:20 a.m., 12, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4;50, 7:25 & 10:10 p.m. Obvious Child (R) ((1/2 Guild Theatre: 2:45, 5, 7:15 & 9:30 p.m. (No 9:30 p.m. on Fri) Singin’ in the Rain (1952) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: Fri: 7:30 p.m. Sat-Sun: 3:35 & 7:30 p.m. Tammy (R) Century 16: 9:15, 10:30, 11:50 a.m., 1:05, 2:25, 3:45, 5:05, 6:25, 7:45 & 9:05 p.m. Century 20: 10:30 a.m., 12:55, 3;20, 5:50, 8:20 & 10:45 p.m. In XD at 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 7:10 & 9:40 p.m. Think Like a Man Too (PG-13) Century 20: 12, 2:35, 5:20, 8 & 10:35 p.m. Third Person (R) Palo Alto Square: 1, 4:05, 7:10 & 10:15 p.m. (No 10:15 p.m. on Sun) Transformers: Age of Extinction (PG-13) Century 16: 9:55, 11:45 a.m., 1:35, 3:25, 5;15, 7:05, 8:55, 10:45 & 11:35 p.m. In 3D at 9, 10:50 a.m., 12:40, 2:30, 4:20, 6:10, 8 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 10:25, 11:45 a.m., 1:20, 2, 3;15, 5:05, 5:40, 6:50, 8:45 & 9:20 p.m. In 3D at 11:05 a.m., 12:25, 12:50, 2:40, 4, 4:25, 6:15, 8 & 9:50 p.m. Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory (1971) (G) Century 16: Sun: 2 p.m. Century 20: Sun: 2 p.m. The Wizard of Oz (1939) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: 5:35 & 9:25 p.m. X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 9:25 a.m., 4:10 & 7:30 p.m. Century 20: 10:25 a.m., 4:30 & 10:25 p.m. AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) STANFORD THEATRE: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing at the Aquarius, visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

23

M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

NHIGHLIGHT â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;GLORIOUS FOURTHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; To celebrate the holiday, the Los Altos Community Foundation will hold a family event called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glorious Fourth,â&#x20AC;? which will include food, live music by the Ye Olde Towne Band, face painting, a bounce house, a reptile display, games and more. July 4, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Shoup Park, 400 University Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-949-5908. losaltoscf.org

ART GALLERIES â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Flowersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by Charles Halleck Bay Area artist Charles Halleck will have on display a series of color photographs of flowers, depicting a variety of flower colors and types. An artist reception will be held on Thursday, July 10, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. July 1-26, Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, noon-4 p.m. Free. Gallery 9, 143 Main St., Los Altos. www.gallery9losaltos. com

BENEFITS/FUNDRAISERS Mid-Summer DiaBeats Benefit Concert The American Diabetes Association will hold a fundraiser at Shoup Park, showcasing local talent. Live acts will include Josh Friedman and Iari Melchor and Libertine Circle. There will also be an art show and free pizza. July 12, 7-9:30 p.m. $30 suggested donation for adults, 5$ for students. Shoup Park Garden House, 400 University Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-814-9923. www.facebook. com/events/246995092161761/?ref_dashboard_ filter=upcoming

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS DIY for dog owners This class will assist students in do-it-yourself projects for their dogs, including a dog collar bandana and octopus dog toy. Sewing is involved, but no previous experience is necessary. Space is limited and registration required. June 9, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7020. goo. gl/04FT0e TV Studio Production Camp In this camp for students in grades 9 to 12, participants will

learn a variety of skills needed to produce, direct and act in television shows in a professional studio. July 14-18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $450. Midpeninsula Community Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-494-8686 ext. 27. midpenmedia.org

CLUBS/MEETINGS 100+ Women Who Care Silicon Valley meeting 100+ Women Who Care Silicon Valley will hold their July meeting in Mountain View. The group meets quarterly to discuss ways of giving back to the community. July 9, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Agave Mexican Bistro, 194 Castro St., Mountain View. 100womensv.org ESL Conversation Club Those learning or improving English are invited to come practice at club meetings with casual conversation and friendly company. All levels are welcome, no registration required. Wednesdays, year-round, 5-6 p.m. Free. Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7020. www.mountainview.gov/depts/library/default.asp Non-fiction Book Club The Portola Valley Library will a meeting of its non-fiction book club for adults to discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just Kids,â&#x20AC;? a memoir by Patti Smith. Drop-ins are welcome. July 17, 1-2:30 p.m. Free. Portola Valley Library, 765 Portola Road, Portola Valley. Call 650-851-0560. smcl.org Sew Sew Saturday The library invites community members to come sew on Saturday mornings; four Baby Lock (Grace model) sewing machines and one serger are available for use. Please register on the website. No instruction will be provided. Saturdays, year-round, 10:15-11 a.m. Free. Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6337. www. mountainview.gov/depts/library/default.asp

COMMUNITY EVENTS

 "%" %$'

invites the community to

"% #

     Tuesdays in July

"$& %$&' "#$"$"!%" $$" ""

oddcm mv.orgg

"

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thursday Night Liveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Downtown Mountain View will host â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thursday Night Live,â&#x20AC;? an evening with dining, shopping, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, a farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; market, live music and a car show. July 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Downtown Mountain View, Castro Street, between Evelyn and California, Mountain View. Call 650-903-6331. www.mountainview.gov/depts/cs/events/ thursdaynightlive.asp Bikefest The library will host this event bringing together bike shops, bike organizations, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s police bike squad and other community members. Organizers will lead bike drills, share skills and lead crafts. July 12, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7020. goo.gl/imI32a Lunchtime Legos for Grown-ups The Mountain View Public Library invites will hold this event where adults can have lunch together and build with Legos. No registration is required. July 17, noon-1:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Public Library, Community Room, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7020. goo.gl/ eOeT7b

CONCERTS U.S. Japan Friendship Special Music Concert Ten musicians with autism from Japan and the U.S. will perform both separately and then together in this concertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finale. Kayoko Hosokawa, the former first lady of Japan and founder of the Special Olympics Nippon, will introduce the musicians. A family concert will be held at 1:30 p.m., followed by a formal recital at 3:30 p.m. July 13, 1:30-5 p.m. $50 VIP; $20 general. Community School of Music and Arts, Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. arts4all.brownpapertickets.com

EXHIBITS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fearless Geniusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Computer History Museum will have on display a photography exhibit by Doug Menuz called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000.â&#x20AC;? It consists of 50 photographs documenting innovators at Apple, Leiner Perkins, Adobe and other companies. July 9-September 7, 10 a.m. $15 general; $12 student/senior/military.

24

â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013;  July 4, 2014

Computer History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. www.computerhistory. org/events â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Huangshan and Zhangjiajie, Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Huangshan and Zhangjiajie, China: Photographs of Land and Cultureâ&#x20AC;? will be on display at the Krause Center for Innovation. A reception will be held on Monday, June 23, from 6 to 9 p.m. June 23-September 26, center hours. Free. KCI Gallery, Krause Center for Innovation, 12345 El Monte Road, Building 4000, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-7318. www. incredibletravelphotos.com/krause-innovationcenter-2014/ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stonewalled in Jerusalemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Santa Cruz mixed media artist Sara Friedlander will have on display her visually arresting and socially focused artwork, which contemplates the Israeli/ Palestinian impasse. Using original and archival images, she explores both sides and welcomes viewersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ideas about moving forward. May 16-August 25, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 831427-2650. www.paloaltojcc.org/events

FAMILY AND KIDS Helix summer sessions Helix will offer summer camp sessions for ages 5 to 14 where kids can learn about the world through investigation. Participants can explore exhibits and spend time learning in the workshop. Monday-Friday, July 7-August 15, 1-4 p.m. $200 member; $250 nonmember. Helix by Exploratorium, 316 State St., Los Altos. helixlosaltos.org/helix-summer-sessions

FILM Hidden Villa Film Series: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Singing Revolutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; As part of its summer film series, nonprofit Hidden Villa will screen the documentary, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Singing Revolution,â&#x20AC;? which tells how Estonians used cultural songs and traditions in the political fight to free themselves from Soviet occupation. Conversation, live music and a picnic will follow the film. July 13, 5 p.m. Free. Hidden Villa, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9702. www.hiddenvilla.org/ programs/public-programs/duveneck-forum

FOOD AND DRINK Friday Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market The Oshman Family JCC will hold a weekly Friday Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market with fresh fruits and vegetables, baked goods, performances, Shabbat surprises, food trucks and more. Fridays, through August, noon-5 p.m. Free. Oshman Family JCC, Jessica Lynn Saal Town Square, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. www. paloaltojcc.org/events/2014/05/02/communityevents/friday-farmers-market-at-the-ofjcc

ON STAGE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pygmalionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; In honor of the workâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100th anniversary, the Pear Avenue Theatre will put on a production of George Bernard Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pygmalion,â&#x20AC;? in which a flower girl transforms into an independent heroine. June 20-July 13, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday at 2:00 p.m. $10-$35. Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View. Call 650-254-1148. www.thepear.org â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Wizard of Ozâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Los Alto Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre will perform the classic musical, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wizard of Oz,â&#x20AC;? following Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tinman, the Cowardly Lion and Toto as they seek to find Dorothy a way home. Thursday-Sunday, July 18-August 3, 7:30 p.m. $15 youth/senior; $20 adult. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 660-9410551. www.losaltosstage.org

SENIORS Community Services Agency on Housing The Community Services Agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Senior Case Managers will be available by appointment to provide resources on landlordtenant disputes, information on low-income housing and guidance in drafting lease agreements. Appointments are required. July 15,

Summer Outdoor Movie Night Series For the first in a series of events, a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monsters Universityâ&#x20AC;? will be shown at Cuesta Park. The movie will begin at 8:30 p.m. or when it becomes dark. Attendees should bring a blanket or lawn chair. The program is sponsored by the City of Mountain View and the Youth Advisory Committee. July 11, 8:30-10 p.m. Free. Cuesta Park, 615 Cuesta Drive, Mountain View. Call 650-903-6331. www.mountainview.gov/depts/cs/events/summermovie.asp 10-11 a.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-9036330. www.ci.mtnview.ca.us/depts/cs/rec/senior/ default.asp

LECTURES & TALKS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fearless Geniusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; talk with Doug Menuez In concert with a new photography exhibit, photographer Doug Menuez will share stories of the sacrifice, hard work and optimism of a discreet group of innovators during the early days of the Silicon Valley digital revolution. Registration is encouraged. July 9, noon-1 p.m. Free. Computer History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. www. computerhistory.org/events â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Your Lawn is Dead, Now What?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sustainable landscape designer Deva Luna will give a talk about creating a water-wise garden, focusing on replacing lawns with native plants and other materials. July 9, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, Program Room, 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. www.sccl.org Author Erika Johansen with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Queen of the Tearlingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Local author Erika Johansen will share her debut work and the first in a series, a fantasy with adventure and romance called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Queen of the Tearling.â&#x20AC;? July 11, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-428-1234. booksinc.net/event/2014/07/17/ month/all/all/1 Author Kim Stolz with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Unfriending My Exâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kim Stolz, a restaurateur in New York and vice president at Citigroup, will share her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfriending My Ex: And Other Things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Never Do.â&#x20AC;? July 9, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-428-1234. booksinc. net/event/2014/07/17/month/all/all/1 Author Tina Gilbertson with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Constructive Wallowingâ&#x20AC;? Tina Gilbertson will read from and sign her book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Constructive Wallowing: How to Beat Bad Feelings by Letting Yourself Have Them.â&#x20AC;? July 15, 7:30 p.m. Free. East West Bookshop, 324 Castro St., Mountain View. www.eastwest.com Technology and Society Committee Luncheon At the committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monthly lunch, Neal Gorenflo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; co-founder of Shareable, a nonprofit hub for news, action and connection â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will talk about his transition away from the corporate world and the mission and values of Shareable. July 8, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. $12 lunch. Hangen Szechuan Restaurant, 134 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-969-7215. tian.greens. org/TASC.shtml

TEEN ACTIVITIES Sports Broadcasting Workshop In this week-long workshop for students in grades 6 to 8, participants will learn various broadcasting skills out of the mobile production truck as they cover real games and create programs that will be aired on local television. July 14-18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $475. Midpeninsula Community Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-494-8686 ext. 37. midpenmedia.org TV Studio Production Camp In this camp for students in grades 6 to 8, participants will learn a variety of skills needed to produce, direct and act in television shows in a professional studio. July 7-11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $450. Midpeninsula Community Media Center, 900 San Antonio Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-494-8686 ext. 27. midpenmedia.org Youth Claymation Camp In these weeklong camps for ages 10 to 14, students will learn how to create clay animation with the stop-motion techniques used in such movies as the Wallace & Gromit films and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicken Run.â&#x20AC;? Small groups of students will come up with a story, mold, animate and edit a film for their final projects. MondayFriday, July 7-August 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $325. KMVT 15 Community Television, 1400 Terra Bella Ave., Suite M, Mountain View. Call 650-9681540. www.kmvt15.org Youth Studio Production Camp This summer KMVT 15 will hold weeklong camps for students ages 10 to 14, where students can use professional studio equipment to gain skills in camera work, directing, sound design, acting and producing. By the end of each camp, students will have produced segments which will be broadcast on cable Channel 15. Monday-Friday, June 9-August 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $369. KMVT 15 Community Television, 1400 Terra Bella Ave., Suite M, Mountain View. Call 650-968-1540. www.kmvt15.org

VOLUNTEERS Silicon Valley Tour de Coop preparation Neighbors Helping Neighbors will hold a variety of volunteer activities leading up to and during the Silicon Valley Tour de Coop, a bike ride between chicken coops and home gardens on September 21. Volunteer opportunities include putting up fliers and posters, doing test bike rides, organizing other small events to spread the word and staffing locations on tour day. The organization also seeks community members with chicken coops, beehives and home gardens to host stops. JuneSeptember, dates and times vary. Free. Neighbors Helping Neighbors events, various nearby locations, Palo Alto and Mountain View. Call 650283-0270. tourdecoop.org

Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com E-MAIL ads@fogster.com PHONE 650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX N BULLETIN

BOARD 100-199 N FOR SALE 200-299 N KIDS STUFF 330-399 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-599 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 800-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997 The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media has the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

fogster.com THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

Bulletin Board 115 Announcements Pregnant? Thinking of adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/ New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN) Ath: Temporary Change in Classified Deadlines Classified deadlines for Weekly and Voice Best Of and Almanac Readers’ Choice newspapers have been changed as follows: July 18 Voice Friday, July 11 at Noon July 23 Almanac Wednesday, July 16 at Noon July 25 Weekly Monday, July 21 at Noon Early deadlines apply to both online and newspaper ads. www.Fogster.com BINGO! Adult Summer Reading Fun BOOK SALE - MPL Friends new Holiday music original ringtones Stanford music tutoring substitute pianist available

120 Auctions Internet Auction BMW and Yamaha of Santa Cruz. Parts, Helmets, Tires, Saddlebags, Seats & More. Selling without Reserve. Shipping or Local Pickup. BID TODAY! www. THEAUCTIONARIUM.com

130 Classes & Instruction German language class Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

FRIENDS OF THE PALO ALTO LIBRARY JOIN OUR ONLINE STOREFRONT TEAM

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts Toyota 1997 Supra - $4600 Toyota 1999 Sienna Single Private owner, 110k miles Leather, automatic, AC, clean http://tinyurl.com/qegq55m

202 Vehicles Wanted Cash for Cars Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 800-731-5042. (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales Ath: Temporary Change in Classified Deadlines Classified deadlines for Weekly and Voice Best Of and Almanac Readers’ Choice newspapers have been changed as follows:

music theory course Thanks St, Jude

140 Lost & Found peach-headed love bird Peach-headed love bird is hanging around our yard. Did it escape from you?

145 Non-Profits Needs DONATE BOOKS/HELP PA LIBRARY Hikes, History and Horses WISH LIST FRIENDS PA LIBRARY

150 Volunteers Fosterers Needed for Moffet Cats

270 Tickets

PA: 728 Middlefield Rd., Sat., 7/5, 8-? Lots of good old and new stuff. Large frame bike, dining table, etc. Please park on Forest or Homer

Kid’s Stuff 345 Tutoring/ Lessons Did You Know that not only does newspaper media reach a HUGE Audience, they also reach an ENGAGED AUDIENCE. Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) Reading Tutor

350 Preschools/ Schools/Camps Laces Soccer Camps Youth summer soccer camp in Palo Alto. All proceeds donated to Right to Play Charity. $100 per week for 1/2 day camp. www.lacessoccercamps.com.

Outdoor Painting Summer Camps SonWorld Adventure ThemePark VBS

403 Acupuncture

Chest Freezer - $50.00

245 Miscellaneous

DISH TV Retailer Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) and High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-357-0810 (Cal-SCAN) Kill Bed Bugs! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killer Complete Treatment Program/Kit. (Harris Mattress Covers Add Extra Protection). Available: Hardware Stores, Buy Online: homedepot.com (AAN CAN) Reduce Your Cable Bill!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-866-982-9562. (Cal-SCAN)

Did You Know 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

Fogster.com is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in The Almanac, the Palo Alto Weekly, and the Mountain View Voice.

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Ath: Temporary Change in Classified Deadlines Classified deadlines for Weekly and Voice Best Of and Almanac Readers’ Choice newspapers have been changed as follows: July 18 Voice Friday, July 11 at Noon July 23 Almanac Wednesday, July 16 at Noon July 25 Weekly Monday, July 21 at Noon Early deadlines apply to both online and newspaper ads. www.Fogster.com Computer Tutor Help adult learn and practice PC skills. Vocabulary; advanced Facebook usage; organizing pictures, files, folders, using Craig’s list. Call Pat, 650/400-5331

PLACE AN AD by E-MAIL at ads@fogster.com

Jobs Multimedia Sales Representatives Embarcadero Media is headquartered in Palo Alto and operates diverse media enterprises, including the region’s most respected and award-winning community newspapers and specialty publications, websites and e-mail marketing products. Locally-owned and independent for 34 years, we publish the Palo Alto Weekly, Mountain View Voice and Almanac on the Peninsula and the Pleasanton Weekly. In each of these communities our papers are the dominate, bestread and most respected among its various competitors. We also operate extremely popular interactive community news and information websites in all of our cities, plus unique online-only operations in Danville and San Ramon. Our flagship website, Palo Alto Online (http://paloaltoonline.com), attracts more than 150,000 unique visitors and 600,000 page views a month.

Summer Chinese Program

240 Furnishings/ Household items

DirecTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-291-0350 (Cal-SCAN)

435 Integrative Medicine

500 Help Wanted

215 Collectibles & Antiques

Horse Wanted Exp. rider looking for potential jumper. 650/533-0524

Safe Step Walk-in Tub Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)

Paul McCartney One Ticket At , - $220.00

Martial Arts Summer Day Camps

235 Wanted to Buy

135 Group Activities

Photo Darkroom Equipment Complete darkroom setup of enlargers, drum processors for printing 35mm up to 4x5 films. Sell or consider donation to local school. 650/854-5986

Early deadlines apply to both online and newspaper ads. www.Fogster.com

Christina Conti Private Piano Instruction (650) 493-6950

Piano Lessons in Palo Alto Call Alita at 650.838.9772

Paul McCartney One Ticket At , - $220.00

Fun Programming Summer Camp

1930’s doll - 90.00 0b0

Piano Lessons Senior Special! Fulfill your dream! Start from scratch or refresh skills you learned as a child. Enjoy a relaxed, fun time. Dr. Renee’s Piano 650/854-0543

Egg Incubator - $25.00

July 18 Voice Friday, July 11 at Noon July 23 Almanac Wednesday, July 16 at Noon July 25 Weekly Monday, July 21 at Noon

133 Music Lessons Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn.View. Most Instruments voice. All ages & levels 650-961-2192 www.HopeStreetMusicStudios.com

Sawmills from only $4397.00- Make and save money with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (Cal-SCAN)

Acupuncture in Los Altos If you are bothered by any health condition and haven’t found effective treatments, call Jay Wang PhD 650-485-3293. Free consultation. 747 Altos Oaks Dr.

425 Health Services Lose up to 30 Pounds in 60 Days with Phentrazine 37.5! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weightloss. 60 day supply - $59.95. Call 877-761-2991 (AAN CAN) Lose up to 30 Pounds in 60 Days! Once daily appetite suppressant burns fat and boosts energy for healthy weight loss. 60 day supply - $59.95. Restricted calorie diet and regular exercise required. Call: 800-561-9814 (CalSCAN)

As the first newspaper in the United States to publish on the web back in 1994, the Palo Alto Weekly is recognized throughout the state and nation as a leader in transforming from a print- only news organization to a innovative multimedia company offering advertisers and readers new and effective products. In 2013, the Weekly was judged the best large weekly newspaper in the state by the California Newspaper Publishers Association. Its web operation, Palo Alto Online, was judged the best newspaper website in California. The Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media are seeking smart, articulate and dedicated experienced and entrylevel sales professionals who are looking for a fast-paced and dynamic work environment of people committed to producing outstanding journalism and effective marketing for local businesses. As a Multimedia Account Executive, you will contact and work with local businesses to expand their brand identity and support their future success using marketing and advertising opportuni-

ties available through our 3 marketing platforms: print campaigns, website advertising and email marketing. The ideal candidate is an organized and assertive self-starter who loves working as a team to beat sales goals and possesses strong verbal, written, persuasive and listening interpersonal skills and can provide exceptional customer service. Duties, responsibilities and skills include: * Understands that the sales process is more than taking orders * Has a strong understanding of how consumers use the Internet * Can effectively manage and cover a geographic territory of active accounts while constantly canvassing competitive media and the market for new clients via cold calling * Can translate customer marketing objectives into creative and effective multi-media advertising campaigns * Ability to understand & interpret marketing data to effectively overcome client objections * Understands the importance of meeting deadlines in an organized manner * Can manage and maintain client information in our CRM database system, is proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel and has knowledge of the Internet and social media * Ability to adapt objectives, sales approaches and behaviors in response to rapidly changing situations and to manage business in a deadline-driven environment Compensation includes base salary plus commission, health benefits, vacation, 401k and a culture where employees are respected, supported and given the opportunity to grow. To apply, submit a personalized cover letter and complete resume to: Tom Zahiralis, Vice President, Sales and Marketing, Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306. E-mail to: tzahiralis@embarcaderopublishing.com

GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS July 4, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

25

MARKETPLACE the printed version of

fogster.com

Director - Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center Avenidas has an opening for the Director of our adult day health and adult day care programs. Our Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center is located in Mountain View and provides health and social services to frail and dependent seniors and their families. Our mission is to support seniors who want to remain in their own homes. Under the general supervision of the Vice President of Programs, the Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center Director is responsible for the development, delivery and evaluation of services provided at the center. Responsibilities UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iiĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;`>Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2021;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; adult day health center UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;`}iĂ&#x152; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>`Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; and local regulations including the timely submission of required reports UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160; vendors UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;V>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>vv UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?iÂ&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;ance plan UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;iiĂ&#x160;LÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}]Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;i`Â&#x2C6;V>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iVÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;v>VÂ&#x2C6;Â?ity management UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;,iVĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;ÂľĂ&#x2022;>Â?Â&#x2C6;vÂ&#x2C6;i`Ă&#x160; professionals, para-professionals and other staff and contractors UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; program UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;i>`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;VÂ&#x2C6;ÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;i>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; development of individual treatment plans UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x203A;iÂ?Â&#x153;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; and educational programs for Center staff UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;i>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;>`Ă&#x203A;Â&#x153;V>VĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;}Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; in the community Qualifications `Ă&#x2022;V>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;Vi\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>`Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; degree in health care administration or related field, or a Bachelor's degree plus Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;LĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;>`Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;iĂ?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160; closely related field. A professional in the fields of nursing, social work, psychology, recreation, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, dietetics, or gerontology is required. At least two years of >`Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;iĂ?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; a direct service program, preferably in the field of aging is required. Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â?i`}i]Ă&#x160;LÂ&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;-Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Ă&#x192;\Ă&#x160; Ă?ViÂ?Â?iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; interpersonal, written and oral communication skills. Strong organization skills and attention to detail. Strong computer skills required. Knowledge of older adult and dependent-care issues. Ability to meet deadlines. Must be team-oriented; able to lead, motivate and supervise a diverse group of professional and paraprofessional staff and volunteers. Fingerprints and DOJ/FBI criminal background investigation is required. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;iĂ?iÂ&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; benefits. Further information can be found at www.avenidas.org.

550 Business Opportunities Be The 1st Medical Alert company in your area! Owning your own local distributorship. We do 70% of the work! Unlimited $ return. Investment required. Free Call 844-225-1200 (CalSCAN)

560 Employment Information $1,000 Weekly! mailing brochures from home. Helping home Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä䣰Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;"ÂŤÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;i`°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;i`Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

Business Services 602 Automotive Repair Did You Know 7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

624 Financial Do you owe over $10,000 Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;,-Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;L>VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;>Ă?iĂ&#x192;ÂśĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;>Ă?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?Â&#x2C6;ivĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;tĂ&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;i/>Ă?]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; vĂ&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;>Ă?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;°Ă&#x160;nääÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;{äĂ&#x17D;°Ă&#x160; (Cal-SCAN) Identity Protected? Is Your Identity Protected? It is our promise to provide the most comprehensive identity theft prevention and response products available! Call Today vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;äÂ&#x2021; >Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;, Ă&#x160;/,Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x2021;nääÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;änÂ&#x2021;xÂŁÂ&#x2122;{°Ă&#x160; (Cal-SCAN) Reduce Your Past Tax Bill LĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x2022;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;xĂ&#x160;*iĂ&#x20AC;ViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;ÂŤĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;7>}iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; />Ă?Ă&#x160; ,Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;iiĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x160; Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160; +Ă&#x2022;>Â?Â&#x2C6;vĂ&#x17E;°Ă&#x160; 1-800-498-1067. (Cal-SCAN) Trouble With IRS? Are you in big trouble with the IRS? Stop wage and bank levies, liens and audits, Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;vÂ&#x2C6;Â?i`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;>Ă?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; ÂŤ>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;>Ă?Ă&#x160;`iLĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;-/°Ă&#x160;-iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; BBB. Call 1-800-761-5395. (Cal-SCAN)

640 Legal Services Injured in an Auto Accident? Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; VVÂ&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Â?Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 1-800-958-5341. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 701 AC/Heating Did You Know Newspaper-generated content is so valuable it's taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) Ath: Temporary Change in Classified Deadlines Classified deadlines for Weekly and 6Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;"vĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;>VĂ&#x160;,i>`iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;½Ă&#x160; Choice newspapers have been VÂ&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;}i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â?Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;\ July 18 Voice Friday, July 11 at Noon July 23 Almanac Wednesday, July 16 at Noon July 25 Weekly Monday, July 21 at Noon >Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`i>`Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; and newspaper ads. www.Fogster.com

703 Architecture/ Design Bright Designs. Barbie Bright Full service Int. Design. Remods. Vail, Beaver Creek, CO. SF, WDS, Monterey, Carmel. 970/926-7866. brightdesigns1@gmail.com

Drivers: Start with our Driver Training or continue your solid career. You Have Options! Company

Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; i>Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; *Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; "Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Operators Needed! (877) 369-7126 www. CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com (Cal-SCAN)

715 Cleaning Services

Drivers: Truck Drivers "LĂ&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;

Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; ÂŁ|Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;iiÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Company Sponsored Training. Also Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; ,iViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; /Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>`Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Ă?ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;Vi`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; LiĂ&#x160; Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; "Â?`iĂ&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?\Ă&#x160;­nĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;xÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x17D;{Â&#x2122;

Isabel & Elbiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housecleaning Apartments and Homes. Ă?ViÂ?Â?iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;,iviĂ&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;,>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192; 650.670.7287/650.771.8281

A Good Housecleaning Service Call Orkopina! Since 1985. Bonded, Ins. Â&#x2C6;V°Ă&#x160;Â&#x203A;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;{°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;xäĂ&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2021;ÂŁxĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;

TD Carpet Cleaning and Jan serv.

To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com

26

748 Gardening/ Landscaping HOME & GARDEN 30 Years in family

LANDSCAPE

Ya       Tree Trim & Removal, Palm & Stump Removal

650.814.1577  J. Garcia Garden Maintenance Service Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;iĂ?°Ă&#x160; 650/366-4301 or 650/346-6781 LANDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING I9>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;I iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;I,Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160; *Clean Ups *Tree Trim *Power Wash *Irrigation timer programming. 18 Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;iĂ?°Ă&#x160;,>Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;xäĂ&#x2030;xĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;{Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; landaramon@yahoo.com R.G. Landscape Yard Clean-ups, debris removal, maintenance, installations. Free est. 650/468-8859 Salvador Godinez Landscaping Maintenance, landscaping and clean-up Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;iĂ?°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;xäÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;䣣

Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Service General CleanuGardening PrunTrimming New LawnSprinkler Systems

 Planting (650) 969-9894 Tired of Mow, Blow and Go? "Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;i`]Ă&#x160;{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;iĂ?°Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x192;es of gardening/landscaping. Ref. Call Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;V]Ă&#x160;{änĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;xä

751 General Contracting A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;>Â?Ă&#x2022;i`Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; fxää°ääĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising.

Â&#x2026;iVÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>VĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°VĂ&#x192;Â?L°V>°}Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; nääÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁÂ&#x2021; - Ă&#x160; (2752). Unlicensed persons taking Â?Â&#x153;LĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160; Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; fxää°ääĂ&#x160; must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the

Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>VĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;ViÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;>Ă&#x20AC;`°Ă&#x160;

757 Handyman/ Repairs Fast and Reliable Handyman One call, does it all! Fast and Reliable >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x17E;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; -iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; }iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iviĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;`>Ă&#x17E;\Ă&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; 800-958-8267 (Cal-SCAN) !CompleteHome ABLE Repair ! modelin !Professional inting !Carpentr  FRED 30 Years Experience !Plumbing !Electrical 650.529.1662 !CustomCabinets 650.483.4227 !Decknces



HANDYMAN

759 Hauling J & G HAULING SERVICE Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;V°Ă&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vvÂ&#x2C6;Vi]Ă&#x160; }>Ă&#x20AC;°]Ă&#x160; vĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;°]Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160; }Ă&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;i]Ă&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i°Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;V°Ă&#x2030; ins. Free est. 650/743-8852 (see my Yelp reviews)

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Mtn. View Asphalt Sealing Driveway, parking lot seat coating. Asphalt repair, striping, 30+ years. >Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;V°Ă&#x160;xäĂ&#x2021;nÂŁ{°Ă&#x160; 650/967-1129 Roe General Engineering Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing, Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x152;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;iĂ?°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;LĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x201C;>Â?Â?°Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Â&#x203A;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x17D;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;xäĂ&#x2030;nÂŁ{Â&#x2021;xxĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)390-0125

783 Plumbing Be & Be Plumbing Â&#x153;V>Â?Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160; Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; iĂ?°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; VÂ?i>Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x160; -Â&#x201C;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;LĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;iÂ?VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;i°Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;V°]Ă&#x160;LÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;`i`]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i`°Ă&#x160;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;äĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;£°Ă&#x160; 650/422-0107

Real Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;i 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Ath: Temporary Change in Classified Deadlines Classified deadlines for Weekly and 6Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;"vĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;>VĂ&#x160;,i>`iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;½Ă&#x160; Choice newspapers have been VÂ&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;}i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Â?Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;\ July 18 Voice Friday, July 11 at Noon July 23 Almanac Wednesday, July 16 at Noon July 25 Weekly Monday, July 21 at Noon >Ă&#x20AC;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`i>`Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160; and newspaper ads. www.Fogster.com Mountain View, Studio - $1695 Palo Alto - $4500

805 Homes for Rent Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160; ,Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;°xĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2C6;nää iÂ&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; *>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160; ,Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; - $4300 Menlo Park, 2 BR/1 BA - $3295.00 Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $5,200.00 Palo Alto Home, 4 BR/2 BA - $4800 .mon Palo Alto, 4 BR/3.5 BA - $8995/Mo Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $4,200.00

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms

Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;ää PA: Furn. Room w/pvt. BA and entry. Midtown. N/P, N/S. $750 mo., utils. incl. Call 650/283-8167 Palo Alto - $1600

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Menlo Park, 3 BR/2 BA - $1099000 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $899000 Palo Alto, 4 BR/2 BA Sunnyvale, 3 BR/2 BA - $599999

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage Nevadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3rd Largest Lake 1 acre Bold Waterfront, $69,900 (was fÂŁ{Â&#x2122;]ää䎰Ă&#x160; £°xĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; >Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160; />Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; >Â?Â&#x2C6;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`iĂ&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}iÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; homesites, central water, paved roads, inspiring views. Call 888-526-4407 (CalSCAN)

771 Painting/ Wallpaper

855 Real Estate Services

Glen Hodges Painting Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs. Â&#x203A;Ă&#x17D;xÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;n°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;xäĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2021;nĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;x

All Areas: Roommates.com Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160; VÂ?Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;itĂ&#x160; 6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;\Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;ÂŤ\Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x2030; www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

H.D.A. Painting and Drywall Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2030;iĂ?Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; ÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}]Ă&#x160; `Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x153;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â?Â?i`°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;`]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;>ÂŤiĂ&#x160; >Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;iĂ?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160; est. 650/207-7703 Italian Painter ,iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x2030; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Â?]Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2030;iĂ?Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160; Ă&#x17E;i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; iĂ?°Ă&#x160; Ă?ViÂ?°Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;ivĂ&#x192;°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x153;LĂ&#x160; too small. AFFORDABLE RATES. Free est. Call Domenico, 650/421-6879 STYLE PAINTING Ă&#x2022;Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;ViĂ&#x160; ÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}°Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i`°Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;V°Ă&#x160; 903303. 650/388-8577

FOGSTER.COM Place an ad or for more info

â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013;  July 4, 2014

Fogster.com is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in The Almanac, the Palo Alto Weekly, and the Mountain View Voice.

1VCMJD /PUJDFT 995 Fictitious Name Statement / ,, Ă&#x160; " /,  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;äxxĂ&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ Terrain Biometrics, located at 675 Campbell Technology Parkway, Campbell, CA 95008, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Corporation. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\ "ÂŤĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă?Ă&#x160;/iVÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x153;}Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;V° 675 Campbell Technology Pkwy. Campbell, CA 95008 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 11, 2014. (MVV June 20, 27, July 4, 11, 2014) -" "/1Ă&#x160; / , /"   //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;£äĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ Songgotu International, located at 2005 7iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;``Â?ivÂ&#x2C6;iÂ?`Ă&#x160;,`°Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x203A;Ă&#x201C;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\  1Ă&#x160;7 2005 West Middlefield Rd. ÂŤĂ&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x203A;Ă&#x201C; Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 13, 2014. (MVV June 20, 27, July 4, 11, 2014)

1-/"Ă&#x160;  ,Ă&#x160; ,  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x201C;nÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ Custom Clear Bra, located at 151 >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x203A;]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x153;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; 94041, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\ 7Ă&#x160;7",/< ÂŁxÂŁĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x203A;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;i°Ă&#x160;Â&#x203A; Mountain View, CA 94041 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 6/6/14. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 6, 2014. (MVV June 20, 27, July 4, 11, 2014) 1 +1 Ă&#x160;  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ Unique Nails, located at 1247 W. Â?Ă&#x160; >Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;,i>Â?]Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x153;]Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160; 94040, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\ " Ă&#x160;+19 Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x160;* ÂŁ{ääĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;ÂŤ San Jose, CA 95116 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 6/13/14. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 13, 2014. (MVV June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2014)  "  "½-Ă&#x160;*<< ,  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ >Â?`Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;>`Â&#x153;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2C6;ââiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>]Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁxĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160; South Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\  /" "Ă&#x160;°Ă&#x160; "  " 256 2nd. Ave. Redwood City, CA 94063 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 08-19-99. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 18, 2014. (MVV June 27, July 4, 11, 18, 2014)

,9/Ă&#x160;-"1 -"1Ă&#x160;  9 ",Ă&#x160; -  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;xÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ £°ŽĂ&#x160;,Â&#x2026;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â?]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;°ŽĂ&#x160;-Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â?Ă&#x160;i}>VĂ&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;°ŽĂ&#x160; Nori Design, located at 229 Diablo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\   ,Ă&#x160; ",Ă&#x160;, 229 Diablo Ave. Mtn. View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 24, 2014. (MVV July 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014)  / -1,

 / -1, ° "  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2021;näĂ&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ £°ŽĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i`]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;°ŽĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;i`°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;]Ă&#x160; located at 1305 Terra Bella Ave., Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Corporation. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\ VIMO, INC. 1305 Terra Bella Ave. Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 8/1/2008. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 4, 2014. (MVV July 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014) INKI DROP  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;xĂ&#x17D;ÂŁĂ&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ inki Drop, located at 939 Rich Ave. Apt. 1, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\    Ă&#x160;," ,1 < 939 Rich Ave. Apt. 1 Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 06/01/2014. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 24, 2014. (MVV July 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014) ÂŁnNnĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160; ½-Ă&#x160;-"  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;{Ă&#x2C6;nĂ&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ ÂŁnNnĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;->Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;xĂ&#x2C6;xĂ&#x160; San Antonio Road Suite 24, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Corporation. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\ 7 /-/," Ă&#x160; / ,*,- ÂŁĂ&#x201C;{{Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ?Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i San Mateo, CA 94402 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 23, 2014. (MVV July 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014) 7 -*, Ă&#x160;*-9 "" Ă&#x160; - ,6  //"1-Ă&#x160; 1- --Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; -//  / Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;°\Ă&#x160;xÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x17D;x{Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160; The following person (persons) is (are) `Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;\ Wellspring Psychological Services, Â?Â&#x153;V>Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;Â?>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;i°]Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x203A;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160; Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. /Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;\Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Individual. The name and residence address of the Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x20AC;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x2030;Ă&#x20AC;i}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;­Ă&#x192;ÂŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;­>Ă&#x20AC;iÂŽ\

," Ă&#x160; °Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x17E;Â?iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;i Milpitas, CA 95035 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on June 24, 2014. (MVV July 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014)

WE CAN HANDLE ALL YOUR LEGAL PUBLISHING NEEDS Just call Alicia at (650) 223-6578

270 6 ! "$!# M O U NTAI N VI E W

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY  434  44 """     

"#"$# $ '!  $ $"" # !"!# " !!$ "& # #   ""$##!  " "

DAV I D T R OY E R

  $

$  !! # ! #

(.!   

 # *1/)-0,+2(.,2-0 %   July 4, 2014 â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013; 

27

Happy 4th of July

YOUR DELEON TEAM IN MOUNTAIN VIEW

from Tori Atwell

EXPERTISE:

The True Team Approach to Real Estate

Local Knowledge Global Marketing Professional Advice Comprehensive Solutions Exceptional Results

Surpassing Your Expectations

Tori Ann Atwell Broker Associate Alain Pinel Realtors

(650) 996-0123 CalBRE #00927794 www.ToriSellsRealEstate.com

DeLeon Realty Inc. CalBRE 01903224

650-600-3484 Homes@DeleonRealty.com www.DeLeonRealty.com

521 South Sunnyvale Avenue In Sunnyvale’s desirable Heritage District!

Ever want to have the home that people stop and admire when walking by? Well, this 1938 charmer is your opportunity! 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms (with the perfect opportunity for creating a 3/2 with huge Master Suite!), impressive front living room with soaring ceiling, flat-screen televison system and vintage fireplace, big eat-in kitchen with granite counters, center island and newer stainless steel appliances, basement with laundry area, formal entry, arched doorways, hardwood floors, dual-pane windows throughout, beautifully landscaped yards, front sitting porch, and a two car detached garage.

T ORI ANN ATW ELL 28

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

(650) 996-0123 BRE #00927794 www.ToriSellsRealEstate.com

Tori Ann Atwell Broker Associate Alain Pinel Realtors

Asking: $998,000

Support Local Business

Royce

...and the art of Real Estate

N SU & AT 0PM N S - 4:3 E OP :30 1

27 Moonbeam Drive Mountain View 2 bed | 1.5 ba | 1,174 sq ft Desirable updated townhome with ÂżUHSODFHODUJHOLYLQJURRPIDPLO\ URRPEDOFRQ\SULYDWHSDWLR  FDUJDUDJH

Residential real estate expertise for the mid-peninsula.

Offered at $695,000 :0LGGOHÂżHOG5RDG Mountain View

NICKGRANOSKI

Broker Associate Alain Pinel Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club DRE #00994196

www.NickGranoski.com

3 bed | 3 ba | 2,296 sq ft 5DUHO\DYDLODEOHDQGWDVWHIXOO\ UHPRGHOHGVWRU\ORIWVW\OHFRQGR ZLWKYDXOWHGFHLOLQJEDOFRQLHV  GHWDFKHGFDUJDUDJH

ngranoski@apr.com 650/269â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8556

Selling? Buying? Make the right move. Call...

Offered $895,000

KEVIN KLEMM REALTORÂŽ CalBRE# 01857018

650.269.6964 kevin@kevinklemm.com www.KevinKlemm.com

C

I OM

NG

O SO

N

979 Belmont Terrace Sunnyvale 3 bed | 3 ba | 1,363 sq ft 7RWDOO\UHPRGHOHGWRZQKRPH ZLWKH[SDQGHGNLWFKHQIURQW FRXUW\DUGÂżUHSODFHKLJKFHLOLQJV FDUWDQGHPJDUDJH

List Price TBD

KLEMM

129 Brahms Way Sunnyvale

LE

Aggressive, strategic and thoughtful representation... 5th generation Bay Area resident, 17+ years of local, sales, marketing and negotiation experience For a consultation on what your home may be worth in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market call or text (650) 400-7412

G

IN ND

PE

LE

License #01916058

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is Quality Important to You? We M easure Quality by Resultsâ&#x20AC;? Yvonne Heyl o w T f o

Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x2C6;xäŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2122;{Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;{Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2122;{ r e Pow

iÂ?Â?Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x2C6;xäŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021;{äxx , Â&#x203A;Ă&#x160;ä£Ă&#x201C;xxĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁ Ă&#x17E;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x17E;Â?JÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i>Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Jeff Gonzalez

Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x2C6;xäŽĂ&#x160;Â&#x2122;{Ă&#x2021;Â&#x2021;{Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x2122;n

iÂ?Â?Ă&#x160;­{änÂŽĂ&#x160;nnnÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;{n , Â&#x203A;Ă&#x160;ääÂ&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;nĂ&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x17D; Â?}Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;â>Â?iâJÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i>Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Team BRE# 70000637 Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;i>Â&#x2DC;`Â?ivvJÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;i>Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C; {Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ääĂ&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;{äĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x201C; Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2DC;i>Â&#x2DC;`Â?ivv°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

2 bed | 1 ba | 720 sq ft 6LQJOHOHYHOWRZQKRPHHQGXQLW ZLWKQRRQHDERYHRUEHORZ 2SHQNLWFKHQLQVLGHODXQGU\ SDWLR GHWDFKHGFDUJDUDJH

List Price $499,000

JOSH FELDER 650.400.7412 jfelder@apr.com

SA

ING

7LFRQGHURJD'ULYH

SA

Sunnyvale

ND

PE

3 bed | 2 ba | 1,815 sq ft :HOODSSRLQWHGKRPHZLWKIDPLO\ URRPVHSDUDWHGLQLQJURRPXSGDWHG HDWLQNLWFKHQ DWWDFKHGFDUJDUDJH

List Price $998,000 Sold with 15 offers!

Royce Cablayan

BRE# 01062078 The #1 Selling Agent in Mountain View since 1995

 Â&#x2021;goroyce@gmail.com www.reroyce.com

Colleen Rose

BRE# 01221104  Â&#x2021;colleen@serenogroup.com

The Royce Group

@TheRoyceGroup

July 4, 2014 â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013; 

29

Support Local Business

I can see your house from here!

Wishing you and your family a great 4th of July

Wishing you and your loved ones a happy 4th of July

t'JOEEFBMTBOE DPVQPOT Francis C. ROLLAND

kim.copher@cbnorcal.com www.justcallkim.com

t.BLF QVSDIBTFT t8SJUFBOE SFBESFWJFXT

No one knows your neighborhood like your neighbor

KIM COPHER 650.917.7995

The online guide to Mountain View businesses

Sr. Consultant - Coldwell Banker - Since 19 85 CalBRE# 00896319 Direct: 650-947-2259 Francis@Frolland.com www.Frolland.com

BRE #01423875

t#VZHJGU DFSUJöDBUFT t%JTDPWFSMPDBM CVTJOFTTFT ShopMountainView.com

fogster.com The Peninsula’s free classifieds website Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers! To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or at fogster.com

No phone number in the ad?

GO TO FOGSTER.COM 30

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ July 4, 2014

SOLD by Pam Blackman (partial list)

I have had the pleasure of bringing

Buyers Sellers 16+ Years and

together

9 2 3

O R E G O N

PALO ALTO

COMING NEX T WEEK

for

s 4RUSTS s .EW#ONSTRUCTION s %XCHANGES s ,UXURY0ROPERTIES s #ONDOMINIUMS s 2ELOCATIONS s 3ENIORS

CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST S E N I O R S R E A L E S TAT E S P E C I A L I S T

$/./4MISSTHISAMAZING 0ALO!LTOOPPORTUNITYINTHESOUGHT AFTER'REEN'ABLESNEIGHBORHOOD

Pam knows how to get it done and she is very patient and reliable. Top Qualities: Great Results, Expert, High Integrity. n("

650.947.4798

Pam@PamBlackman.com www.PamBlackman.com CalBRE# 00584333

INCREASE YOUR EXPOSURE Get your name known in the community. Showcase your listings to thousands of potential buyers and sellers.

A V E .

sBEDROOMS ANDBATHS s!PPROXIMATELY  SQUAREFEET s"RIGHTWITH NATURALLIGHT ANDBEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED s(ARDWOODmOORS THROUGHOUTTHE LIVINGAREASAND DUALPANEWINDOWS s%AT INKITCHENWITHNEWERWHITE APPLIANCES RECENTLYREPLACED ELECTRICCOOKTOP ANDPAINTED CABINETRYWITHDESIGNERCOLORS s#OVEREDPATIO EXTENDINGFROM THEKITCHEN ISPRIVATE SERENE AND PERFECTFORENTERTAINMENT

s%ASYACCESSTO(IGHWAY s,OCATEDONA  SQUARE FOOT LOTINANAMAZINGLYQUIETPARTOF /REGON!VENUE s%XCELLENT0ALO!LTOSCHOOLS $UVENECK%LEMENTARY *ORDAN -IDDLE AND0ALO!LTO(IGH BUYERTOVERIFY

/&&%2%$!4$1,795,000

Call Rosemary at the Mountain View Voice 650-964-6300

Sunny Kim

David Chung

 SKIM APRCOM

 DCHUNG APRCOM

"2%

"2%

W W W $ A V I D A N D 3 U N NY C O M

Buying or selling a home? Try out the Mountain Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Online real estate site, the most comprehensive place for local real estate listings. We offer the one online destination that lets you fully explore: s)NTERACTIVEMAPS s(OMESFORSALE s/PENHOUSEDATESANDTIMES s6IRTUALTOURSANDPHOTOS

s0RIORSALESINFO s.EIGHBORHOODGUIDES s!REAREALESTATELINKS sANDSOMUCHMORE

Our comprehensive online guide to the Midpeninsula real estate market has all the resources a home buyer, agent or local resident could ever want and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all in one easy-to-use, local site!

Agents: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to explore our unique online advertising opportunities. Contact your sales representative or call 650-326-8210 today to ďŹ nd out more.

Explore area real estate through your favorite local website:

PaloAltoOnline.com

PaloAltoOnline.com TheAlmanacOnline.com MountainViewOnline.com And click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;real estateâ&#x20AC;? in the navigation bar.

TheAlmanacOnline.com

MountainViewOnline.com Š2014 Embarcadero Publishing Company

July 4, 2014 â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013; 

31

)&9/5!2%,//+).' &/2!2%!,4/24/(%,09/5

FIND YOUR IDEAL HOME 0,%!3%')6%-%!#!,, I OFFER: s&ASTRESPONSETIMESDAYORNIGHT s%XCELLENTNEGOTIATIONSKILLSTOHELPYOUGETAGREATDEAL s!RElNEDSYSTEMTOMAKETHEWHOLEPROCESSSMOOTHAND EASYFORYOU s!CONSULTINGAPPROACHTOHELPYOU RATHERTHANAhSALESvAPPROACH s#ONTACTSWITHEXCELLENTCONTRACTORS ANDMORTGAGELENDERS s)MWELL CONNECTEDWITHMANY OTHERLOCALAGENTSGIVINGMYCLIENTSA COMPETITIVEADVANTAGE

MICHAEL GALLI 02%3)$%.43#,5" 650.248.3076 | Michael@apr.com | BRE# 01852633 32

â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013;  July 4, 2014


Mountain View Voice July 4, 2014