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FOOD FOR THOUGHT WEEKEND | P.16

FEBRUARY 3, 2012 Volume 20, NO. 2

650.964.6300

INSIDE: MOVIES | PAGE 18

MountainViewOnline.com

City officials upset at loss of tax district By Daniel DeBolt

A

COURTESY RICK KRAMER

Mountain View High School students don’t let winter weather keep them out of the new pool.

MVHS debuts new pool with a splash By Nick Veronin

T

he local high school district marked the completion of a major Measure A-funded construction project on Tuesday morning — with a splash. District officials and a group of students gathered at the Mountain View High School campus on Jan. 31 to celebrate the opening of a new 30-meter

swimming pool and weight room facility, which was finished on time and on budget, according Joe White, superintendent of business services for the Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District. Despite the chilly weather, after a brief dedication ceremony a group of swimmers and water polo players plunged into the pool, which will allow Mountain View High School

to hold swim meets and water polo games for the first time in its history, said White. The old pool, originally built in the 1960s, was “too small to host swimming competitions and too shallow for official water polo matches,” according to a district press release. The new pool has space for 10 regulation-size swimming See POOL, page 14

Hacker Dojo’s doors to stay open FUNDRAISING EFFORT BEGINS WITH $250,000 GOAL By Daniel DeBolt

A

fter the city threatened to shut Hacker Dojo down on Jan. 31, a fire alarm being installed at the last minute will allow computer programmers to use the gathering space as long as a continued effort is made to meet city codes. Hacker Dojo hired Statcom to install a fire alarm, but the contractor couldn’t get it done before

INSIDE

the city’s deadline. “We feel they are acting in good faith,” said City Attorney Jannie Quinn on Monday, explaining the decision to extend Hacker Dojo’s deadline. If the Dojo doesn’t follow through with installing the fire alarm, a hearing could be set for March 6 where an administrative law judge will decide whether to shut the Dojo down or give it more time, Quinn said.

Dojo directors announced Monday that they were kicking off a campaign to raise $250,000 for a “triage” list of building requirements: fire sprinklers, fire exits and bathrooms that meet the requirements of the American Disabilities Act. “The fire and safety systems are a top priority,” said Katy Levinson, one of the Dojo’s direcSee HACKER, page 10

GOINGS ON 19 | MARKETPLACE 20 | REAL ESTATE 22 | VIEWPOINT 15

“Many of the schools think they are going to be getting a windfall, but all this means is the state is no longer is going to be back-filling” school budgets, Kasperzak said. “They’ll be getting the same money, from a different source. It’s going to be a big surprise to people. People will say, ‘Where is the money?’”

state-ordered shutdown of Mountain View’s Downtown Revitalization Authority took effect Wednesday, and city officials are not happy. “Midnight tonight is the execution, no more redevelopment authorities tomorrow,” said Mayor Mike Kasperzak on Lost funds, lost Tuesday. “I am infuriated by property what the Legislature has done,” The law disbanding redevelhe said, questioning the ben- opment agencies also nullifies efits. the last-minLike 400 other ute transfers ‘Taxpayers are of downtown redevelopment agencies in the property (an going to get the acre estimated state, the City Council-conto be worth $5 short end of trolled downtown million) and Authority will stop funds ($5.5 the stick.’ receiving property million) from taxes Wednesday, the Authority MAYOR MIKE KASPERZAK some $4.4 milto the city last lion a year from March, not long a 16-block area of downtown. after Gov. Jerry Brown proposed The 1969 tax district is credited to shut redevelopment agencies with transforming Castro from down. The move was part of a a nearly deserted street to a pop- wave of last-ditch efforts by citular, vibrant destination. City ies before Brown’s proposal was officials had hoped to do more approved by the state Legislawith the money, such as improve ture. broadband access downtown, The oversight committee could assemble more properties for uphold the transfer, but the posredevelopment and fund the sibility of losing the property, facade improvement of Ava’s now pieces of parking lots on Downtown Market, which is Bryant and Franklin streets, in a struggling to transform itself state-ordered “fire sale,” is frusinto the popular downtown trating to city officials. grocery store residents have “Investors are going to get a demanded for years. steal and taxpayers are going to As was Gov. Jerry Brown’s get the short end of the stick,” intent, the Authority’s money Kasperzak said. “It’s nuts.” will now be distributed to The Authority had been assemlocal schools and government bling the six parcels downtown agencies, and used to pay off for redevelopment since 1989. the Authority’s $36 million in The properties include half of debt until 2019. But it remains the parking lot at California and unclear whether there will be a Bryant streets (.67 acre), and a benefit for schools. Kasperzak, piece of a parking lot on Franklin also president of the League of Street between Dana and Villa California Cities, claims there See RDA, page 9 won’t be.

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Nice 3bd/2.5ba two-story townhouse in the Vineyards complex. MBR with vaulted ceilings, fireplace and a deck overlooking the gardens. 1-car garage. $525,000

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

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Asked in downtown Mountain View. Photos and interviews by Anna Li.

How do you feel about school lunches? “I don’t usually have my kids eat school lunches. They could have more wholesome food. Even though they try, I think they could get rid of the sweet drinks and do better.” Lisa Gefken, Mountain View

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The Mountain View Voice (USPS 2560) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Periodicals Postage Paid at Palo Alto CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free upon request to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.

Mountain View Whisman School District K-8 ENROLLMENT 2012-2013 BEGINS FEBRUARY 1* DISTRICT OFFICE / 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

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More information: 650.526.3500, ext. 1001 www.mvwsd.org

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community

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Inspirations Photo of Emily and Olivia Porat bobbing in the Dead Sea, Israel. Take a photo with the Mountain View Voice on your next trip and email to digitalads@paweekly.com

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  FEBRUARY 3, 2012

Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-223-6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com

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■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Bullis, LASD continue to butt heads

USPS may move mail service to Los Altos

By Nick Veronin

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he battle between Bullis Charter School and the Los Altos School District con-

By Daniel DeBolt

M

ountain View businesses that move large amounts of mail through the Post Office may soon have to make a trip to Los Altos to do so, according to a new proposal from the U.S. Postal Service. A letter sent to business customers of the Postal Service says the agency plans to study the closure of Mountain View’s “Business Mail Entry Unit” at 211 Hope St. and consolidate its operations with the Los Altos-Loyola BMEU at 1525 Miramonte Ave. near Loyola Corners. The proposed closure of the service in Mountain View was met with critical remarks from Mayor Mike Kasperzak. “We’ve got twice the population of Los Altos,” Kasperzak said. “I support what the Postal Service is trying to do to get its costs under control, but it sure seems a little backwards.” Postal Service spokesperson Jim Wigdel said the retail operation at the main Mountain View post office on Hope Street would stay. “What we’re considering is possibly consolidating two BMEU’s that are fairly close to each other,” Wigdel said. “It has nothing to do with retail. If we were even considering closing a post office, there’s public meetings that have to be held.” Why it makes sense to move the service to Los Altos rather than the other way around is still being analyzed, said Ricky Chan, manager of customer services for the USPS’s offices in San Francisco. “It would depend on a lot of factors which we haven’t analyzed yet,” Chan said. “If enough customers say we would rather have it the other way, we would consider it.” Chan said it was too early to say if staff would be laid off at See POST OFFICE, page 10

MICHELLE LE

Titus Ares teaches the rules of the game to Monta Loma students (from left) Rashel Galindo, Tyler Gaw, Sadie Jacobsen, Katie Carrillo and Kassia Engelmann on Jan. 27.

Playing to learn at recess MONTA LOMA PROGRAM STRESSES THE IMPORTANCE OF SCHOOLYARD GAMES By Nick Veronin

B

ehavior referrals are down and kids are more focused in class, thanks to a new program that brings greater structure to recess at Monta Loma Elementary, a school official said. Now in its third year at the school, the Playworks program

has helped improve student conduct and concentration by getting more children to participate in an organized sport or schoolyard activity, said Cathy Baur, principal of Monta Loma. According to Baur, before the introduction of program many children would spend their free time aimlessly wan-

dering around the playground or congregating in groups, which can lead to trouble. “Idle hands...” Baur explained, trailing off without completing the idiom. Things are different these days. On Jan. 27, Baur walked around her school’s playSee PLAYWORKS, page 14

New rules for healthier school lunches By Nick Veronin

A

week after the First Lady and the nation’s agriculture secretary unveiled new federal standards for school meals, local education officials are still figuring out exactly what the new nutrition rules will mean for Mountain View schools. While it is still unclear what it will take to comply in terms of money and training, superintendents at both the Mountain View Whisman and Mountain ViewLos Altos school districts agreed that it was good to be located in a health conscious part of a health

conscious state. In many ways, the Mountain View Whisman School District is “ahead of the curve,” said Superintendent Craig Goldman. “We view federal guidelines as a floor, not a ceiling,” Goldman said. “We have ongoing discussions about how to improve the quality, nutrition and appeal of the food we serve to children.” A significant component of the Michelle Obama-endorsed Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, the new U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines call for more fruits, vegetables and whole grains, a reduction of

processed, salty and fatty meals, and limiting the number of calories served to children based upon age. “California is way ahead of the federal curve,” said Joe White, superintendent of business services at the Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District. According to White, some of the new requirements coming down the pike have already been implemented in his district. For example, he said, MVLA already serves fruit on a daily basis, as well as fat free and reduced fat milk. See FOOD RULES, page 10

tinues. Officials from the local charter school have rejected the preliminary offer of facilities approved by the district board Jan. 30 — calling the district’s proposal unacceptable, unfair and illegal less than two weeks after it seemed the entire conflict had come to an end. “I’m deeply disappointed by the offer,” Bullis board member Anne Marie-Gallagher said. “It astonishes me. I don’t believe the offer is legally compliant.” Marie-Gallagher said the district has once again failed to offer the charter school “reasonably equivalent” facilities as required by law. She said the district’s new offer proposes to give Bullis facilities on two campuses — with students in kindergarten through sixth-grade continuing at its current site on the Egan Junior High School campus, and putting seventh- and eighthgrade students at Blach Junior High School. “Bullis runs an integrated K-8 program that must be housed together,” Marie-Gallagher said. Splitting the school over two sites, she added, is “just not fair.” Mark Goines, president of the LASD board of trustees, contends his district’s offer is in line with the final order handed down Jan. 18 by a California appellate court, ending a lengthy legal conflict over school facilities. Goines said that splitting the school is the only tenable option the district has — outside of building an entirely new campus. Given Bullis’ current size, the only way to accommodate the school on a single campus would be to close a school and replace it with the charter, he said. Goines said that Bullis has repeatedly requested that the district do just that with its Gardner Bullis School in Los Altos Hills. “I think it’s unreasonable to ask other families to give up their neighborhood school for the benefit of their charter school,” Goines said. “Nowhere in the law does it say we must close a highperforming school to make room See BULLIS, page 10

FEBRUARY 3, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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Simitian leads fundraising for supervisor race By Gennady Sheyner

J

oe Simitian’s quest to retake his former seat on the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors is benefiting from a strong lead in cash raised, newly released campaign-finance documents show. Simitian, a former Palo Alto mayor who is now in the final year of his term in the state Senate, has raised more than $96,000 as of the end of 2011, compared to about $55,000 raised by Kathleen King. Simitian and King were vying for the seat currently held by Liz Kniss, but King announced Tuesday that she is no longer in the race. King told the Voice that she is suspending fundraising and withdrawing due to her son’s medical condition. His health had been worsening, and he was just hospitalized for a week, she said. “I work full time, I have these issues going on (at home), it’s just a little too much to run a major campaign at this time,” King said. Simitian’s campaign funds came from a broad range of contributors, including local developers, businesses, labor unions, individual donors and other political campaigns. The campaign of Alan Lowenthal, Simitian’s colleague in

the state Senate, gave Simitian’s campaign $500, as did the Senate campaigns of Juan Vargas and Kevin de Leon. Former Palo Alto Mayor Gary Joe Simitian Fazzino contributed another $500 to Simitian’s campaign, while Councilwoman Nancy Shepherd gave $100. Simitian also drew $500 contributions from various unions, including the California Association of Highway Patrolmen, the California Nurses Association and the California Professional Firefighters. He also received $500 contributions from several major companies, including Applied Materials and Union Pacific Railroad. Palo Alto developers also chipped in. Charles “Chop” Keenan and Roxy Rapp each donated $500, while Jim Baer gave Simitian’s campaign $300. Simitian also loaned $10,000 to his own campaign. King, a former Saratoga mayor who now serves as executive director of the Santa Clara Fam-

NCOMMUNITYBRIEFS

FREE PROGRAM TO REDUCE ENERGY BILLS ily Health Foundation, drew much of her campaign cash from health-care professionals, businesses and residents in the central and southern parts of the county, including Saratoga, San Jose and Campbell. She received $500 contributions from top executives at various Saratoga companies, including ME Fox and Co., PMG and Cirrus Logic. Michele Bolton, owner of Executive Edge Consulting in Campbell, contributed $500, as did the company’s chief operating officer, Lloyd Bolton. King also received $500 payments from Joanne Allen, president and CEO of Daughters of Charity Health Systems and the Children’s Recovery Center. Nutritionist Nancy King contributed another $500, while Paul Taylor, chief executive officer of Momentum for Mental Health gave $100. The campaign-finance documents also show Simitian outspending King by a two-to-one margin. He had spent $14,924 as of Dec. 31, compared to King’s $7,471. —Andrea Gemmet contributed to this report V

Nine months after the Energy Upgrade Mountain View (EUMV) program began, the city confirmed that residents who participated reduced the cost of their energy bills. Residents who sign up online allow the city to access their PG&E bills. They receive a personalized report that breaks down how much energy their household uses and for which appliances. The city offers inhome visits and free power strips to reduce energy in the program. High-energy users may qualify for an energy meter that detects energy usage in real-time. “We enable residents to get a good sense of where their energy is being used, and how they can reduce it through no- and low-cost measures,” said Steve Attinger, the environmental sustainability coordinator. The free service is available to all Mountain View residents including owners and renters of single-family homes, mobile homes, apartments and townhouses. Information is available at www. energyupgradeMV.org. —Anna Li

CHEERLEADERS SEEK FUNDS FOR NATIONALS The Los Altos High School cheerleaders are holding an e-waste recycling event on Saturday, March 3 to raise money so the team can compete in the 2012 USA Spirit National Championships. The cheerleading team won first place at the USA Regional competition this January, beating two-time national champions Notre Dame High School. The Los Altos team will compete for the national title at Disneyland on March 30. The fundraiser on March 3 is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Los Altos High School, 201 Almond Avenue, Los Altos. They will collect electronic waste, including TVs, computers, laptops, cell phones, printers, scrap metal, mice, keyboards, microwaves ovens and appliances. “I’ve seen a huge change in all the girls’ attitudes. This is very important and they’re passionate about it,” says their coach, Nikia Crawley. “Our main focus is fundraising because not everyone can financially pay for such a big trip. My biggest goal is for them to see all their hard work pays off for them.” For information, contact Crawley at losaltoscheercoach@yahoo.com. —Anna Li

WE WANT YOUR IDEAS. North Bayshore Precise Plan

www.NorthBayshorePrecisePlan.org 6

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

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Kaiser strike shutters psychiatry department NURSES UNION JOINS WALKOUT, CITING DEEP CUTS IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES By Nick Veronin

T

he department of psychiatry at the Mountain View branch of Kaiser Permanente closed its doors on Jan. 31 as a direct result of a union strike. All four members of the National Union of Healthcare Workers working at the local Kaiser facility — all of whom worked within the department of psychiatry — participated in a 24-hour statewide strike, organized by the labor group. The California Nurses Association, an affiliate of the National Nurses United union organized a “sympathy strike” in coordination with the NUHW protest. Ken Rogers, who works at a Kaiser facility in Campbell, explained that while no psychiatrists in the department are represented by his union, the department was closed as a result of all four NUHW psychologists walking away from their posts. “Kaiser management has not been bargaining in good faith,” said Rogers, a psychologist and shop steward with the National Union of Healthcare Workers. The union is upset with “unnecessary delays” in negotiations and proposed reductions to health benefits and freezes to pensions. Rogers added that he would be more sympathetic to the cuts if Kaiser reported that spiraling benefits costs were hurting the organization. However, he said, “This is an organization that has made $5.6 billion in profit over the past three years.” No union members picketed the Mountain View facility; protests were held outside a Kaiser location in Santa Clara. “Kaiser Permanente Northern California has been bargaining in good faith with NUHW for more than a year, and we will continue to do so,” said a statement from Kaiser Permanente. “We are disappointed in NUHW’s decision to strike. We recognize their legal right to conduct a strike, but believe differences are best resolved at the bargaining table.” The statement went on to criticize the strikers for inconveniencing patients attempting to access Kaiser services that had been shut down as a result of the strike. Rogers said that all of the union members who were planning to walk out had done their best to help reschedule patients in order to avoid putting patients out. “We don’t enjoy inconveniencing patients,” he said. “That is a negative.” However, he added, it was something the union had to weigh against the goals of the strike. According to Rogers, in addition to protesting cuts in

benefits and pensions, the union was upset by patient inconveniences he claimed were caused by Kaiser management. “We don’t consider the way they’ve been treated to be acceptable,” he said, asserting that the policies of Kaiser management have done much more to inconvenience patients than a single 24-hour strike could ever do. Liz Jacobs, communications spe-

cialist with the California Nurses Association, said her union joined in solidarity with the NUHW because Kaiser nurses in Northern California have seen mental health services atrophy at the healthcare organization in recent years even as Kaiser has been “quite profitable.” Jacobs did not have any official count of how many nurses walked out of the Mountain View Kaiser location. V

Working Together Works By Anna G. Eshoo

I

t seems like only yesterday that our Valley was preparing for “Netday.” It was 1996 and Sun Microsystems, Cisco, Apple and many other leading companies planned, in barn raising fashion, to wire schools. If the internet could educate, it should surely be in classrooms! John Gage of Sun was the project’s Chief Evangelist and before long, employees, vendors and educators were at work filling up rosters of volunteers at school sites. Cable was donated and engineers consulted. Enthusiasm and resources quickly spread across the country. On the assigned day, then-Vice Prsident Al Gore pulled wires at a high school in Contra Costa County and nearly half the Clinton Cabinet were engaged – several in California. Mayors, legislators, local officials – including many school board members joined in. The imagination, vision, know-how and purpose that produced Netday became a permanent part of tech folklore. Private initiative with government support lifted and gifted schools and their communities. Over the years, the relationship between government and the tech industry, not surprisingly, has had its ups and downs. That’s as it should be. Industry is understandably self-interested and government must advance the public’s interest. Yet, government’s ongoing role removing barriers, leading investment and prompting a supportive climate for industry expansion hasn’t always been featured in the Tech Narrative. So it was with some interest that I noted the recent news about job growth in the Valley last year. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, over the past 12 months the South Bay job market grew by 3.2%, nearly triple the U.S. rate of growth and almost double the rate for California. Why is it that Silicon Valley companies are the first to rebound and expand following lean times? Talent, capital and a culture of inventiveness and experimentation are certainly essential to our region’s success. Curiosity, a high regard for education and a willingness to fail add to our brand. “Government policy” rarely gets a mention in the story. It is common to hear “only the private sector can create jobs.” Government is cast as an impediment to progress and rarely recognized as the vehicle for progress that it is. At critical junctures, government policies advance and expand industries, creating new jobs.

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Saturday, February 4 at 7:30 pm St. Bede’s Episcopal Church 2650 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park (Reception follows)

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This ad sponsored by Ginny Kavanaugh and Joe Kavanaugh of Coldwell Banker, Portola Valley. Visit them at www.thekavanaughs.com

Sunday, February 5 at 2:30 pm Los Altos United Methodist Church 655 Magdalena (at Foothill Expressway) Los Altos (Reception at intermission)

For the past thirty years the R&D tax credit, for example, has rewarded a company’s investment in research and development. Valley Members of Congress have worked to make the R&D tax credit permanent because we know that government support for innovation is one of the best ways to foster job growth. I’m proud to have written a bill to expand and permanently extend the Research and Development tax credit. Consider my e-commerce legislation that enabled online signatures to be legally binding on digital documents. Sounds almost quaint today, but it is a clear example of government removing a barrier to commercial progress. Who could have imagined online banking as it is practiced today, but the on-line signature was its ancestor. The solar industry offers another example of government enhancing a Silicon Valley vision. The scientific community’s recognition of climate change led to demand for alternative sources of energy. In Congress, we appropriated funds for high risk, high reward clean energy research and we extended a renewable energy grant program that provided grants in lieu of existing tax credits to spur job growth in the solar and wind industries. Investors saw their opportunity and solar and wind companies grew. So the next time you hear carping about obstructionist, gridlocked government, remember that sometimes government gets it right; sometimes growth is unleashed by a digital signature or sparked by a federal grant. Sometimes public-private partnerships work. When they do, it can mean a computer company in Silicon Valley has a new customer in Iowa or a social media site has more room to grow on the spectrum. And government did that. Not that different from pulling wire at schools, working together works. Anna G. Eshoo (D-Palo Alto) represents California’s 14th Congressional District and serves as the ranking member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Communications and Technology subcommittee

Paid for by Anna Eshoo for Congress FEBRUARY 3, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

7

Palo Alto Medical Foundation Community Health Education Programs

February

-OUNTAIN6IEW   s0ALO!LTO   

&ORACOMPLETELISTOFCLASSESANDCLASSFEES LECTURES ANDHEALTHEDUCATIONRESOURCES VISITpamf.org/healtheducation.

Lectures and Workshops

Cancer Care

Hypertension and the Heart: Practical Ways to Reduce Your Risk For Your Health Community Lecture Series

– Exercise for Energy – men and women’s group – Expressions – Healing Imagery – Healing Touch

Presented by Deepu Nair, M.D., PAMF Cardiology Tuesday, Feb. 14, 7 – 8:30 p.m. 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View 650-934-7373

Childbirth and Parent Education Classes

Understand the prevalence of high blood pressure and its effects on the heart and blood vessels, identify the key risk factors for hypertension and their relative importance and learn what you can do to reduce your risk for high blood pressure and how to treat it if it develops.

The Facts About Losing Weight with Weight Loss Surgery San Carlos Library Lecture Series Presented by John Feng, M.D., FACS, PAMF Bariatric & General Surgery Monday, Feb. 27, 7 – 8:30 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos 650-591-0341 Join us for a discussion that will focus on the different types of weight loss surgery. The discussion will include health issues related to excess weight gain, pros and cons of surgery and weight loss surgery results.

– – – – – – – –

Baby Safety Basics Breastfeeding Childbirth Preparation Feeding Your Young Child Infant and Child CPR Infant Care Infant Emergencies and CPR Introduction to Solids

– Healthy Eating After Cancer Treatment – Look Good, Feel Better – Qigong – When Eating is a Problem, During Cancer Treatment

– Mother-Baby Circle – New Parent ABC’s – All About Baby Care – OB Orientation – Prenatal Yoga – Sibling Preparation – What to Expect with Your Newborn

Living Well Classes – Back School – Mind/Body Stress Management – Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

Nutrition and Diabetes Classes Mountain View, 650-934-7177 s Palo Alto, 650-853-2961

– Diabetes Management – Healthy Eating with Type 2 Diabetes – Heart Smart (cholesterol management)

– Living Well with Prediabetes – Sweet Success Program (gestational diabetes)

Upcoming Lectures and Workshops in March For Your Health Community Lecture Series s %AT9OUR7AYTO4RUE(APPINESS Nutrition Strategies to Boost Your Mood, Curb Your Cravings and Keep the Pounds Off (Palo Alto) Library Lecture Series s Environmental Healthy Living (Sunnyvale) s Kidney Stones (San Carlos) Parent Workshop Series s Sleep and Your Child (Mountain View)

8

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

Weight Management Programs – Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery Program – Healthy eating. Active lifestyles. (for parents of children ages 2-12)

s 1-888-398-5597

– HMR Weight Management Program – Lifesteps® (adult weight management) – New Weigh of Life (adult weight management)

Support Groups – – – – –

AWAKE Bariatric Surgery Breastfeeding Cancer CARE

– – – – –

Chronic Fatigue Diabetes Drug and Alcohol Kidney Multiple Sclerosis

-PDBM/FXT BW[Sb]P`SOYc^eWbVg]c`]ZRe]`Y]cbO\R

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The Authority bought the properties using loans from the city. In a staff report, city officials said one reason for the transfer was that “the value of the six parcels is at least equal to the debt amount.� The city was still owed $2 million, half of which was interest. As for the redevelopment funds transferred to the city in March, the council transferred the $5.5 million to the city’s capital improvement budget to allow the city to continue its strategic property acquisitions downtown. New committee usurps city By May 1, the city hands control of the Authority’s funds and obligations to an oversight committee of school, county and city officials who will have the final word on how to pay off the Authority’s debts, liquidate any assets, and disburse as much as $10 million in unspent funds. It will have seven representatives: two from the County Board of Supervisors, one from the County Office of Education, one from the Chancellor of California Community Colleges, a former employee of the Authority appointed by the mayor, another mayor appointee and a representative of the largest special district in the area. “We’re still having some discussion about who the largest district is,� said Mountain View’s economic development director, Ellis Berns, who added that it could be the Santa Clara Valley Water District or the city’s downtown parking district. Despite the loss of funds and potential loss of property, city officials say the loss of its redevelopment agency is a smaller loss for Mountain View than other cities. The Authority had been set to sunset in 2011, and was granted a two-year extension to “wind down in an orderly fashion.� The city’s general fund is expected to take a hit of only $580,000 in taking on the ongoing expenses of the Authority, mostly in administrative expenses in order to retain Berns and his assistant Tiffany Chu. “We had really strived towards sun-setting the agency in an organized fashion,� Berns said of the city’s previous plans, which would have paid off the city’s debts a few years earlier, by 2016. “What this legislation has done is create some confusion and lack of clarity in what exactly are the steps. And it takes control away from our local community.�

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FEBRUARY 3, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

9

-PDBM/FXT FOOD RULES

Continued from page 5

Schools will get an increase in federal funding for implementing the rules of the act — 6 cents for every meal served. The new regulations mark the first significant raising of public school food standards in more than 15 years. In a press release issued by the USDA, the First Lady said the legislation was meant to ensure that kids eat as well at school as they do at home. “As parents, we try to prepare decent meals, limit how much junk food our kids eat, and ensure they have a reasonably balanced diet,� Obama said. “When we send our kids to school, we expect that they won’t be eating the kind of fatty, salty, sugary foods that we try to keep them from eating at home.� Carol Chase, nutrition education administrator for the California Department of Education, said the new rules will begin going into effect on July 1. According to her, the USDA wants schools to work on getting lunches compliant first; districts won’t be responsible for making sure breakfast programs are in line with the new standards until July

BULLIS

Continued from page 5

high-performing school to make room for a charter.� If he had the money and the community support he would gladly approve the construction of a new campus, he said. “The idea that they will build us

1, 2013. It’s a good thing that California schools have more time to revamp their breakfast programs, according to Chase. Breakfast is a discretionary program and since Congress has yet to approve any increase in breakfast reimbursements to help pay for the changes, some feared that schools would simply eliminate their morning offerings, leaving many low-income California children to go hungry. While Mountain View may be ahead of the national curve, Chase said the new rules will surely prove challenging to many schools California. “We are concerned about the majority of our districts,� she said. With the emphasis on serving more fresh foods, new preparation and food handling protocols will need to be put in place. “When you’re handling fresh fruits and vegetables, it takes additional steps to make sure the food is provided in a safe manner,� she said. Despite her concerns, Chase said that the new rules represent a “net good.� “Our kids spend the majority of their days in school,� she observed, echoing Obama. “We want to make sure the meals they are being provided are meeting nutritional requirements.� V

a timeline sometime in the future doesn’t help us,� Marie-Gallagher said, insisting that Bullis needs space immediately. “We’re simply asking for fairness now, and I don’t believe there is any reason to wait. I simply don’t believe that we need to buy new land and build a new school to accommodate Bullis charter school in this district.� V

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HACKER

Continued from page 1

tors. City officials say the Dojo illegally moved into its industrial warehouse space at 140 S. Whisman Road in late 2009, but was able to get a conditional use permit for one year, which expired and was not renewed. The permit came with several requirements that have yet to be met, including a fire alarm. Levinson said that a fire alarm was being installed over two months ago, but the city forced work to stop because the fire alarm plans weren’t approved. The city said, “You were supposed to check with us,� Levinson recalled. Dojo directors said, “We thought you outlined all the features pretty well. We’re programmers — we were just going to implement the specs.� City building official Anthony Ghiossi said the alarm was also being installed in two additional spaces the Dojo had leased next door that still needed building permits. City officials did not want to say, “Yeah, go ahead and do that (install the fire alarm), but you can’t occupy that space,� because of the lack of permits, Ghiossi said. Levinson said the volunteer-run nonprofit was only recently able to hire staff, one of whom has been working on an almost weekly basis with the city in trying to meet the requirements. Dojo directors say they were frustrated by the Jan. 31 deadline because they had been working as fast as possible to comply. In the longer term, Dojo director

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Brian Klug said the Dojo is taking a new approach in seeking building permits. Efforts will focus on an assembly use, rather than office use. That will allow the Dojo to continue having large conferences, events MICHELLE LE and classes. The Plans for Hacker Dojo to expand into this adjacent space city has ordered are on hold, due to permit problems with the city. the Dojo not to have events with fire sprinklers that could cost over more than 49 people — state fire $100,000. “We have very talented codes require fire sprinklers and people who would like to do some proper fire exits for those. of these systems,� Levinson said. “When they originally came in The state requires a licensed years ago they weren’t having these contractor to handle fire sprinklers big events,� Ghiossi said. “They and alarms, Ghiossi. were having small trainings. If you Another major expense is buildlooked on their website the last ing several American Disabilities part of the year (2011), they were Act-compliant bathrooms. But having events with 150 people or the floor is a concrete slab, which more.� means moving the plumbing The Dojo has opened a large roll- around isn’t a trivial task, Levinson up door the bigger large events to said. provide an exit in case of fire, but When asked if it wouldn’t have Ghiossi said that wasn’t acceptable been easier to just find an office from the city’s point of view. building, Levinson said, “An office “If it was a cold winter night building wouldn’t permit assemand that door is down, you are bly use. It’s hard enough to find trapped,� Ghiossi said. “We don’t a landlord that likes this group monitor every event,� he added. of people. The landlord has been Dojo directors say they had to quite good to us. We’ve had landcancel numerous large events, lords that won’t deal with us. It’s including a job fair and several an unconventional business model conferences and large classes that and they just aren’t interested.� easily draw more than 49 people. Nevertheless, Levinson said the “If you want to host it here you Dojo would be doing a disservice need to stand at the door and when to its members if it didn’t consider the 47th student person enters you the option of moving to a more need to tell the next one that the suitable space. dojo can’t permit this next stu“I would like to stay, I like the dent to come in for fire reasons,� space,� Levinson said. “Having the Levinson said Dojo organizers Dojo has changed the landscape of were told. “A lot of classes don’t the area.� The landlord “gets a lot want to do that.� of referrals for office space because Dojo directors are a bit miffed (certain tenants) want to have that they can’t use their own space space next to the Dojo.� for fundraising events. There are two more years left on “Basically, we’ve been calling the Dojo’s lease, and Levinson said people and been saying, ‘Can we six Dojo members are liable for please use your assembly space?’� those payments themselves if the Levinson said. Dojo can’t make them. Some have criticized the Dojo’s The Dojo is looking to sublease hackers in online forums for not two units next door for at least coming up with a hack to meet four months while they acquire codes with their own sweat equity, building permits to use the spaces. but Levinson says contractors have The 2,400- and 2,860-square-foot to be involved for liability reasons. units have broadband and WiFi That means some potentially high included and are zoned for light costs: a $15,000 fire alarm and industrial uses. V

POST OFFICE

Continued from page 5

one of the offices. The letter sent to local businesses explains, “the U.S. Postal Service is facing one of the most difficult challenges in history. The Postal Service must realign its network to match its resources with mail volume. Consoli-

dating some postal operations and placing our people where we need them makes logical business sense given the economic realities.� The Postal Service is accepting public input on the proposal until Feb. 27; send comments to: Manager Business Mail Entry Re: Mountain View Park BMEU Feasibility Study PO Box 7846 San Francisco, Ca 94120

-PDBM/FXT

Foothill football coach Boyett dies By Keith Peters

D

oug Boyett was a football man and a family man. That was evident when he traveled to Pasadena earlier this month to watch his nephew, John, help the Oregon Ducks beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. “Doug traveled with us to a lot of games,� said his father Dan. “There wasn’t any conflict with Foothill football. He’s made all the big bowl games with us.� Those days of family trips to football games, came to an end for Boyett following his death this past weekend at age 52. Boyett, the head football coach at Foothill College, died in his sleep on Friday night. The cause of death has not yet been determined. Boyett, a former Foothill College student, became a full-time faculty member in 1990 and head coach of the football team in 2007. “He cared deeply for his students and took great pride in their academic accomplishments,

which were numerous under his guidance,� said Foothill president Judy C. Miner in a release to the faculty on Saturday. “He will be greatly missed by his Foothill family.� Boyett took over the Owls’ football program after 20-plus years as the defensive coordinator. In his five years as head coach, the Owls went 41-13 and won four bowl games and finished ranked fourth in the nation in 2007 — the team’s highest national ranking ever. Success on the field also transferred into the classroom with some 90 percent of Boyett’s student-athletes transferring to four-year universities. Boyett attended Foothill and earned his bachelor’s degree in physical education at Chico State. He also held a master’s degree in physical education from St. Mary’s College in Moraga. He was a 1977 graduate of Palo Alto High. He is survived by his wife, Lisa.

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Cupertino’s Chang enters Board of Supervisor’s race (BACE). His long-runarry Chang, a Cupertino ning battle against city councilman who has the Lehigh cement vigorously fought polluplant and quarry tion by the Lehigh Southwest (Permanente) has Cement Company, is challengat times rankled ing state Sen. Joe Simitian for Barry Chang his colleagues. the Santa Clara County Board of He hasn’t minced Supervisors seat. words regarding the county Board The fifth-district seat is currently of Supervisors and what he views as held by former Palo Alto mayor their lax attitude toward the cement Liz Kniss and includes the cities company. He claims the company of Mountain View, Cupertino, produces an estimated 500 pounds Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Monte of mercury annually that could Sereno, Palo Alto, Saratoga, Stan- cause health problems for residents ford, Sunnyvale, West San Jose and the unborn. neighborhoods, and unincorpoCounty Executive Jeffrey Smith rated areas of Santa Clara County. chastised Chang in a May 18, 2011, Kniss is termed out after serving letter for his behavior at two public since 2000. meetings, during which he allegedly Kathleen King of Saratoga accused the county of not exercising announced Tuesday she is with- its enforcement responsibilities at drawing from the race. the Permanente Quarry and saying Chang, a Taiwanese immigrant, the county and a senior planner had is a real estate agent and has a degree lied to residents. in civil engineering. In 1995, he was Chang and other environmentalelected to the Cupertino Union ists won a major victory in July 2011, School District Board of Education when the California Office of Mine and was re-elected in 2003. He also Reclamation notified the cement served four years on the Cuper- operator that it needed to comply tino Public Safety Commission. with pollution and mining laws in He was elected to the Cupertino 30 days or be removed from the City Council in 2009, campaign- government-approved contractor ing on health and safety issues and list, known as the AB 3098 list. is a board member of the group Lehigh then filed a lawsuit against Bay Area for Clean Environment the state.

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2526 Leghorn Street, Mountain View FEBRUARY 3, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

11

2011-2012 Hono

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

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FEBRUARY 3, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

13

-PDBM/FXT

PUBLIC NOTICE FORMER NAVAL AIR STATION MOFFETT FIELD

PLAYWORKS

Continued from page 5

Restoration Advisory Board Meeting   

The next regular meeting of the Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) for former Naval Air Station (NAS) Moffett Field will be held on:

Thursday, February 9, 2012, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at: Mountain View Senior Center Social Hall 266 Escuela Avenue Mountain View, CA 94040-1813

The RAB reviews and comments on plans and activities about the ongoing environmental studies and restoration activities underway at Moffett Field. Regular RAB meetings are open to the public and the Navy encourages your involvement. To review documents on Moffett Field environmental restoration projects, please visit the information repository located at the Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View, CA 94041, (650) 903-6337. For more information, contact Mr. Scott Anderson, Navy Base Realignment and Closure Environmental Coordinator at (619) 532-0938 or scott.d.anderson@navy.mil. Visit the Navy’s website: http://www.bracpmo.navy.mil/basepage.aspx?baseid=52&state=California&name=moffett

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ground, pointing out five distinct Playworks-organized activities: jump rope, four-square, soccer, street hockey and a game called Pac-Man tag. Only a few children did not participate in a game. “Play is essential for kids,” Baur said. For starters, kids need to blow off steam, she said — an assertion that fifth-grade student and Playworks “junior coach” Idalia Lopez agrees with. “If we didn’t have recess, I think kids would be bad in school, because they didn’t get their energy out,” Idalia speculated. But there are additional benefits to the program, aside from combating in-class restlessness and playground mischief. “It’s all about getting them to interact with each other,” said Titus Ares, director of the Playworks program at Monta Loma. Aries, who the kids call “Coach Titus” and Baur calls, “the most popular person on campus,” said that the games provide a gateway to real life skills, such as cooperation, communication and conflict resolution. “We take the chaos of the playground and we

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remold it.” If a minor dispute arises, Ares said, the kids are taught to hold a quick bout of rock, paper, scissors; whoever wins the match wins the argument. On the surface it may seem like a completely arbitrary solution, but each time a conflict is resolved peacefully this way, it reinforces one of the most essential of all adult skills. “They are learning to work it out,” Ares said. “They are learning to compromise.” Additionally, the program recruits student volunteers to help Ares run the games. These fourth- and fifth-grade “junior coaches” learn leadership skills; they are taught the rules of the games so that they may preside over them with a level of authority and help ensure that everybody plays fair. Playworks is administered by a national non-profit organization of the same name. The company was founded in Berkeley in 1996 with one goal: “transform recess and the school day with safe and healthy play, so teachers can teach and kids can learn,” according to its website. Since then, it has spread to more than 300 schools in 23 U.S. cities and reaches approximately 130,000 students every day. The Playworks program at Monta Loma is funded in part by the school’s site fund, but it is also subsidized by the Playworks organization and money from El Camino Hospital. V

POOL

Continued from page 1

lanes and a deep end large enough for water polo. Two shade canopies near the pool and the weight room roof have been fitted with a thermal solar heating system, which White estimated would provide up to 50 percent of the heat for the pool. A new building adjacent to the pool will serve as both a pool house and weight room for the school, White said. Up until now, the MVHS weight room was housed in a converted food services portable. “This is great for the school to have a brand new facilities — to be able to accommodate the students both during the school day with physical education programs, as well as being able to offer afterschool athletic programs,” White said. The completion of the pool and weight room comes after a number of other Measure A-funded projects were installed, including the construction of solar-panel canopies and a new, high-speed wireless Internet system. V

7JFXQPJOU NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F Editor & Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Intern Anna Li Photographer Michelle Le Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Ruth Schecter, Alissa Stallings

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Lili Cao, Shannon Corey, Diane Haas, Paul Llewellyn, Scott Peterson

Advertising Vice President Sales and Marketing Tom Zahiralis Advertising Representatives Judie Block, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Email news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com Email letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   fax (650) 326-0155 Email Classified ads@MV-Voice.com Email Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. Copyright ©2012 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM Post your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com EMAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 223-6507

City ends stand-off with Hacker Dojo

T

hanks to an 11th hour deal, the city and Hacker Dojo appear to at least have a path to the necessary permits for the cooperative space for programmers to operate. Facing a Jan. 31 deadline set by the city to install a list of major improvements or face being red-tagged and closing its doors, Dojo organizers have wisely decided to attempt to raise funds for numerous upgrades at the 140 S. Whisman warehouse that serves as a haven for budding technology-driven entrepreneurs who need an inexpensive place to do their work. The Dojo is close to the ideal home for these programmers, given its Mountain View location and reasonable price — $100 a month. Some 300 members call the Dojo their home base, where they work on their own computers and occasionally attend classes. But the good vibes at the Dojo just about came to an end earlier this week when it appeared that the directors could not find a way to meet the city’s deadline for installing a fire alarm, fire sprinklers, accessible restrooms and other improvements that could cost more than $200,000. Without the necessary funds on hand, the Dojo’s future looked bleak. Then on Monday, an agreement was announced that gives the Dojo until early March when an administrative law judge will decide if enough progress toward correcting the code violations has been made. With work progressing on installing a fire alarm, City Attorney Jannie Quinn said the city felt the Dojo was “acting in good faith,” which was enough to pull back the Tuesday deadline to close the operation. Katy Levinson, a Dojo director, was optimistic, saying the group began a drive on Monday to raise the $250,000 needed to install the remaining improvements that will give the Dojo a clean bill of health from the city. Despite the tug-of-war with the Dojo, the city and the programmers finally were able to reach a compromise and develop a plan to save the facility, which is highly popular and is filling a real need in Mountain View. In addition, when it installs sprinklers and American Disabilities Act-compliant restrooms, the Dojo will be able to seek a permit to be an assembly space and hold large events. Currently, it is an office space, which allowed only 49 participants at any event, a serious handicap for the Dojo. If they can obtain the proper permits, the cooperative will be able to host large conferences and classes which will help them stay afloat financially. It appears that the Dojo’s directors were not wellversed in the city’s permitting process, which in many cases are based on national or state codes and cannot be changed, even if the city officials wanted to. Perhaps the lesson learned here is that there are some rules even hackers have to follow.

■ EDITORIAL ■ YOUR LETTERS ■ GUEST OPINIONS

NLETTERS

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

EL CAMINO BUS LANE CLAIM DISPUTED In your Jan. 20 article, “El Camino bus lanes nixed by council,” Valley Transportation Authority planning manager Kevin Connolly is reported saying that the time it would take to get from Santa Clara to Mountain View would be reduced by only one minute with dedicated bus lanes in the middle of the street. Under questioning from Los Altos City Council member Jarett Fishpaw at the Jan. 24 meeting, Connolly said the claim is based on the assumption that many drivers would divert to other roads like Foothill or Central Expressway to avoid congestion on El Camino. In fact, losing one lane on El Camino would reduce auto capacity by 950 cars. The VTA must use the same spin doctor as the High-Speed Rail Authority. Pat Marriott Los Altos

CITY DROPPED THE BALL ON SHORELINE GOLF In response to Christine Crosby’s letter regarding the Shoreline Golf Links published Jan. 20: While I understand and share Ms. Crosby’s concern about wild bird habitat, she provides no evidence for her assertion that “it is a matter of survival.” To the contrary, the substantial number of Canada geese that make Shoreline their year-round home, and

the coots that take up residence at Shoreline, are not endangered. Their instincts have dictated that they need not fly farther south for the winter. Perhaps global warming is the culprit. While the geese foul the course with their excrement, the coots cause more damage. They use their sharp beaks to pull up the grass by the roots. Several years ago Shoreline implemented an abatement program that was partially successful at discouraging the birds. This year, the city spent a great deal of money filling in several of the ponds but did not continue the abatement program. Consequently, the birds simply relocated to the remaining two large ponds and multiplied. The course is in the worst shape ever; it is not playable at any price, let alone as the most expensive municipal course in the South Bay. This is the fault of the greens keeper and the course manager. All the other golf courses along the South Bay have managed to limit the damage from migratory birds. The Shoreline Golf Links is a public resource that is doubly valuable — as an important recreational opportunity for thousands of residents from all over the Bay Area and as open space along the Bay. What it is not, and never has been, is a dedicated wildlife refuge. We golfers can only hope that the new course manager will do a better job balancing course condition with nature than the city has done in its stewardship. Bill Adler Hedgerow Court

V

FEBRUARY 3, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

â–  FOOD FEATURE â–  MOVIE TIMES â–  BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT

N F O O D R F E AT U R E

Hot lunch jam SILICON VALLEY CHEF BRINGS HIS RESTAURANT ELAN TO THE CASTILLEJA SCHOOL KITCHEN By Sheila Himmel

Y

KELSEY KIENITZ

Forrest Gingold, a veteran chef from La Pastaia, prepares turkey and brie sandwiches for lunch at Castilleja School in Palo Alto.

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S

Pizzeria Venti

ou can take the chef out of the restaurant, but then what happens? Some write cookbooks or memoirs. A few become TV celebrities. In Silicon Valley, many restaurant chefs go to work in homes where they are the only ones whose fingers ever touch a kitchen appliance. Forrest Gingold took another route. He went back to school. After 32 years in Silicon Valley restaurants, Gingold took over the kitchen at Castilleja School in Palo Alto in September 2010. It’s been an adjustment. “I had my first New Year’s Eve and Valentine’s Day in the house I’ve lived in for 21 years,� Gingold

says. “I’m turning into less of a Scrooge� — by which he means grouch — “at Christmastime.� It isn’t a season of marathon hours, no days off, sore back, cuts and burns. “I had two weeks off this year!� Not that Gingold has any kind of “poor me� attitude about his restaurant years. He loved the adrenaline rush. But it was hard to commit to social occasions. He made it to his daughters’ events, but other plans often got hijacked by crises in the kitchen. Now he is amazed at how a person can put something on a calendar and depend on it being correct. Continued on next page

Ossobuco is a classic dish from Milan and features braised Veal shanks in a white wine and tomato sauce. Our simple, yet elegant recipe will be a family favorite for years to come. For your dining pleasure, we offer this recipe.

From our kitchen to yours, BUON APPETITO! Pizzeria Venti Recipe - Chef Carlo Maeda

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OSSOBUCO sTABLESPOONSEXTRAVIRGINOLIVEOIL sSMALLONIONCHOPPEDlNE sCARROTSCHOPPEDlNE sSTALKSOFCELERYCHOPPEDlNE sVEALSHANKSCUTABOUTINCHES thick, each tied tightly cross-wise smOUR SPREADONAPLATE

sCUPDRYWHITEWINE sTABLESPOONSBUTTER s CUPCHICKENBROTH sCUPTOMATOES CRUSHEDWITH their juices sFRESHLYGROUNDPEPPERTOTASTE sSALTTOTASTE

Preparation instructions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in foil pan. Add the onion, carrot and celery. Cook until the vegetables soften, about 10 minutes then drain the oil. 3. Meanwhile, heat the other 4 tablespoons of olive oil in a foil pan. Dredge the veal shanks in the our, coating on all sides and shake off the excess our. When the oil is hot, slip in the shanks and brown them on all sides. This should take about 6-7 minutes per side. Remove the veal shanks and place them in the ďŹ rst pan on top of the cooked vegetables. 4. Add the wine, butter, chicken broth, tomatoes, pepper and salt to the pot. The liquid should come at least two thirds of the way to the top of the shanks. If it does not, add more broth.

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.mvpizzeriaventi.com

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  FEBRUARY 3, 2012

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

5. Cover the pan and place it in the oven. Cook for about 2 hours, turning and basting every 30 minutes, until the meat is very tender. 6. Transfer the Ossobuco to a warm plate and carefully remove the strings. To serve place Ossobuco on a plate with Risotto Milanese, or Pastina pasta in herbed olive oil and garlic.

-PDBM/FXT Continued from previous page

The day he spoke to a reporter, Gingold consulted the calendar to see why there were no kids at school. “Ah, it’s some kind of teacher in-service day.� Most weekdays, he and his staff of six serve 550 meals. Weekly menus are posted online, including soup, grill, entree and dessert items. A recent menu featured celery-root bisque with thyme, baked Mediterranean ziti, barbecued chicken with scalloped potatoes, and cookies. Castilleja students may not see exact replicas of the chef’s signature penne con cavolfiore (pasta quills with cauliflower) or ossobuco di agnello (braised lamb shank), but he has brought much of his restaurant repertoire. And, he says, “Being outside the constraints of an ethnic restaurant has allowed me to branch out quite a lot.� One day he served falafel, the next day, turkey meatloaf. He may have schmoozed with business bigwigs and visiting celebrities in his time, but now “It’s about fitting into a school culture. There are a lot more of them than me.� Castilleja’s being a girls’ school doesn’t faze Gingold, who has two teenage daughters. Gingold entered restaurant

work at 15-and-a-half, when he lied about his age to get a job as a dishwasher at a downtown Los Gatos institution called the Broken Egg. The cook was only too happy to show Gingold and his friend how to make omelets, and pretty soon the teenagers were the A-team, cooking at the restaurant’s peak times: Saturday and Sunday mornings. Gingold met his wife, Mari, when both worked at the Original Crab House in San Jose. She was the hostess and he was cooking, while slogging through community college. That was when he started to think seriously about making food his life. He dropped college and went to the California Culinary Academy, worked a couple of years at Scott’s in San Jose, and then spent most of his career at La Pastaia. In the early 1990s, the restaurant moved to downtown San Jose’s newly restored De Anza Hotel. At one time, La Pastaia also had outlets in Palo Alto and Campbell. Gingold does miss the intensity: “I miss the line on a busy night, working as part of a welloiled machine under pressure.� La Pastaia got slammed during Sharks season, by visiting hockey teams as well as fans. His Castilleja team gets glimpses of that adrenaline rush at events and parties. “But it’s a controlled environ-

KELSEY KIENITZ

Forrest Gingold preps roasted chicken with garam masala in the Castilleja kitchen on Jan. 25.

ment. I know exactly how many people are coming, and they’re the same people every day.� Gingold has gone in the opposite direction from Charlie Ayers,

who went from being personal chef for the Grateful Dead to feeding Google employees, to opening his own restaurant and market, Calafia, in Palo Alto. But

whether the cooking is done for the public or a private audience, Gingold concludes, “A lot is the same whether you’re cooking in a convent or a greasy spoon.� V

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If you would like to be listed in DINING ON THE TOWN please call Brent at the Voice at 964-6300. FEBRUARY 3, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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Concerned about your aging spouse or parent?

There are daytime options! Come discover more at an evening reception: y Learn about our two levels of daytime care y Hear experiences of other families y Enjoy refreshments y Free gift and free parking

Thursday, Feb. 23, 7- 8:30 pm in Mountain View RSVP to (650) 289-5499 www.avenidas.org/care

Tutor quote: “She learned that I was always there when I said I would be.”

Quality Daytime Care for Older Adults

Providing volunteer mentors & tutors for our community youth

OUR KIDS NEED YOU: BE A MENTOR OR TUTOR Join us to volunteer in the Los Altos and Mountain View Schools Please Contact: Carole Dorshkind 650-641-2821 or email us at volunteer@pngmvla.org www.pngmvla.org

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

8FFLFOE NMOVIETIMES A Separation (PG-13) Guild Theatre: 2:30, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 11:30 a.m. The Adventures of Tintin (PG) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 4:10 & 9:25 p.m.; In 3D at 1:35 & 6:50 p.m. Century 20: 2 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Tue. & Thu. at 4:30 & 9:55 p.m. Albert Nobbs (R) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4:20, 7:15 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 4:45 & 10:20 p.m.; Sat. also at 10:45 p.m. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) Century 20: 1:30 p.m.; Fri.-Wed. also at 5:55 & 10:30 p.m. The Artist (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Fri.-Tue. 2, 4:20 & 7:25 p.m.; Wed. & Thu. at 2, 4:30 & 7:15 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 9:50 p.m. Beauty and the Beast (G) Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; In 3D at 3:45 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Wed. also at 8:10 p.m. Big Miracle (PG) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:45, 4:40, 7:35 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 1:50, 4:25, 7:05 & 9:45 p.m. Chronicle (PG-13) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:30, 5, 7:45 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:35, 2:50, 5:10 & 7:30 p.m.; Fri.-Wed. also at 9:50 p.m.; Thu. also at 9:35 p.m. Contraband (R) Century 16: 12:30, 3:40, 7 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 2:45, 5:20, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m. The Descendants (R) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 3:15, 6 & 8:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 12:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:15 & 9:55 p.m. Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG-13) (( Century 16: Noon, 3:10, 6:40 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 1, 4:05, 7:05 & 10:10 p.m. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) (R) ((( Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 3:20, 6:45 & 10:05 p.m. The Grey (R) ((( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 2:15, 4:55, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Haywire (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 2:20, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. Hugo (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 2:40 & 9:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11:30 a.m. & 6:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 5 & 10:35 p.m.; Sat. also at 7:50 p.m.; In 3D at 2:10 p.m.; In 3D Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 7:50 p.m. The Iron Lady (PG-13) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 4:15 p.m.; Fri.Sun., Tue. & Wed. also at 7 & 9:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:30 p.m.; Thu. also at 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 & 10:05 p.m. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) Century 16: Thu. at 12:01 a.m.; In 3D Thu. also at 12:01 a.m. Man on a Ledge (PG-13) Century 16: 11:05 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:20 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 2:50, 5:25, 8 & 10:40 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: The Enchanted Island (Not Rated) Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Miss Representation (Not Rated) Aquarius Theatre: Thu. at 7 p.m. Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG-13) Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:45, 4, 7 & 10:15 p.m. National Theatre Live: Travelling Light (Not Rated) Century 20: Thu. at 7 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Thu. at 7 p.m. One for the Money (PG-13) Century 16: 11:05 a.m.; 1:30, 3:50, 7:05 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:30, 4:50, 7:20 & 9:40 p.m. Pina 3D (PG) Palo Alto Square: 1:50 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. also at 4:30 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:50 p.m. Red Tails (PG-13) Century 16: 12:10, 3:30, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:45 & 10:35 p.m. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 20: 1:50 p.m.; Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 7:25 p.m. Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Century 16: Thu. at 12:01 a.m. Century 20: Thu. at 12:01 & 12:02 a.m. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 3, 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. UFC 143 Live in 3D: Carlos Condit vs. Nick Diaz (Not Rated) Century 20: Sat. at 7 p.m. Underworld: Awakening (R) Century 16: 11 a.m.; In 3D at 1:30, 4, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; In 3D at 1:30, 3:45, 6, 8:20 & 10:40 p.m. War Horse (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m. We Bought a Zoo (PG) (1/2 Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 7 p.m. The Woman in Black (PG-13) Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:40 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 3, 5:30 & 8 p.m.; Fri.-Wed. also at 10:30 p.m. -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

THE GREY ---

(Century 16, Century 20) Action-horror hybrid “The Grey” pits man (Liam Neeson) versus wild (bloodthirsty wolves) in a subArctic death match. Oil-pipeline grunts, whose flight to Anchorage crashes far off the beaten path, confront starvation, freezing and a pack of wolves that make it known that the men have encroached on their territory. Thankfully, “The Grey” is exponentially better than the last teaming of director and co-screenwriter Joe Carnahan and Neeson. This film’s relatively minimalist approach seems like some kind of penance for the excesses of “The A-Team.” Forced by circumstance, the abrasive group stumbles into male bonding as well as quarrels over the best plan of survival, meanings of life or lack thereof, or nothing at all, the last preferable to letting in fear. Though it does thrill with intense, close-cropped action photography, swift editing and vivid sound design, the film makes as much of an impression by being unexpectedly emotional. Rated R for violence/disturbing content including bloody images, and for pervasive language. 1 hour, 57 minutes. — P.C.

THE ARTIST ---

(Palo Alto Square, Century 20) Any filmgoer undaunted by something different will walk out of this new silent film with a grin. Michel Hazanavicius’ feature has an emotional generosity that speaks louder than words. Opening in 1927, “The Artist” begins with a premiere of a silent film starring George Valentin (Jean Dujardin). When Valentin stumbles into a photo op with Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), the ground for a relationship is paved. Peppy sees her star begins to rise with George’s fall, precipitated by the arrival of talkies and the crash of 1929. Writer-director Hazanavicius mostly steers clear of comparisons to the era’s epics and screen comics, instead inhabiting melodrama. The acting is inventive, and the film joyously celebrates the movies. Rated PG-13 for a disturbing image and a crude gesture. One hour, 41 minutes. — P.C.

THE IRON LADY ---1/2

(Aquarius, Century 20) Don’t expect sharp political analysis of Margaret Thatcher’s 11-year reign as the only United Kingdom female prime minister, the ultraconservative who led with an iron will and iconic hairstyle from 1979 to 1990. Phyllida Lloyd, who directed Meryl Streep in “Mamma Mia!,” offers a soft-focus look at the controversial figure — and Streep captures Maggie-the-PM and Maggiethe-frail-elderly-woman in yet another incredible performance. Thatcher’s ability to shatter gender and class barriers all the way to 10 Downing Street counterpoints the inventive rendering of her inner life and lends poignancy to the discrepancy between her situation then and now. And newcomer Alexandra Roach exhibits the spunk and drive of the Iron Lady as a young woman. You decide if Thatcher succeeded in her attempts to put the “Great” back in “Great Britain.” Politics aside, the film is a must-see for Streep’s great performance in a story compellingly told. Rated PG-13 for brief nudity and some violent images. One hour, 45 minutes. — S.T.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley

(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

ART GALLERIES

‘Libations’ Photography by Bay Area artist Christine Arthur exhibit celebrates the spirits, their vessels and the craft of their creation. On display Jan. 31 through Feb. 25. Artist reception: Fri., Feb. 3, 5-8 p.m. Gallery hours: Tue.-Sat, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun. noon-4 p.m. Free. Gallery 9, 143 Main St., Los Altos. www.gallery9losaltos. com

AUDITIONS EL Camino Youth Symphony Annual Auditions ECYS invites young musicians ages 6-20 with at least one year of experience on a musical instrument to audition for the musiceducation program for the 2012-2013 Season. Auditions take place throughout March/April. Auditioners apply online: http://www.ecys.org/ auditions.html. $25. www.ecys.org

BENEFITS

tion A new-student orientation for Foothill College’s child-development program is planned. Reservations via email required. Feb. 10, 6-7 p.m. Free (parking $3). Foothill College, Middlefield Campus Building I, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www.foothill.fhda.edu/childdevelopment/

DANCE Belly Dancing & World-Music Night Adriana will perform at 8:30 p.m. Reservations recommended. Feb. 4, Free. Morocco’s Restaurant, 873 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650968-1502. www.moroccosrestaurant.com

FAMILY AND KIDS ‘Water Magic Show’ A musical presentation is planned by the Water Wizard. Feb. 4, 1-2 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, Program Room, 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. santaclaracountylib.org/losaltos

Book Sale Book sales benefiting the Mountain View Public Library will be held in the library bookmobile garage. Admission is free. Dates are: Feb. 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Feb. 12, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Feb. 12 (bag sale), 2-4 p.m. Friends of The Mountain View Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-526-7031. www. mvlibraryfriends.org

Children’s Story Time A read-aloud of “Mustard: A Story about Soft Love and Strong Values” by Jessel Miller. Creative activities to follow. Cynthia Starborn is the guest reader. Ages 4 and up. Attendees should call to reserve a seat. Feb. 4, 4-4:45 p.m. Free. East West Bookstore, 324 Castro St., Mountain View. www. eastwest.com

Friends of Palo Alto Library Vinyl Sale Audio High is hosting a vinyl (records) sale to benefit the Friends of the Palo Alto Library. Feb. 11, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Audio High, 165 Moffett Blvd., Mountain View. Call 650-964-4000. www.audiohigh.com

HEALTH

Child-Development Program Orienta-

B E T T E R

‘Restorative Yoga and Guided Imagery’ This class combines supported restorative yoga poses with guided imagery in hopes of helping students reduce stress and anxiety, manage pain and cancer-treatment side effects,

B A N K I N G

W I T H

NHIGHLIGHT ‘FIRST FRIDAY’ Downtown Los Altos is hosting a “Valentine Sweets Tour” for the First Friday in February. About 25 shops and 20 restaurants will be open late and holding activities such as a dessert-tasting tour, Valentine’s-card creation for children and live music. Feb. 3, 6-8 p.m. Free. Main and State streets, Los Altos. www.losaltosfirstfriday.org/

and relieve symptoms of fatigue and insomnia. Feb. 4, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 N. Whisman Road, Mountain View. Call 650-968-5000. www.cancersupportcommunity.net

of improper relations with one of his male students. The Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by John Patrick Shanley plays Jan. 26-Feb. 18. $26-32. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-941-0551. www.busbarn.org

’Women and Heart Disease’ This talk in the Community Wellness Lecture features Dr. Jane Lombard. Registration required; call 800216-5556/ Feb. 9, 6-7 p.m. El Camino Hospital, Conference Rooms A & B, 2500 Grant Road, Mountain View. www.elcaminohospital.org/ Heart_Vascular_Institute/About_the_Heart_ Vascular_Institute/Events/Heart_Month_Events

‘Moon for the Misbegotten’ This Eugene O’Neill play is a story of blarney, scheming and betrayal. Directed by Jeanie Smith. Jan. 13-Feb. 5, Thu.-Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 2 p.m. $15-$30. Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View. thepear.org

LIVE MUSIC ‘Moroccan Music Night’ Moroccan music including tribal and contemporary will be performed. Feb. 6, 5 p.m.-midnight. Free. Morocco’s Restaurant, 873 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-968-1502. www.moroccosrestaurant.com ‘World-Music Night’ World music will be performed. Reservations recommended. Feb. 5, 5 p.m.-midnight. Free. Morocco’s Restaurant, 873 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-9681502. www.moroccosrestaurant.com Flamenco Guitar Chris Cucuzza will perform starting at 7 p.m. Reservations recommended. Feb. 3. Free. Morocco’s Restaurant, 873 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-968-1502. www. moroccosrestaurant.com

ON STAGE ‘Doubt, A Parable’ Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects young Father Flynn

G R E A T

‘The Pitmen Painters’ TheatreWorks presents “The Pitmen Painters,” a Lee Hall comedy-drama play about six 1930s miners who become stars of the art world. Jan. 21-Feb. 12, with afternoon and evening performances Tue.-Sun. $19-$69. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www.theatreworks.org

SPORTS El Camino YMCA Triathlon Club This club meeting is for people who are new to triathlons and seeking support, guidance and coaching. Feb. 4, 9-10 a.m. Free. El Camino YMCA, 2400 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650-429-1349.

TALKS/AUTHORS Rebecca MacKinnon The author and global Internet policy advocate speaks on “Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom.” Feb. 8, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www. booksinc.net

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

Tamara Duricka Johnson The author speaks on “31 Dates in 31 Days,” about the modern dating scene. Feb. 9, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www. booksinc.net

‘Insight Meditation South Bay’ Shaila Catherine and guest teachers lead a weekly “Insight Meditation” sitting followed by a talk on Buddhist teachings. Tuesdays through Feb. 7, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. St. Timothy’s/Edwards Hall, 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650857-0904. imsb.org

Wael Ghonim Egyptian activist Wael Ghonim will speak about personal convictions, social media and revolution. Feb. 7, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $50 ($25 for members). Computer History Museum, 1401 North Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 408-265-0130. ransition.churchillclub.org

SINGLES

VOLUNTEERS

‘Meet Your Valentine’ This singles’ dance includes dancing and appetizers. Adults of all ages welcome. Dressy attire requested. Feb. 3, 8-11:45 p.m. $20 ($15 if bought by Feb. 2). Michael’s at Shoreline Park, 2960 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 415-507-9962. www.thepartyhotline.com

Tutor with JustREAD JustREAD is a nonprofit, literacy program dedicated to improving the reading/writing skills of students. Volunteers are trained by JustREAD and work one-on-one with students. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. JustREAD Tutorial Center, 1299 Bryant St., Mountain View. Call 650-691-0416. justREADcenters.org

R A T E S

Worry-free Checking O P E N A C H E C K I N G AC C O U N T W IT H A N O - F E E D E B IT C AR D

Mobile Banking

Easy Electronic Funds Transfer

Free Online Banking

Convenient ezDeposit

Free Touchtone Teller

Thousands of ATMs nationwide

Secure Bill Pay

ATMs inside 7-Eleven® stores

FEBRUARY 3, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

19

Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com E-MAIL ads@fogster.com PHONE 650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX N BULLETIN

BOARD 100-199 N FOR SALE 200-299 N KIDS STUFF 330-399 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-599 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 800-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997

20

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

Bulletin Board 115 Announcements PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

The Manzana Music School www.ManzanaMusicSchool.com Palo Alto Kids & Adults Guitar, Banjo, Mandolin, Violin, Cello,& Bass lessons

Alta Mesa plot hillview lot 221 subdivision 7

135 Group Activities

Oak Fire Wood - $90-300

Irish Valentines Day Singles

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment

140 Lost & Found Lost Cat Parkinson Av

150 Volunteers Conversation Partners needed Feed homeless cats in MV/PA Help A Kid: Mentor

Art4Growth

help cats near Willow-Hamiln MP

Dance Expressions

Help street cats MP-PA-MV

Little Dancers Creative Movement

Tutor at-risk preschoolers

replacement pianist

155 Pets

Spring Down Horse Show Stanford music tutoring

Aunt Effie’s Pet Sit- Dog Walksl Call (650) 644-9642 -Experienced

Thanks to Saint Jude

120 Auctions Advertise Your Auction in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

130 Classes & Instruction Earn College Degree Online *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.CenturaOnline.com (Cal-SCAN) High School Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN) Immigration or BK Paralegal $395.00. Includes Certificate, Resume & 94% Placement! 626-918-3599 or 626-552-2885. Placement in all 58 counties. (Cal-SCAN) Teach English Abroad! 4-week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries! www.teflworldwideprague.com info@teflworldwideprague.com Work on Jet Engines Train for Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 242-3382 toll free. (Cal-SCAN) German language class

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

CEMETERY $6000.00

PLOT,

Alta

Mesa

Polar S625X Hrt Ra650.387.3305 $129.00

270 Tickets Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered AM Part- Time Nanny available. Mandarin speaking nanny 8am-2pm WWW.BABYSITTERHQ.COM

BMW 2008 328i Sedan - $23,988

345 Tutoring/ Lessons

Mini 2009 MIni Cooper - $18,300

Chess Lessons for kids and adult

202 Vehicles Wanted

One-to-One Tutoring Service

Sell Your Car, Truck, SUV today! All 50 states, fast pick-up and payment. Any condition, make or model. Call now 1-877-818-8848. www. MyCarforCash.net (Cal-SCAN)

355 Items for Sale

210 Garage/Estate Sales

Big lotBOY 5Years winterclothes

LA: 201 Almond Ave., 2/4, 8-3 Huge Rummage Sale for Haiti. Los Altos High School Haiti Solidarity Club. Benefits sister school in Port au Prince. Furn., appl., clothes, toys, books, hsehold goods, bake sale. Redwood City, Quartz St, ONGOING

-

5Y Boy fall/winter/springclothes Avent bottles,bowls,forks,spoons Box withBoyBabyBlankets/comforte Boy clothes 4Y spring/SUMMER Jackets BOY 6mon-3 years $5 Size 3T suit/tuxedo jacketReniew Stuffed animals box full only$20 Toddler shoes Size 4-6Boy - 3 Toddler Soccer cleats size13 $5

Stanford, 587 Alvarado Row, Feb. 4, 11am-2pm

215 Collectibles & Antiques Antique Tbl Lmps650.387.3305 (2) $258

220 Computers/ Electronics

415 Classes

COMPUTER STUFF - $5

425 Health Services

230 Freebies

133 Music Lessons

Odd Fellow Rebecca - FREE

Barton-Holding Music Studio Accepting new students for private vocal lessons. All levels. Call Laura Barton, 650/965-0139

240 Furnishings/ Household items

Think and Feel Like You’re 20 again! Revolutionary Supplement Improves Mood, Memory and Cognition, Exercise Endurance, Energy and Sexual Function. Physician Developed. 1-800-747-1359 or www.thebrainvitamin.com (Cal-SCAN)

Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650)961-2192 www.hopestreetmusicstudios.com

Leather reclining650.387.3305 - $97

Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529 Piano and Organ Lessons All levels and ages. Andrew Chislett, D.M. (812)345-2350 Piano Lessons in your home Children and adults. Christina Conti, B.M. 15+ yrs exp. 650/493-6950 PIANO WITH E. MORENO, PhD MUS

FILING CABINET and ORGANIZER $100.00 mattress and bed headboard - $120.00 Table Lamps650.387.3305 - $258

245 Miscellaneous Infrared iHeater Heat your home for 5 cents an hour! Portable infrared iHeater heats 1000 sq. ft. Slashes your heating bills by 50%. FREE Shipping too! Use claim code 6239. Was $499 Now $279. Call 1-888-807-5741. (Cal-SCAN) Satellite TV Dish Network lowest nationwide price $19.99 a month. FREE HBO/ Cinemax/Starz FREE Blockbuster FREE HD-DVR and install. Next day install 1-800-336-7043 (Cal-SCAN)

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Sales: CNPA CNPA (Sacramento) is seeking an articulate, highly-motivated, energetic and persistent individual to join our team. Responsible for contacting businesses via telephone and selling classified advertising. Excellent Written/Verbal communication skills. Good phone etiquette and computer skills. Phone/Sales experience a plus (25-50 outbound calls/day) Contact wolf@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) Computer Sr. Sup. Eng-r, Mntn. View, CA. MS Degree. Support appls: Linux, Python/ Java/JavaScript, Web-ser., DBMS(SQL/ NoSQL). Res: EPAM Systems, 41 University Dr., # 202, Newtown, PA 18940. Computer Senior Computer Analyst in Mountain View, CA: Perform sys. analysis, testing and implementation. BS in CS, Math, Statistics or related, or equiv. + 5 years exp. req'd. Exp. w/ design of large databases and good understanding of networking req'd. Knowledge of relational DB designs and methods and modeling expertise in statistical techniques req'd. Apply to Caspio, Inc. at http://www.caspio. com/company/careers.aspx

4 Years BOY Summer clothes$40

Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

SMALL GROUP CHORAL SINGING The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media has the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

fogster.com

2-DAY INTENSIVE Hypnosis: Creati

440 Massage Therapy SEEKING MASSAGE THERAPIST

THINK GLOBALLY POST LOCALLY To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com

Computer Sr. Software QA Eng-r. Mntn. View, CA. 2 positions; MS Degree: Testing appls: Java/Python/ JavaScript/Selenium. Res: EPAM Systems, 41 University Dr., # 202, Newtown, PA 18940.

540 Domestic Help Wanted Atherton Housekeeper Needed Hello there Atherton family seeking permanent full time housekeeper.Duties include cleaning, dusting, dishes, fixing beds, laundry, etc. Nice family seeking extra help for busy working professional parents. We are seeking a person who is trust worthy reliable and has great follow through. We will require references for this position. You must be punctual, reliable and have previous experience in running a formal home. Serious inquiries only. Thank you. M Athertonhome@yahoo.com FT Housekeeper Atherton family seeks full-time, permanent executive housekeeper. Must be local, 100% punctual and have 3-5 years of housekeeping experience in a formal home. Excellent compensation and benefits. Please email resume to athertonhousekeeper@gmail.com

560 Employment Information $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com (AAN CAN) Driver: Start out the year with daily pay and weekly home time! Single Source Dispatch. Van and refrigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 1-800-414-9569. www.DriveKnight.com (Cal-SCAN)

Driver: New Career for the New Year! No experience needed! No credit check! Top industry pay and quality training. 100% Paid CDL Training. 1-800-326-2778. www.JoinCRST.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: CDL Training Career Central. No money down. CDL training. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k 1-877-369-7126. www.CentralDrivingJobs.net (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: OTR Class Iowa Reefer company hiring OTR Class A CDL drivers. Late model equipment, scheduled home time, excellent miles. Call Chuck to qualify at (800)645-3748. (Cal-SCAN) Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram. net (AAN CAN)

Business Services 620 Domestic Help Offered Elsa’s Housekeeping P/T or F/T. Good refs, exp. $16/hour. 650/208-0162; 650/568-3477

640 Legal Services Auto Accident Attorney Injured in an auto accident? Call Jacoby and Meyers for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 888-685-5721. (Cal-SCAN) Disability Benefits Social Security. Win or Pay Nothing! Start your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Call Today! Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys and BBB Accredited. Call 877-490-6596. (Cal-SCAN)

645 Office/Home Business Services Advertise Truck Driver Jobs in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Classified Advertising Reach Californians with a Classified in almost every county. Experience the power of classifieds! Combo~California Daily and Weekly Networks. One order. One payment. Free Brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Display Business Card Ad Advertise a display Business Card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost of $1,550. Your display 3.75x2” ad reaches over 3 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 710 Carpentry Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

Fogster.com THE PENINSUL A’S FREE CL ASSIFIEDS WEBSITE

GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

715 Cleaning Services

751 General Contracting

Family House Service Weekly or bi-weekly green cleaning. Comm’l., residential, apts. Honest, reliable, family owned. Refs. Sam, 650/315-6681. Holiday Cleaning by Tere. Houses * Apartments * Offices. Genl. cleaning, laundry, ironing, comml./res. Excel. refs. Lic. #40577. 650/281-8637 House Cleaning Services All household Cleaning. 6 yrs exp., Fair Rates. 15/HR, Refs. 1st visit 10% discount. 650-630-0606 magna housecleaning Olga’s Housecleaning Res./Com. Wkly/mo. Low Rates. Local Refs. 25 years Exp. & Friendly. I love My Job! Ins. (650)380-1406

Orkopina Housecleaning “The BEST Service for You� Bonded

Since 1985

Insured

! TrustworthyDetailed !Laundr W Walls/Windows !Out ! W !  Work

650-962-1536 - Lic. 20624 www.orkopinabestcleaningservice.com

Socorro’s Cleaning Service Full housecleaning, laundry. San Carlos to MV. 650/465-3765

730 Electrical Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION $ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $! www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti    "

(650) 799-5521 754 Gutter Cleaning Carlson’s Rain Gutter Cleaning Roof cleaning and pressure washing. 20 years in business (650)322-5030

757 Handyman/Repairs AAA HANDYMAN AND MORE

Stewart Electric Lic# 745186 New Circuits, Repair. 408 368-6622 Professional Service! Free Quotes!

Repair        

Lic.# 468963

Since 1976 Licensed & Insured

650-222-2517

748 Gardening/ Landscaping

ABLE HANDYMAN FRED

Beckys Landscape Weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree pruning, clean-ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Power washing. 650/493-7060

Jody Horst

Artist

856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080

HANDY

“Ed� MAN

 $!$   #$$

Keane Construction Specializing in Home Repairs

# J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc., office, garage, storage, old furniture, green waste and yard junk. cleanups. Licensed & insured. FREE EST. 650/368-8810 (see my Yelp reviews)

College Student Will haul and recycle your unwanted items and do genl. clean up. 650/641-3078; 650/868-6184

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE TRIMMING/ PRUNING, TREE SERVICE, STUMP GRINDING, CLEAN UPS, AERATION, IRRIGATION, ROTOTILLING. ROGER: 650.776.8666

Frank’s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

767 Movers Armando’s Moving Homes, Apartments, Storage. Full Service moves. Serving the Bay Area for 20 yrs. Licensed & Insured. Armando,650-630-0424. CAL-T190632

SHMOOVER

MOOVERS LICENSE CAL. T-118304

No phone number in the ad? GO TO

FOGSTER.COM

for contact information

    %   %2/  $$ 3   % %

650.799.8495



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775 Asphalt/Concrete Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

 ($ # )  * $ +$%

779 Organizing Services

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End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

790 Roofing



 

Al Peterson RooďŹ ng since 1946 Specializing in   ng         

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650-493-9177

",-. '/)0 * $ +$%

Real Estate

    %2./$% &3 3

Serving the Peninsula since 1975/Owner-Operated!

327-5493 771 Painting/ Wallpaper Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292





  

801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Mountain View, 2 BR/1 BA - $1750

ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274

Sam’s Garden Service

Tired of Mow, Blow and Go? Owner operated, 40 years exp. All phases of gardening/landscaping. Refs. Call Eric, 408/356-1350

 ($ # * $ +$%

STYLE PAINTING Full service painting. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

Palo Alto, 2 BR/1 BA - $3100/mont

#1 Family Hauling Will beat most prices and haul anything. 650/207-9674

(650)969-9894

     

  www.PinnaclePaintinginc.net

805 Homes for Rent

R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859

                  



Specializing in: ( " '! (  $ ( % (" (&"#  ( #&'! ( #"#

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FREE ESTIMA     

759 Hauling

est.

          

30 Years Experience

650.529.1662 3.27

Miller’s Maintenance Plumbing, Painting, Tile and wall repair. Free Est. No job too small. Senior discount. 25 years exp. 650/669-3199

Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477. Free

CompleteHomeRepair Maintenanc  emodelin ProfessionalPainting Carpentr Plumbing Electrical CustomCabineDesign Deckence  AnMuchMore

Kitchens, Bathrooms, Stucco, Dry Rot & Masonry and more! 650-430-3469 Lic.#743748

LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maintenance*New Lawns*Clean Ups*Tree Trimming*Wood Fences* Power Washing. 17 years experience. Senior Discount 650-576-6242

Mario’s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. 650/365-6955; 995-3822

NOTICE TO READERS It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

     !"

Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $2,450/mo.

$ $ )""   

* $ +$%

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

#   $ %   1   $  $ $ 3

820 Home Exchanges





  

$3250 / 2br - 1200ft. Palo Alto Architect

825 Homes/Condos for Sale

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Los Altos, 3 BR/1.5 BA - $,1275,000

",,*  .-   

* $ +$%

Redwood City, 5+ BR/4+ BA - $1,315,888

840 Vacation Rentals/Time Shares

#    $ %     

Vacation Properties Advertise your vacation property in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

  





   

ARCHITECT - CUSTOM HOME DESIGN

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage Texas Lake Bargain 4 ac -just $49,900. Come see how much your money can buy in the North Texas Hill Country! Spectacular 4 acre lake access homesite w/ incredible Hill Country views and covered in trees. Enjoy 18,000+ acres of crystal clear waters -boat, ski, scuba! Prime location near Dallas/Ft Worth. Low taxes, booming economy, affordable living! Ask about our FREE OVERNIGHT STAY! Excellent financing. Call now 1.877.888.1636, x1563 www.pklakefront.com (Cal-SCAN)

855 Real Estate Services Pebble Beach & Carmel Homes Considering a second home in PEBBLE BEACH or CARMEL? Start your search at www.AdamMoniz.com

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  ,-.+ / FEBRUARY 3, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  21

WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS Is Quality Important to You?

wo! er of T he Pow

T

s9VONNE(EYLs

Direct (650) 947-4694 Cell (650) 302-4055 DRE# 01255661

s*EFF'ONZALEZs

Direct (650) 947-4698 Cell (408) 888-7748 DRE# 00978793

EMAIL TOYVONNEANDJEFF AOLCOM s www.yvonneandjeff.com

464 Whisman Park Drive, Mountain View

OP EN SU ND AY

1-4

1VCMJD/PUJDFT doing business as: Dove Dental Smiles, located at 877 W. Fremont Ave., Suite L1, Sunnyvale, CA 94087, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): SHIRLEY IRUDAYARAJ DDS INC. 2534 Dell Ave. Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 23, 2012. (MVV Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012)

995 Fictitious Name Statement HAMAMOTO EXECUTIVE SERVICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 560001 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Hamamoto Executive Services, located at 950 Desmet Way, San Jose, CA 95125, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): ALICE HAMAMOTO 950 Desmet Way San Jose, CA 95125 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 7/28/2006. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 11, 2012. (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10, 2012)

NWHC FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 560080 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: NWHC, located at 301 Acalanes Dr. #21, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are):

DOVE DENTAL SMILES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 560423 The following person (persons) is (are)

s"EDROOMS  "ATHS s!PPROXIMATELY 3Q&TOF,IVING 3PACE s0REMIUM,OT !PPROXIMATELY  3Q&T s"UILTINBY3HEA(OMES s,OFTWITH#USTOM$ESK3HELVING FOR/FFICE s"ONUS2OOM s.EW$ESIGNER0AINTTHROUGHOUT s.EW,IGHT&IXTURESIN3OME2OOMS s.EW3INK&AUCETSIN-ASTER"ATH 0OWDER2OOM s"RAND.EW"RONZE$OOR+NOBS THROUGHOUT s"RAND.EW#ARPETON3TAIRSAND 5PSTAIRS

s4ILE&LOORSIN!LL"ATHROOMS s'RANITE+ITCHEN#OUNTERSINCLUDING "REAKFAST"AR s#ENTRAL(EATINGAND!IR#ONDWL $UAL:ONES s"UILT )N3PEAKERSIN&AMILY2OOM s5PSTAIRS,AUNDRY!REA s-ASTER"ATHWITH*ACUZZI4UB 3EPARATE3HOWER3TALL s7ALK )N#LOSETIN-ASTER"EDROOM s,ARGE,OW-AINTENANCE"ACK9ARD s#AR!TTACHED'ARAGE s2EFRIGERATOR 7ASHERAND$RYER )NCLUDED

Offered at $889,000

Need to publish a FICTITIOUS BUSINESS STATEMENT in a Santa Clara County newspaper of general circulation? Call the Mountain View Voice

326-8210

LAKRESHA MACKEY 301 Acalanes Dr. #21 Sunnyvale, CA 94086 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 1/20/2011. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 12, 2012. (MVV Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012) J & M BOOKKEEPING SERVICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 560650 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: J & M Bookkeeping Services, located at 2005 Rock Street #6, Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): JUDY SILVA 2005 Rock Street #6 Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 27, 2012. (MVV Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: January 9, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: SBI ENTERPRISES LLC The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 660 San Antonio Rd. Mountain View, CA 94040-1304 Type of license(s) applied for: 47 - ON-SALE GENERAL EATING PLACE (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2012) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN RICHARD LUCY Case No.: 1-12-PR-170035 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who

may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOHN RICHARD LUCY. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PETER LUCY in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: PETER LUCY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 29, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ James A. Thompson 600 Allerton St., Suite 200 Redwood City, CA 94063 (650)365-7333 (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2012)

Just Listed OPEN SATURDAY 1:30 – 4:30 P.M. Special SUPERBOWL SUNDAY Open House Hours: 12:00 – 3:00 P.M. 744 Edge Lane, LOS ALTOS s %XCELLENTLOCATIONINSOUTH,OS!LTOS JUSTMINUTESTO2ANCHO#ENTER s /NELEVELmOORPLANWITHBEDROOMS ANDBATHROOMS s !PPROXIMATELY SQUAREFEETOF LIVINGSPACE s .UMEROUSUPDATESTHROUGHOUT INCLUDINGREMODELEDCHEFSKITCHEN WITHGRANITEANDSTAINLESSSTEEL APPLIANCES s (ARDWOODAND/LD7ORLDLIMESTONE mOORSINSOMEROOMS

s ,ARGEFAMILYROOM FULLYOPENFROMTHE KITCHEN WITHFULLWALLOFSLIDINGGLASS DOORSANDWINDOWSTOTHEREARYARD s !TTACHEDTWO CARGARAGEWITHHALF BATH s $EEPREARYARDWITHLEVELLAWN RAISEDVEGETABLEBEDS ANDNUMEROUS FRUITTREES s %XCELLENTSOUTH,OS!LTOSLOCATION JUSTMINUTESTOSHOPPINGAND COMMUTEROUTESTOHIGH TECHCENTERS IN3ILICON6ALLEY

s .EWLYCARPETEDMASTERSUITEOPENSTO s 4OP RATED,OS!LTOSSCHOOLSBUYERTO CONlRMENROLLMENT THEREARGROUNDS

Price upon request Scan now for up-to-date info:

650.947.4798

Pam@PamBlackman. com www. PamBlackman. com INTERO CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE, TOP 1%

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  FEBRUARY 3, 2012

DRE# 00584333

Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

www.PamBlackman.com

 S A N C A R R I Z O W AY           

4 BEDS

3 BATHS

          % % %      ! !  '   

BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED

       

BAMBOO FLOORS

 ( (  $ #! &!   

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#1 AGENT 2011: combined sales in MV, LA & LAH* FEBRUARY 3, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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PALO ALTO

1664 MULBERRY LN $1,695,000 5 BR 3 BA Remodeled hm in Willow Glen w/family rm, French doors, updtd baths, lrg backyard & patio.

220 RED OAK DRIVE W #K $335,000 3 BR 2 BA Best location! No one above! Sliding door leads to private patio, overlooks greenery, pool

2951 GALA COURT $443,500 2 BR 2 BA Stunning remodel! Move in ready! Top Cupt schls! Staged! Only common wall in 2-car garage.

3180 MORRIS DR $1,098,000 3 BR 2 BA Beautifully updated contemporary home with a large lot on a quiet street near Midtown PA.

Tim Trailer

Melanie Johnson

Karen Quaid

Ken Morgan & Arlene Gault

650.325.6161

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MOUNTAIN VIEW

650.328.5211

MENLO PARK

CUPERTINO

2587 EMERSON ST $1,800,000 4 BR 3 BA Well-designed kitchen. Family room. Two bed/bath suites. Skylites. Oak floors.

521 TYRELLA AV $699,000 Spacious duplex in Mtn.View! Each unit has 2 bedrooms,1 bath, & garage!

1124 WERTH AVENUE $1,995,000 3 BR 3.5 BA 3 bed + office. Wood floors, remodeled kitchen, Custom cabinets, 10,000 sq ft lot

22845 POPLAR GROVE SQ $775,000 3 BR 2.5 BA 2 story townhouse. 1,586 sq. ft.2 car attached garage. Gated complex.Top Cupertino Schls

Nancy Goldcamp

DiPali Shah

Ellen Barton

Richard Ric Parker

650.325.6161

CAMPBELL GREAT PRICE!

650.325.6161

LOS ALTOS HILLS $499,000 EARLY CALIFORNIA HACIENDA

3 BR 2 BA New kitch countrs,cherry stained cabinets,hrdwd flrs thru out most of hm.Dual Pn windows. Ron & Nasrin Delan 650.941.7040

FREMONT

MENLO PARK

5 BR 4.5 BA 6000+ square ft beautiful custom home. 1.3 acre oaktree studded lot with expansive lawns. Terri Couture 650.941.7040

Spacious rooms, 2balconies, A/C,pool. Top Las Lomitas Schools. Christine Hoover Sorensen 650.941.7040

MOUNTAIN VIEW

$2,695,000 QUALITY $615,000 6 BR 4 BA Rare! Over 5,000 newly CUSTOM HOME 4 BR 2 BA Custom cabinets, granite counters. Spacious family room kitchen. Double pane windows. Wendy Wu 650.941.7040

LOS ALTOS 231 HAWTHORNE AVE SAT 1:30 - 4:30

$3,290,000

5 BR 5 BA Beautiful Architecture + Floor Plan Amenities Abound. Gleaming HW Floors, Lovely Granite. Jim Galli 650.941.7040

920 STAGI COURT SUN 1:30 - 4:30

remodeled at end of a cul de sac on over 1 acre! Palo Alto schls Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

ELEGANT-AMAZING VIEWS

$1,788,000

3 BR 2 BA Mostly remodeled ranch on nearly half acre affords convenience, privacy, & views. Kirk Mahncke 650.941.7040

0 EASTBROOK AV SAT/SUN 10 - 5

Please pick up a flyer & call the listing agent. Jamie & Phyllis Carmichael 650.941.7040

LARGE HOUSE

$1,430,000

6 BR 3 BA With 6 bedrooms!There are2 bedrooms wings -3+3.Great location,huge deep backyard. Ron & Nasrin Delan 650.941.7040

800.558.4443 24

QUIET CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ FEBRUARY 3, 2012

CONDO ON THE LAKE

$1,879,000 TOP FLOOR CONDO

4 BR 3 BA 12,200 sq ft lot. 4 bed 3bath.Los Gatos schls.”Martha Stewart inspired” eat-in kitchen. Terri Couture 650.941.7040

Los Altos Palo Alto

MOUNTAIN VIEW $468,000

2 BR 2 BA Spacious end unit. French doors to private deck, kitch w/granite, master w/ walk-in closet. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

LOS GATOS LOS ALTOS

$510,000

2 BR 1.5 BA Soaring vaulted ceilings. Inside laundry rm w/full size w/d hookups. Balcony off living rm Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

$1,795,000

1905 QUAIL MEADOW RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,578,000 Eastbrook lot will be open and unattended. 4 BR 3 BA 1/2 acre property close to town. 2200 sq ft. New carpet and paint throughout. Barbara Cannon 650.941.7040

$1,190,000

4 BR 2 BA 2000+ sq ft of living space, near parks, shops, commutes. Separate family rm, lrg backyd. Nancy Adele Stuhr 650.941.7040

$2,395,000 320 CENTRAL AV SAT 1:30 - 4:30

3 BR 2 BA Private hills living awaits your touch & imagination!Enjoy a generous lot of 1.170 acres. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

$1,650,000

5 BR 5.5 BA Built w/love.Formal entry,grand living room w/high ceiling,chandelier & fireplace. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

$2,645,000 CONVENIENT LOCATION

5 BR 4.5 BA Experience a beautifully dynamic residence that transforms with the setting sun. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

VALLEY VWS W/PA SCHOOLS

PALO ALTO

SINGLE LEVEL CONDO $995,000 800 S CALIFORNIA AV $3,195,000 3 BR 2 BA Open Plan. Hardwood floors. SAT 1 - 4

NATURE LOVER’S DREAM!

STUNNING REMODELED HOME

650.941.7040

650.941.7040 650.325.6161

SAN LORENZO VALLEY $2,598,000

5 BR 3 BA Elegance & Craftsmanship combine in this newly completed home in desirable College Terrace Jerry Haslam 650.941.7040

BEAUTIFUL 4BDRM 3BATH

$995,800

4 BR 3 BA 5+ mostly level acres of your own natural preserve. Enis Hall

2615 COWPER ST SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.941.7040

$2,295,000

4 BR 3.5 BA 100% new. 4BR + Office, 3.5 baths. Top quality. Great Midtown loction. Tree-lined street. Judy Shen 650.328.5211

SARATOGA 13278 MCCULLOCH AVE SAT 1:30 - 4:30

REDWOOD CITY 3240 SPRING ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$449,000

3 BR 2 BA Say HELLO to a GOOD BUY! This home features 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and a BIG family rm! Rod Creason 650.325.6161

$925,000

4 BR 2 BA Over 1,700 sq ft home on 10K lot. 3 car gar, hdwd flrs, sep family rm w/ fireplace, exc. schls Gary Herbert

650.941.7040

WOODSIDE PRIME

REDWOOD CITY PRIME MOUNT CARMEL LOT!

LOCATION!

$29,000,000

Private prestigious location. 11+ acre

$335,000

Beautiful 6880 sf lot on a wonderful street. Ready to draw plans for your dream house! Alexandra Von Der Groeben 650.325.6161

property in central Woodside close to town. Susie Dews & Shena Hurley 650.325.6161

ON TOP OF

SAN JOSE

CONVENIENT $199,000 CAMBRIAN HOME

1 BR 1 BA Well cared for. Large living rm. Dining with sliding door to balcony that overlooks pool. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

650.941.7040

THE WORLD

$2,995,000

$550,000 5 BR 4 BA Hm w/views like no other.

4 BR 2 BA Corner lot - open floor plan. Office/den/4th bedroom. Freshly painted inside and out. Joanne Fraser 650.941.7040

Features meadow,pond, gated vegetable garden w/large chicken coop Jamie Carmichael

©2011 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC. DRE License # 00313415

650.941.7040


Mountain View Voice 02.03.2012 - Section 1