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JANUARY 27, 2012 VOLUME 20, NO. 1

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INSIDE: MOVIES | PAGE 17

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Council passes smoking ban SMOKING NIXED NEAR BUILDINGS AND OUTDOOR DINING AREAS By Daniel DeBolt

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MICHELLE LE

Smokers are going to have a hard time finding places to smoke on Castro Street once the city’s new outdoor smoking ordinance goes into effect later this year.

Eshoo sees progress on Hangar One deal OFFER BY GOOGLE EXECS IS STILL HUNG UP AT NASA HEADQUARTERS By Andrea Gemmet

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oogle’s $32 million offer to restore Hangar One’s siding still hasn’t been accepted, but there has been progress, said Congresswoman Anna Eshoo. “I’m working with the White House, because this is one hell of an offer,” Eshoo told the Voice last week. “All the stakeholders support this,” she said. “It’s a short sentence, but it’s a big deal.” The gargantuan hangar is in the midst of having its toxin-laced siding removed, but funds to replace the siding were stripped from the NASA budget

INSIDE

by Congressional Republicans last year. In October, Google’s top executives offered to pay for the restoration in exchange for a lease on part of Hangar One to house their private fleet of aircraft, but there’s been no response from NASA administrator Charles Bolden. The offer from Google is now on the desk of the White House’s liaison with the House of Representatives, said Eshoo, D-Palo Alto. Eshoo had no kind words to spare for Bolden, whom she characterized as unresponsive. “I don’t know what’s wrong with (him), if he’s like a deer frozen in headlights or he’s

stupid or what,” she said. Eshoo said she’d been sending letters to Bolden every month, with no response. Her last letter was so terse, she finally got a phone call from him, she said. “I don’t think your staff has served you very well,” she said she told Bolden. “At least just send a canned letter and say we’ll get back to you in five years.” Without Google’s offer to foot the bill, there is no other funding in sight to restore Hangar One, the iconic 200foot-tall structure built in the 1930s to house the airship the See HANGAR ONE, page 8

GOINGS ON 18 | MARKETPLACE 19 | REAL ESTATE 20 | VIEWPOINT 14

t just got a lot harder to smoke in Mountain View. On Tuesday night the City Council narrowly passed a ban on smoking near publicly accessible buildings and outdoor dining areas. Council members voted 4-3, with Laura Macias, John Inks and Tom Means opposed. The new rules mean a $50 citation for smokers who stand within 25 feet of windows, doors —even cracks and vents in the walls — of workplaces, restaurants and any publicly accessible building where smoking is already banned. The Council also put the kibosh on smoking within 25 feet of outdoor dining

areas, including those at restaurants and picnic areas in public parks, where smoking is already banned within 30 feet of a playground. Smoking is now largely banned in busy commercial areas like Castro Street though exception is given to smokers who “are actively passing from one destination to another,” said Kim Castro of the city’s community services department. The vote gave no exceptions to bar owners and patrons who protested the ban, which ends the practice of allowing smoking on outdoor patios near doors and windows, as is the practice See SMOKING, page 6

Survey shows support for new school bond MOUNTAIN VIEW WHISMAN DISTRICT LIKELY TO PLACE MEASURE ON JUNE BALLOT By Nick Veronin

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new public opinion survey has local education officials feeling fairly confident that there is enough support from local voters to pass a $196 million bond measure. In a December 2011 phone poll, more than 60 percent of local voters said they felt that the Mountain View Whisman School district had at least some need for more money and that they would support the proposed bond, according to a report from Gene Bregman & Associates, the research firm that conducted the survey.

“We’re extremely pleased,” said Craig Goldman, Mountain View Whisman’s superintendent. “It certainly validates our belief that Mountain View residents understand the importance of strong schools for the benefit of children and the community overall.” The survey questioned 400 local registered voters. It found that among those voters most likely to go to the polls during the upcoming June election, 64 percent would vote yes on the bond. Of those voters who were likely to turn out in the November See SURVEY, page 7

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 27, 2012

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Asked in downtown Mountain View. Photos and interviews by Anna Li.

Does Mountain View need a history museum? “I think it would be nice. Anything I know about the history of Mountain View I got from the Rengstorff House. So I would certainly go.” Sarah Campbell, Mountain View

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After an “exhaustive� search police couldn’t find a man with a rifle reportedly seen near the intersection of highways 237 and 85 on Jan. 23. Police spent more than two hours searching for the suspect on Highway 237 near the intersection of Highway 85, Mountain View police spokeswoman Liz Wylie said. The search, which involved multiple agencies and a helicopter, began after the MVPD received a report from a driver, via the California Highway Patrol, that she’d seen a man in

a puffy orange vest pointing a rifle at freeway traffic at about 11 a.m. on Monday. In the wake of the report, police shut down a connecting ramp between the two freeways and asked local school officials to keep children indoors. The schools were Landels Elementary, Western Montessori Day School, St. Stephen Lutheran School and Building Kidz School — all located near the intersection of the two highways. Although only one person reported seeing the gunman, and no drivers reported having been shot at, Wylie said that police believed the report to be legitimate.

NPOLICELOG

POLICE SEARCH FOR GUNMAN After an “exhaustive� search police couldn’t find a man with a rifle reportedly seen near the intersection of highways 237 and 85 on Jan. 23. Police spent more than two hours searching for the suspect on Highway 237 near the intersection of Highway 85, Mountain View police spokeswoman Liz Wylie said. The search, which involved multiple agencies and a helicopter, began after the MVPD received a report from a driver, via the California Highway Patrol, that she’d seen a man in a puffy orange vest pointing a rifle at freeway traffic at about 11 a.m. on Monday. In the wake of the report, police shut down a connecting ramp between the two freeways and asked local school officials to keep children indoors. The schools were Landels Elementary, Western Montessori Day School, St. Stephen Lutheran School and Building Kidz School — all located near the intersection of the two highways.

Although only one person reported seeing the gunman, and no drivers reported having been shot at, Wylie said that police believed the report to be legitimate.

UNDERWEAR THIEF A Mountain View man was arrested in the early hours of Jan. 24 after allegedly breaking into a garage for the second time seeking to “steal women’s undergarments for sexual satisfaction,� according to police. Jesus Quintero, 20, of Mountain View, was arrested after officers found him shortly after 1:30 a.m. in the garage of a home in the 2300 Jane Lane. He was in possession of burglary tools and laundry was strewn all over the floor, police spokeswoman Liz Wylie said. One of the victims, a 39-yearold woman who lives in the home, called police when she saw a man force his way into the garage, Wylie said. When police arrived, they discovered Quintero, who held his Continued on page 8

NCOMMUNITYBRIEFS

VOLUNTEER TRAINING AT SHORELINE Volunteers are needed to serve as docents and rangers at Shoreline Park. Training is set for Feb. 2, with two orientation sessions, the first from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and the second from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Patrol rangers provide visi-

Photo of Victor Jee taken in Venice, Italy. Take a photo with the Mountain View Voice on your next trip and email to digitalads@paweekly.com

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 27, 2012

tors with information about facilities at the 750-acre wildlife and recreation area, including the Stevens Creek Trail. The gatehouse attendants greet visitors and monitor activity at the park and recreation area. The environmental docents Continued on page 6

The Mountain View Voice (USPS 2560) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Periodicals Postage Paid at Palo Alto CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free upon request to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.

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■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Legal battle ends between Bullis, LASD By Nick Veronin

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MICHELLE LE

Members of Hacker Dojo work at the popular hang-out, which is under pressure from the city to comply with safety and building codes.

City could shut down Hacker Dojo POPULAR HANGOUT FOR PROGRAMMERS FACES BIG BILL TO MEET CITY CODES By Daniel DeBolt

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ity officials say that the popular classroom and open office space for computer programmers, Hacker Dojo, may be redtagged and shut down on Jan. 31 if the non-profit does not meet some potentially pricey city code requirements. The Dojo, which is used by 300 programmers who pay a $100 monthly fee, has been open since late 2009. Until last fall, Dojo board members say city officials had been relatively

permissive as the Dojo operated without building permits in an industrial garage space, and was welcomed by some officials as a sort of incubator for tech start-ups. But Dojo directors admit that they didn’t know much about city requirements when they picked the building and moved in. And the result has been a conflict is wearing on both city officials and Dojo directors. “We had been trying to work with them,” said the city’s economics development director, Ellis Berns. City officials have

been saying, “You gotta start meeting the terms of the conditional use permit,” Berns said, which required a fire alarm and building permits. But those and other requirements weren’t met, and the permit expired. “Then we learned not too long ago that they leased additional space,” Berns said. Last fall the Dojo was set to double in size, leasing a pair of 2,500-square-foot spaces nextdoor that were to be used for classes and work space.

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s we start 2012, let’s look back to see how five technology companies that have grown in Mountain View are contributing to our economy with multi-billion dollar businesses — Adobe, Symantec, Sun Microsystems, Intuit and Google. On arriving in California, I had to write software so that our office Xerox laser printer, connected to a computer running the UNIX operating system, could print. Different printers used different commands. So, in 1982, John Warnock and Charles Geschke left Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) to

found Adobe to help standardize printing by creating the Postscript language. From Embarcadero Road in Palo Alto, Adobe moved to new premises at 1585 Charleston Road, graced by a sculpture of a person peeping out of a tower. In 1997, Adobe left Mountain View for downtown San Jose office towers. Adobe is now a $4.2 billion, 10,000-employee company with software and online services for document management, digital media

creation, web management and publishing. Symantec, founded in 1982 and headquartered at 350 Ellis Street, started with a combined flat-file database and word processor called Q&A for personal computers. After a few acquisitions, Symantec took off when it purchased Peter Norton’s Norton Computing in 1990, becoming a leader in security software. It expanded from personal computer software into enterprise systems and cloud computing services. Revenues for the fiscal year ending April 1 2011 were $6.2 billion. See HEY TECH, page 11

See BULLIS, page 11

El Camino board member steps down from post UWE KLADDE WILL REMAIN IN HIS SEAT ON THE HOSPITAL DISTRICT’S BOARD

See HACKER DOJO, page 8

Billion-dollar tech players hatch in MV By Angela Hey

he California Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal from the Los Altos School District on Jan. 18, effectively ending the yearslong battle between the district and Bullis Charter School over equitable sharing of the district’s facilities and funds. The court’s decision was celebrated by officials at Bullis Charter School who said the ruling was a precedent-setting victory for charter schools across the state. “This case was not only of great importance for the families and children at our school,” said Ken Moore, chair of the board of directors at Bullis. “It’s also an important message throughout the state that public school students that choose to attend a charter school program do not give up their rights to be treated equally to their peers who attend district-run programs.” Jeff Baier, superintendent of the Los Altos School District, said he was “disappointed” with the high court’s decision, as well as with the ultimate ruling of the court of appeals.

“We thought it warranted (the state Supreme Court’s) attention, because the appeal court hearing has implications for school districts throughout the state,” Baier said. He said that the district sought to have the official opinion of the appeals court “unpublished,” because of concerns over some of the methodologies the court outlined for determining how to calculate equitable apportionment. “I hope it’s not a precedent,” said Diane Ravitch, an author of numerous books on education in America. Ravitch, once in favor of the charter school movement, has changed her mind on the matter. “The original purpose of the charter school was to help the neediest kids in a community. This is not the profile of Bullis. What you have is a group of wealthy parents who have created a private school with public school money.” If the state Supreme Court’s decision in this case were to set a precedent, Ravitch said, it would be a “dangerous” one. “Increasingly the charter sector

By Nick Veronin

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we Kladde, who has served on El Camino Hospital’s board of directors since 2008, has announced he will be stepping down immediately in order to “spend more time and energy on his family.” He will continue to serve on the board of the hospital district, a separate governing body made up of the same board members. The hospital board meets monthly on business decisions, while the district board meets quarterly and rules strictly on matters pertaining to the El Camino Hospital District. The board of directors has not decided how it will go about replacing Kladde, a former registered nurse who was elected

in 2008 to a four-year term that expires this November. The hospital statement said that the board will determine the process it will follow to fill the vacancy in the coming weeks. Since it is the district board members who appoint the members of the hospital board, it may be that Kladde will have some say in choosing his replacement. “He has had tremendous positive impact over these past three years on El Camino Hospital, its patients and the community,” said John Zoglin, chairman of the hospital’s board of directors. “It has been my privilege to serve on the El Camino Hospital Board of Directors, and I am pleased to be able to continue to See KLADDE, page 10

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El Camino program targets ‘functioning’ addicts

NCOMMUNITYBRIEFS Continued from page 4

lead tours showcasing the diverse Baylands ecosystem. “We hope to meet many new interested members of the community who care and want to give back, in their own backyard,” says Kristina Perino of the city of Mountain View. The training will take place in the Community Conference Room at the Mountain View Library on 585 Franklin St. and is open to anyone over 18 who is willing to complete a free LiveScan fingerprint process. Contact Perino at 930-6073 or Kristina. Perino@mountainview.gov.

FREE TAX HELP United Way Silicon Valley offers free tax preparation to local low-income families who need help filing their taxes.

The organization has trained volunteers who speak a number of languages, including English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Russian. “W2 forms go out this month and we know a lot of hardworking local families are in a hurry to get their taxes done because they need the refund,” said Carole Leigh Hutton, president and CEO of United Way Silicon Valley. The organization is partnering with financial organizations and government agencies, including the Internal Revenue Service, to assist families that earn $50,000 or less a year. Mountain View residents can find free tax preparation services at St. Athanasius Catholic Church and San Antonio Place. For more information or to make an appointment, call 211 or visit www.211scc.org.

Mountain View Whisman School District K-8 ENROLLMENT 2012-2013 BEGINS FEBRUARY 1* DISTRICT OFFICE / 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Kinder Info Site Visits and Open Houses throughout the month of January MVWSD offers Choice Programs: Castro DI (English-Spanish) Monta Loma CEL (parent participation) Stevenson PACT (parent participation) *IMPORTANT: Registration for the month of February is BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. Go to district website to sign up for an appointment time.

More information: 650.526.3500, ext. 1001 www.mvwsd.org

Avenidas presents its 1st Annual

Money Matters: A Financial Conference Saturday, January 28 8:30 am - 2 pm Topics include: Š Investing in a volatile market Š Tax information for seniors Š Maximizing Social Security Š Making sense of Medicare Š Financial management

Register at Avenidas.org or call (650) 289-5435.

Resources and programs for positive aging

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 27, 2012

NEW OUTPATIENT DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT OPTION LETS PATIENTS KEEP JOBS, STAY IN SCHOOL By Nick Veronin

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l Camino Hospital has opened an addiction treatment service aimed at helping local professionals and students struggling to kick their dependence on drugs and alcohol, while still going to work or school during the day. The Addiction Services Program expands on the hospital’s existing dependency treatment options by targeting “functioning addicts” — individuals who, in varying degrees, manage to hold their own in society, despite their substance abuse. “There are some very highfunctioning folks out there — drinking amounts and using amounts that would knock anybody else out,” says Diana O’Rourke, program head and clinical coordinator of behavioral health at El Camino. All treatment sessions will be held at night, after standard 9-to-5 working hours, O’Rourke explains. And, as an outpatient program, it offers much more flexibility than stricter rehabilitation programs — which may require patients to spend upwards of eight hours a day at a treatment facility or live on site.

SMOKING

Continued from page 1

at the Sports Page on Shoreline Boulevard. “My concern is loss of employment for my staff,” said Jackie Graham, the owner of Sports Page, which has a large outdoor patio that allows smoking. “I deal with an international community. In various parts of the world, smoking is socially acceptable. They expect to smoke and drink in comfort,” he said. “The city of Mountain View needs to work with businesses on individual basis. If work is reduced, I may have to lay off people.” Council member Jac Siegel said he had struggled with whether to ban smoking for such establishments, and said it came down to the health of the employees. He said he was sure Graham’s seven employees didn’t like breathing second-hand smoke. “They don’t have a choice,” Siegel said. “They need a job, they are making a decision whether to have a job or to inhale secondhand smoke.” Council member Tom Means, the ban’s most vocal opponent,

Functioning alcoholics and drug abusers are an underserved population in Silicon Valley, O’Rourke says. Government numbers indicate that more than 9 percent of Americans struggle with addiction. And while nearly 75 percent of those individuals are employed in some capacity, El Camino’s program will be the first of its kind between Redwood City and San Jose. “I believe this is a program that can be helpful to a large number of people,” O’Rourke says. “There is so much information to be given to people about this illness.” Disease, not a decision O’Rourke stresses that alcoholism and drug addiction is, in fact an illness. “There are a lot of people who still believe that addiction is just a matter of choice, and if an addict only put their mind to it, they could be better,” she says. However, according to O’Rourke, research is increasingly showing that addictive compounds “hijack” the brain, rewiring neurotransmitters responsible for survival instincts. “The drug becomes as important to the addict as food or oxygen,” she says. addressed Siegel’s remarks by saying “employees do have choices. They get to chose where they work. We ended slavery over a century ago.” Santa Clara County gave the city a $53,788 grant to create an ordinance to reduce exposure to second-hand smoke, $14,000 of which will go to new cigarette butt receptacles on Castro Street. “Tobacco is the number one killer in this country,” said Martin Fenstersheib, health officer for Santa Clara County. He said that businesses eventually see an increase in business when they restrict smoking. Means turned to Graham and said, “You ran the business for 20 years but (Fenstersheib) knows more about it than you do. You’re just not smart enough, I think.” Means made a motion to only approve the portions of the ordinance dealing with public parks and buildings, which council members approved. But then the council also voted to approve the rest of the ordinance. A handful of smokers spoke in protest, most of whom said the city should have spent the

On the less severe end of the spectrum, users may require significant moral support and coaching to return to a state where they no longer lump their drug of choice in with such necessities, she says. Uppers, like methamphetamine and cocaine, along with opiates, like prescription painkillers and heroin, can lead to a physical dependence that is extremely painful to shake. Alcohol and sedatives commonly prescribed by doctors to treat anxiety, such as Xanax and Valium, cause the most serious withdrawal symptoms — heavy users who attempt to cut out such drugs cold turkey run the risk of seizures, hallucinations and even death. El Camino’s program combines a number of methodologies, O’Rourke says, including one-onone counseling, group therapy and, in certain cases, prescription medications that can help ease the painful or dangerous side effects of withdrawal. Social stigma The psychological and physical challenges posed by quitting are See DRUG PROGRAM, page 10

money on anti-smoking education efforts, and said the parking lot behind Castro Street bars would be full of smokers. “I’m disabled, but I can walk a bit,” said one woman. “Now I’ve got to walk every time (I) want a cigarette. How many people do you think are going to smoke in those car parks? It’s going to be a nightmare. Let’s put money into education. This is potentially discriminating to me as a disabled smoker.” Foothill college smoking cessation counselor Kathy Hagiwara commended the council for considering the ban, saying that the U.S. Surgeon General finds that there is no safe level of cigarette smoke. “Cigarettes kill people,” she said. “Nicotine is an addictive substance as powerful, if not more so, than heroin.” Of her own children, Hagiwara said, “I told them I would prefer them to smoke marijuana than cigarettes.” The ban goes into effect 90 days after the council votes on the ordinance a second time, which is scheduled on Feb. 14. V

Email Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

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EVgeS

Continued from page 1

election — a presidential election — 66 percent said they would vote yes on the bond. Gene Bregman, along with a few other employees from his firm, presented their findings to the Mountain View Whisman School District’s board of trustees on Jan. 19 — recommending that the district file paperwork by early March to get the bond measure on the June ballot. “It looks like June would provide a great opportunity for us in terms of the support of local voters,� Goldman said. “Unless the board decides otherwise, we are likely to recommend moving forward on a June election.� With the district still stretched thin financially, and with the probability of further state education cuts looming, Goldman said Mountain View Whisman could use revenues generated by a bond to help pay for projects identified in its master plan. The district’s Student Facilities Improvement Plan calls for construction and renovation projects at all Mountain View Whisman schools. The plan is meant to address health and safety requirements, enrollment growth and failing infrastructure, as well as accommodate new educational programs and make for a more energy-efficient school district. The bond will be supported by up to $30 per $100,000 of assessed property value and require only 55 percent of the vote to be passed. It would come on top of Measure C, the eight-year, $3 million voterapproved parcel tax that went into effect in 2009. Depending on parcel size, property owners are assessed anywhere from nearly $150 to over $1,000 a year under Measure C Steve Nelson, a very vocal and regular attendee of local school board and city council meetings, voiced concern over the proposed bond measure at the Jan. 19 meeting of the Mountain View Whisman trustees. He later told the Voice he felt that the entire process seemed rushed and that the district had not provided enough time for community comment. Goldman disagreed and noted that should the bond be approved, a citizens’ oversight committee will be formed to ensure that the Mountain View community will have ample input on all projects the bond intends to fund. The superintendent said the sooner the bond can be passed, the better. “We hope that voters recognize that a continued investment in our schools is a continued investment in our community, and the long term value of their homes and the great livability of Mountain View,� he said.

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-PDBM/FXT HACKER DOJO Continued from page 5

“We were excited at that point,� said David Weekly, one of the Dojo’s directors, of the expansion. “It made us the largest hacker space in the world.� “We had a small celebration, but it wasn’t a big, crazy celebration� Weekly said. “That kind of pushed them over the line. They were starting to see us as a commercial event space.� Then the city began stepping up the enforcement of its codes, he said. Not wanting it to occupy more space without building permits, the city ordered the Dojo to vacate the new spaces, which the Dojo is now looking to sublet. The city also began pressing for more codes to be met. Weekly rattled off what appear to be significant costs: $150,000 to make three bathrooms compliant with the American Disabilities Act, $130,000 for fire sprinklers, and potentially thousands more in building permit fees and other improvements. The Dojo also lacks a required fire alarm, which could cost $15,000. Without one, city officials say they’ll seek the closure of the Dojo by the end of the month. “They want us to commit to a traffic study, build concrete

walls around the dumpster and have the landlord re-slope the driveways,� Weekly said. City staff said that it hasn’t been determined whether the building has adequate exits and parking. “We were told we wouldn’t have to install fire sprinklers and we could get a variance on ADA bathrooms — basically we could continue to run the place as is,� Weekly said. “They could exert some leniency, but they ran out of patience.� City officials say code enforcement officers saw the Dojo advertising events online that would exceed the Dojo’s 49-person occupancy limit for a building without fire sprinklers. “These are statewide building and fire codes we are implementing here,� said Ellis Berns, saying that safety is the city’s primary concern. The Dojo has had to cancel numerous money-raising events and classes that easily attract more than 49 people. “Our membership is down considerably� without the classes, said Weekly. “We lost dozens of members. We had classes on machine learning and Android programming.� Also cancelled was a job fair in which employers and job seekers switch roles: programmers sit at tables presenting their work to potential employers who make

the rounds. “We’ve gotten dozens of people hired from these,� Weekly said. The event brings in up to 150 people and “raises a good chunk of change. But we can’t run it this year and these people can’t get hired.� Weekly said that a former mayor and city staffers attended a previous job fair, despite the fire code violations. “They attended, they were huge fans,� Weekly said. “This is all part of a feeling that the city has changed its mind� about the Dojo. Berns has spent a lot of time speaking with Dojo directors about the issues, as it is his job to bring in and retain new businesses in the city. But Berns said it’s nearly gotten to the point that “it’s out of my hands, it goes to the code enforcement department.� City Attorney Jannie Quinn, who runs the city’s code enforcement department, said that at the very least, the Dojo needs a fire alarm and to commit to a plan for obtaining building permits by the end of the month. The fire department and police department also may respond if there are more than 49 people in the building and “figure out whether or not to cite them or take some other enforcement action against them.� “They don’t have permission to conduct the use that they are

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now,� Quinn said. “They just didn’t have planning approval or building permits to allow such a use.� City officials caution others who might find themselves in a pickle with the city when moving into a building. “If they would have come into the city and said, ‘Here’s what were proposing to do,’ we would say, ‘Here’s the kinds of things you need to do to comply with the building code,’� Berns said. “We don’t want to be in these situations, we want businesses to succeed,� he said. “But we cannot compromise on health and safety. We are really encouraging them to move forward with this and to just get through this.� But with the pressure to meet all the other costly requirements, Weekly said the situation seemed “frustrating and hopeless.� Weekly said the Dojo has enough money — $15,00 — to put in fire alarms. “We just wish they would take into account the reality of the situation,� he said. “What I don’t think they realize is this is a volunteer-run nonprofit. We don’t have millions of dollars coming out of our ears because we are affiliated with numerous computer-related things.� Email Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

For more information call 650.223.6587 or email info@ShopMountainView.com

U.S.S. Macon. The interior has been gutted, and work to reduce the hangar to a bare frame is scheduled for completion this September. In a unique agreement that allows use of the federal airfield for personal flights, the Google executives’ planes have been stored in Hangar 211 at Moffett since 2007 under a $1.3 million-a-year lease agreement that allows use of the aircraft for NASA’s scientific work. The offer to restore and replace the siding on the hangar is in exchange for a long-term lease for a fleet of eight aircraft overseen by Google’s H211 LLC. While the Navy is overseeing the environmental cleanup to remove the siding and other toxins from Hangar One, NASA is responsible for footing the bill for the restoration. Eshoo, who was at Moffett Field last week for a medal ceremony for World War II veteran Carl Clark, said she made sure to point out the half-stripped hangar to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus when he arrived at Hangar 651. Eshoo said her tenacious nature hasn’t gone unnoticed by Mabus. “He said to me, ‘Anna, you’re like gum stuck to my shoe,’� she said. V

Continued from page 4

hands in his pockets and refused to comply with officers’ commands. The police ultimately forced Quintero to the ground, discovered a screwdriver and a wrench in his pockets, which police believe he used to force his way into the garage, Wylie said. Police believe Quintero is the

same person who broke into the garage of a house on Jane Lane on Dec. 21, Wylie said. Both times, it is believed that he was in search of women’s undergarments. “This is very strange for us,� Wylie said. “It’s not common that we have this kind of thing happen.� Police do not believe that any other homes have been burglarized by Quintero at this time.

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only exacerbated by the social stigmas surrounding addiction. “There will be no judgment or censure� at the Addiction Services Program, O’Rourke says. “We are here to help. This is a community service.� Just like with a doctor’s visit, all information divulged within to any of the sessions is confidential. And, just as health insurance companies will help pay for a physical evaluation, most will cover a significant percentage of a drug treatment program, O’Rourke says. Physician fees will be extra. O’Rourke emphasized that while kicking drugs can be quite difficult, neglecting to do so carries much graver consequences. “If you truly are an addict, it’s only going to get worse,� she says. “It’s not going to get better. And the ultimate outcome for a lot of addicts is death.�

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The process From the very start of enrollment, which begins with a phone interview and is followed by an in-person consultation, the Addiction Services Program will focus on tailoring every recovery plan, O’Rourke said. Patients will attend four sessions per week — each session lasting at least three hours — for two months. From there, however, each individual’s plan will be different. Once a patient’s needs are assessed, they will be treated using what O’Rourke called “evidence-based� methods — treatment protocols that have been proven effective through careful scientific research. Arguably the most important step in the healing process isn’t actually getting a person to stop using, O’Rourke says. More important is giving an individual the necessary tools to live a sober life. “Relapse prevention is about 70 percent of the work we need to do with people,� she says — “getting them to deal with the contingencies in their lives that were making them drink or do drugs in the first place.� Dialectical behavior therapy is aimed at building skills that will help people deal with a wide range of difficult and distressing emotions without picking up a bottle or popping pills, O’Rourke says. The program also incorporates what is called the “stages of change� theory in its treatment methodology. This model assumes that addicts will go through a series of phases on their way to sobriety. “It’s important to know where people are in that process,� she says. “This is where interviewing and screening comes in. Are they really serious about change or are they not?� El Camino’s program approaches addiction recovery differently than the longstanding 12-step programs. “We really have worked hard to address the whole person with this program.� The program will accept 10 patients initially, O’Rourke says, and may expand if demand warrants it. Information is available by calling 650-988-7700, toll free at 866-789-6089, or at the behavior health services website at www. elcaminohospital.org/bhs. V

KLADDE

Continued from page 5

contribute through my elected seat with my colleagues on the El Camino Hospital District Board,� Kladded said in a statement. “I am looking forward to having more quality time with my family while staying connected to El Camino Hospital through my seat on the District Board.� V

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 27, 2012

-PDBM/FXT BULLIS

Continued from page 5

has become entrepreneurial and aggressive,” she said. “It is part of a privatization movement. This is very bad for our society.” “This notion that the money somehow belongs to the school district is a very warped perspective,” said Eric Premack, executive director of the Charter Schools Development Center, which supports charter schools around the country, and especially in California. People become upset when they believe that charter schools are “stealing” money from public school districts, Premack said. “It’s not the school district’s money,” he said. “It’s the public’s money.” In his view, that money should be able to follow the students. Bullis is open to any student in the state, said Moore. Bullis is prohibited by law from charging tuition or creating selective criteria that might favor one group of students over another, it must participate in standardized state testing just like any other public school, and, unlike public schools, charters face a review process every five years where they can be denied renewal. “There is no perfect school and there is no perfect school system,” Moore said. In addition to the charter school’s review process, “If you don’t provide something the public wants you will go out of business. That is unlike a school district, which runs in perpetuity.” Charter schools, in Moore’s opinion, are meant to provide an alternative to the generationsold public school system — challenging the status quo in order to encourage change for the better. The high court’s decision was the last in a series of judicial rulings stretching back to November 2009, when the Santa Clara County Superior Court initially rejected Bullis’ claim that the LASD had violated a state law, which mandates that school districts share land, facilities and other resources with charter schools established within their boundaries. Bullis believed that the district had incorrectly calculated the correct proportion of resources that it was required to provide — in money, facilities and space — to the charter school. Bullis appealed, and in October 2011 the California Court of Appeal for the Sixth District reversed the decision of a Santa

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Clara County trial court. The appeals court found that the school district had failed to tally more than 1 million square feet of space that should have been counted when calculating the “reasonably equivalent” share of public school facilities it is required to provide Bullis under the provisions outlined in Proposition 39. Even though the appeals court’s decision was unanimous and written forcefully in favor of Bullis, LASD fought back, asking the state’s Supreme Court to review the case, which it declined to do. While Baier remained upset with the ultimate outcome, he said he has accepted the court’s decision as final. “With this dispute coming to a close,” he said in a district press release, “we look forward to continuing our commitment to providing the opportunity for an outstanding education for all the students residing within the LASD boundaries.” V

HEY TECH

Continued from page 5

Sun Microsystems started by selling open architecture workstations that cost less than competing proprietary hardware for applications like circuit design and publishing. In the mid-1980s, headquartered at 2550 Garcia Avenue, Sun had many nearby offices around Charleston, now occupied by Intuit and Google. In 1997, Sun moved its headquarters to a former Ford Aerospace building on the site of Palo Alto’s Jewish Community Center, then to Agnews Developmental Center in Santa Clara. Sun’s former East Menlo Park campus, known locally as “Sun Quentin” is being remodeled for Facebook. By selling servers, storage and software for enterprises and the Internet, Sun grew rapidly. In 2010, Oracle acquired Sun for $7.4 billion, or $5.6 billion net of debt and cash. The revenues to Oracle from hardware alone, with related sup-

port, are about $7 billion. The first talk I heard from Intuit’s founder, Scott Cook, compared Quicken check printing software to an old-fashioned pen and checkbook. Based on Cook’s enthusiasm, in 1987 I bought Quicken for my Mac Plus. For many years, Intuit was in Menlo Park. Then it moved headquarters to 2700 Coast Avenue. From simple accounting to tax planning, Intuit has expanded to also offer software for employee management, data storage and web hosting. For the fiscal year ending July 31, 2012 Intuit expects revenues of over $4 billion. Advances in software tools, online distribution and widespread use of computers and cell phones mean that Google, founded in 1998 out of Stanford, has grown much faster than the companies started in the ‘80s. Google reported preliminary revenues for 2011 of $37.9 billion, up 25 percent on 2010, with net income of $9.7 billion. Google employs about

32,500 people. According to StatCounter (http://gs.statcounter. com), Google’s Chrome browser market share globally grew from 15 percent in December 2010 to 27 percent by December 2011, second only to Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, whose share is declining rapidly. In the same period, Android’s mobile operating system market share went from 14 percent to 22 percent globally. With revenue for the last four quarters approaching $500 million, more than double the previous year, and a 2011 initial public offering, can business social networking company LinkedIn become the next Mountain View company worth over $1 billion? Watch their growth as they remodel and fill more office space on Stierlin Court near the Shoreline Amphitheatre. Which Mountain View technology company do you think will make its first $1billion in 2012? Read this article online and comment with your guess. V

Bullis Charter School

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REGISTRO PARA K-6 Y LOS GRADOS 7-8 DE ESCUELA PRIMARIA Y COLEGIO Excelencia Académica: Escuela distinguida de California Colegiatura gratuita Abierto a cualquier estudiante de California Día escolar más largo Programa de estudios de enriquecimiento personal que incluye arte, drama, música y ciencias

Violins Meet Piano 2/5

Attached 2/8

Violins Meet Piano Chamber Music Concert with Alexander Barantschik, Era Lifschitz and Alona Tsoi A night of classical music by Beethoven, Ravel, Prokofiev and Shnitke.

Sunday, 2/5 at 8:00 PM $25 OFJCC Members and students, $30 Non-Members in advance $35 at the door, space permitting

Authors Amir Levine and Rachel Heller, Attached What’s your attachment style? Explore the science of relationships with this psychiatrist-neuroscientist duo.

Los materiales de inscripción están disponibles en la escuela o en línea. Residentes del distrito de Los Altos tendrán mayor prioridad.

Wednesday, 2/8 at 7:00 PM $10 OFJCC Members, $15 Non-Members in advance $18 at the door, space permitting

Inscripciones se cierran el 3 de febrero del 2012

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit 102 W. PORTOLA ALOS ALTOS, CA 94022  650-947-4939

www.bullischarterschool.com

www.paloaltojcc.org/arts. Oshman Family JCC 3921 Fabian Way | Palo Alto, CA | (650) 223-8700 | www.paloaltojcc.org/arts

AAD

JANUARY 27, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 27, 2012

-PDBM/FXT

Art for everyone INSPIRING ‘PITMEN PAINTERS’ PLAYS LIKE A PLEA FOR ART EDUCATION By Chad Jones

H

ow do you teach an art-appreciation class to someone who’s never seen a painting? The answer, according to Lee Hall’s drama “The Pitmen Painters,” is that you don’t. You let your students paint their own pictures and build an appreciation from there. That’s how it actually happened for the members of the Ashington Group, a collective of coal miners in Northern England circa 1934 who, in embarking on an art class offered by their Workers Educational Association, ended up garnering a certain notoriety in the British art world up through the 1970s. The inspiring and transforming nature of art is a recurring theme in the work of British scribe Hall, who is most famous for his screenplay (and later Broadway musical adaptation of) “Billy Elliot.” “Pitmen Painters,” which had a warmly received run on Broad-

way in 2010 and is still running in London’s West End, is now at TheatreWorks, and it’s a noble theatrical undertaking. The fact that this is a true story is inspiring all by itself (with a nod to William Feaver’s book “Pitmen Painters, the Ashington Group 1934-1984”). And that the production, directed by Leslie Martinson, makes good use of the real Pitmen paintings, seen in projections and reproductions, serves as a wonderful introduction to a fascinating chapter of art history. When art teacher Robert Lyon (Paul Whitworth) arrives in Ashington, he’s not quite prepared for the sub-beginner level of his five students: three coal miners, a dental mechanic and an unemployed lad. Lyon puts a slide of a painting on the screen and says, “A Titian,” to which a student replies, “Bless you.” Lyon quickly realizes that these men need hands-on experience with composition and color and subject before they can even

begin to think about the great masters. When the miners begin bringing in their work, it’s clear that they not only have a distinct point of view but also an astonishing measure of talent. With art serving as a common denominator for humanity, Hall spends most of his play’s nearly two-and-a-half hours delving into the meaning of art and what it means to be an artist, both inside and outside the professional art establishment. This is a static play, and to director Martinson’s credit, the only dull patches hover briefly in Act Two. It’s essentially words and paintings and words about paintings. There’s a danger that this mostly plotless docudrama will become its own sort of remedial art class, but Martinson and her appealing cast — featuring some of the Bay Area’s best actors — keep the pedantry to a minimum and turn up the dial on what Hall clearly finds to be an inspiring story. Feeding the pro-proletariat fervor of the play, Act One ends with the assertion that “Real art belongs to everyone.” Once that proclamation is made, there’s not really much farther for the play to go. So if Hall’s drama never builds up

much steam, at least we continue to care about the painters themselves, but more as a group rather than individuals. (For dramatic purposes, Hall reduced a group of about 20 to five.) James Carpenter plays George, the stern leader of the group who is strictly by the book, especially when chiding his on-the-dole nephew (Nicolas Pelczar). Jackson Davis is the closest the play comes to comic relief as Jimmy, the miner who never hesitates to express his befuddlement with all this art stuff. Dan Hiatt gets some fiery moments as the Marx-quoting socialist who feels art should be radical and political, but the heart of the play belongs to Patrick Jones as Oliver Kilbourn, the miner with the soul of an artist. Kilbourn’s paintings (seen in the helpful projections created by Jim Gross) are extraordinary, especially when you consider he was completely self-taught. Jones is a soft-spoken but solid presence, believable as a proud miner and equally believable as a man capable of creating works of beauty. Jones’ character, and, indeed, his performance, is the only one shaded with real complexity. There’s not a lot of female energy in this miner-centric

tale, but Marcia Pizzo makes an elegant impression as a wealthy art lover fond of taking artists under her well-upholstered wing. And Kathryn Zdan charms in the superfluous role of a lifestudy model. To Hall’s credit, he keeps the focus on the art teacher and the miner-artists and everything their success meant in terms of class, creativity and the artistic potential in every person if given the opportunity to express it. There’s no forced romance, no artificial drama, no Hollywood flourishes. But there’s still a lingering feeling that, despite the inspiring real-life story, what we have in “The Pitmen Painters” is less a play than it is a well-argued, well-intentioned plea for more arts and more arts education. V

“The Pitmen Painters” by Lee Hall, presented by TheatreWorks at Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St. Runs through Feb. 12 with 7:30 p.m. shows Tuesday and Wednesday, 8 p.m. shows Thursday through Saturday, 2 p.m. shows Saturday and Sunday and 7 p.m. shows Sunday. $19-$69 with student, senior and educator discounts. Go to theatreworks.org or call 650-463-1960.

C[YQZ UZ .a_UZQ__ 

JANUARY 27, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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7JFXQPJOU NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE

Flood basins pass final hurdle

Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F Editor & Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Intern Anna Li Photographer Michelle Le Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Ruth Schecter, Alissa Stallings

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Lili Cao, Shannon Corey, Diane Haas, Paul Llewellyn, Scott Peterson

Advertising Vice President Sales and Marketing Tom Zahiralis Advertising Representatives Judie Block, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Email news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com Email letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   fax (650) 326-0155 Email Classified ads@MV-Voice.com Email Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. Copyright ©2012 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM Post your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com EMAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 223-6507

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he scary scenario of huge storm water overflows racing down Permanente Creek created enough concern for county voters to approve a flood control measure in 2000 designed to protect more than 1,300 Mountain View homes from a 100-year flood. Since that $40 million measure passed, the Santa Clara Valley Water District has been planning how to reduce the chances of such a catastrophe ever happening, and in the process reduce the flood insurance costs for more than a thousand local homeowners. Last week, the City Council finally approved the water district’s latest plan, which will lower parts of Cuesta Park Annex by 12 feet, leaving gently sloping walls and landscaped areas behind. It adds the final piece to a plan that also includes lowering McKelvey Park by 15 feet with new baseball facilities. It is a plan the City Council has endorsed throughout the process, although diehard opponents continued to reject the idea at last week’s council meeting. But early on, a study conducted by the city to confirm the Water District���s calculations came to the same conclusion — that the project is necessary to guard against the worst case scenario and reduce the need for flood insurance for homeowners. It is not difficult to understand why some residents continue to oppose carving a flood basin out of the rustic Cuesta Annex, which will give the park a more polished look than it has today. But when you couple a slightly remodeled Annex with Cuesta Park next door, residents will continue to have a major open space asset in the heart of the city. At McKelvey, which has been home to two playing fields for some 50 years, the lower elevation should not change the nature of the playing fields, which will be rebuilt to the latest specifications and will continue to serve many young baseball and softball players. In addition, the park remodel will include a .7-acre minipark for neighbors who said they had little use for the two playing fields. Also last week, the council found out that the Mountain View Historical Association’s plans to build a history museum in the Annex have been disbanded. The committee said it lacked the funds to build a museum, in part due to the council’s decision to turn down developer Roger Burnell’s proposal to move the 1880s Pearson House from its downtown location to the park. Burnell’s effort to restore the home in return for being permitted to build a 20,000-square-foot office building at 902 Villa St. would have enabled the History Association to meet the fund-raising goal required by the city. Unlike many of its neighbors, Mountain View has yet to develop a building to house its historical documents. It is sad to lose the commitment for a museum at Cuesta, but in our view, the council was correct in turning down the Pearson House. Other opportunities are certain to show up in the years ahead that eventually will lead to a permanent home for Mountain View’s historic archives and artifacts, some of which are stored in the library’s Pioneer Room.

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 27, 2012

■ EDITORIAL ■ YOUR LETTERS ■ GUEST OPINIONS

NLETTERS

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

BUS LANES GOOD FOR EL CAMINO

CHECK OUT DOWNTOWN’S NEW GROCERY STORE

I was disappointed to see several City Council members dismiss the dedicated bus lanes for El Camino Real. This project would greatly improve transit speed and reliability along VTA’s most popular transit corridor while giving El Camino Real a much needed multimodal facelift. New bike lanes, mid-block cross walks, and pedestrian-friendly sidewalks are part of the project, and they will build a sustainable and livable foundation for the next generation of growth on El Camino Real. Surprisingly, we should take a cue from Santa Clara, which has committed to dedicated transit lanes on El Camino Real as a means to provide incentives for redevelopment projects to be transit-oriented, human-scaled projects while mitigating the strain new residents will place on the region’s roads. Santa Clara’s policies will help El Camino transition from an auto-oriented strip to a Grand Boulevard where residents can accomplish many tasks by walking, biking, or taking a quick, reliable bus trip. Council members must look beyond the next five years and envision what the city and the county will look like with an additional 600,000 persons, according to the ABAG estimates. Trafficchoked arterials with unreliable alternatives are not an option. This project gives us a reliable alternative to driving, and sets a precedent for more livable growth and sustainable land use patterns. Jarrett Mullen Latham Street

The latest incarnation of our largest downtown grocery store provides an opportunity that some people might want to check out. I encourage everyone finding themselves in the vicinity of 340 Castro St. to visit Ava’s Downtown Grocery and Deli, which opened in November. The deli isn’t there yet, but the groceries have been greeted with surprise and delight by many neighbors. The owners expect you to ask if you don’t see what you want — they often have it but things move around with so many new items coming in all the time. They also take the suggestion box submissions very seriously. We have been waiting for this moment for 25 years, and now have a chance to do both ourselves and the store a favor by helping them get through the always-difficult startup period. Julie Lovins California Street

LANE REDUCTION WOULD CLOG TRAFFIC I work in Fremont so I drive down El Camino every weekday morning to reach Hwy. 237. Every weekday evening, I turn from 237 onto El Camino in order to get home. I know that others use El Camino to get to and from Hwy. 85. A reduction from three lanes to two in each direction would cause traffic to get even worse than it is now. Konrad Sosnow Trophy Drive

8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

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N F O O D F E AT U R E

A whole life in whole grain LOCAL WOMAN BRINGS TIME-TESTED WHEAT VARIETIES BACK TO CALIFORNIA By Daniel DeBolt

M

ountain View resident Monica Spiller has made it her life’s mission to promote whole grains, a passion that has led her to sell once-forgotten varieties of wheat seed, and the pasta and flour made with it. Spiller, a former high school chemistry teacher from England, became fascinated with the idea of making whole grain bread and growing organic wheat in the 1980s. The Ardenwood Historic Farm in Fremont offered the use of its space to grow wheat if she could find some varieties of wheat grown around 1900. Her pre-Internet search eventually lead to the United States

Department of Agriculture, to Spiller’s surprise. The USDA had been keeping seed stocks of wheat that modern farmers had mostly forgotten, occasionally replanting them to keep the stock fresh — for decades. Spiller took various wheat seeds and planted them, for 10 years. “My lesson resulted in recognizing these old-fashioned varieties are the ones appropriate for organic farmers,� Spiller said. So she became a self-appointed marketing person for these grains — connecting farmers who could sell each other seeds, or buying and selling them herself. Continued on next page

MICHELLE LE

Monica Spiller, the founder of Whole Grain Connections in Mountain View, pauses in front of a mural outside of Country Sun, a grocery store that carries her heirloom wheat pasta.

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S

Pizzeria Venti

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Pizzeria Venti is your ticket to Italy (NO PASSPORT REQUIRED) &ROMTHEHILLSOF2OMETOTHESEABREEZESOFTHE!MALlCOASTANDWINDING back through the ancient towns of Tuscany, Pizzeria Venti has captured the soul of Italian cooking. We take pride in bringing you the very best. The ingredients are simple. Imported Italian water to make our dough; fresh herbs to bring out the true taste of the regions and extra virgin olive oil ENHANCECLASSICDISHESFROMTHEWORLDSlNESTCUISINE*OINUSSOONAND experience the taste of Italia‌ right here in Mountain View. To our valued customers: Our love of Italian food knows no bounds. It is in this spirit that we will be sharing some of our classic recipes with you each week.

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s  CUPlNELYGROUND breadcrumbs s JARGOODQUALITYTOMATOSAUCE heated s 3ALT s &RESHLYGROUNDPEPPER s !LITTLEBUTTERFORTHEBAKINGDISH

Preparation: Preheat your oven to 350 F Pound the cutlets at, trim away any fat, and remove any membrane. Salt and pepper the meat to taste, dip it in the beaten egg, and dredge it in the bread crumbs, pressing down to make sure the crumbs adhere.

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Melt butter in a large skillet, and when it begins to bubble. Fry the cutlets until golden, turning them once. Transfer them to a buttered baking dish, lay a slice of prosciutto and one of cheese slices on each piece, and bake for 10 minutes or until the cheese melts. Spoon a warm tomato sauce over each and serve with crusty bread.

JANUARY 27, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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8FFLFOE

Organic whole-grain pasta and wheat , from left: Sonora wheat ribbons; Ethiopian Blue Tinge ribbons; grains of Sonora wheat; Sonora and Ethiopian Blue Tinge pasta spirals. Continued from previous page

She believes the most popular type, Sonora wheat, was grown by Native Americans in the Southwest for years before the Juan Batista de Anza expedition in 1775, and it was grown in California until modern, engineered wheat varieties took over in the 1950s. Sonora wheat can be grown without pesticides, fertilizers and irrigation, and it grows tall above the weeds that organic farmers often battle. When turned into flour, it makes a stretchy dough that lends itself well to making tortillas, as well

as pasta, pastries, flatbreads and pancakes. Spiller’s non-profit, Whole Grain Connection, now sells Sonora and other heirloom wheat seeds for $1.25 a pound. While she’s not looking to make a living on it, she’s sold her seeds to 90 organic farms, many of which had been using modern wheat seeds in their crop rotations to build the soil. Unlike “terminator seeds� that are genetically modified to be sterile, the farmers only need to buy her seeds once. Spiller said she hopes to work herself out of her seed marketing business eventually. She’s moved

into the flour and pasta business and soon will offer bread made from the wheat she’s marketed. Spiller’s Whole Grain Connection label can be found on pasta and whole grain flour sold at Country Sun Market in Palo Alto. The pasta and flour are available in two varieties: Sonora and Ethiopian Blue Tinge. Whole Grain Connection’s flour is ground by Giusto’s Specialty Foods in South San Francisco, while the pasta is made by Pasta Sonoma in Rohnert Park. The wheat for both comes from farmer Fritz Durst in Capay, Calif. Spiller has also lined up a bakery to produce bread for the Whole Grain Connection brand. She is currently looking for someone to help her market the pasta and flour to other grocers. Despite its rougher texture and darker color, an increasing number of restaurants and grocers espousing sustainable local products are reportedly looking for pasta made from locally grown wheat. “The trend that I’m trying to ride is the local food movement,� Spiller said. “It gives us the opportunity to produce whole grain products rather than refined grain products.� The difference between refined and whole grains is an important one to Spiller. Her late husband, Dr. Gene Spiller, authored books

on the dietary benefits of whole wheat that are still widely read. She coauthored one of his books, “What’s with Fiber?� in 2005, the year before he passed away. “It was through that work that he did that I understood that the biggest need we have in our diet is whole grain foods,� Spiller said. Like his wife, Gene Spiller was an advocate for returning to old-fashioned ways of eating. His book “The Power of Ancient Foods� says, “In order to choose a more healthful way to eat we expect formal statements by major research or government organizations — all this while the peasant of Crete and the Incas of Peru knew ages ago all we need to know about healthful foods.� Spiller says many modern diseases can be traced to the increased use of refined grains, including digestive problems, obesity and diabetes. Whole wheat is ground in such a way that it leaves intact the vitamins and minerals necessary for the human body to properly digest the protein and starch in the grain, Spiller notes. It also provides anti-oxidants to prevent diabetes, and short-chain fatty acids, which can lower cholesterol. She claims that her Ethiopian Blue Tinge wheat, is “one of the best anti-diabetic foods you

can eat.� The number of antioxidants in it turn it purple, she said. Only 5 percent of the grain sold in the U.S. is whole grain, but the USDA recommends that 50 percent of the grains people eat be whole grains, she said. “If the supply isn’t there, how can we possibly do that?� Spiller said. Because of conventional agriculture’s dependence on artificial fertilizers and herbicides, “the ground is depleted, really,� Spiller said. “I’m trying to encourage these organic farmers to use wheat in rotation with legumes to rebuild the soil and produce a good soil. It will take a number of years. Until the rebuilding has happened the wheat is not so productive. “The same field of Sonora doesn’t yield as much as a conventional field,� she said. But because it does not require herbicides, irrigation, fertilizers, “eventually I think this old-fashioned organically grown wheat will be less expensive than conventional wheat.� Information about Whole Grain Connection is at sustainablegrains.org. Products are available at Country Sun, 440 S. California Ave., Palo Alto and seed wheat is sold at Common Ground, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto. V

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8FFLFOE NMOVIETIMES 3 Superstars in Berlin Aquarius Theatre: Wed. at 7 p.m.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY CLOSE --

(Century 16, Century 20) This Jonathan Safran Foer novel beguiled many readers but wilts as an Oscar-season drama. Director Stephen Daldry (“The Hours�) and screenwriter Eric Roth (“Forrest Gump�) attempt to replicate the novel’s subjective treatment of a boy protagonist. But literalized by the camera, the story’s creakiness seems loud and close for anyone sensitive to the contrived and cloying. The story concerns 11-year-old Manhattanite Oskar Schell (Thomas Horn), reeling from the death of his father (Tom Hanks) in the Twin Towers. Though the boy’s mother (Sandra Bullock) harbors serious concerns for her son, she does not discourage him when he becomes convinced that his puzzleloving dad has left behind one more mystery: a small key to an unknown lock somewhere in the city. Rated PG-13 for emotional material, disturbing images and language. Two hours, 10 minutes. — P.C.

HAYWIRE --

(Century 16) Filmmaker Steven Soderbergh follows his whimsy in his latest cinematic lark. Seeing mixed-martial arts fighter Gina Carano on TV, Soderbergh decided she needed to be an action star. Thus, “Haywire,� scripted by Lem Dobbs (“The Limey�). Carano plays Mallory Kane, an ex-Marine sent on black ops by a private agency. Matters go “haywire� when Kane becomes inconvenient to those who hired her, which sends the operative on a mission of revenge and self-preservation. That’s all you need to know about the story, which trafficks in the usual cliches but in a souped-up Soderbergian vehicle distinguished by its driver: Carano. Soderbergh’s pursuit of fun turns out to be fairly infectious, whether it be a subplot that finds Kane whisking up a freaked-out innocent bystander (Michael Angarano) or a beach-set battle that evokes the classic TV spy series “The Prisoner.� Rated R for violence. One hour, 33 minutes. — P.C.

TINKER, TAILOR, SOLDIER, SPY ---1/2

(Century 16) Call the British foreign intelligence agency SIS or MI6, but le Carre’s characters call it “the Circus,� run by Control (John Hurt) out of smokefilled rooms. In 1973, a botched attempt to discover the identity of a double agent results in a wounded field officer, international tensions and curtailed careers for Control and trusted lieutenant George Smiley (Gary Oldman). A civil servant asks Smiley to come out of retirement to root out the “mole� hiding within the Circus’ inner circle. With great subtlety, Oldman demonstrates what makes Smiley an extraordinary spy: his insistence on taking in more than he lets slip. Rated R for violence, some sexuality/ nudity and language. Two hours, eight minutes. — P.C.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley

A Dangerous Method (R) Guild Theatre: 3:45, 6:15 & 8:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:15 p.m. The Adventures of Tintin (PG) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 4:10 & 9:30 p.m.; In 3D at 1:35 & 6:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 4:35 & 10 p.m.; In 3D at 2 & 7:25 p.m. Albert Nobbs (R) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4:20, 7:15 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:10 & 9:55 p.m. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) Century 20: 11:40 a.m.; 1:55, 4:20 & 6:50 p.m. The Artist (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:35 a.m. & 2:10 p.m.; Fri.-Wed. also at 4:40, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m.; Thu. also at 10:20 p.m. CinÊArts at Palo Alto Square: 2, 4:20 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:45 p.m. Beauty and the Beast (G) Century 16: In 3D at 11 a.m.; 1:20, 3:50 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; In 3D at 1:35, 4:10 & 10:15 p.m. Ben-Hur (1959) Century 20: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. Chemical Brothers: Don’t Think Century 16: Wed. at 7:30 p.m. Contraband (R) Century 16: 11:25 a.m.; 2:05, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 2:45, 5:20, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m. The Descendants (R) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 3:15, 6 & 8:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 12:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:15 & 9:55 p.m.

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community

MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View OfďŹ ce Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189

To include your Church in

Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-223-6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG-13) (( Century 16: Noon, 3:20, 7 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 1, 4:05, 7:05 & 10:10 p.m. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) (R) ((( Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 6:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 3:20, 6:45 & 10:05 p.m. The Goat Rodeo Sessions Live (PG) Century 20: Tue. at 8 p.m. CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: Tue. at 8 p.m. The Grey (R) Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 2:15, 4:55, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Haywire (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. Hugo (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 2:30 & 9:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11:30 a.m. & 6:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 5 & 10:35 p.m.; In 3D at 2:10 & 7:50 p.m. The Iron Lady (PG-13) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 4:15 & 9:45 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 7 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 & 10:05 p.m. Joyful Noise (PG-13) Century 20: 1:20 p.m. Kevin Smith: Live from Behind Century 16: Thu. at 6:30 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 6:30 p.m. Man on a Ledge (PG-13) Century 16: 11:05 a.m.; 1:50, 4:30, 7:20 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 2:50, 5:25, 8 & 10:40 p.m. Mission: Impossible -- Ghost Protocol (PG-13) Century 16: 12:20, 3:40, 7:25 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:45, 4, 7 & 10:15 p.m. One for the Money (PG-13) Century 16: 11:05 a.m.; 1:30, 4, 7:05 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:30, 4:50, 7:20 & 9:40 p.m. Pina 3D (PG) CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 1:50 & 4:30 p.m.; Fri.Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:50 p.m. Red Tails (PG-13) Century 16: 12:10, 3:30, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:45 & 10:35 p.m. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 3 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 9:50 p.m.; Wed. also at 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 4:25 & 10:30 p.m.; Fri.-Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 7:35 p.m. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) (((1/2 Century 16: 12:20, 3:40, 7 & 9:55 p.m. Underworld: Awakening (R) Century 16: 11:50 a.m. & 10:25 p.m.; Fri.-Wed. also at 5 p.m.; Thu. also at 2:30 p.m.; In 3D at 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4, 7 & 9:35 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Wed. also at 2:20 & 8 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m. & 9:15 p.m.; In 3D Fri.-Wed. at 1:30, 3:45, 6, 8:20 & 10:40 p.m.



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War Horse (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 6:30 p.m. Century 20: 7 p.m. We Bought a Zoo (PG) (1/2 Century 20: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 & 9:25 p.m. -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies. JANUARY 27, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

AUDITIONS

EL Camino Youth Symphony Annual Auditions ECYS invites young musicians ages 6-20 with at least one year of experience on a musical instrument to audition for the musiceducation program for the 2012-2013 Season. Auditions take place throughout March/April. Auditioners apply online: http://www.ecys.org/ auditions.html. $25. www.ecys.org

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS ‘All About Roses’ Master Gardeners will describe how to prune roses to improve their health, vigor, structure and appearance. They will also discuss general rose care and demonstrate bare-root planting. Jan. 31, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 408-282-3105. mastergardeners.org/ scc.html ‘Energy-Efficiency Workshop’ This workshop focuses on new cash incentive programs to support home energy upgrades affordable for Santa Clara County residents. Feb. 1, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. The Neutra House, 183 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 408-224-8687. losaltos-euc.eventbrite. com

COMMUNITY EVENTS ‘Disaster-Resiliency Panel’ Panel discussion and audience Q&A. Panelists: Robert Dolci, acting director, NASA Ames; Martin Griss, director, CMU & DMI; Steve Jordan, CEO of NDRC; Tor Andre Nilson, founder and VP, IntraPoint. Jan. 31, 7-9 p.m. Free. NASA Research Park, Building 3, Moffett Field. researchpark.arc.nasa.gov/ ‘First Friday’ Downtown Los Altos is hosting a “Valentine Sweets Tour” for the First Friday in

February. About 25 shops and 20 restaurants will be open late and holding activities such as a dessert-tasting tour, Valentine’s-card creation for children and live music. Feb. 3, 6-8 p.m. Free. Main and State streets, Los Altos. www.losaltosfirstfriday.org/ World Harmony Chorus Students of CSMA’s World Harmony Chorus perform songs from around the globe Jan. 30, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts at Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend

DANCE ‘Argentine Tango Boot Camp’ Argentine tango instructor and performer Christy Coté will offer a “tango boot camp” with 13 hours of instruction. The intensive weekend is intended for beginners. Jan. 28-29, 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. $189. Cheryl Burke Dance Studio, 1400 North Shoreline Blvd., #-A1, Mountain View. Call 650864-9150. www.tangobootcamp.org

ENVIRONMENT Tree Planting Mountain View Trees volunteers celebrate the group’s sixth anniversary by planting trees to along the Highway 237 corridor. Children may attend if they are accompanied by adults. No experience necessary; tools and refreshments provided. Jan. 28, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Ferguson/Hwy 237 corridor, 430 Ferguson Drive, Mountain View. Call 415-412-1127. www.mountainviewtrees.org Stephen Kent Kent performs music of Australia in two shows Jan. 29, 2 and 4 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts at Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www. arts4all.org/attend

HEALTH

‘Advances in Radiation Therapy for Cancer Treatment’ This discussion will be about the latest methods for radiation treatment, and what advances may be on the horizon. Facilitated by Robert Sinha, medical director of El Camino Hospital’s radiation oncology Department. Jan. 31, 6-8 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 Whisman Road, Suite 300, Mountain View. Call 650-968-5000. www.cancersupportcommunity.net ‘Cancer: Dealing with Uncertainty’ This discussion will cover such questions as: “Will my cancer recur?”, “Did I do enough research?” and “Should I have gotten another opinion?” Jan. 28, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 Whisman Road, Mountain View. Call 650968-5000. www.cancersupportcommunity.net Eddie Cohn Eddie Cohn plays experimental rock music. Jan. 27, 8-10 p.m. Free. Red Rock Coffee, 201 Castro St., Mountain View. Middle Eastern Music & Belly Dancing show Mini-belly dancing class from 6:30 to 7, with several professionals performing after that. The restaurant is open until midnight, with reservations recommended. Feb. 1. Free. Morocco’s Restaurant, 873 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-968-1502. www.moroccosrestaurant.com

ON STAGE ‘Moon for the Misbegotten’ This Eugene O’Neill play is a story of blarney, scheming and betrayal. Directed by Jeanie Smith. Jan. 13-Feb. 5, Thu.-Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 2 p.m. $15-$30. Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View. thepear.org ‘The Pitmen Painters’ TheatreWorks presents “The Pitmen Painters,” a Lee Hall comedy-

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650-961-0302

NHIGHLIGHT ‘DOUBT, A PARABLE’ Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school principal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects young Father Flynn of improper relations with one of his male students. The Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by John Patrick Shanley plays Jan. 26-Feb. 18. $26-32. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-941-0551. www.busbarn.org

drama play about six 1930s miners who become stars of the art world. Jan. 21-Feb. 12, with afternoon and evening performances Tue.-Sun. $19 -$69. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www. theatreworks.org

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY ‘Insight Meditation South Bay’ Shaila Catherine and guest teachers lead a weekly “Insight Meditation” sitting followed by a talk on Buddhist teachings. Tuesdays through Feb. 7, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. St. Timothy’s/Edwards Hall, 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650-8570904. imsb.org

SENIORS Chinese New Year Celebration Senior Friendship Day will celebrate the Year of the Dragon with a traditional performance of songs and dances followed by a Chinese lunch. Feb. 1, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $5. Cubberley Community Center Theater and Room M4, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-854-8897.

SINGLES ‘Meet Your Valentine’ This singles’ dance includes dancing and appetizers. Adults of all ages welcome. Dressy attire requested. Feb. 3, 8-11:45 p.m. $20 ($15 if bought by Feb. 2). Michael’s at Shoreline Park, 2960 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 415-507-9962. www.thepartyhotline. com

SPORTS El Camino YMCA Triathlon Club This club meeting is for people who are new to triathlons

and seeking support, guidance and coaching. Feb. 4, 9-10 a.m. Free. El Camino YMCA, 2400 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650-429-1349.

TALKS/AUTHORS ‘Loving Your Teen Without Losing Your Mind’ Mike Bradley speaks on his book “Yes, Your Teen Is Crazy! Loving Your Kid Without Losing Your Mind.” Topics will include: how the teen brain works. Feb. 2, 7-9 p.m. Free. Mountain View High School, 3535 Truman Ave., Mountain View. ptac.mvwsd.org/parented.html ‘Pursuing Work Visas & Permanent Residence After Graduation’ The Foothill College International Students Program presents “Beyond the F-1: Pursuing Work Visas & Permanent Residence After Graduation,” by immigration lawyer Gali Schaham Gordon. Jan. 27, 12:30-2 p.m. Free (parking $3). Krause Center for Innovation, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-7159. ‘Short-Term Coaching’ A presentation on “Short-Term Coaching for Rapid and Long-Term Results.” Jan. 30, 6-9 p.m. $40 at the door, $25 in advance ($15 for members) German International School of Silicon Valley (GISSV), 310 Easy St., Mountain View. Call 650-386-5015. www.gabanetwork.org

VOLUNTEERS Volunteer Training An orientation will be held for community members interested in volunteering as a patrol ranger, gatehouse attendant or environmental docent. Orientation sessions at 4 and 6 p.m. Call to RSVP. Feb. 2. Free. Mountain View Library, Community Conference Room, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6073. mountainview.gov

Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com E-MAIL ads@fogster.com PHONE 650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative.

Bulletin Board 115 Announcements PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

133 Music Lessons

Redwood City, Quartz St, ONGOING

470 Psychics

Barton-Holding Music Studio Accepting new students for private vocal lessons. All levels. Call Laura Barton, 650/965-0139

215 Collectibles & Antiques

Love Specialist Stops Divorce, Cheating, Reunites Separated Partners, Solves Severe Problems. Never Fails. FREE 15 MINUTE Reading By Phone 718-300-3530 or 1-866-524-6689

FUN, Piano/Guitar/Violin Lessons Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650)961-2192 www.hopestreetmusicstudios.com Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529 Piano and Organ Lessons All levels and ages. Andrew Chislett, D.M. (812)345-2350 Piano Lessons in your home Children and adults. Christina Conti, B.M. 15+ yrs exp. 650/493-6950 SMALL GROUP CHORAL SINGING

‘Spirit of Uganda’, Jan. 29, 6pm "Invigorating the stage with that elusive thing called joy." The New York Times When: Sunday, Jan. 29 at 6:00pm Where: M-A Performing Arts Center Tickets: $30/person online at http://spiritofugandamenlopark2012. eventbrite.com. art4growth.com Dance Classes

INDEX

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com

The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media has the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

BOARD 100-199 N FOR SALE 200-299 N KIDS STUFF 330-399 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-599 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 800-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and

Introduction to opera

N BULLETIN

fogster.com

Spring Down Horse Show Stanford music tutoring Thanks to Saint Jude

120 Auctions Advertise Your Auction in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth 916/2886019. (Cal-SCAN)

130 Classes & Instruction

The Manzana Music School www.ManzanaMusicSchool.com Palo Alto Kids & Adults Guitar, Banjo, Mandolin, Violin, Cello,& Bass lessons

135 Group Activities Irish Valentines Day Singles

140 Lost & Found

Work on Jet Engines Train for Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 242-3382 toll free. (Cal-SCAN) German language class Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

FOGSTER.COM

220 Computers/ Electronics COMPUTER STUFF - $5

240 Furnishings/ Household items mattress and bed headboard - $150.00 Oak Dining Rm Chairs650.387.3305 - $234.00

245 Miscellaneous Heat Your Home for 5 cents an HOUR! Portable infrared iHeater heats 1000 sq. ft. Slashes your heating bills by 50%. FREE Shipping too! Use claim code 6239. Was $49; now $279. Call 1-888-807-5741. (Cal-SCAN) Alta Mesa plot hillview lot 221 subdivision 7

150 Volunteers

Alta Mesa single plot - $5000/best

Conversation Partners needed

Vintage inspired button earrings - $6.00

Feed homeless cats in MV/PA

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment

Fosterers Needed for Moffet Cats Help A Kid: Mentor help cats near Willow-Hamiln MP museum volunteers

155 Pets Lost Cat

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts BMW 2008 328i Sedan - $23,988

Polar S625X Hrt Ra650.387.3305 $149.00

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered Nanny/Au Pair available

340 Child Care Wanted P/T nanny/driver needed

345 Tutoring/ Lessons Chess Lessons for kids and adult French Group lesson 650-691-9863

High School Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www.SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN)

Teach English Abroad! 4-week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries! www.teflworldwideprague.com info@teflworldwideprague.com

KENT COFFEY IMPRESA 6-piece 1960

Lost Cat Parkinson Av

Earn College Degree Online *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.CenturaOnline.com (Cal-SCAN)

Immigration or BK Paralegal $395.00. Includes Certificate, Resume and 94% Placement! 626-918-3599 or 626-552-2885. Placement in all 58 counties. (Cal-SCAN)

Custom & Designer clothing from estate of late Stanford professor. Mostly men’s clothing, some women’s clothing along household items. Prices vary from $50. to over $2,000. plus. phone 415-258-4873 & leave message.

One-to-One Tutoring Service

355 Items for Sale Ford 2000 F250 Diesel Super-Duty XLT truck 75K, $14.5K/BO 650-776-5712

4 Years BOY Summer clothes$40 Avent bottles,bowls,forks,spoons Big lotBOY 5Years winterclothes

Mini 2009 MIni Cooper - $18,300

Box withBoyBabyBlankets/comforte

Toyota 1998 Camry LE

Jackets BOY 6mon-3 years $5

202 Vehicles Wanted

Pink BarbieJeep1998MattelRemote

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Size 3T suit/tuxedo jacketReniew Stuffed animals box full only$20 Toddler shoes Size 4-6Boy - 3 Toddler Soccer cleats size13 $5

Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

Palo Alto, 3991 Sutherland Drive, Sunday Jan 29, 11am-5pm Palo Alto, 505 E. Charleston, Jan. 29, 9-1:30

500 Help Wanted Sales: CNPA CNPA (Sacramento) is seeking an articulate, highly-motivated, energetic and persistent individual to join our team. Responsible for contacting businesses via telephone and selling classified advertising. Excellent written/verbal communication skills. Good phone etiquette and computer skills. Phone/sales experience a plus (25-50 outbound calls/day) Contact wolf@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) Computer Programmer Comp. Programmer, Lead. Mntn View, CA. MS; Java, Python, HTML, CSS, nonrelat. databases. Res: EPAM Systems, 41 University Dr., # 202, Newtown, PA 18940 Cook Immed. F/T opening in retirement community. Exp. pref. Excel. benefits and work environment. Apply 4075 El Camino Way, PA.

540 Domestic Help Wanted FT Housekeeper Atherton family seeks full-time, permanent executive housekeeper. Must be local, 100% punctual and have 3-5 years of housekeeping experience in a formal home. Excellent compensation and benefits. Please email resume to athertonhousekeeper@gmail.com

550 Business Opportunities Start Now! Red Hot Dollar Plus Store, Mailbox, Discount Party, Discount Clothing, Teen Store, Fitness Center from $51,900 worldwide! www.DRSS25.com. 1-800-518-3064. (Cal-SCAN)

415 Classes 2-DAY INTENSIVE Hypnosis: Creati

440 Massage Therapy SEEKING MASSAGE THERAPIST

Truck Drivers Will provide CDL training. Part-time driving job with full-time benefits. Get paid to train in the California Army National Guard. www.NationaIGuard.com/Truck or 1-800-Go-Guard. (Cal-SCAN)

Business Services 640 Legal Services Auto Accident Attorney Injured in Accident? Call Jacoby and Meyers for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 888-685-5721. Disability Benefits Social Security. You win or pay us nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For your FREE book and consultation. 877-490-6596. (Cal-SCAN)

645 Office/Home Business Services Advertise Truck Driver Jobs in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Classified Advertising Reach Californians with a Classified in almost every county! Experience the power of classifieds! Combo~California Daily and Weekly Networks. One order. One payment. Free Brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Display Business Card Ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost of $1,550. Your display 3.75x2” ad reaches over 3 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services

560 Employment Information

710 Carpentry

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com (AAN CAN)

Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

Driver - New Career for the New Year! No experience needed! No credit check! Top industry pay and quality training. 100% Paid CDL Training. 1-800-326-2778. www.JoinCRST.com (Cal-SCAN)

715 Cleaning Services

Driver: Weekly Hometime! Dry and Refrigerated. Daily Pay! 31 Service Centers. Local Orientation. Newer trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 1-800-414-9569. www.DriveKnight.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: CDL Training Career Central. No money down. CDL Training. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k 1-877-369-7126. www.CentralDrivingJobs.net (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales Palo Alto, 1514 Walnut Dr, ENE-28

Jobs

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

Movie Extras People needed now to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON 877-824-7260

Family House Service Weekly or bi-weekly green cleaning. Comm’l., residential, apts. Honest, reliable, family owned. Refs. Sam, 650/315-6681. Holiday Cleaning by Tere. Houses * Apartments * Offices. Genl. cleaning, laundry, ironing, comml./res. Excel. refs. Lic. #40577. 650/281-8637 House Cleaning Services All household Cleaning. 6 yrs exp., Fair Rates. 15/HR, Refs. 1st visit 10% discount. 650-630-0606 magna housecleaning Olga’s Housecleaning Res./Com. Wkly/mo. Low Rates. Local Refs. 25 years Exp. & Friendly. I love My Job! Ins. (650)380-1406 Socorro’s Cleaning Service Full housecleaning, laundry. San Carlos to MV. 650/465-3765

GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS JANUARY 27, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

19

To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com

WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS Is Quality Important to You? s9VONNE(EYLs

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Direct (650) 947-4694 Cell (650) 302-4055

owe The P

DRE# 01255661

s*EFF'ONZALEZs

Direct (650) 947-4698 Cell (408) 888-7748 DRE# 00978793

Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

Beckys Landscape Weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree pruning, clean-ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Power washing. 650/493-7060

Jody Horst

Artist

ST JU

SU N1 -4

856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080 LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maintenance*New Lawns*Clean Ups*Tree Trimming*Wood Fences* Power Washing. 17 years experience. Senior Discount 650-576-6242

s"EDROOMS  "ATHS s!PPROXIMATELY 3Q&TOF,IVING 3PACE s0REMIUM,OT !PPROXIMATELY  3Q&T s"UILTINBY3HEA(OMES s,OFTWITH#USTOM$ESK3HELVING FOR/FFICE s"ONUS2OOM s.EW$ESIGNER0AINTTHROUGHOUT s.EW,IGHT&IXTURESIN3OME2OOMS s.EW3INK&AUCETSIN-ASTER"ATH 0OWDER2OOM s"RAND.EW"RONZE$OOR+NOBS THROUGHOUT s"RAND.EW#ARPETON3TAIRSAND 5PSTAIRS

s4ILE&LOORSIN!LL"ATHROOMS s'RANITE+ITCHEN#OUNTERSINCLUDING "REAKFAST"AR s#ENTRAL(EATINGAND!IR#ONDW/ $UAL:ONES s"UILT )N3PEAKERSIN&AMILY2OOM s5PSTAIRS,AUNDRY!REA s-ASTER"ATHWITH*ACUZZI4UB 3EPARATE3HOWER3TALL s7ALK )N#LOSETIN-ASTER"EDROOM s,ARGE,OW-AINTENANCE"ACK9ARD s#AR!TTACHED'ARAGE s2EFRIGERATOR 7ASHERAND$RYER )NCLUDED

Offered at $889,000

Mario’s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. 650/365-6955; 995-3822

Free

NOTICE TO READERS It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION $ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $! www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti    "

754 Gutter Cleaning est.

R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859

Sam’s Garden Service

                  

(650)969-9894

Frank’s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

Repair        

Armando’s Moving Homes, Apartments, Storage. Full Service moves. Serving the Bay Area for 20 yrs. Licensed & Insured. Armando,650-630-0424. CAL-T190632

767 Movers

AND MORE

Since 1976 Licensed & Insured

650-222-2517

(650) 799-5521

Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477.

757 Handyman/ Repairs AAA HANDYMAN

Lic.# 468963

751 General Contracting

748 Gardening/ Landscaping

464 Whisman Park Drive, Mountain View TED LIS

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE TRIMMING/ PRUNING, TREE SERVICE, STUMP GRINDING, CLEAN UPS, AERATION, IRRIGATION, ROTOTILLING. ROGER: 650.776.8666

Stewart Electric Lic# 745186 New Circuits, Repair. 408 368-6622 Professional Service! Free Quotes!

EMAIL TOYVONNEANDJEFF AOLCOM s www.yvonneandjeff.com OP EN SAT &

Tired of Mow, Blow and Go? Owner operated, 40 years exp. All phases of gardening/landscaping. Refs. Call Eric, 408/356-1350

730 Electrical

Carlson’s Rain Gutter Cleaning Roof cleaning and pressure washing. 20 years in business (650)322-5030

To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com

SHMOOVER

ABLE HANDYMAN FRED

MOOVERS

CompleteHomeRepair Maintenanc  emodelin ProfessionalPainting Carpentr Plumbing Electrical CustomCabineDesign Deckence  AnMuchMore

LICENSE CAL. T-118304

Serving the Peninsula since 1975/Owner-Operated!

327-5493

30 Years Experience

650.529.1662 3.27

HANDY

771 Painting/ Wallpaper

“Ed� MAN

 $!$   #$$

Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292

#"#!

FREE ESTIMA     

ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274 Keane Construction Specializing in Home Repairs Kitchens, Bathrooms, Stucco, Dry Rot & Masonry and more! 650-430-3469 Lic.#743748

           Specializing in: ( " '! (  $ ( % (" (&"#  ( #&'! ( #"#

Miller’s Maintenance Plumbing, Painting, Tile and wall repair. Free Est. No job too small. Senior discount. 25 years exp. 650/669-3199

  www.PinnaclePaintinginc.net

759 Hauling

650.799.8495

# J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc., office, garage, storage, old furniture, green waste and yard junk. clean-ups. Licensed & insured. FREE EST. 650/368-8810 (see my Yelp reviews)

STYLE PAINTING Full service painting. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

#1 Family Hauling Will beat most prices and haul anything. 650/207-9674 College Student Will haul and recycle your unwanted items and do genl. clean up. 650/641-3078; 650/868-6184

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

Place a FREE ad at FOGSTER.COM

NEW CONSTRUCTION FOR THE NEW YE AR – projected completions early 2012 11662 Putter Way LOS ALTOS

11672 Putter Way LOS ALTOS

s BEDROOMS OFlCE ORthBEDROOM FULLBATHS ANDHALF BATHS s !PPROXIMATELY  SQFT OFLIVINGSPACE s -OSTLYLEVELREARYARD

s BEDROOMS OFlCE FULLBATHSPLUS SPACEFORMEDIA lTNESS ANDWINECELLAR s !PPROXIMATELY  SQFT OFLIVINGSPACE s -OSTLYLEVELREARYARD

www.11662Putter.com

www.11672Putter.com

Offered at $2,198,000

Offered at $2,398,000

COMING SOON! Edge Lane, LOS ALTOS 4 bedrooms / 2.5 baths near Rancho Shopping Center; many upgrades, hardwood oors, and more

JUST SOLD!

JUST SOLD!

JUST SOLD!

JUST SOLD!

106 Arbuelo Way, LOS ALTOS

2077 Eugenia Way, LOS ALTOS

1509 Fordham Way, MOUNTAIN VIEW

606 Nandell Lane, LOS ALTOS

for $1,425,000 as is

for $1,268,000 as is

$1,580,000 as is

$2,500,000 as is

650.947.4798

www.PamBlackman.com

Pam@PamBlackman. com www. PamBlackman. com INTERO CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE, TOP 1%

DRE# 00584333 Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

20

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 27, 2012

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

790 Roofing Al Peterson RooďŹ ng since 1946 Specializing in   ng         

650-493-9177

795 Tree Care

Palo Alto

TREE SERVICE

             25 yrs ExpLic & Ins. #819244 (650) 380-2297

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Mountain View - 1245 Palo Alto 1 Bdrm Apt. $1850/mo. Includes wash/dryer. New amen., must see! (650) 274-5171

805 Homes for Rent Atherton, 3 BR/2 BA - $2000/mont Palo Alto, 2 BR/1 BA - $3100/mont Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $2,450/mo.

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

815 Rentals Wanted house wanted—280 access

820 Home Exchanges $3250 / 2br - 1200ft. Palo Alto Architect

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Redwood City, 5+ BR/4+ BA - $1,315,888

840 Vacation Rentals/Time Shares Vacation Properties Advertise your Vacation Property in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)2886019. (Cal-SCAN) ARCHITECT - CUSTOM HOME DESIGN

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage Texas Lake Bargain! 4 acred -just $49,900. Come see how much your money can buy in the North Texas Hill Country! Spectacular 4 acre lake access homesite w/ incredible Hill Country views and covered in trees. Enjoy 18,000+ acres of crystal clear waters -boat, ski, scuba! Prime location near Dallas/Ft Worth. Low taxes, booming economy, affordable living! Ask about our FREE OVERNIGHT STAY! Excellent financing. Call now 1.877.888.1636, x1563 www.pklakefront.com (Cal-SCAN)

855 Real Estate Services Pebble Beach & Carmel Homes Considering a second home in PEBBLE BEACH or CARMEL? Start your search at www.AdamMoniz.com

No phone number in the ad? GO TO

FOGSTER.COM

for contact information

1VCMJD /PUJDFT 995 Fictitious Name Statement ELECTRODOXZ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 559336 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Electrodoxz, located at 2620 Fayette Drive, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): SCOTT McDEVITT 2620 Fayette Dr. Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 22, 2011. (MVV Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012) FOUNTAINBLUE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 559610 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: FountainBlue, located at 405 Hedgerow Court, Mountain View, CA 94041, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): LINDA HOLROYD 405 Hedgerow Court Mountain View, CA 94041 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 06/06/2001. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 30, 2011. (MVV Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012) HAMAMOTO EXECUTIVE SERVICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 560001 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Hamamoto Executive Services, located at 950 Desmet Way, San Jose, CA 95125, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): ALICE HAMAMOTO 950 Desmet Way San Jose, CA 95125 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 7/28/2006. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 11, 2012. (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10, 2012)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: December 14, 2011 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: LORENA SOTOMAYOR DE FLORES The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 820 E. El Camino Real, Ste. C Mountain View, CA 94040-2837 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 - ON-SALE BEER AND WINE-EATING PLACE (MVV Jan. 13, 20, 27, 2012) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: STEPHEN JOSEPH BERGER Case No.: 1-12-PR-169958 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of STEPHEN JOSEPH BERGER, STEPHEN J. BERGER. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARY BERGER in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARY BERGER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the

petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 8, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ Douglas Barnes Douglas P. Barnes, A Professional Law Corp. 210 Almendra Ave. Los Gatos, CA 95030 (408)395-4800 (MVV Jan. 13, 20, 27, 2012)



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NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: January 9, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: SBI ENTERPRISES LLC The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 660 San Antonio Rd. Mountain View, CA 94040-1304 Type of license(s) applied for: 47 - ON-SALE GENERAL EATING PLACE (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2012) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN RICHARD LUCY Case No.: 1-12-PR-170035 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOHN RICHARD LUCY. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PETER LUCY in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: PETER LUCY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 29, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ James A. Thompson 600 Allerton St., Suite 200 Redwood City, CA 94063 (650)365-7333 (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2012) Call Alicia Santillan 650.326.8210 x6578 to assist you with your legal advertising needs. Email: asantillan@paweekly.com

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JANUARY 27, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

21

Wonderful family compound or an excellent investment property near downtown Mountain View! A 3 bedroom 2 ½ bath house plus three additional smaller houses on a 15,000 square foot lot. All four homes have hardwood floors, covered parking and individual laundry facilities.

Offered at $1,499,000

MICHAEL GALLI

632 Chiquita Av, Mountain View

President’s Club Phone: 650.248.3076 www.MichaelGalli.com Michael@apr.com DRE# 01852633

LOS ALTOS 167 S. San Antonio Road 22

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 27, 2012

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OPEN SAT & SUN, EXTENDED HOURS 4    www.444Lassen8.com

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OPEN SUNDAY

757 "!!(&' M O U NTAI N VI E W

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23

4:00

4:30

00n 1:

Su

Su

WILLOW GLEN

4:30

30-

30n 1:

Sat

&

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PALO ALTO

MENLO PARK

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MOUNTAIN VIEW

1664 MULBERRY LN $1,695,000 5 BR 3 BA Remodeled hm in Willow Glen w/family rm, French doors, updtd baths, lrg backyard & patio.

10 MANSION CT $1,325,000 2 BR 2.5 BA Size, condition, location, price ! Larger than many single family homes for the price.

3180 MORRIS DR $1,098,000 3 BR 2 BA Beautifully updated contemporary home with a large lot on a quiet street near Midtown PA.

521 TYRELLA AV $699,000 Spacious duplex in Mtn.View! Each unit has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, & garage!

Tim Trailer

Nancy Goldcamp

Ken Morgan & Arlene Gault

DiPali Shah

650.325.6161

650.325.6161

MOUNTAIN VIEW

0

-4:3

4:30

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650.328.5211

1:30

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LOS ALTOS HILLS

30 n 1:

650.325.6161

0

-4:3

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u &S

Su

FREMONT

SAN JOSE

QUALITY CUSTOM HOME $1,650,000 5 BR 5.5 BA Built w/love.Formal entry,grand living room w/high ceiling,chandelier & fireplace.

11035 EASTBROOK AVENUE $3,195,000 5 BR 4.5 BA 6000+ square ft beautiful custom home. 1.3 acre oaktree studded lot with expansive lawns.

36014 DERING PLACE $615,000 4 BR 2 BA Custom cabinets, granite counters. Spacious family room kitchen. Double pane windows.

3010 JULIO AVENUE $550,000 4 BR 2 BA Corner lot - open floor plan. Office/den/4th bedroom. Freshly painted inside and out.

Royce Cablayan

Terri Couture

Wendy Wu

Joanne Fraser

650.941.7040

CAMPBELL PERFECT DOWNTOWN LOCATION

LOS ALTOS HILLS NATURE LOVER’S $769,000 DREAM!

4 BR 3 BA Perfect downtown Campbell location. Only 13 yrs old w/marble, granite & hardwood flooring. Jeff Beltramo 650.325.6161

GREAT PRICE!

$3,290,000

5 BR 5 BA Beautiful Architecture + Floor Plan Amenities Abound. Gleaming HW Floors, Lovely Granite. Jim Galli 650.941.7040

CONVENIENT $2,695,000 LOCATION

4 BR 2 BA 2000+ sq ft of living space, near parks, shops, commutes. Separate family rm, lrg backyd. Nancy Adele Stuhr 650.941.7040

16755 LITTLEFIELD LANE SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,879,000

$510,000

2 BR 1.5 BA Soaring vaulted ceilings. Inside laundry rm w/full size w/d hookups. Balcony off living rm Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

LARGE HOUSE

$1,430,000 300 SAND HILL CIRCLE #101 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $995,000 TOP FLOOR CONDO

6 BR 3 BA With 6 bedrooms!There are2 bedrooms wings -3+3.Great location,huge deep backyard. Ron & Nasrin Delan 650.941.7040

800.558.4443 24

3 BR 2 BA Open Plan. Hardwood floors. Spacious rooms, 2balconies, A/C,pool. Top Las Lomitas Schools. Christine Hoover Sorensen 650.941.7040

Los Altos Palo Alto

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 27, 2012

$499,000

2 BR 2 BA Spacious end unit. French doors to private deck, kitch w/granite, master w/ walk-in closet. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

MENLO PARK

$199,000

1 BR 1 BA Well cared for. Large living rm. Dining with sliding door to balcony that overlooks pool. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

650.941.7040 650.325.6161

$335,000

Beautiful 6880 sf lot on a wonderful street. Ready to draw plans for your dream house! Alexandra Von Der Groeben 650.325.6161

NO STAIRS! $2,295,000 2 CAR ATTD GRG.

4 BR 3.5 BA 100% new. 4BR + Office, 3.5 baths. Top quality. Great Midtown loction. Tree-lined street. Judy Shen 650.328.5211

$443,500

2 BR 2 BA Stunning remodel! Move in ready! Top Cupt schls! Staged! Only common wall in 2-car garage. Karen Quaid 650.941.7040

$575,000

Clear lot with plans and permits in place for 2730 Sq Ft home with 4 bedrms and 3 bathrms Eppie Cf Lam 650.941.7040

CONDO 650.941.7040 ON THE LAKE

REDWOOD CITY

SANTA CLARA

Formal entry w/granite tile. Remodeled kitchen & baths. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

GREAT LOCATION

LOS GATOS

650.941.7040

PRIME $2,598,000 MOUNT CARMEL LOT!

5 BR 3 BA Elegance & Craftsmanship combine in this newly completed home in desirable College Terrace Jerry Haslam 650.941.7040

$868,000 100% NEW, 4 BR 3 BA Townhome at Walden Park. 4BR + OFFICE!

LOT W/PLANS $2,395,000 & PERMITS

3 BR 2 BA Private hills living awaits your touch & imagination!Enjoy a generous lot of 1.170 acres. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

Terri Couture

PALO ALTO

800 S CALIFORNIA AV $1,190,000 SUN 1 - 4

4 BR 3 BA 12,200 sq ft lot. 4 bed 3bath.Los 1905 QUAIL MEADOW RD Gatos schls.”Martha Stewart inspired” eat-in SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,578,000 kitchen. 4 BR 3 BA 1/2 acre property close to town. 2200 sq ft. New carpet and paint throughout. Barbara Cannon 650.941.7040

650.941.7040

1625 GRANT RD $2,645,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

5 BR 4.5 BA Experience a beautifully dynamic residence that transforms with the setting sun. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

VALLEY VWS W/PA SCHOOLS

LOS ALTOS

MOUNTAIN VIEW

6 BR 4 BA Rare! Over 5,000 newly remodeled at end of a cul de sac on over 1 acre! Palo Alto schls Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

ELEGANT$499,000 AMAZING VIEWS

3 BR 2 BA New kitch countrs,cherry stained cabinets,hrdwd flrs thru out most of hm.Dual Pn windows. Ron & Nasrin Delan 650.941.7040

231 HAWTHORNE AVE SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.941.7040

3366 VERNON TE SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

5 BR 4 BA Enormous living - dining - family - kit area + 2 patios on cul-de-sac. 10,956 sq.ft. lot! Geraldine Asmus 650.325.6161

GREAT OPPORTUNITY

SARATOGA

$2,288,000

SPACIOUS HM ON LARGE LOT

$925,000

4 BR 2 BA Over 1,700 sq ft home on 10K lot.3 car gar,hdwd flrs,sep family rm w/ fireplace,exc. schls Gary Herbert 650.941.7040

$1,267,000

5 BR 3 BA 5 bed, 2 office + 3 bathrm home. Attchd 1 car garage w/ample extra storage. PA schools. Helen Kuckens 650.941.7040

WOODSIDE PRIME LOCATION!

$29,000,000

Private prestigious location. 11+ acre property in central Woodside close to town. Susie Dews & Shena Hurley 650.325.6161

REDWOOD CITY $449,000 20777 SKYLINE BLVD SUN 1-4 3 BR 2 BA Say HELLO to a GOOD PRICED TO SELL!

BUY! This home features 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and a BIG family rm! Rod Creason 650.325.6161

$2,995,000

5 BR 4 BA Hm w/views like no other. Features meadow,pond, gated vegetable garden w/large chicken coop Jamie Carmichael 650.941.7040

©2011 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC. DRE License # 00313415


Mountain View Voice 01.27.2012 - Section 1