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A sweet taste of the cosmopolitan WEEKEND | P.12 JANUARY 21, 2011 VOLUME 19, NO. 3

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Council says school funding must wait DOWNTOWN PROJECTS FIRST IN LINE FOR SPECIAL DISTRICT’S TAX DOLLARS By Daniel DeBolt

parking improvements, maintenance and business recruitment espite concerns that it in the future. Spending $1.5 could hurt local schools, million to $2 million to attract a the City Council said long-sought downtown grocery Tuesday that it wants to extend store has had support on the City the city’s downtown revitaliza- Council as well. tion authority for another two While the tax district won’t years. expire for two years, the city “This is the last major chunk says it will begin paying off the of money we will have to do any- district’s $27 million debt right thing significant in the down- away so that the extension would town area,” said council member “hold harmless” local schools. Mike Kasperzak, referring to the That way the city’s schools can downtown authority’s current begin to receive their share $5.5 million of downtown balance. property taxes Without an ‘What’s good for the in five years. extension, the “What’s good money would for the school school districts need to be spent districts is good by the authori- is good for the city.’ for the city” and ty’s April 9, 2011 vice versa, said COUNCILWOMAN RONIT BRYANT sunset date. council member The proposal Ronit Bryant, was not met who supported with stiff opposition from school the two-year extension along officials and parents at the meet- with the rest of the council. ing, who were reassured by city Jim Pollart was one of seven officials that they would prob- parents who have been very ably begin receiving their share involved in school district fundof tax revenues by 2016-17, only raising efforts and who made one year later than if the author- their presence known at the ity were to expire in April with meeting. The group has been its current balance unspent. The primarily interested in the city’s council did not take a vote at the $26 million-a-year Shoreline meeting, but is scheduled to do Community Fund property tax so on Feb. 22. revenue, which is dedicated to City Manager Kevin Duggan maintenance and improvement said the intent of the extension in the Shoreline area indefinitely is not to add to the city’s eco- under special state legislation. nomic development funds, but Pollart noted that he felt “a kick to buy time so that the authority in the stomach” when he heard could “wind down in an orderly months ago of potentially several fashion.” The city needs time to million dollars in state budget spend its current $5.5 million cuts to the Mountain View Whisbalance, he said, which has been man School District’s $24 million budgeted for several studies on See COUNCIL, page 8 how to fund the downtown’s

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MICHELLE LE

Teacher Patti Fambrini jokes with her students during cooking class at Los Altos High School.

Making the cut in cooking class TEENS SLICE, DICE AND STIR THEIR WAY THROUGH CULINARY ARTS AT LOS ALTOS HIGH By Nick Veronin

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atti Fambrini’s seventh-period culinary class at Los Altos High School has all the ingredients of a competitive reality cooking show. One student blindly stirs a bowl of sauce to his right while reading an itemized recipe on the counter to his left, mumbling the

directions to himself. A girl with her dark hair in a ponytail darts across the kitchen to fetch some herbs and spices. And when the brighteyed, extremely energetic Fambrini launches into an impassioned lecture, the adolescent cooks all snap their heads toward the sound of See CULINARY, page 9

Carbajal trial: Niece recounts being raped as child By Nick Veronin

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wo of three alleged victims took the stand at the Santa Clara County Hall of Justice in San Jose to testify against Pedro Carbajal, the Mountain View soccer coach who is accused of molesting his young nieces six to 11 years ago. The eldest, a 21-year-old, woman maintained her composure before Superior Court

INSIDE

Judge Griffin M. J. Bonini on Jan. 14 as she told the court that her uncle had raped her numerous times when she was between the ages of 8 and 9. As county prosecutor Dan Fehderau questioned her in detail, she told the court that her uncle molested her while she was sharing a two-bedroom apartment on California Street with her mother, brother, two sisters, Carbajal and his wife.

During the cross examination, defense attorney Darby William attempted to cast doubt on the young woman’s testimony, questioning why she had such spotty memory of the purported attacks and why she took so long to come forward. Carbajal was first arrested and charged in February of 2009. “I didn’t know if that was what See CARBAJAL, page 8

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Have a question for Voices Around Town? E-mail it to editor@mv-voice.com JANUARY 21, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Council: McKelvey ball fields will stay

Bedbugs slip into town TWO CALDERON APARTMENTS ARE INFESTED, TENANT SAYS By Daniel DeBolt

By Daniel DeBolt

A

fter infesting the East Coast with a vengeance, bedbugs are beginning to jump into bed with West Coast residents, including some who live in Mountain View. The tiny blood-sucking creatures have appeared in a pair of apartments in Mountain View’s Avalon at Creekside apartment complex at 151 Calderon Avenue. To kill the bugs, exterminators were heating the neighboring apartments in building 70 with special fans on Monday, Jan. 17. Mountain View is not alone in attracting the vermin. “They’re all over the place,” said one of the exterminators, not about these apartments in particular but about the various bedbug infestations he’d fought up and down the San Francisco Peninsula. The exterminator said he couldn’t comment about what bugs in particular he was killing, but a neighbor in the same building was happy to explain. Apartment managers had brought in dogs to sniff surround apartments for the bedbugs, said the neighbor, who wished to remain anonymous. Though no bedbugs were found in the neighboring apartments, the news that the two units were infested had some neighbors “freaking out,” he said. The bugs are known to

MICHELLE LE

Wo’O Ideafarm dismantles the portable easel he uses to post his signs in Mountain View at ABC Self Storage earlier this month.

‘Arrest’ turns on Ideafarm SPAT OVER SIGNS ENDS IN JAIL FOR CITY’S RESIDENT PROTESTER By Nick Veronin

H

e may be extremely familiar with how his speech is protected by the First Amendment, but Wo’O Ideafarm, the man known for displaying provocative signs on the streets of Mountain View, appears to have a slightly more tenuous grasp on the rules governing citizen’s arrests, a police spokeswoman said. The local “location-less” man and self-styled public speaker was arrested Friday, Jan. 14, near the corner of Charleston Road and Independence Avenue on charges of battery and false imprisonment after he pushed a woman to the ground and held her there for about 10 minutes, said Liz Wylie,

public information officer for the Mountain View Police Department. Police received a call just after 4 p.m. reporting that Ideafarm had a woman pinned on the ground, according to Wylie. When police arrived, the woman was “hysterical” and Ideafarm told the authorities that he suspected the woman of vandalizing his property. Earlier that day, Ideafarm had set up a sign reading “queers are perverts.” After setting up the sign, he went away. When he returned, Wylie said, he found that the sign had been taken down and thrown into some nearby bushes, and that many of his See IDEA FARM, page 6

See BED BUGS, page 10

The City Council on Tuesday night did not support a proposal for removing a 90-foot baseball field from McKelvey Park, despite a campaign by neighbors for seeking more useable park space. “It’s a community asset, that’s why it deserves to stay,” said council member Tom Means of the major league-sized field at McKelvey. Five other council members agreed. Laura Macias had to recuse herself from the discussion because she lives near McKelvey. The meeting brought Little League players and their families out en masse to defend the baseball tradition at McKelvey. A 90-foot field and a 60-foot Little League field have existed there for more than half a century. Families say evening games keep kids out of trouble on Friday and Saturday nights. And moving the 90-foot field to another location, as some neighbors proposed, would mean splitting up families who have young ones playing on the little field while their older kids play on “big McKelvey.” But the council chambers were also filled with nearby residents who said the kids in the neighborhood end up playing in the street because there is no real neighborhood park, despite the large space at McKelvey. See MCKELVEY, page 8

Race to save last historic piece of Hangar One UNIQUE WINDOWS AT STAKE AS NAVY CONTRACTORS COMPLETE INTERIOR DEMOLITION By Daniel DeBolt

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ith Hangar One’s restoration funding unexpectedly lost in last year’s political re-shuffling in Washington, D.C., preservationists are fighting to save one last thing before it’s too late — the hangar’s unique corrugated windows. In just over two months, the siding and windows will be torn

off the landmark building, which will be left a bare steel skeleton unless funding for restoration can be secured. The windows on the top half of the hangar were designed to withstand the explosion of a 1930s airship filled with hydrogen, said architect and preservationist Linda Ellis in a presentation to the Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board last week.

The Navy has been planning to send the windows to a landfill rather than clean off the caulking that may contain toxic PCBs. Preservationists say that disposing of the windows may not be the cheapest way for the United States Navy to meet its environmental cleanup responsibilities, and would make long-term efforts See HANGAR ONE, page 10

JANUARY 21, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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Hundreds of new apartments on El Camino? By Daniel DeBolt

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he City Council voted unanimously last Tuesday to allow two large apartment building projects to move through the city’s planning process, potentially adding 535 homes to the city. Under the proposed zoning changes, the Urban Housing Group could build a 203-unit apartment building on 2.91 acres at 2650 and 2656 West El Camino Real, near the city’s western border, while on the other edge of town, at 870 East El Camino Real, the Archstone Group could build 332 apartments and 5,400 square feet of retail space on 9.7 acres. The zoning changes were met with some consternation by Mayor Jac Siegel, who asked why the city

IDEA FARM

Continued from page 5

other possessions had been strewn about. Ideafarm reassembled his sign and again left — this time to use his laptop computer at a nearby Chipotle restaurant, Wylie said. While he was in Chipotle he told police that he saw a woman approach his sign and look at it.

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Suspecting that she was the same person who had torn his sign down and scattered his belongings earlier in the day, he rushed out of the restaurant and told the woman that he was placing her under citizen’s arrest, Wylie said. When she attempted to leave he restrained her. He pushed her down and attempted to hold her on the ground, said Wylie. The woman managed to get up but Ideafarm pushed her down and held her again, and she began crying, witnesses told police. Some people attempted to persuade Ideafarm to get off of the woman, Wylie said, but he refused, so they called police. “We did not accept his citizen’s arrest,� Wylie said. “There is nothing to indicate that she was the one who ripped up his sign.� California law allows for citizen’s arrests, Wylie said, and there are even allowances for physically restraining someone in such an arrest. However, Ideafarm made a miscalculation when he laid his hands on the victim. Wylie said that the charges Ideafarm now faces are likely the most serious he has yet faced in Mountain View. False imprisonment can

be classified as either a felony or a misdemeanor and in Ideafarm’s case it is currently classified as a felony, she said. The district attorney will decide how the case will ultimately be prosecuted, Wylie said. “There are a lot of people who research law extensively and then they want to exert their right to all of those laws,� Wylie said. “But they often don’t understand all the nuances of those laws.� Ideafarm frequently carries a book on the First Amendment and has attempted to place others under citizen’s arrest in the past. He fervently defends his own right to free speech, even as he has been threatened for the messages that appear on his signs. Those messages, he has said, are meant to get the people of Mountain View, and eventually the greater United States, to live “unselfishly� and in harmony with one another. “I want to connect people wholesomely,� he has said. He aims to accomplish this by stirring a debate within the community around topics such as gay rights and immigration. Wylie stopped short of saying that local media outlets ought to stop covering Ideafarm, but made a point of saying that said she believes he feeds off of seeing his name in the papers. Ideafarm frequently sends the Voice e-mails — especially before he takes an action he believes will draw ire from the community and draw the attention of law enforcement. These e-mails, sometimes written in the third person, often read like a press release from a political organization. While he awaited transport from the Mountain View Police Station to Santa Clara County’s Main Jail in San Jose, Ideafarm used his one phone call to notify a reporter with the Palo Alto Daily News of his arrest. “He very much enjoys the coverage,� Wylie said.

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stone apartment complex built in the 1960s. The UHG project replaces the San Antonio Inn, which has the drawback of eliminating a source of hotel tax revenue for the city. Designs have not been submitted for either project. But developers said both would feature a mix of one- and two-bedroom units. At the Archstone site, heights could rise as high as four stories along El Camino Real, with retail on the first story, and taper down to three stories at the rear. The density prosed is 37 units per acre for Archstone, and 70 units per acre for the UHG project. UHG did not indicate how tall its project might be.

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was considering such large buildings when they would be built according to density and height limits that have only been proposed for the city’s 2011-12 General Plan, not yet approved. He also said the projects wouldn’t do anything to help the fact that 42 percent of the city is rental property, which hurts the city’s tax revenue. Council member Ronit Bryant said she expected the Urban Housing Group (UHG) project near the city’s western border to be a “showpiece project� as it will be near the gateway to the city from Palo Alto. “I will expect the very best quality,� she said. And that includes how well it “fits the neighborhood,� she said. The Archstone project would replace the existing 180-unit Arch-

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Abe-Koga named chair of VTA board COUNCIL MEMBER WILL BE MAJOR PLAYER IN COUNTY TRANSIT DECISIONS By Daniel DeBolt

the county, including a ountain View’s Margaret new express shuttle service Abe-Koga was named opening in San Jose at the chair of the Valley Transend of the month. portation Authority board of direcThe board as whole tors last week, which may bring a approves a budget twice a focus to local transportation issues year and approves all expenthat the city hasn’t seen since the ditures the VTA makes early 1990s. that exceed $250,000. The Abe-Koga, a Mountain View Margaret Abe-Koga board also recommends City Council member and former large transportation projmayor, is now a mayor of sorts for a much ects to the state and federal government larger organization, overseeing a budget for funding. of $363 million and 2,100 employees. The The VTA general manager, Michael last time a Mountain View council mem- Burns, has announced that the VTA is ber held the post was the early 1990s when beginning the year with an optimistic Pat Figueroa was appointed. budget outlook after a tough 2010. “I’ve come to find transportation really In a press release, Abe-Koga said she was interesting and quite fascinating,� Abe- encouraged by the news, but urged the Koga said. “I’m really excited about it. It is VTA to be “prudent.� important for Mountain View, definitely, “In terms of goals, I would like to focus because it helps us to advocate for our on the basics,� she said. projects in the city, to make sure we have a voice. We (Mountain View) are pretty key Her priorities to transit in the county.� Abe-Koga said a top priority for her was Abe-Koga was the top fund raiser in the saving cash-strapped Caltrain, which the 2006 and 2010 City Council elections, and VTA funds, along with San Mateo and is also eyeing Liz Kniss’ seat on the Santa San Francisco counties. She notes that Clara County Board of Supervisors when Mountain View has the second busiest Kniss terms out in 2012. Abe-Koga’s new Caltrain station on the line, second only job enables her to network with city and to San Francisco. county leaders from around the county. Major VTA-funded Mountain View projects in the works include a bikeNew duties sharing program at the downtown transit Like the Mountain View mayor job, her center, express light rail service to and duties as VTA board chair include help- from downtown Mountain View and ing to set the agenda for regular board improvements to the rapid transit 522 meetings, which allows her to set pri- bus line on El Camino Real. That could orities to some extent. She will also make include dedicated bus lanes and improved appointments to various committees and bus turnouts on El Camino Real, a “big act as ribbon-cutter for projects all over project for Mountain View� Abe-Koga

M

benefit costs. Ultimately, she said, the VTA needs a new source of revenue, because depending on sales tax for most its revenue means the VTA is subjected to the wild swings of the economy. “It is pretty hard to predict how much funding we’re gonna get,� she said. “If transit is going to survive or do better we have to find a more stable source of revenue.�

said. Bus rapid transit is said to be as fast as going by car, skipping unpopular stops and communicating with stoplights to get green lights. This summer, Abe-Koga said VTA will test a system to notify riders of an early or late bus. Using GPS tracking devices on the buses, riders with Internet-enabled phones will be able to “check on line to see when the next bus is coming, whether it’s coming early or late, so you can plan your schedule better,� she said. Initial roll-out of that project is scheduled for this fall. As for more controversial topics in Mountain View, VTA continues to make the extension of BART to San Jose a big priorit Abe-Koga said, despite concerns among North and South County cities that the VTA cannot afford it. And the VTA is also considering a new program that would reward cities that build larger shares of the county’s housing with transit funding. The Association of Bay Area Governments rates cities on the number of housing starts every year, and poor ratings for Mountain View have angered Mountain View officials, who have questioned ABAG’s rating methods.

Getting the job Abe-Koga almost wasn’t given the opportunity to chair the board. It started with a re-organization of the board last year, which allowed board members to be elected by city groupings. Under the old system, it would not have been Mountain View’s turn to sit on the board for several years. But last year, after three years on various policy and finance-related VTA committees, Abe-Koga was made vice chair of the board, which made it a sure bet that she would rotate into the top seat this year. County Supervisor Ken Yeager was selected to be vice chair last week, making him next in line. The new job means longer hours for Abe-Koga, who already works 20-30 hours a week on City Council duties. Being vice chair was a 15-hour a week job, she said. Her compensation? She says she receives a stipend of $80 per meeting, which includes one board meeting and several committee meetings a month. That’s on top of about $500 a month she receives as a Mountain View City Council member.

Finding funding The VTA was facing major budget cuts late last year, but an unexpected influx of funding and a rosier sales tax revenue report in the last quarter will probably mean no cuts to bus or light rail service this year, Abe-Koga said. Hopefully, services cut recently can be added back as the economy improves, she added. The VTA is also negotiating contracts with its unions this year, and she says the agency will be taking a close look at salary and

E-mail Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

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budget, much more than parents’ fundraising efforts could absorb. He made it clear that the group is interested in working with the city so schools can receive as much of the economic development funds as possible. The group didn’t take a clear position at the meeting on what Pollart called key issues: whether to extend the district and whether to spend its $5.5 million balance on debt payments in order to release tax revenue to schools sooner. Mountain View Whisman alone would receive $825,000 a year while the Mountain View-Los Altos High School District would receive $670,000. The city’s general fund would receive $840,000. School district superintendents Barry Groves and Craig Goldman

also attended the meeting but did not speak. Echoing a comment from Pollart about the state of downtown, real estate agent Mike Cobb said that real estate in downtown Mountain View is doing “extremely well” compared to other cities, as evident in low office vacancy rates and substantial rent growth. Ever since Proposition 13 passed in 1979, restricting schools’ efforts to raise property tax revenue, schools have eyed the property taxes locked in such special tax districts. Since 1969, Mountain View has collected all of the property taxes within a 16-block area along Castro Street and funneled the taxes toward property acquisition, economic development and streetscape and facade improvements downtown. It was a factor in causing downtown property values to increase from $22 million in 1969 to over $418 million today, officials said.

The authority’s revenues totaled $5.4 million last year. To fund below market rate housing, 20 percent is set aside ($1 million a year), which will continue while debt is paid off and as long as the district exists. To help plug the state’s $25 billion deficit, Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed the complete elimination of Mountain View’s Revitalization Authority and over 300 others like it around the state this June. But economic development director Ellis Berns said the city should go forward with its extension because there is no guarantee that it will happen and council member Laura Macias and others said Brown’s proposal was unlikely to pass the state Legislature. Vice Mayor Mike Kasperzak, who is also the vice president of the League of California Cities, said that Brown’s proposal threatens 300,000 jobs across the state. But state budget cuts that might otherwise be necessary could mean significant job loss as well. Brown would use $1.7 billion of the redevelopment money to balance the state’s budget next year, and allow cities to pay off their redevelopment agency debts in following years. V

E-mail Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

CARBAJAL

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uncles do to nieces,” she said. The woman — who throughout the proceedings spoke in a quiet and reserved manner — said she had tried to forget the incidents. William suggested at one point that she may have been upset with her uncle and is seeking retribution. The woman denied that she was trying to get even with Carbajal. A group of mostly women sat on Carbajal’s side of the courtroom during the proceedings. Though they did not wish to comment on the case, one member of the group identified herself and everyone with her as “friends and relatives of Pedro.” While the woman on the stand appeared distraught for the majority of the proceedings, she never broke down while in the courtroom. However, after one recess, her lawyer asked why she had been crying during the break. There were people in the courtroom who made her uncomfortable, she said. During Fehderau’s examination, the victim said one of her sisters told her that she had

McKelvey Park

also been touched inappropriately by Carbajal. Before his arrest, Carbajal worked as a chef at a Palo Alto law firm and coached a soccer league for at-risk youth. Throughout the day’s hearings he frequently rested his face on his right hand, maintaining an emotionless expression and smiling when he stood to face the jury as they entered the courtroom after recesses. When the trial resumed on Jan. 19, the first alleged victim resumed the stand, breaking down shortly before the end of her testimony. “I’ve just been holding it in so long,” she said. When asked why she took so long to go to the authorities, she said that she was afraid of breaking up her family. The second eldest of the alleged victims took the stand after her sister stepped down. Before the lunch recess she told Fehderau that Carbajal touched her underneath her underwear in a “rubbing motion” when she was about 8 or 9 years old. “I was scared,” she said. “I didn’t know what to do or say.” So she didn’t say anything, she testified. At the Voice’s press deadline Wednesday, the trail was set to resume after a lunchtime recess. V

Mountain View

The latest conceptual design for McKelvey Park, as supported by the City Council Tuesday.

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McKelvey Park

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MCKELVEY

Continued from page 5

Community service director Dave Muela said 660 kids a year use McKelvey’s baseball fields during the evenings and all day on the weekends for most of the year. But according to one neighbor in the Saint Francis Acres neighborhood, “We also have 300 kids with no place to play.” With the Santa Clara Valley Water District proposing to rebuild McKelvey as a 15-footdeep flood basin for Permanente Creek, neighbors saw an opportunity to move the larger field to the Shoreline area, where new

baseball and soccer fields are being built. A second 60-foot field could replace the 90-footer at McKelvey, leaving more space for a park, neighbors said. But under the position the council took Tuesday, the 60- and 90-foot baseball fields will remain at McKelvey and neighbors will have to settle for a .7-acre minipark squeezed onto the edge of the park. Council members noted that while it may sound small, it is actually larger than other miniparks in the city, including MercyBush Park — a “jewel” in the Old Mountain View neighborhood, said council member Ronit Bryant, who lives nearby. The city is planning to build

new 60- and 90-foot baseball fields and two soccer fields at Shoreline along Garcia Avenue, which would meet only the current demand for fields, according to city staff. Adding a second, larger baseball field to Shoreline would pose several problems, according a city staff report, including the need for a tall fence where perching raptors would endanger the rare burrowing owls. It would also mean spreading a baseball field across both landfill and non-landfill areas, which settle differently. The City Council has yet to approve a detailed final plan for McKelvey, and construction could be several years away. V

-PDBM/FXT

Teens make splash with ocean film fest By Nick Veronin

T

wo environmentally minded student clubs at Mountain View High School are hosting a film festival and town hallstyle discussion to explore how humanity is contributing to the ecological degradation of world’s oceans and aquatic life, and offer potential solutions to the problem. The Ocean Film Festival, which will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. Friday evening, Jan. 21, in the Mountain View High School Theatre, is co-hosted by the school’s Environmental Club and the Save the Sharks Club. “Our oceans are filled with some of the most spectacular forms of life on this planet, and because of the

effects of global warming and other trends, the whole marine ecosystem is in jeopardy,” Katherine Guns, one of the student organizers, said in a press release. “ It’s time we do something about it.” To educate those who attend, three films — possibly more, if time allows — will be shown at the free event. According to a press release, the festival’s centerpiece film, “Bag It,” follows “an average American guy” who pledges to quit using plastic bags, which ultimately leads him “on a global tour to unravel the complexities of our plastic world.” Two shorter films discuss whales, and argue for the cessation of whaling worldwide. Afterward a panel will discuss the topics covered in the films.

MICHELLE LE

From left, Zaineb Khan and Miguel Carrillo sautee onions as Abbie Fontanilla checks her group’s pot of chili.

CULINARY

Continued from page 1

her voice. “Gentlemen! Ladies!” she yells over the din of chopping knives, mixing spoons, boiling water and churning dishwashers. “What is wrong with this picture?” The lecture that follows comes from a different place than the fiery tirades of prime-time cooking celebrities. Fambrini is not here to smash plates and generate ratings. She is here to teach. That’s not to say that she doesn’t understand where Chef Gordon Ramsay, of “Hell’s Kitchen” fame, is coming from with his ranting and raving — although, she says he is almost certainly “hamming it up for Hollywood.” “It’s a very high-stress, intense job,” she says, acknowledging that she raises her voice in the kitchen — both with her students and at her Palo Alto restaurant. Fambrini has been in the food and hospitality business for 33 years. She owns and is the chef of Fambrini’s Terrace Cafe and once worked 30 hours straight

The panel will include Dr. Geoff Shester and Wallace J. Nichols, representatives from conservation organizations Oceana and Ocean Revolution respectively. Every other week, Mountain View residents wheel blue recycling bins — filled with plastic containers, glass bottles, aluminum cans and assorted paper products — out to the curb to be scooped up by the rumbling collection truck and carried off to be transformed back into more bottles, boxes and book pages. But before her neighbors pat themselves on the back for being so green, Mary Heeney said they need to hear the entire story. “All of those cargo ships that come from China carrying tons

MICHELLE LE

Gabby Sanchez carefully measures red pepper flakes during Patti Fambrini’s cooking class.

as the lead caterer at a 1,500-seat event at Stanford University. She began teaching at Los Altos High School in 2008, and she hasn’t looked back. “I love it!” Fambrini exclaims. Fambrini’s class is held in a professional, industrial kitchen. Multiple island workstations, a plethora of pots, pans, knives, blenders, herbs and spices are at the student’s disposal. Perishable ingredients are stored in a restaurant-size stainless steel refrigerator, which stands next to an ice machine. A long stove range with two large ovens sits below a fan that directs smoke and steam up and out through the high ceiling. ‘Everyone likes food’ The students are sifting through dried beans, pulling out rocks, and preparing them to be cooked combined with a spicy sauce of tomatoes, onions and perhaps even some meat. Broken into groups — each group in charge of a different style of chili — the teens are periodically interrupted by Fambrini. “That’s too much cumin,” she tells Alex Fujimoto, a junior at

Los Altos, who is making vegetarian chili with his team. Fujimoto says he signed up because he wanted to learn how to cook, and takes a very pragmatic view of the lessons he is learning. “Everyone likes food,” he says. “No one wants to starve.” Sandra Mejia, a senior, stands with dripping wet hands at one of the dishwashing stations in the back of the kitchen, where dirty pots and pans are scrubbed and the white cooking smocks are tossed in a large laundry machine after class. For her, she says, learning to be selfreliant factored into her decision to sign up for the class. “I never cooked before,” Mejia says. Now she feels confident in the kitchen. “It has turned out to be a valuable life experience.” Gabby Sanchez, also a senior, had lots of experience cooking with her grandmother and on her own before signing up for Fambrini’s class, which she says has improved her cooking. Proportions, Sanchez says, are key. “You don’t want to overpower a dish with one flavor.” These are all lessons Fambrini hopes her students will learn in

and tons of plastic products into the port of Oakland every day, and when they leave they are full of empty plastic containers,” she said. These ships then head back to China, perhaps passing by the massive blob of floating debris — known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — on their way. The amount of energy used to transport American recyclables overseas to be melted down, turned into more plastic and shipped right back is just one example of inefficiency and waste in America’s waste management system to be covered at the Ocean Film Festival. Heeney spearheaded the festival as part of Be the Change, a project sponsored by Acterra, a Palo Altobased environmental organization that works to engage community members in local green projects. She says she felt a call to action

after spending time swimming with whales and witnessing ocean life up close. “I believe that because we have the brain that we do, we have responsibility to care for the Earth and also care for the creatures we are living with,” she said. “But first we have to convince people that there is a problem.” She hopes that the films will convince viewers that humans — especially Americans — are living in a way that is unsustainable. Furthermore, she hopes those who attend will see that they can make a difference. “We throw up our arms and say ‘I feel like this is such a huge task and the little thing that I do can’t really matter,’” Heeney said. “But it does. By setting examples and working together I think we can get this done.”

the class. “It is a perfect opportunity for people to come in and learn the fundamentals of cooking,” she says. It is a very valuable life skill, as Mejia points out, and it can even turn into a career.

rant job, she says the class will give participants the skills and understanding necessary to ace an interview for a restaurant. “When I interview somebody I give them a knife and an onion and say ‘cut this,’” she says. “If they know how, they will show that they have the basic skills needed to be a chef.” Students taking Fambrini’s class will work in the professional kitchen at Los Altos High School, learning the basics of cooking, including knife skills, kitchen safety, food pairings and how to make soups, stocks and sauces. The class will cover food chemistry and learn about herbs and spices from around the world and the role they play in creating regional flavors. Additionally, Fambrini will cover the business end of the food and hospitality industry. “It’s an opportunity,” Stefanski says. “It shows an employer that you took the time to get these basic skills and that he or she is not going to have to train you.” Cooking “is the pathway to the world’s kitchens,” Fambrini says, and those who learn to cook well will also have the opportunity to go wherever they want with their skill. She hopes that such a path will start in her high school class, or perhaps her adult school course, scheduled to begin in August. The desire to get a job in the industry, however, is not enough to carry someone to the next level, she says. “You have to have a passion.” For those with a love of food and a desire to pursue a career in the culinary arts is fulfilling, she says. “When you see someone sitting at the table thoroughly enjoying their food and smacking their lips, there is nothing more fulfilling to me.”

Adult classes Next summer, the Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District plans to expand the program by offering a night class at its adult school. “We know there is a lot of interest with a number of high school-age students and young adults” in the culinary arts, says Laura Stefanski, director of the district’s adult education program. “We would like to extend that opportunity to young adults, particularly (those) who have graduated from our district.” Stefanski says that she is excited to be adding a culinary class to the adult school’s course selection, and hopes that it will have a decent draw. She Wynne Satterwhite, the principal of Los Altos High School, originally suggested that Fambrini teach in the district. “We meet a lot of people who are looking for work,” Stefanski says. The adult school works closely with California’s Employment Development Department, she explains. Her experience there has led her to believe that cooking, which calls for creative people who like working with their hands — and which produces a product that everyone needs to live — will be a hit, especially among those looking to start a career straight out of high school, or who may be looking to switch career paths. While Fambrini doesn’t want to guarantee that anyone that takes her class will land a restau-

V

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JANUARY 21, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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leave large red welts behind on their victims. “They say they can spread, that’s why we’re worried,� he said. “I’m going to continue to look under my mattresses to make sure nothing is there. I mean, anything is possible right?� The bugs usually spread by hitching a ride on people, jumping off their victims to infest new spaces. They are found in hotels and apartment complexes most often, where people come and go more frequently.

COURTESY AMEC EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL

Interior buildings in the cavernous Hangar One at Moffett Field have been demolished; preservationists are racing to preserve the windows before its siding comes off in April.

HANGAR ONE

Continued from page 5

to preserve Hangar One as a historic building much more costly. At the RAB meeting, Ellis passed around a square-foot sample of the wavy windows, which have what looks like a layer of chicken wire for reinforcement. Reproducing the unique glasswork would cost $200 a square foot, according to a quote from one custom glass maker, she said. “Holding this in my hand, I can tell that you can’t just go down to Home Depot and buy this,� said Lenny Siegel, RAB member and IT P

director of the Center for Public Environmental Oversight. As of late last year, the inside of Moffett Field’s iconic Hangar One has been completely gutted of its interior buildings, along with the toxic asbestos and PCBs used on walls, floors and pipes. So far, 1,897 tons of debris and nearly 5,000 fluorescent light tubes have been taken to special landfills at Altamont Pass and Newby Island. During the project, water was used to keep down the toxic dust, which did not reach dangerous levels, according to air sensor placed just outside the hangar. The work took thousands of man hours, and there were no accidents, said Mike Shulz of U.S. Navy contractor AMEC Earth and

Environmental. Navy officials say that NASA, Hangar One’s owner, needs to come up with $1.2 million if it wants to save the windows, a figure that was questioned at the meeting by preservationists who wanted to know how much it would cost to send the windows to a landfill. “Saving the glass could be cheaper than disposing of it,� Siegel said. NASA Ames said last year that it is committed to finding $20 million for Hangar One restoration with new siding. But NASA Ames deputy director Lewis Braxton said last week that that is now more difficult without Congresswoman Anna Eshoo’s $8 million earmark, lost when Republicans took over

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the House of Representatives late last year. Paying for new siding is “not a wise thing to do when you can’t point out where you will get the additional funding to finish it,� Braxton said, later adding that “we’re facing significant cuts throughout the agency to try to deal with what’s going on� in Washington, D.C. Braxton also announced that he had been called to work in NASA’s Washington offices for a year, where he will be “trying to find that $20 million.� If the Navy doesn’t reconsider its plans to trash the windows, possibly in April, preservationists hope a few wealthy donors come forward to preserve them. It could be a step towards building a Smithsonianchartered air and space museum in Hangar One. To that end, preservationists have formed the Air and Space West Foundation. “This will be a test as to whether we can raise that kind of money,� Siegel said.

According to bedbugregistry. com, there have been complaints about bedbugs all around the Bay Area, but only one complaint from Mountain View, made in 2009 at a Central Avenue apartment complex. By a large margin, complaints made on the West Coast are outnumbered by those made on the East Coast. To deal with the problem, exterminators use a process that heats the air inside the apartments until the bedbugs are killed, along with any other living thing, such as mold. E-mail Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com The foundation is not asking the public for smaller donations, at least not yet. “We would need a whole lot of $100 donations to get a million dollars,� Siegel said. Shulz updated the RAB on AMEC’s efforts to save artifacts inside the hangar. The Navy contractor said it succeeded in saving numerous explosion-proof lights, a mural of Moffett Field and many cranes that were installed along the ceiling. Also saved, mostly, is the most historic structure in the hangar, the temperature-controlled “cork room� where airship gas bags were stored. The steel frame was left intact, pieces of a conveyor system put into boxes and its wooden doors put in storage. But the cork walls and wood floors, which preservationists tried to save, were said to be contaminated with toxic dust and had to be taken to a landfill. Nevertheless, the cork room can be “reconstructed in the future,� Shulz said. V

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THE OPINION OF THE VOICE

VOICE FROM THE COMMUNITY

Redevelopment districts in limbo

Counterpoint to Jan. 7 editorial

lthough there is no certainty that Gov. Jerry Brown’s plan to wipe out redevelopment agencies in the state will happen anytime soon, this is a good time for the city to seriously consider what it would be like if all property tax monies coming to its two districts were shared more equitably between the city, local schools and other special districts. The governor’s idea — to take dedicated funding away from special districts and return it to local governments and schools — is far from becoming law and is certain to be strongly opposed by cities and special districts from around the state. Mountain View could lose its downtown and Shoreline redevelopment agencies (RDAs), which have financed improvements worth millions of dollars on Castro Street and in the Shoreline area. Brown’s message said in part, “RDAs were not intended to become a permanent source of business subsidies� and that their original intent was to “relieve blight� in a “limited amount of time.� In Mountain View, the life of the downtown “Revitalization Authority� began in 1969. It was set to expire in April but the City Council said Tuesday that it now wants to extend it another two years as the city figures out other ways to pay for future needs like new parking, business recruitment and maintenance. Some also hope to spend $1.5 million to $2 million of the current $5.5 million balance to subsidize a downtown grocery store. For the uninitiated, an RDA collects and keeps all the property taxes that are due in the district, but must spend all the proceeds to make improvements inside district boundaries. When a special district is created, no other districts, including schools, receive any funds from the district. In Mountain View, for example, the downtown district collected and spent its taxes to improve the streetscape, help pay the city’s economic development team and build parking structures. Without it, nearly $1 million would have gone to local schools and not been available for downtown improvements. The city’s other single-purpose cash generator is the Shoreline Community District, which, unlike a typical RDA, is endowed with the power to collect taxes in perpetuity, unless the Legislature acts to end its run. This district generates millions of dollars a year that have been used to build the Shoreline area into a major economic engine for the city. Last year, Mountain View Whisman Superintendent Craig Goldman created a stir when he pressed the city for a larger share of its Shoreline property taxes, which exceeds $25 million a year. So far, the city is continuing to share a small percentage of the Shoreline proceeds with the school district, but it is far less than the $5 million elementary and middle schools would otherwise receive. It seems unlikely that council members will volunteer to part with anywhere near that amount. One only needs to look to Palo Alto to see that a city can function quite well without these special tax districts. And the improvements that could be afforded to schools could raise the city’s property values as well. While we are thankful for the city improvements paid for by the Shoreline and downtown districts, it is time to explore other options, including Brown’s proposal to allow economic development bonds to be approved by only 55 percent of voters, rather than a twothirds majority now required. As it becomes clear how little the city needs these special tax districts there will be increasing pressure to dedicate the money to schools. And while a few projects remain to be done for Shoreline, such as the continued expansion of the city’s trail system, it seems only fair that local schools receive a fair share of the tax revenue that is generated by Google and other high-tech firms. And with downtown now looking as nice as anyone could wish, it’s hard to prioritize further improvements there over local schools which face millions in budget cuts.

By Don Letcher

I

cannot disagree more with your Jan. 7 editorial titled “City has long list of jobs ahead.� I am a 40-year property owner on Rengstorff (and my family before me). As a resident I feel I should be able to weigh in on where Mountain Views is going as a city. ■ Voters should not approve bond measures at this time. The secondary bond market is flooded with discounted tax allocation bonds at huge discounts from cities that did borrow when revenues dropped. ■ Mountain View cannot afford to tightly regulate marijuana dispensaries — and should wait until the state does. ■ School districts should not receive any money from the Shoreline tax district. It was designed not to share funds with school districts. The current City Council (for the first time ever) plans to allow Google housing at Shoreline which could force the Shoreline District to sunset and leave the city with a huge bond debt or the loss of Shoreline Park. ■ The BMX people had an adequate facility that they built. The city attorney unilaterally had it bulldozed. Now the council completely discriminates against the burrowing owl habitat — which will drive them out forever. Parks and city

land should not continue to be given away free to nonprofits or special interest groups. ■ The Francia family should not have their land “stolen� (like mine was) by abusive rezoning. The city charter gives the council the power over “all land use� in Mountain View and they terribly abuse that power to force people and businesses out of Mountain View — or at least out of business — in violation of private property rights. ■ The City Council members have their own personal fringe agendas that overrule the results of the 2006 resident survey. It would be better if the council represented the people of the city instead of add-ons to the General Plan for “personal agendas.� ■ I see on Page 15 of the city budget that Mountain View is now $188 million in debt — without the proposed bond borrowing. Mountain View has spent most of its reserves on building out the city’s two major community parks. Borrowing more for services, reducing community park open space and at the same time stacking housing to force the city population up and drive small business owners and long-term property owners out is not what the General Plan is for, in my view. Don Letcher lives on North Rengstorff Avenue and is a frequent critic of city government.

JANUARY 21, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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Fresh take on baklava STANFORD RESIDENT BRINGS HER DELICATE TAKE ON TRADITIONAL SWEETS TO LOCAL MARKETS By Sarah Trauben

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VERONICA WEBER

Walnut baklava is a delicate, lightly sweet pastry when made by Heba Badran, a local entrepreneur.

Dining Town on

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eba Badran offers local gourmets and marketgoers a taste of the cosmopolitan with her dainty baklava and orange tea cakes. On a recent morning at the Menlo Park Farmers Market, where Badran starting selling her desserts in 2008, Grace, a 10-year-old Palo Alto resident, sampled Badran’s light, airy orange tea cake. A playful smile spread about her face as she complimented Badran: “When I grow up, I want to be a chef.� “I got into this because I like to bake,� Badran replied warmly.

Starting the Stanford-based business 5KCuisine L.L.C. was not a forgone conclusion for Badran. Born in Egypt, she attended London secondary schools. For 10 years, she wielded her MBA as marketing executive with Proctor & Gamble in Egypt. In a recent interview, Badran said that while she was inspired by a long family line of “fantastic cooks without a single cooking class to their names,� she gives her natural, preservative-free desserts her own special touch. “My mother taught me to make baklava when I was 10. Egyptian baklava is sweeter, and she mixes nuts, but I’ve taken a more purist

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If you would like to be listed in DINING ON THE TOWN please call Anna or Brent at the Voice at 964-6300.

12

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 21, 2011

2010

Valid for dinner Monday—Wednesday 5pm—10pm. Expires January 26, 2011. Offer valid with purchase of dinner. Minimum 2 person dinner party. Dine-in only. No wine substitutions. One bottle per table.

8FFLFOE

VERONICA WEBER

Heba Badran, a Stanford resident, layers phyllo dough with melted butter in her commercial kitchen in Redwood City.

VERONICA WEBER

Crushed walnuts are gently pressed into place as Heba Badran makes baklava.

approach,� Badran said. She offers four varieties of delicately sliced baklava at her farmers market stall and at several local gourmet groceries ($5 for six pieces, $7 for 12). Customers and colleagues say that its taste and texture have earned the tagline: “Better than baklava.� Three different nuts each provide a subtle riff on the lemon-infused pastry, made up of dozens of delicate sheets of phyllo dough sweetened with homemade sugar syrup and a rich, nutty base. Walnuts provide a kick in one of her offerings, while the pistachio variety lets a sweeter nut be the star. A less traditional take, her almond baklava allows lemon, sugar, and pastry layers to shine through the lightly flavored nut base. She also serves up a nut-free variety. Baklava can often be overly sweet or have too dry a mouthfeel, but Badran’s recipes avoid both pitfalls. “My specialty is a very light take on baklava, so that you can take in its taste, not just its sweetness,� Badran explained. A newcomer to the Happiness Within line is an orange tea cake ($3.25 for four miniature cakes, $5 for nine cakes). The recipe, Badran said, was inspired by her adolescence and later years in London. Flavored with orange rind and freshly squeezed juice, the cakes contain whipped egg whites and are so airy and light that Badran’s customers sometimes serve them as a continental breakfast. “I can’t trace my cakes to any specific part of my time in England, but as you know, they like their tea and cakes,� Badran explained. She first decided to make her hobby of cooking a professional endeavor when her she received positive feedback from guests as well as from her husband, an engineer, and her son, then 8 years old. Armed with samples, she approached the Menlo Park

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13

8FFLFOE

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Farmers Market, only blocks away from her previous home, to try her luck selling the desserts. Badran jumped a long waiting list of people looking to open a stall, farmers market manager Lori Hennings said. “I wasn’t really looking for a new addition, but there was just something about her entrepreneurial spirit,� Hennings said. Heba said that many customers approach her to hoping to start a craft or prepared food stall. “Farmers markets seem more accessible as a place to start (in contrast to grocery stores), but in reality, they’re not that accessible. Many people don’t realize you can’t just walk out of your kitchen with your product and take it to the market,� Badran

Miniature orange cakes are made with fresh orange juice and zest, and inspired by British tea cakes.

said. Badran credits the Menlo Park Farmers Market organizers and stall-workers with giving her advice on how to start and run her business, from how to set up shop in a commercial kitchen to how to weigh down her awning on windy days. As her sales grew — they have almost tripled since the beginning of 5KCuisine — Badran expanded her sights beyond the farmers market, contracting with an established baker to use her

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 21, 2011

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VERONICA WEBER

recipe exclusively. She sells her pastry at seven local gourmet groceries, including Crossroads World Market, Bianchini’s, Sigona’s, and Draeger’s. Bianchini’s Pastry chef Amber Cid said Badran’s baklava clearly stands out to customers when she provides samples in the San Carlos location. “She puts a lot of heart into her product. Hers has a more traditional, homemade feel, and you can tell the pieces are hand-cut,� Cid said. Several stores’ employees credited her not only for the excellence of her pastries but for her professionalism. Badran diligently takes responsibility for delivery, product demonstrations, and regular stock turnover, they said. Getting her signature desserts into stores wasn’t a simple task, Badran said. “I would call, try to find out who is responsible for the bakery, write a presentation, and bring samples. I expected to present in an office, but sometimes I found myself giving a pitch at the check stand!� Contracting with local businesses hasn’t stopped Badran from keeping a stall at the market where she got her start. Noting that many customers give Happiness Within baklava as a gift, she experimented with gift sales this holiday season and will debut them on her website. V

N I N F O R M AT I O N Happiness Within baklava and orange tea cake can be found at the Menlo Park Farmers Market every Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., as well as at Sigona’s, Bianchini’s, Draeger’s, Robert’s, and Crossroads World Market. Website: http://happiness-within.com/

8FFLFOE NMOVIETIMES Barney’s Version (R) Guild Theatre: 1, 4, 7 & 9:50 p.m. Black Swan (R) ((( Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 5, 7:40 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 2:45, 5:20, 8 & 10:35 p.m. Blue Valentine (R) (((( Aquarius Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

BLUE VALENTINE----

Gulliver’s Travels (PG) Century 20: In 3D at noon, 2:30 & 4:40 p.m.

(Aquarius) At the film’s present-day outset, we find youngish couple Dean (Ryan Gosling) and Cindy (Michelle Williams), along with kindergarten-age daughter Frankie (Faith Wladyka), living in that house in rural Pennsylvania. The early scenes show a functional family with everyday tensions, little fissures that eventually erupt. Dad’s attentive but a little too buoyant; Mom’s wearily responsible but nearly humorless. The point is pressed when the family dog goes missing, with an emotional fallout that sends Frankie to the grandparents for a spell and forces Dean and Cindy to deal with each other. In a clumsy bid for romance, Brooklyn-bred Dean insists: “We have to get out of this house. Let’s go get drunk and make love.” So the couple repairs to a honeymoon hotel and encamps in the cheesily decorated (and pointedly chosen) “Future Room.” The story unfolds in two timelines: the present-day and six years earlier, when the couple meet, court and marry. Rated R on appeal for strong graphic sexual content, language and a beating. One hour, 52 minutes. — P.C.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (PG-13) ((( 1/2 Century 20: 6:50 & 10:05 p.m.

THE GREEN HORNET-1/2

Cat People (1942) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Mon. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 4:45 p.m. The Company Men (R) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 2:35, 5:05, 7:40 & 10:10 p.m. Country Strong (PG-13) Century 16: 12:40, 3:50, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:40 a.m. & 2:25 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 5:10, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m. Dangerous (1935) Stanford Theatre: Thu. at 7:30 p.m. The Dilemma (PG-13) Century 16: 11:55 a.m.; 2:30, 5:10, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:10, 1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:45 & 10:45 p.m. Ex-Lady (1933) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m. The Fighter (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:10, 3:20, 6:40 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:55, 5:35 & 8:25 p.m. Front Page Woman (1935) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 5:55 & 8:50 p.m. The Green Hornet (PG-13) (1/2 Century 16: Noon, 3, 6:10 & 9:10 p.m.; In 3D at 1, 4, 7:20 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 3:10 & 6 p.m.; In 3D at 11:30 a.m.; 1:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5, 7, 7:50, 9:50 & 10:45 p.m.

I Walked With a Zombie (1942) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Mon. at 6:10 & 8:55 p.m. The King’s Speech (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2:10, 4:55, 7:45 & 10:25 p.m. CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 1:30, 3, 4:20 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri.-Tue. & Thu. also at 5:55 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 8:45 & 10 p.m. Little Fockers (PG-13) Century 16: 2:15 & 7:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:35 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: La Fanciulla del West Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. No Strings Attached (R) Century 16: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 1, 2:20, 3:40, 4:50, 6:15, 7:30, 8:55 & 10:15 p.m.; Sun. also at 10:25 a.m. Rabbit Hole (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 1:50, 4:10, 7:10 & 9:35 p.m. Season of the Witch (PG-13) Century 16: 11:45 a.m.; 4:40 & 9:55 p.m. The Social Network (PG-13) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 2:30, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Somewhere (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:05, 2:40, 5:15, 8 & 10:25 p.m. Special Agent (1935) Stanford Theatre: Thu. at 6 & 9 p.m. Tangled (PG) ((( Century 16: In 3D at 12:30, 3:30, 6:20 & 8:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 1:45 & 4:15 p.m.; In 3D at 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:10 & 10:30 p.m.; In 3D Sun. also at 10:20 a.m. The Tourist (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 8:50 p.m. Tron: Legacy (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: In 3D at 12:15, 3:10, 6:30 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 6:55 & 9:55 p.m.; In 3D at 11:45 a.m.; 2:40, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. True Grit (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 12:50, 2:25, 3:25, 5:05, 6:50, 7:55, 9:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 1:55, 3:05, 4:40, 5:55, 7:20, 8:40 & 10 p.m. The Way Back (PG-13) Century 16: 12:20, 3:40, 7:05 & 10:10 p.m. Yogi Bear (PG) Century 20: 12:25 p.m.; Sun. also at 10:15 a.m. Note: Screenings are for Friday through Tuesday only.

AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) GUILD: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing at the Aquarius and Guild visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

(Century 16, Century 20) Britt Reid (Seth Rogen) is the wastrel son of newspaper publisher James Reid (Tom Wilkinson), who defined his son’s future 20 years earlier by spitting, “Trying doesn’t matter because you always fail.” His father’s unanticipated death nudges Britt into the daylight, but he has no ambitions for The Daily Sentinel. Only when he meets the family mechanic/barista Kato (Jay Chou of “Curse of the Golden Flower”) does Britt find inspiration: A drunken criminal escapade turns into an impromptu crimefighting incident. Soon, Kato is putting his mechanical genius and martial-arts skills to heroic use, though Britt gets all the credit as the masked duo’s front man, the Green Hornet. Ponying up for a ticket at any price will teach you the true meaning of the hero’s battle cry, “You’ve just been stung!” Rated PG-13 for sequences of violent action, language, sensuality and drug content. One hour, 59 minutes. — P.C.

RABBIT HOLE---1/2

(Century 16) Eight months earlier, Becca (Nicole Kidman) and Howie’s (Aaron Eckhart) 4-year-old son, Danny, chased his dog into the street, and suburban bliss turned into a seemingly unyielding emotional claustrophobia. The odds are against the Corbetts salvaging their marriage; though they have thus far endured, the halt on their sex life is a bad sign, and tensions have begun to win out over tolerance. Their different grieving processes have yet to mesh. Howie finds day-today comfort in his memories and a support group, while the perpetually touchy Becca rejects painful keepsakes and those who claim to know what she’s feeling. Howie puts it succinctly: “Something’s gotta change.” Though the death of a child and potentially a marriage are unspeakably horrible, “Rabbit Hole” turns out to be improbably hopeful. Rated PG-13 for mature thematic material, some drug use and language. One hour, 32 minutes. — P.C.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley

Mentor Quotes: “I really like my mentor she is really nice and listens to me without judging.”

Providing volunteer mentors & tutors for our community youth

OUR KIDS NEED YOU: BE A MENTOR OR TUTOR Join us and volunteer in the Los Altos and Mountain View Schools

You can make a difference Please Contact: Carole Dorshkind 650-641.2821 or email us at volunteer@pngmvla.org JANUARY 21, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

15

(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

ART GALLERIES Rotary Club of Mountain View Crab Feed Proceeds from the 2011 crab feed will benefit local charities. Jan. 29, 4:30-7:30 p.m. $45/ages 11-up, $17/ages 3-10. Mountain View Buddhist Temple, 575 N Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 650-605-3418. mvrotarycrabfeed2011.eventbrite.com/

CLUBS/MEETINGS Peninsula Gem and Geology Society The Peninsula Gem and Geology Society meets the fourth Wednesday of the month at the Garden House. Featured are mineral displays, videos, reference library and a lapidary. Jan. 27, 7-9 p.m. Shoup Park, 400 University Ave., Los Altos. www.pggs.org Rhododendron Culture At the next meeting of the De Anza Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society, find out about rhododendron culture from Kathy Van Veen of Van Veen Nursery in Portland Oregon. Jan. 25, 7:30 p.m. Free. Hillview Community Center Room 12, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. www.deanza-ars.com

COMMUNITY EVENTS Graham Middle School Zumbathon Graham Middle School presents a “Cardio Fitness Zumbathon.� Salsa, merengue, hip hop, cumbia and much more. This is a fundraising event to support Graham Middle School. Jan. 21, 3-6 p.m. $5 at the door. Graham Middle School in the MUR, 1175 Castro Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-471-3357. Step Out for Pro-Choice Annual rally and walk in downtown Los Altos to support woman’s right to choose, Mon., Jan. 24. Organized by American Association of University Women. Address by Sara Kennedy, MD, MPH, Physicians for Reproductive Choice. Program begins at noon. Noon-1:30 p.m. $1 at the door. Los Altos Youth Center, 1 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. www. aauw-losaltosmountainview.org Writing Buddies Volunteers Needed Write stories with first-graders: Writing Buddies pairs adults 1:1 with schoolchildren at Castro School in a six-week program that meets for two hours on Tuesdays, once per week at Castro School. All training is provided, and you don’t

NHIGHLIGHT WILD CAT ADVENTURE Wild Cat Adventure features five live wild cats from around the world. Each cat is shown on stage as information about the species is shared with the audience. You may see a cheetah, rare king cheetah, cougar, serval, caracal, Siberian lynx, Canada lynx or Geoffroy’s cat. Jan, 23, 2-3 p.m. $10-$5. Foothill College - Appreciation Hall, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 707-8740-3176. www.wildcatfund.org

SPECIAL EVENTS

need to be an educator to volunteer. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Castro School Writing Buddies, 505 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 408-462-5883.

2nd Bay Area Wellness Festival Introduction of various wellness groups. Speakers: Prof. Adiel Tel-Oren, MD, on “Should Food Really be you Medicine� and John Robbins on “The New Good Life.� Jan. 30, 2-7 p.m. $10. Cubberley Theater, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www. BayAreaWellnessFestival.com

CONCERTS World Harmony Chorus CSMA’s World Harmony Chorus presents a concert of their repertoire from the Fall 2010 semester. Jan. 24, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA), 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend

TALKS/AUTHORS

EXHIBITS Photography by Mountain View High Students Exhibition of photography by students at Mountain View High School. Through Jan. 30, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) at Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend

LIVE MUSIC Houston Jones Houston Jones, an Americana quintet, perform a mix of original folk, bluegrass, blues and gospel music. Jan. 23, 8 p.m. $10. Dana Street Roasting Company, 744 W. Dana St., Mountain View. http://www.houstonjones.com Jack Conway Trio Hear classic jazz from vocalist Juanita Harris and The Jack Conway Trio on Saturday, Jan. 22. 8-10 p.m. Free. Dana Street Roasting Company, 744 Dana St., Mountain View. Call 650-823-9387. www.jackconwaytrio.com Jenne Sluder Jenne Sluder performs live Jan. 21, 8 p.m. Free. Redrock Coffee, 201Castro St., Mountain View.

ON STAGE “No Good Deed� by Paul Braverman Set in the midst of the Irish gang war, this new play is told with a classic film noir feel. Thurs - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2p.m. Jan. 13-30, $15 - $30. Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave. Unit K, Mountain View. www.thepear.org “Sylvia� Greg and Kate’s empty-nesting years of marriage are disrupted when Greg becomes enamored with Sylvia, a dog he has found in Central Park. This romantic comedy about a marriage and a winsome canine plays Jan. 27-Feb. 18. 8 p.m. $24-32. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.,

COURTESY OF NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART

Patrick Dougherty: A site-specific installation The Palo Alto Art Center presents a monumental, site-specific installation by Patrick Dougherty, one of the nation’s most prominent environmental sculptors. Public may view the artist’s creative process during his three week artist residency, Jan. 11- 28, 2011, on the grounds of PAAC. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-329-2366. cityofpaloalto.org/artcenter. Pictured is “Trail Heads,� a 2005 installation in North Carolina. Los Altos. Call 650-941-0551. www.busbarn.org Vertavo String Quartet Musical excerpts and conversation with the musicians of Vertavo String Quartet. Part of CSMA’s Stanford Lively Arts Informances series. Jan. 25, 6-7 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA), 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www. arts4all.org/attend

OUTDOORS Hands-on Nature: Critters of the Bay Area “Touch an owl! Sniff a skunk! Respect a rattlesnake! Join Hidden Villa’s lead naturalist at the hearthside for a fascinating evening featuring local wildlife both big and small. No live animals present, but plenty of cool things to investigate, then treat yourself to warm cocoa and cookies. 5 years old and up,� Hidden Villa said. Jan. 21, 7-8:30 p.m. $7 per student/limited income or $10 per person. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-9499704. www.hiddenvilla.org

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RESEARCH SUBJECTS The Unknown Messenger - Our Voice Advice on how to use audio as an interface medium via mobile devices. This talk will address: why is the use of voice so important, what are the most common types of inhibition, what vocal elements can be trained, and why is the voice so connected with our confidence. Jan. 25, 1:302:30 p.m. Free. Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, NASA Research Park, Bldg 23, Moffett Field. Call 650-335-2852. www.cmu.edu/silicon-valley/ news-events/seminars/index.html

SENIORS Newcomers’ Group An orientation and tour of the Senior Center includes a review of classes, upcoming events, social services, and general information. Tour begins in the front lobby. Jan. 24, 2 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330.

Lecture by Patrick Dougherty The Palo Alto Art Center presents a site-specific installation by Patrick Dougherty, one of the nation’s most prominent environmental sculptors. Reception for the exhibitions to follow Patrick Dougherty’s lecture until 9 p.m. Jan. 27, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Palo Alto Art Center, 1313 Newell Road, Palo Alto. Call 650-329-2366 . www.cityofpaloalto. org/artcenter No Such Thing As Small Talk: 7 Keys to Understanding German Business In this GABA networking event Melissa Lamson will present her new book and speak about how culture impacts international business communication. Jan. 26, 6-9 p.m. $15 members, $25 nonmembers, $35 at the door. German International School of Silicon Valley (GISSV), 310 Easy St., Mountain View. Call 650-386-5015. http://www. gaba-network.org TEDxBayArea TEDx is a program of local, selforganized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. Jan. 25, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30. Samovar Conference Hall, 1077 Independence Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-4693243. http://tedxbayareajan2011.eventbrite.com/

TEEN ACTIVITIES Teen Open Gym Teen Open Gyms are open every Saturday night for various sports. Middle School and High School students only; bring student ID. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Whisman Sports Center, 1500 Middlefield Road, Mountain View. Call 650-903-6410.

NMORELISTINGS For a complete listing of local events, see our website at www.MountainViewOnline.com

H ELLER I MMIGRATION L AW G ROUP Employment-based, Family/Marriage & Investor Visas A Full-Service Immigration Law Firm Serving the SF Bay Area & Silicon Valley for 25+ years PERM Labor CertiďŹ cation N EB1/NIW Self-Petitions Green Cards, H1B and Work Permits Engineers, IT/Computer ďŹ elds, Scientists/Researchers HR/Corporate, Business & Individual Clients

Free Attorney Consult! 650.424.1900 N greencard1.com Nheller@greencard1.com

Mountain View Whisman School District (K-8) ENROLLMENT 2011-2012 BEGINS FEBRUARY 1 DISTRICT OFFICE 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM Kinder Info Site Visits and Open Houses throughout the month of January MVWSD offers: Castro DI (English-Spanish) Monta Loma CEL (parent participation) Stevenson PACT (parent participation)

'RANT2OAD ,OS!LTOSsWWWSTSIMONORG &ORINFORMATION#ALLXOR%MAILADMISSIONS STSIMONORG 4OURSAVAILABLE NOAPPOINTMENTNECESSARY

16

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 21, 2011

More information: 650.526.3500, ext. 1001 www.mvwsd.org (Enrollment Info)

$MBTTJGJFE

1VCMJD/PUJDFT 995 Fictitious Name Statement ESSENTIAL SPIRITS ALAMBIC DISTILLERIES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 546046 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Essential Spirits Alambic Distilleries at 865 Sonia Way, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/ registrant(s) is(are): CLASSICK IMPORT & EXPORT LLC 865 Sonia Way Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 03/15/2001. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 28, 2010. (Voice Jan. 14, 21, 28, Feb. 4, 2011) CHORAEGUS SHAREMUSIC FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 546702 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Choraegus Sharemusic at 844 Park Dr., #3, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/ registrant(s) is(are): LARRY SUE 844 Park Dr., #3 Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 1/5/1996. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 14, 2011. (Voice Jan. 21, 28, Feb. 4, 11, 2011)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 10-0126130 Title Order No. 10-8-458401 APN No. 14838005 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/24/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by GREGORY R GRAY, AN UNMARRIED MAN, dated 07/24/2007 and recorded 08/08/07, as Instrument No. 19542206, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Santa Clara County, State of California, will sell on 02/04/2011 at 10:00AM, At the Market Street entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 190 North Market Street , San

Jose, Santa Clara County, CA at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2178 LELAND AVENUE, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA, 94040. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $811,985.55. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. DATED: 01/02/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281 8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.122172 1/07, 1/14, 1/21/2011 Voice NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: December 13, 2010 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: TARGET CORPORATION The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 555 Showers Dr. Mountain View, CA 94040-4795 Type of license(s) applied for: 21 - OFF-SALE GENERAL (Voice Jan. 7, 14, 21, 2011)

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BEST CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY ON THE PENINSULA

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN MICHAEL RUSSELL Case No.: 1-11-PR-168201 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOHN MICHAEL RUSSELL, JOHN RUSSELL, JOHN M. RUSSELL. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: JON M. RUSSELL in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: JON M. RUSSELL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 23, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ Francis A. La Poll SBN 115013 Gilfix & La Poll Associates, LLP 2300 Geng Rd. #200 Palo Alto, CA 94303 (650)493-8070 (Voice Jan. 21, 28, Feb. 4, 2011)

9250 Labor Special

$

Total Price For Labor On Standard Couch or Chair Plus the cost of any fabric you select from our complete line of fabrics. Labor price of $92.50 includes frame, spring and webbing repair. Additional charge for cushion ďŹ ller, tufting and channeling. Customer supplied fabric charged at standard labor rate of $50 per yard.

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FREE Pick Up & Delivery Our 45th year.

Sterling Custom Upholstery 1243 W. El Camino Real, Mountain View (At Miramonte – behind Baskin-Robbins)

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A T E G

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20.11

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650.265.2040 OvertimeFitness.com .3HORELINE"LVD -TN6IEWs- &AM PM3AT3UNAM PM JANUARY 21, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

17

Marketplace Bulletin Board 115 Announcements PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Valentine Singles Dance Winter Singles Dance www.art4growth.com

140 Lost & Found Runaway Cat!

Mickey Mouse Holiday Animation - $30.00

145 Non-Profits Needs Donations Needed! Knitters Wanted Manager-Foster Cat Program

150 Volunteers Cat Care Coordinator Needed

Free Kids Reiki

Library Volunteers Needed

Free talk: Introduction to Reiki

Museum Volunteers

Free talk: Theta Healing

NASA cats need fosterers

House Cleaning Katha Pollitt Talk

Org. 1955 Mickey Mouse Club, - $20.00 Rare! Org. 30’s D. Duck Glass - $25.00

For Sale

Prepare for Year End

201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

Self Employed? Need Help?

Cadillac 1977 De Ville d Elegance - $1600

Self-Employed? Need a CFO?

HONDA 2001 ODYSSEY EX - $6,000

Softball Tryouts 14U

Mercedes Benz 2002 E320SE 2002 Mercedes E320SE $15,850 Very Good Cond. Always garaged. Only 31,920 miles (this is not a misprint!).Clean, just smogged, registered and serviced. Clean title.Orig owner. call: 650-948-7580

Arts,Music,Bilingual,play based.

Vintage Bakelite Purse - $30

Child Care opening in San Carlos

Vintage lighting

Debbie’s Family Day Care - RWC

VINTAGE ROCK T-SHIRTS: 80s

EXCELLENT BABYSITTER AVAILABLE!

220 Computers/ Electronics

EXCELLENT NANNY AVAILABLE!

5 Assorted Wii Games(Bundled) - $70 OBO ANTI-SLEEP ALARM: Keychain**

Top Nanny for Hire Excel. refs. 650/233-9778

Fatemi Computer Peripherals - 100

Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

133 Music Lessons A Piano Teacher Children & Adults Ema Currier (650)493-4797 Barton-Holding Music Studio Next 6 week “singing for the non-singer� class starts Jan. 13. Call Laura Barton 650/965-0139 FUN Piano Voice Violin Guitar Guitar Lessons 650-224-3550 beg/int all styles your home $60 Hope Street Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650) 961-2192 Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529 Manzana Music School Lessons in Palo Alto on Guitar, Violin, Vocals, Fiddle, Banjo, or Mandolin. Call us at: 650 799-7807 www.ManzanaMusicSchool.com McCool Piano Studio 566-9391MP Near Burgess Gym Menlo Park Piano Lessons Taught in your home. Member MTAC & NGPT. Specializing in beginners. All levels welcome. Karen, (650)367-0307 or

135 Group Activities BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP

340 Child Care Wanted

HDMI CABLE FOR BLUE RAY NEW - $15.00

Are You our PT Sitter?? PT sitter for 10 and 12 y/o. Responsib. include driving, dinner, homework, light housekpg. Req. exc. refs, nonsmkr, clean DMV and exc. Eng. 6-12 hrs/week, M-Th beg 3:30p. Avail. to stay late on certain nights required. 650-996-1134 teresa@ pilateswithteresa.com

IBM Selectric II Typewriter - $350 LASER PRINTER/COPIER: Xerox

230 Freebies Learn to Live Pain Free - FREE

235 Wanted to Buy Comic Books Sports and bubble gum cards. Mags, toys, movies and music, rock and roll stuff anything pre 1975. Please call Mike: 800-7235572 $ Paid. (Cal-SCAN)

Black Leather Sofa and Armchair - $500

French babysitter/tutor wanted Mother’s Helper Needed Looking for a mother’s helper to primarily play with and feed my 3 year old son Tuesday - Friday from 3 pm to 7 pm (hours somewhat flexible). Other duties include occasional care for my newborn and light housework (loading the dishwasher, etc). The ideal candidate would be energetic, creative, outgoing, and have a clean record. High school/ college students okay. $12 per hour. Nanny wanted

345 Tutoring/Lessons

Dining Table B&B Italia - $900

Chess Lessons for kids and adult

Lenox Solitaire Platinum-Banded - $ varies

One-to-One Tutoring Service

Living Rm-kitchen table Olive Living room couch, love seat-ottoman, coffee table, end table. Round kitchen table with 4 chairs. All very nice condition. Kids 4-wheeler. Queen mattress and box spring.

Stanford-Educated Expert Tutors Tutoring/Homework Help Writing/SAT Tutor Grades 6-12

sofa for sale - $150.00

350 Preschools/ Schools/Camps

245 Miscellaneous

Holiday Horseback Riding Camps Webb Ranch (650)854-7755

Showtime Rotisserie and BBQ - $75. obo

60s-70s Toys: Star Wars+++++ ABORIGINAL BOOMERANG: Signed

MVPNS-preschool Open house 1/15

BASS ALE BEER TAP HANDLE: **

355 Items for Sale

Saturn 1994 SC2 Coupe - 1499.00 ob

CANON CHARGER & 4L BATTERY - $15.00

4Y Boy winterclothes30+items$40

CRUTCHES: Adj. Aluminum Lg.

Baby comforter/blankets2bags

202 Vehicles Wanted

CRYSTAL DECANTER: Signed****

BOY 1-2years clothes 30+items

FREE FIREWOOOD & MULCH

Snowboots size 10 toddler$8

Donate Vehicle Receuve $1000 Grocery Coupons, Your Choice. Noah's Arc, No Kill Animal Shelters. Advanced Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, IRS Tax Deduction. Non-Runners. 1-866-912-GIVE. (Cal-SCAN) Donate Your Car Children's Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child's Life Through Research and Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy and Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales Los Altos, 956 St. Joseph Ave, 1/22 9-2, 1/23 9-noon Quality items. Everything must go! Clothes, linens, dishes and other kitchen items, tools, books, toys, LP records, children’s furniture and even wooden skis! RWC: 1228 Douglas Ave., 1/21 11-2; 1/22, 9-1 Big Rummage Sale benefits Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. CASH ONLY. (650)497-8332 or during sale (650)568-9840. (Just south of Woodside Rd. bet. Broadway and Bayshore Frwy.)

garden shed - $60 HAWAIIAN PETROGLYPH TRIVET:

Large Bird Cage & Bird Items - $25 PARACORD: Blackhawk Black POSTERS: French, DM, Batman+ Pre-Teen Girls Clothing - $2.00 or L QUARTZ JAGUAR CARVING: Mayan

425 Health Services

ULTIMATE BBQ GRILL: Fire+Ice

Toren Psychological Services - $800 to $1200 for a

VINTAGE VINYL: Elec./Rock/DJ

250 Musical Instruments Baby Grand Piano - $1550.00 Piano-Baldwin Hamilton - 2,250.00 POWERED PA SPEAKERS: Johnson Roland HD-1 V-Drums - $700 OBO

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment GRAPHITE TENNIS RACQUET SOFTBALL BAT: Ten Pro Alumin THREE RACQUETBALL RACQUETS:

NATURE/OUTDOORS Events Calendar

TWO FISHING ROD & REEL COMBO

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers! All Cash Vending Route Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN)

560 Employment Information $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) Able to Travel? Hiring 8 people. No experience necessary. Transportation and lodging furnished. Paid training. Work and travel entire USA. Start today. www.ProtekChemical.com 1-208590-0365. (Cal-SCAN) Airlines Are Hiring Go to aviation maintenance college for FREE! Tuition paid for the BEST. H.S. Grad w/ good grades and proven work history. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866) 8596378. (Cal-SCAN) Company Drivers Solos and Hazmat Teams * GREAT PAY * GREAT MILES * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated and regional positions available. Call 866-789-8947. Swift. (Cal-SCAN) Computer Work Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888304-2847. (Cal-SCAN) Driver Drive KNIGHT in 2011. Daily or Weekly Pay. Top Equipment, 27 Service Centers, Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A with 3 months OTR experience. 1-800-414-9569. www. DriveKnight.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits. 300 New T660's. Need CDL-A and 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www.MeltonTruck. com (Cal-SCAN) Logistics Trainee Earn as you learn. Good pay, medical/ dental, $ for school. No experience needed. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri 1-800345-6289. (Cal-SCAN) Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! HYPERLINK “http://www.homemailerprogram.net/�www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) Administrative Support

Business Services 604 Adult Care Offered Caregiver / Companion Responsible, good refs., nights avail., special needs.Call Bill: 650.396.7486

624 Financial Cash Now! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866494-9115. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (Cal-SCAN)

LAPLAND SHAMAN WITCHES DRUM:

Learn to Square Dance

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 21, 2011, 2010

VHS VideosThomas,Ninja,Boyvideos

Humane Animal Trap/Carrier - $54.00

CHILDREN’S ENTERTAINER

18

Violin Teacher

HANDSFREE HEADSET: 2.5mm

240 Furnishings/ Household items

GERMAN Language Class

Little Ages Has January Opening Sweet and Outgoing Babysitter

High School Diploma Graduate in 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www. SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN)

Fibromyalgia and Well-being

After School Care/Driver Avail Are you looking for mature Nanny

Diabetic Test Strips Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don't throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

Polaris 2009 Ranger XP 700 EFI AWD This is a 2009 Polaris Ranger XP 700 4x4 Limited Edition.It is a liquid cooled, 4-stroke, fuel injected twin cylinder beast of a utility vehicle with a fully automatic transmission. The transmission has high and low range as well as reverse.It has four wheel independent suspension and on-demand 4 wheel drive meaning that when you need 4x4 you only have to flip a switch. When you don’t need it you can turn it off and save gas. You can also unlock the rear differential to save your turf.This machine is in like new condition.It has only 884 original miles and 141 engine hours on it.FREE SHIPPING!!!For more questions regarding the Ranger please email me at:thomas.summer007@msn.com

330 Child Care Offered

SPORTS MEMORABILIA: 80s-’10

Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2105162 www.Centura.us.com (Cal-SCAN)

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

Kid’s Stuff

SHOT GLASS CHECKERS: 25 Pcs.

Brother HL-2140 - $62.50

Mobile Notary Public

130 Classes & Instruction

Disney’s Donald Duck Framed 50’s $25.00 Disney’s Org. 50’s Donald Duck - $20.00

Canary Foundation Luncheon

Your Personal CFO

1930’s Style Mickey Mouse Framed - $5.00

Lost leather Glove ladies brown glove. 650.964.0251

C-oDependents Anonymous (CoDA)

Peanut Farm Do you remember the old Peanut Farm bar/roadhouse in Woodside that closed in the 1980s? If you have any souvenirs or memorabilia from the Peanut Farm we would be interested in purchasing it.

215 Collectibles & Antiques

fogster.com

Jobs 550 Business Opportunities ALL CASH VENDING IN YOUR LOCAL AREA. Be your own boss25 machines/candy all for -$9,995.00. 1-877-915-8222 Vend 3. 880 Grand Blvd, Deer Park, NY. (AAN CAN)

crosetti funding CASH NOW we offer fast cash for your mortgage note, annuity, and business note call 1 800 391 4032 Note Investment 6 percent ret., paid monthly, 50%LTV, secured on Woodside income property. Owner/agent Jim 650-851-7300

645 Office/Home Business Services Advertising - Best-Kept Secret A business card sized display ad 140 California community newspapers. Reach 3 million+ Californians. Cost $1,550.$1.33 cost per thousand. Free brochure (916)2886019; www.Cal-SDAN.com (Cal-SCAN)

Fogster.com THE PENINSUL A’S FREE CL ASSIFIEDS WEBSITE

Classified Advertising 240 California community newspapers reaching over 6 million Californians. 25-words $550 works out to 18 cents cost per thousand! FREE email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SCAN.com (Cal-SCAN) Press Release The California Press Release Service distributes news releases electronically to 500 California newspaper editors. www. CaliforniaPressReleaseService.com Questions call (916) 288-6010. (Cal-SCAN)

650 Pet Care/ Grooming/Training All Animals Happy House Pet Sitting Services by Susan Licensed, insured, refs. 650-323-4000

Home Services 703 Architecture/ Design Design/Permits One stop for your remodel/design needs. Comp. plans incl structural engineering and energy compliance (T-24). ADW 650-969-4980

710 Carpentry Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

715 Cleaning Services AC Housecleaning Residential/Commercial. Move in/ out, offices, more. Good rates. 11 years exp. Please call 650/678-4792. www.achousecleaning.com

Asuncion Yanet House Cleaning ! !!       

650-906-7712 or 650-630-3279

Francisca’s Deep Housecleaning Experienced, Refs. 650-669-0628 or 650-701-0703 Marlem HouseCleaning House, Condos, Apartments, Office, Move-in, Move-Out, Free Estimates. Good References. “Serving All The Bay Area� 650-380-4114 or 650-389-3327

Orkopina Housecleaning “The BEST Service for You� Bonded

Since 1985

Insured

%TrustworthyDetailed %Laundry,Linens %WW#Blinds % " " !  Clean-up % #Wash %  Work

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Patty’s House Cleaning Service Apartments, Houses, offices. 10 years exp. Excellent Ref. Free est. Call Anytime. Lic#32563 (650)722-1043 Socorro’s Housecleaning Comm’l, residential, general, move in/out. Detailed, honest, good refs, 25 yrs exp. 650/245-4052

719 Remodeling/ Additions Domicile Construction, Inc.

General Contractor T 415 999-3143 650 366-8335 www.domicileconstructioninc.com since 1990 lic #627843

730 Electrical Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

748 Gardening/ Landscaping Beckys Landscape Weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree prune, clean ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Demolition, excavation. Driveway, patio, deck installs. Power washing. 650/493-7060

GARDENING MAINTENANCE

             Jose Martinez

Since1990!

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS          

650-322-7930 PL/PD STATE LIC# 608358

www.cjtigheconstruction.com

General Construction Services RooďŹ ng, Water ProoďŹ ng, Decks and other Services.

(408) 532-8020 Lic#770948-B&C39

(650) 271-4448

754 Gutter Cleaning Carlson Gutter Cleaning Pressure Washing Available Servicing Menlo Park and surrounding areas CALL MARK (650)322-5030

Jody Horst

Artist

856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080 JR’s Garden Maintenance Residential clean up, trimming, new lawn and sprinkler installations. 16 yrs exp. Great refs. Jose, 650-743-0397 Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477. Mario’s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. Free est. 650/3656955; 995-3822 R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859 Uriel’s Gardening Maint., haul, poison oak, clean up, free est. 650/862-1378 Uriel Vidal Gardening & Landscaping Bi-Weekly, twice a month clean up. Tree removal. Fences, retaining walls, new lawn irrigation systems. Gutter cleaning. Free est., excel. refs. 650-771-0213 WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Comm/Res. Tree Ser. Aeration, Irrigation, Rototilling, Stump Grinding, Trimming/ Pruning. Roger 650.776.8666

751 General Contracting NOTICE TO READERS t is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb. ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION $ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $!

757 Handyman/ Repairs AAA HANDYMAN AND MORE

Repair        

Lic.# 468963

Since 1976 Licensed & Insured

650-222-2517

ABLE HANDYMAN FRED CompleteHomeRepair Maintenanc  emodelin ProfessionalPainting Carpentr Plumbing Electrical CustomCabineDesign Deckence  AnMuchMore 30 Years Experience

650.529.1662 3.27

HANDY

“Ed� MAN

   $! $      #$ $     #   "  #!   FREE ESTIMA     

ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274 Miller’s Maintenance Plumbing, Painting,Tile & wall repair Free Est. No job too small! Senior Disc. 25 years Experience (650)669-3199 Small Jobs Welcome Local, refs., 25 years exp., trusted, reliable. 650/218-8181

759 Hauling a J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, appliances, garage, storage, etc, clean-ups. Old furniture, green waste and yard junk. Licensed & insured. FREE ESTIMATES 650/368-8810

A

JOHNSTON

70% Recycled

LARGE TRUCKS ,&(,'*-Trees LARGE/small JOBS Free Estimate Insured

650-327-HAUL cell: 415-999-0594

HAULING 

A Junk Hauling Service Residential & Commercial. Yard clean-up service. Large & Small jobs. 650-771-0213 Frank’s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

767 Movers

   "

Armandos Moving Homes, Apartments, Storage. Full Service moves. Serving the Bay Area for 20 yrs. Licensed & Insured. Armando, 650-6300424. CAL-T190632

(650) 799-5521

SHMOOVER

www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti

MOOVERS LICENSE CAL. T-118304

No phone number in the ad? GO TO

FOGSTER.COM for contact information

Redwood City, Studio - 940.00

771 Painting/ Wallpaper

Serving the Peninsula since 1975/Owner-Operated!

327-5493 FOGSTER.COM

815 Rentals Wanted

Don Pohlman’s Painting *Detailed Craftsmanship *Excel. Restorative Prep *Great Local References 650/799-7403 * Lic. 635027 Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292 STYLE PAINTING Comm’l/Res. Full service painting and decorating. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/Concrete

Great Caretaker-Tenant - $1000 Home Wanted Long-Term Rental Needed

     



Seeking Quiet Cottage/Guest Quar

3$3 " #       5    6 

820 Home Exchanges FULLY FURNISHED NEW 2 BEDROOM/2 NEW 2 BEDROOM/2.5 BATH NEW 2 BEDROOM/2.5 BATH HOME New luxury executive duplex home Palo Alto 2 BR/2.5 BA

825 Homes/Condos for Sale

    

Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

"   && )

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

787 Pressure Washing

 !"   # " 

Palo Alto Condo, 3 BR/3 BA Open Sat. & Sun. 1/15&16 2-4 P.M. For Sale by Owner. Remodeled 4th fl. corner unit w view, pool, security in desirable downtown Hi-rise, approx. 1800 S.F. Palo Alto schools. $895K. 650-321-2827.

" 0  ) 1 

Discount Pressure Washing Decks * Patios * Driveways Becky, 650/493-7060



   

790 Roofing Al Peterson Roofing since 1946

& "  '($&)*+'($&)

Specializing in  ng        

650-493-9177

795 Tree Care THE TREE EXPERTS Tree trimming/removal. Quality tree care. 10% off. lic./Ins. (650)222-4733

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios

    

Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA One level condo with balcony views in the heart of downtown Palo Alto— low maintenance—$475—covers HDTV. Priced at $1.1 million. Walk to University Ave stores, restaurants and Caltrain. Seventeen unit, well managed elevator building with two underground parking spots and storage unit. We are represented by Gary Kurtz at Alain Pinel real estate

-  .  / )  &     



 

Phone: 650.543.1202 Cell: 650.796.5507

& "  '($&)*+'($&)

830 Commercial/ Income Property

334   #      )  / )  6  17

Los Altos Hills, 3 BR/2.5 BA - $5500 Menlo Park, 2 BR/1 BA - $1780/mo Mountain View, Studio - $999 Palo Alto 2 Br/2.5 Ba - $4500/month , 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 1 BR/1 BA - $1,845/mo Palo Alto, 2 BR/2 BA Condo - $4500/month Palo Alto, 3 BR/3 BA - $4250 WDSD: Studio Secluded studio, central Woodside. $1250 mo., utils incl. Gar. 650/851-1113

803 Duplex New Luxury Executive Duplex Home For Lease In The Midtown Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3500

805 Homes for Rent Great Price In The Neighborhood! Midtown Palo Alto Duplex Home For Lease / Rent :, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3500 Menlo Park, 2 BR/2 BA - $2600.00/m New Palo Alto 2 Br/2.5 Ba Home, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 2 BR/1.5 BA - $3,050/mon Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 4 BR/3 BA - $6950 Palo Alto, 5+ BR/3 BA - $6500/mo. Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $3,250/mon Woodside, 1 BR/1 BA - $1,300.00

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) LA: Room Share home w/elderly woman. Full privs. Convenient loc. $700 mo. N/S/P. 650/254-1810 Palo Alto, 2 BR/1 BA - $985.00

810 Cottages for Rent New 2 Bedroom/2 1â „2 Bath Duplex Home/ Furnished, 2 BR/2.5 BA - 4500

 

 

 

Deli/Restaurant/Commercial Restaurant - Deli - Wine Shop/BarGrocery - Retail - Menlo Park - For Lease. 650-218-3669

& " ," '($&)*+'($&)

840 Vacation Rentals/ Time Shares

$ %   

Sell/Rent Timeshares For CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $78 Million Dollars offered in 2010! www.SellaTimeshare.com (877) 554-2098 (Cal-SCAN)

2 )   )  2 % 

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage



   

Arizona - Phoenix Area Everything Must Go! $1,000 an acre. Priced less than the developer paid. 90 minutes north of Phoenix. 36 acres with electric, reduced to $36,000. Private peaceful setting, breathtaking mountain views, abundant wildlife. Financing available. Saddle Creek Ranch by AZLR. 1-888-690-8271. (Cal-SCAN) ARIZONA BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS $99/mo., $0-down, $0-interest. Golf Course, Nat'l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int'l Airport. Guaranteed Financing. NO CREDIT CHECK! (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www.sunsiteslandrush.com (AAN CAN)

& " ," '($&)*+'($&)

  ! "#$# %" &'%"(" )*"  + ,-. /'"#$# % 0%")"/ *" 

890 Real Estate Wanted Retired couple want 2bed/2bath

To place a Classified ad in The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com

 





 

JANUARY 21, 2011, 2010 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

19



LIFELONG MOUNTAIN VIEW RESIDENT & AREA SPECIALIST

      



    

   

DIANE S C HMIT Z Realtor (650) 947-2955 www.DianeSchmitz.com dianeschmitz@serenogroup.com DRE # 01235034

        

         

      

      

      

        

     

            

      



   



      

    

              

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 21, 2011, 2010

3 bed, 21/2 bath home, Large 2-car garage. (Charge your car inside!) Los Altos Schools!

AY ND

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YOU BET!

$645,000 www.49ShowersD464.com 1.888.328.8097 Tour #273

- serving you Since 1985 Direct: 650-947-2259 Francis@Frolland.com

634 Lombardy Way, Redwood City

Consult the Mountain View Voice for all your real estate needs!

T

erriďŹ c 2 Bedroom 2 Bathroom ranch home that has been remodeled & updated on a large lot. Great to live in or build your dream house. Storage shed in back offers extra storage space. Lot directly behind the property is 11,979 sq. ft. & is also for sale.

Offered at: $799,950

Nancy Palmer DRE #00525350

650.434.4313 npalmer@apr.com www.nancypalmer.com

650.964.6300

461 Palo Alto Avenue, Mountain View Open

Sat &

Sun

C

IRCA  "UNGALOW LOCATED ON A PREMIER TREE LINED STREET IN THEHEARTOFTHE/LD-OUNTAIN6IEW NEIGHBORHOOD OFFERING CHARM WITH THEOPTIONTOMOVERIGHTIN.ESTLEDON ALARGELOTPRESENTINGTHREEBEDROOMS ANDONEBATHWITHROOMTOEXPANDOR REBUILD #ONVENIENTLY LOCATED WITHIN MOMENTS TO DOWNTOWN SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS %ASY ACCESS TO #ALTRAIN TRANSPORTATION AND MAJOR COMMUTE ROUTES/THERAMENITIESINCLUDENEWER ROOF NEWEXTERIORSIDING ACELLARAND MODERNIZEDWITHFORCEDAIRHEATING s!PPROXIMATELY SQUAREFEETOFLIVINGSPACEs!PPROXIMATELY SQUAREFOOTLOT s%XCELLENTSCHOOLS"UBB%LEMENTARY 'RAHAM-IDDLE AND-OUNTAIN6IEW(IGH

Barbara Williams BWILLIAMS APRCOMsWWWBARBSITECOM

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Looking for the perfect place to call home?

Francis C. ROLLAND

s

    

Yes! It is possible!

DRE#01033672

Offered at $799,000 When it comes to buying or selling a home, you want Barb in your corner.

apr.com | LOS ALTOS | 167 S. San Antonio Road | 650.941.1111

Single family home sales in local cities



        

INCREASE YOUR EXPOSURE

Get your name known in the community. Showcase your listings to thousands of potential buyers and sellers.

Call Rosemary at the

In 2010, the following number of homes sold in the below listed cities

WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS

Is Quality Important to You?

r of Two! e w o P e h T

City

Number of Homes

Santa Clara Sunnyvale Mountain View Los Altos Los Altos Hills Palo Alto Menlo Park

500 500 297 333 81 441 355

Low / High Prices

$175,000 / $1,190,000 $320,000 / $1,625,000 $315,000 / $2,475,000 $820,000 / $4,750,000 $1,000,000 / $8,200,000 $645,000 / $5,850,000 $174,000 / $5,300,000

Tori Ann Corbett Broker Associate

 #!  % """#!

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Direct (650) 947-4694 Cell (650) 302-4055 DRE# 01255661

Alain Pinel Realtors

% $$%

(650) 996-0123

Direct (650) 947-4698 Cell (408) 888-7748 DRE# 00978793

#00927794 www.ToriSellsRealEstate.com

INTERO REAL

650-964-6300

E S TAT E

S E RV I C E S ÂŽ

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580 Camellia Way, Los Altos OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY

NEW LISTING

January 22 & 23, 1:00 - 4:00pm . &%&$%8*#$ . !!# )%*2,888$"%  '$! . # $!&$ , 3 %$ . #( - #$%# & &% &   .  $% # # $!#%*#  (# . %%## .  %$+ !!# )%*  $"%

The only Diamond CertiďŹ edÂŽ Realtor in Mountain View diamondcertiďŹ ed.org and Los Altos

650 947 4780 DRE# 00893793

l

HBloom@InteroRealEstate.com

l

. )% $ % $$ $ &  %#* &$%&%$(* Offered at $1,769,900

www.HowardBloom.com Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

JANUARY 21, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

21

GORGEOUS MONTA LOMA EICHLER 3TIR7EX7YR

507 EMMONS DRIVE, MOUNTAIN VIEW 8LMWPSZIP]I\TERHIH)MGLPIVLSQIMWMRETVMQI 1SRXE0SQE2IMKLFSVLSSHPSGEXMSRERHJIEXYVIW ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ

8LVIIFIHVSSQW8[SFEXLW )\TERHIH0MZMRK6SSQ[MXLEHHMXMSR SJJSVQEPHMRMRKERHSJ´GIVSSQ /MXGLIRLEWPEVKIFVIEOJEWXRSSO FEQFSSµSSVWERHMRGPYHIWEPP ETTPMERGIW &IEYXMJYPERHXVIRH]VIQSHIPIH FEXLW 8LMVHFIHVSSQLEWFIIRI\TERHIH ERHLEWFYMPXMR1YVTL]FIHERH QIHMEWLIPZMRK

ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ

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1741 Crane Avenue, Mountain View 4 Large, deep lot offers expansion 4 Upgraded electric service, central opportunities forced air furnace, AC, and other upgrades 4 Refinished hardwood floors, fireplace in living room 4 Located near Cuesta Park, shops, YMCA, hospital, commute routes 4 Updated kitchen with gas stove & and not far from Downtown! French door to backyard

3 Bdrm/1 Bath Offered at $850,000

 VSJIWWMSREPPERHWGETMRK[MXLPSZIP] 4 µEKWXSRIERHFVMGO[EPOMRKTEXLW 8[SGEVKEVEKI[MXLI\XVEWXSVEKI GEFMRIXW 7SPEVTERIPWJSVIPIGXVMGEPTS[IV

3JJIVIHEX

Mountain View Neighborhood Specialist

PAT JORDAN CRB, CRS

650.793.4274 RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

DRE#: 00898319 email: californiajordan@yahoo.com www.patjordan.com | www.alwaysthinkresale.com

     

650.575.8300

web: www.nancystuhr.com

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23

n Su

01:0

0 4:0 n Su

SUNNYVALE

4 BR | 2 BA

:30 0-4 3 : n1 Su

:30 0-4 1:3

PALO ALTO

2 BR | 1 BA

PALO ALTO

5 BR | 3.5 BA

625 W REMINGTON DR $848,000 Atrium model w/skylight,updated kitch w/tile counters & woodtrimmed cabinets,Fam Rm.

1549 ALMA ST $850,000 Secluded Private Home in the Walter Hays Elem District. Fenced Yard, Hwd Flrs, Fireplace.

1631 CASTILLEJA AVE $2,175,000 Built by owners this home has large family rm w/woodburning fireplace. Downstairs suite.

Melanie Johnson

Leannah Hunt & Laurel Robinson

Alan & Nicki Loveless

650.948.0456

:30 0-4 3 : 1 un t/S a S

650.325.6161

MOUNTAIN VIEW

LOS ALTOS HILLS

3 BR | 2 BA

507 EMMONS DR $819,000 3 BR 2 BA Larger floorplan than most w/added office, dining area & expanded kitchen, remodeled baths. Pat Jordan

5 BR | 3 BA

24632 OLIVE TREE LN $2,700,000 Fabulously updated home with a beautiful gourmet kitchen. Terri Couture

650.941.7040

650.325.6161

LOS ALTOS 439 RINCONADA COURT SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

1020 SHERMAN AV $3,250,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

MOUNTAIN VIEW

OLD WORLD CHARM

3 BR | 2.5 BA

311 CUESTA DR $1,848,000 Beautiful spacious home almost completely remodeled in 2004.Large family room and yard.

271 SIERRA VISTA AV #2 $1,219,000 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.325.6161 Royce Cablayan $1,095,000 65 EVANDALE AV #C

2 BR 2 BA Stylish remodeled home w/ charac-

1060 LINCOLN AV $545,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.948.0456

REDWOOD CITY FARM HILL VISTA CONDO $360,000 $2,295,000 3 BR 2 BA Skylights, remodeled kitchen w/

4 BR 3 BA A must see! This sunny, exquisite 4 granite counters & hickory cabinets.Wonderful bdrms 3bths home in sought after Crescent floor plan. Sharon Witte 650.325.6161 Park

Denise Monfette

650.325.6161

841 TERRACE DR SUN 1:30 - 4:30

Ken Morgan/Arlene Gault $1,659,000 650.328.5211

3 BR 2 BA Discover privacy and prestige in this resplendent 3BR/2BA hm. Specializes in elegance!

Terri Couture 266 ALMOND AVENUE SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

MOUNTAIN VIEW

SAT 1:30 - 4:30

$1,499,000 23 SPINNAKER PL $519,950 3 BR 2.5 BA Brand new! In an enclave of 3 SUN 1 - 4

$425,000

10869 MORA DR SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$4,795,000

$820,000 in 55+ Park. Many custom features. Spacious 3 BR 2 BA Updated w/granite & stainless steel floor plan. in kitchen w/breakfast bar.LivRm has frplc & Deborah Greenberg 650.328.5211 bay wndw SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

Kathleen Jarvis Pasin

650.325.6161

SAN CARLOS 1340 ALAMEDA SUN 1 - 4

$730,000

650.328.5211 $795,000

SANTA CLARA Sought After

$526,200

2 BR 2 BA One-level condo w/fireplace. Newer 2 BR 2.5 BA RIVERMARK townhome. 650.948.0456 carpet, kitchen appliances. Secure building w/ Gorgeous newer TH in popular & upscale Rivermark community. $249,000 elevator.

$1,649,000 bath-heat, frplc in liv rm. Near shops, park, Mountain View. R. Brendan Leary 650.325.6161 5 BR 3 BA Nestled behind a private courtyard. commutes Nancy Adele Stuhr 650.948.0456 Beautifully remodeled & updated. SPACIOUS, GREAT LOCATION $85,000 Carole Feldstein 650.941.7040 809 ALICE AV 2 BR 2 BA Beautiful mobile home located LOS ALTOS HILLS

Judy Shen

CREEKSIDE RETREAT Barb Zuckerwise $850,000 1 BR 1 BA Open patio facing redwood trees, creek & pool. Near vibrant downtown ELEGANT LIFESTYLE! 3 BR 1 BA Lg deep lot, hrdwd flrs, updt kit-

650.941.7040 GREAT LOCATION NEAR PARK

$819,000

23 Spinnaker Pl 2 BR 2.5 BA Gorgeous remodeled waterfront home. 2 BR, 2½ BA+ Den. Pool, spa & tennis. 2 car garage.

1340 Alameda 3 BR 1.5 BA Charming home in excellent condition. Wd flrs, FP, skylights, fresh 2-YEAR NEW TOWNHOME $838,000 paint, lrg 2-car gar. 650.948.0456 3 BR 3 BA Elegant 2-year new townhome, Wendi Selig-Aimonetti 650.328.5211 many green built w/energy efficient features.

2 BR 1 BA Find your flair in this especially 320 PALO ALTO AV #D1 deluxe 2-BR hm. Garage. An exceptional hm! SUN 1:30 - 4:30

Royce Cablayan

REDWOOD SHORES

649 HOMER AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

716 N SAN ANTONIO ROAD ter & instant appeal. Designer finishes though- SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 3 BR 2.5 BA Located in small 4 unit complex. two-story craftsman inspired homes. Exquisite SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,695,000 out. details. 4 BR 3.5 BA Master suite & sitting area. Judy Decker 650.325.6161 Low HOA dues of $150.1 car garage.Inside Nancy Goldcamp 650.325.6161 laundry. Full guest cottage completed.2car garage.Built 224 WILLOW RD 653 HOMER AV Ric Parker 650.948.0456 2005. $948,000 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,499,000 Terri Couture 650.941.7040 SAT 1 - 4 3 BR 2 BA Tastefully remodeled home in the 49 SHOWERS DR #N367 3 BR 2.5 BA Brand New! Two balconies + 2 Upper Willows w/gourmet island kitchen & air patios. Craftsman inspired. Close to downSUN 1:30 4:30 $485,000 489 VALLEY VIEW DR 2 BR 2 BA www.49ShowersN367.com Bright town. SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,300,000 conditioning 650.325.6161 650.328.5211 & updated-beautiful views.A/C,new granite Nancy Goldcamp 3 BR 3.5 BA 16 years old 2 story home. Joanne Shapiro Desirable setting on 1/2 an acre lot.Inviting BEAUTIFUL SPACIOUS HOME $898,000 countertops. park-like garden. 3 BR 2.5 BA Beautiful, spacious 3-level home. Francis Rolland Dora Thordarson 650.941.7040 Walls of glass. Large, bright kitchen w/breakfast 97 SHERLAND AV rm.

650.941.7040

PALO ALTO

4 BR 3.5 BA Enjoys Mills Act benefits.Classic 4 BR 2 BA This charming home near Downtown 2 BR 2.5 BA Townhome w/dual master suites. Farnsworth hm in the heart of Los Altos,built Menlo Park features stepping stones & tower- Attached garage. Skylight. Open kitchen. Living ing trees. rm w/fireplace. in 1895.

Barbara Sawyer

LOS ALTOS

Hannelore Blanchard

MENLO PARK

Jo Buchanan & Stuart Bowen 650.941.7040

650.325.6161

:30 0-4 3 : 1 un t/S a S

:30 0-4 3 : 1 un t/S a S

650.325.6161 Ron & Nasrin Delan $725,000

650.941.7040

SARATOGA

2 BR 2 BA Lux Condos in Dwntwn PA. Exceptionl amenities. Pool, fitness rm, guest 12450 CURRY CT SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,225,000 apts, 55+ community Jo Jackson 650.325.6161 4 BR 2.5 BA Flexible floorplan, refinished hrdwd floors, vaulted ceilings, den & spacious 4250 EL CAMINO REAL #D237 backyard

SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$459,000 R. Brendan Leary

2 BR 1 BA Beautiful 1 BR + Den currently used as BR. Enjoy the quiet & comfort of this home.

650.325.6161

SUNNYVALE

Jim Galli & Merrian Nevin 650.941.7040 Kathleen Jarvis Pasin 650.325.6161 996 ALPINE TE #4 PALO ALTO 4 BR 4 full BA + 2 half Stunning gated home SAT 1:30 - 4:30 $538,000 w/bay views on approx. 1.65 ac.Tour @ www. DUPLEX IN MOUNTAIN VIEW! $849,000 OLD PALO ALTO 2 BR 2.5 BA Well appointed townhome in the $3,849,000 115 GREENMEADOW WAY sevenpondsmoradrive.com Spacious duplex in Mtn. View! Each unit has 2 4 BR 3 BA Classic center hall colonial hm on a SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $410,000 middle of a highly desirable complex.Inviting bedrooms,1 bath, & garage! BY APPT. ONLY! lrg 12,825 sq. ft. lot. Separate dining rm, hd flrs. 1 BR 1 BA Contemporary 1 level w/ hi ceil- living room. Mickey Shaevitz & Ellen Barton ing, lr/dr combo, open granite kit, cheery br, Royce Cablayan 650.948.0456 DiPali Shah 650.325.6161 Debbie Nichols 650.941.7040 650.325.6161 garden patio 1011 ASBURY WY Geraldine Asmus 650.325.6161 MAGNIFICENT MARY MANOR $145,000 14176 STANFORD CT GREENPOINT 2 BR 2 BA Updated manufactured home in $698,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,988,000 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 CERTIFIED HOME $3,600,000 terrific neighborhood. A great condo alternaREDWOOD CITY 3 BR 2.5 BA West Court Beauty! Well appoint5 BR 4.5 BA Beautiful Hm w/Western Hills tive! Over 1400sf ed townhome on a private cul-de-sac off main 6 BR 5.5 BA Green to the core! vw.Virtual tour www.EllenBarton.com Close Janie & John Barman 650.325.6161 Sophisticated,eclectic & colorful Mediterranean 507 BUENA VISTA AV road. to Stanford SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $849,000 Royce Cablayan 650.948.0456 hm. WOODSIDE Ellen Barton 650.941.7040 Vivi Chan 650.941.7040 3 BR 2 BA Open floor plan, updated, large lot, detached bonus room, pool, gated front yard. 49 SHOWERS DR #D464

2.25 ACRES

$1,795,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$645,000 PROFESSORVILLE ELEGANCE $2,795,000 Drew Doran

650.325.6161 308 BLAKEWOOD WY SUN 1:30 - 4:30

MDA 30,790 sq. ft., MFA 12,725 sq. ft. Large 3 BR 2.5 BA www.49ShowersD464.com Best 5 BR 4.5 BA 2-sty chic custom contemporary YOUR OWN HOME & RENTAL $839,000 view lot, close in, with Tennis court site. location, largest unit. Desired complex. LA sch within minutes of downtown PA, Stanford,train, 3/2 like a private home & 2/1 rental in the front. Jamie & Phyllis Carmichael top schls. district!! No common walls. New roof in 2006.

650.941.7040

Francis Rolland

650.948.0456 Margaret Williams

650.941.7040 Geraldine Asmus

650.325.6161 Susan Selkirk

©2009 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.  An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC.  DRE License # 00313415

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 21, 2011

$948,000

3 BR 2.5 BA Idyllic treasure offers a calm oasis in a secluded street close to neighborhood amenities

650.325.6161


Mountain View Voice 01.21.2011 - Section 1