Issuu on Google+

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, July 21, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

usines

B

Showcase

S

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Meadowland Market evolves to discount grocery store The new Meadowland Market is a bit old-fashioned. Like general stores of old, shoppers who visit Meadowland Market can find a little bit of everything – food, toys, produce, home décor, meats and cheeses and party supplies. Since the store first came to the Morris area, owners Trevor and Jody Schmidgall have helped Meadowland Market evolve from a simple “bent and dent” store to a thriving discount grocery store that focuses on overstock items and locally sourced goods like produce, meats and cheeses. Meadowland Market still works with vendors to sell items that have been pulled from larger grocery stores. With each shipment, the team of around 15 employees – plus family and friend volunteers – sorts out products that are too badly damaged or too outdated to sell, then moves the rest to the store floor. “Everything you get has been checked over before it goes out on the shelf,” said Jody. “I'm not going to sell something that I wouldn't eat or feed my family.” However, the store has also expanded into selling more overstock items – products that are still good, but may have been removed from other stores because of a label change or surplus purchase. These overstock items can be sold at a deep discount in stores like Meadowland Market. In May, Meadowland Market moved from their first location in Morris to a much bigger space on the corner of 6th Street and Pacific Avenue. The new space has allowed Trevor and Jody to expand their offerings and meet customer requests for more products like milk and everyday produce items. Meadowland Market now offers a number of locally sourced products including beef from Wulf's, pork from Outback Five, cheese from Riverview Dairy, milk from Stoneycreek Dairy, kidney and black beans from Bonanza Beans, and honey from Braaten Honeybees. The new location has also provided the opportunity to begin offering everyday produce staples through a vendor from the Twin Cities and locally grown items from gardeners in the area. Recently, Meadowland Market has been bringing in boxes of fruit directly from orchards – blueberries and two types of cherries this week. A vendor in the Twin Cities will also be supplying Elberta peaches later this month. “Our buyer will go directly to the orchard to get the cherries and the blueberries, then brings them to us,” said Jody. “They don't go through the processing plants where they wash the fruit – the minute you start washing fruit or vegetables, it starts breaking down the product.” This winter, Trevor and Jody hope to add a vendor for locally-grown popcorn and expand their toy department during the holidays. The store also includes a section of party supplies – everything from plates and napkins to balloons and pinatas. “We're always looking for something new,” said Jody. “If there's somebody around the area that sells something that is packaged for retail, we'll try it at our store – it's nice to support the local areas if we can.”

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 10B - Saturday, July 28, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

usines

B

Showcase

S

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Stepping toward the future with Footnotes

Photo credit Jennifer Pederson

On many afternoons, the sound of music, tap shoes and bodies in motion can be heard from the top promenade of the City Center Mall in Morris. Footnotes Studio of Dance is an award-winning company of young dancers. Many of their students have performed at community events, as well as competition events throughout the state. Stephanie Ferrian, owner and director of Footnotes, is proud of the 8-year studio. Opening in 2004, Footnotes started with about 50 students and has been going strong ever since. Providing dance instruction to boys and girls, the studio has distinguished itself as an excellent local venue for young dancers. “My goal was to provide the same experience I had growing up,” Ferrian said, “I started dancing when I was two years old at a competition dance studio in Coon Rapids. Learning dance from a young age taught me to take pride in what I do, while at the same time becoming accountable for my progress. My work ethic came from these experiences, and they’ve driven me to provide the same experiences for my students.” The school’s dance styles have a ballet foundation, and students learn various styles of jazz, tap and other forms as they progress through the program. Some dancers participate as recreational students and perform two recitals a year, in addition to other local events. Others choreograph dances for competition and participate in regional events. “Dancing has helped me develop the ability to work with others in a group. Teamwork and camaraderie are as important in life as they are in dance,” Ferrian said. “We identify goals together—like performing in a competition or for a recital—and then work together to accomplish those goals. If one student is struggling, others help them out. That builds respect and teamwork, something that I learned from my teachers.” Recently, Footnotes students have performed at summer parades in area cities including, Chokio, Morris and Hancock. One group of girls ages 16-18 received third place at the Prairie Pioneer Days talent show and are moving on to compete at the State Fair. “Their success is so special to me, because I’ve had these girls consistently since the beginning of Footnotes—since they were 8 or 10—so I’ve been with them every step of the way. I feel so proud of my students,” Ferrian said. Dance instruction begins with students as young as two, who practice creative movement and balance. Older students learn the vocabulary of ballet and learn several styles of dance. The high-school age kids learn more challenging dances and Ferrian often works with students to create their own, unique choreography. This spring, the high school competition group placed first overall out of 100 groups in their division at one of the largest regional competitions in the nation, held in Bloomington. “I think I get more nervous than they do,” Ferrian laughed. “Before they went on stage for their award-winning performance, they asked me why I’m so nervous. I said it was because seeing them do well reflects on my growth as a teacher.” Competition, Ferrian said, isn’t about winning or losing, it’s about watching and learning from what other dancers are creating, and then discovering ways to improve. “It’s so wonderful seeing the students develop as dancers. They’ve taken what I’ve taught them and seen in competition and really grown. It’s fun to see that I’ve taught them something I love, and they love it too.” In the future, Footnotes plans to grow with the dream of adding more practice space and inviting guest instructors to come and share their skills. “I’m also excited to see my daughter, Adelyn, begin dancing this year,” Ferrian added. “She’s two and I can’t wait to share dance with her.” Footnotes Studio of Dance’s 2012-13 season is now open. For those who would like to come in and try out their dance moves, the studio will be holding a workshop the week of July 30 – Aug. 1 for children grades K-12. Some popular classes started last season will be continuing, including an all-boys class for ages K-12, as well as some new classes, including a 7th-grade-and-older dance team that will perform at local events.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, August 4, 2012

B

Morris, Minnesota 56267

S

usines Showcase

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Since 1883, monument business has stayed in the family

Fergus Falls Monument Company co-owner Bob Welle, in front of Morris Monument, the company’s retail outlet in Morris. Fergus Falls Monument Company (below) has been owned by the Welle family since 1883. The Fergus Falls Monument Company has been owned and operated by the Welle family of Fergus Falls since 1883. Brothers Bob and Tom Welle took over operation of the monument business in 1970 after their father, Ralph, passed away, even though neither one had management experience. However, both Bob and Tom had worked with Ralph in the business – Tom in sales and Bob back in the shop. After 24 years, Bob's sons Ryan and Mike are preparing to oversee the business and continue the tradition of family ownership in a third generation. “We're very proud of the old and established firm,” said Bob. “The test of time proves quality.” In addition to pride in their tradition of family ownership, Fergus Falls Monument Company also sets itself apart as a manufacturer and direct seller for all of their monuments. Controlling all aspects of the monument production process, from sourcing granite from quarries around the world to installing memorials at local cemeteries, helps Fergus Falls Monument Company offer affordable prices and strong customer service. Monuments purchased through a third party like a funeral home can be more expensive because of additional middlemen in the process. When choosing a memorial, there are four major decisions to consider: color, shape, size and polish. Fergus Fall Monument Company sources different types of granite from around the world. The color of granite is dependent on the area it’s quarried from, based on the vegetation of the region when the granite was formed. Red granite is shipped to the area from Wisconsin, while popular black granite is only formed in countries overseas. There are many options for “local” granite, including a dark gray with black spots, but some do not work well for lettered memorials, said Bob. When the color is chosen, Bob and his staff will make recommendations on lettering and style. After the specifications are made, the company will draw up the design for approval, then pass it along to their manufacturing plant in Fergus Falls. The company also installs the finished monuments at the cemetery. To make sure monuments stand the rest of time, the monuments are protected by warranty forever. “That means a lot too – having something that is warranted forever and for all time from a company that has been here since 1883,” said Bob. Although ownership has stayed the same, staff of Fergus Falls Monument Company have seen many changes in the monument business. One more recent trend is for people to purchase their monuments in advance to help ease the burden for their loved ones after they pass away, said Bob. “It makes so much sense because you don't leave it up to your children, who may have a difficult time figuring out what you would want to have or spend” said Bob. “Back in the '50s, people felt like they didn't want to see their name on a stone ahead of time,” he continued. “Nowadays, people are proud of the workmanship and they're not so shy about purchasing their monument. Most people now are farsighted enough to think that way and prearrange their wills and monuments and funerals so that their kids don't have to go through a real hassle when something does happen.” Fergus Falls Monument Company's Morris outlet store, Morris Monument, was opened in 2008 to provide a more convenient space for local customers. Morris Monument is open every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Customers interested in making an appointment can call 1-800-664-2549 or (218) 731-4007. Bob is also available to make house calls in the area by appointment.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 10B - Saturday, August 11, 2012

B

Morris, Minnesota 56267

S

usines Showcase

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

New Dimensions grows with Morris

New Dimensions Home Health Care staff based at Grandview Apartments in Morris include (from left): Madella Thorstad, Wendy Erlandson, Bernice Christie, Elissa Heck, Pam Wiese, Debi Wiegman, Katelyn Harren, Theresa Curfman and Julie Hensinger. “Team Morris” also includes many aides who work in the homes and are not pictured. It all started with teamwork, which is still evident today. In 2007, Fergus Falls-based New Dimensions Home Health Care received a call that Stevens Community Medical Center was getting out of the home care business. While any transition can be difficult, New Dimensions was one of the area agencies that pledged to work together to make the smoothest possible transition for SCMC’s clients. “We recognized very early on that keeping as many talented nurses and aides who were familiar with the needs of Morris-area clients was vital,” said Wendy Erlandson, administrator of New Dimensions Home Health Care. Erlandson said New Dimensions was thrilled when experienced local nurses like Bernice Christie, Pam Wiese, Madella Thorstad and Debi Wiegman chose to come aboard and help the agency build its Morris office. “Their experience and professionalism were just what we were hoping for, and we had the added benefit of preserving those client-caregiver bonds that are at the heart of what is important to our agency,” Erlandson explained. Since setting up shop in Morris in 2007, New Dimensions has grown to a staff of five nurses and about a dozen home health aides. The agency has about 50 clients in the immediate Morris area. New Dimensions serves Morris and the surrounding communities in two ways: first, it provides care for assisted living clients at Grandview Apartments. Second, it provides in-home care for those who can still live independently. New Dimensions has its Morris headquarters at Grandview Apartments, 100 S. Columbia Avenue. From this home base at Grandview, nurses and aides assist with Activities of Daily Living – everything from helping set up medication and wound care to housekeeping, laundry and meal preparation. The key is the services are tailored to what each client needs – no more, no less. Customers purchase a service package that fit their needs, and New Dimensions is on-site to serve. Other Activities of Daily Living include bathing, skin care, oral care, dressing and grooming, hair care and shampooing, toileting, meal preparation and planning, medication reminders and delivery, grocery shopping, safety checks, skin care, arranging transportation and assistance with exercise plans. Nursing professionals can provide help with injections, medication management, blood pressure and other monitoring services, ordering medical supplies, wound care, foot care, ostomy care, monitoring blood sugar and health consultations. Through contracts with area therapists, New Dimensions also offers physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy. New Dimensions also provides the same services for in-home clients in the Morris area. Its team of nurses and aides make in-home visits with the goal of keeping people healthy in their own homes. “New Dimensions’ roots are in home health care, and the mission has always been to deliver high-quality care to help our clients stay independent as long as they want to be,” said New Dimensions Director of Nursing Kim Lindgren. “We work with your current doctor to make sure his or her plan of care is followed, and we work with you to make sure you’re comfortable and feeling good.” “If you are someone who is struggling with household chores or bathing, but you’re otherwise independent and sharp, home care may be the answer to keeping you independent longer,” explained Wiegman, who supervises the Morris office. “Often a family member is providing help with these things, but for whatever reason, they can’t help as much anymore or they’re getting overwhelmed. We can team up with a family member or provide all of the care necessary for you to stay independent and happy.” Is home care affordable? “One of the first – and biggest – questions people have is, ‘How do I pay for it?’” explained Chief Financial Officer Julie Braeger. “For instance, if you’re on Medical Assistance, you can talk to your current social worker. If you’d like to pay privately, we have an affordable schedule of rates we can go over with you. If a doctor orders care, you may be covered by Medicare. We’re always happy to go over your options with you. Getting good information costs nothing, but it can provide a lot of peace of mind once you have it.” If you have questions about home care, contact the New Dimensions team at (320) 589-9960 or toll free at (800) 395-9949. Visit online at www.newdimensionshhc.com.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 10B - Saturday, August 18, 2012

B

Morris, Minnesota 56267

S

usines Showcase

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Sonia’s is a one-stop shop for looking and feeling great

Never underestimate the power of a great hairstyle! Looking great and feeling great go hand-in-hand and Sonia’s Hair Clinic has everything you need to be fabulous. Sonia’s Hair Clinic is a full-service salon and spa located on the upper level of Morris City Center Mall, and provides a variety of hair, tanning, nail and skin-care services. Their goal is not only to help its customers enhance their current look, but reflect their personality—where they’ve been and where they want to go in life. Sonia Meyer, owner and manager of Sonia’s Hair Clinic, started her business nearly 50 years ago, during the mid-60s. Styles have changed a lot since the days of fashion icons like Twiggy or Jackie Kennedy, but her goal as a stylist hasn’t changed a bit. “I’ve worked my whole life to make this world a better place for women to work live and play,” Meyer said. “I think that if you care about people, truly care about them, everything else with follow. If I go in to work only thinking about making money, I can’t focus on what’s really important, which is the people I’m helping.” To keep their styles and services up to date, Sonia has made continuing education of her employees a top priority. Each stylist is required to attend two industry events every year, where they get training and information on the latest in styles, trends, tools and technology. "It’s always been our goal to provide services equal to or better that the stylists in Minneapolis/St. Paul. We certainly don’t charge what they do, but we work to provide that same quality.” Ms. Meyer’s daughter, Dawn Kosbab, helps to manage the Hair Clinic and said, “I’ve continued my education as a hair stylist to be sure that our salon remains current with hair styles and products. Cosmetology is an ever changing career.” Ms. Kosbab says the Hair Clinic’s focus is always helping their customers’ look and feel their best, but training, supplies and services can only go so far. "True service is founded on making a personal connection with each person. Being a hairstylist is one of the last professions where physical contact is a part of the job,” she said. “It’s that personal contact that makes people feel special and taken care of. The power of the human touch is amazing.” Ms. Meyer shared a story to illustrate this point. “A few years ago, we held a contest where people wrote in to nominate someone for a full makeover,” she said. “The person who won the makeover later wrote me a letter saying that her experience gave her a new sense of self-image. Everyone had positive things to say about her, and when it was all over she said, ‘my goodness, I look so nice don’t I?!’ That helped her gain the confidence to pursue a change in her career. It made me feel so good that we could help her literally change her life.” Hours: Everyone’s hair is different, and Sonia’s stylists do a great deal of research to Monday & Tuesday: specially tailor their products and styles. Sonia’s highly-trained stylists help create 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. a flattering hairstyle for you to accent your face shape and eye color. Their services can help you achieve the perfect tan, or relax with a massage, facial, manicure Wednesday & or pedicure. You can even top off your style with a new beauty product, purse, Thursday: scarf, or nail polish. 8:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. "We are professional people who’ve put a lot into our education and services,” Friday: Meyer said. “Even if things are tough in life, I always try to be open and caring 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. with my customers. That’s what’s most gratifying to me.” Sonia’s is the perfect place to renew your style and feel refreshed. It’s is your Saturday: one-stop shop for looking and feeling great. When you feel good about yourself, it 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. shows!

Mission Statement: Our goal is to help you reflect, refresh and renew your life and your style. Let us show you the way to a more beautiful you, inside and out.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

-- Sonia, Dawn, Beth, Christina, Joanna, Debbie, Karen, Kira, Megan

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, August 25, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

usines

B

Showcase

S

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Two family practice physicians join Stevens Community Medical Center When Dr. Brent Barnstuble signed a contract to come work at Stevens Community Medical Center during an interview, he knew he'd be joining the hospital staff at the same time as another young physician, Dr. Toby Christie-Perkins. Like small town doctors of the past, both Dr. Barnstuble and Dr. Perkins are family practice physicians, trained to care for patients from before they are born until old age. Both also have experience and interest in obstetrics and gynecology, and hope they will be able to encourage more women to deliver their babies locally. Dr. Barnstuble graduated from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and then completed a master's program in biomedical engineering. He went to medical school at the University of North Dakota, and completed his residency at the University of Nebraska. Before coming to SCMC, Dr. Barnstuble practiced medicine in the Air Force and completed an additional training program in obstetrics and gynecology before moving to Morris with his wife, Ingrid, and their two children – Sage and Clare. Dr. Perkins grew up in Dawson, and attended the University of Minnesota, Morris where he worked as an EMT with the Stevens County Ambulance Service. After nursing school at South Dakota State University in Brookings, Dr. Perkins worked as a pediatrics nurse in Sioux Falls before attending medical school at A.T. Still University, Kirksville, Mo.

Dr. Brent Barnstuble

Dr. Perkins completed his residency at the University of Minnesota, St. Cloud Hospital Family Medicine Program. After graduating from the program this June, Dr. Perkins began work at SCMC the beginning of August. For Dr. Perkins, the decision to come to SCMC was relatively easy, and he made it well before completing his training. Dr. Perkins said he wanted to stay close to his family in Dawson, and knew that he and his wife, Lisa, loved Morris from their time as students at UMM. “We're trying to raise our kids (Mason, Alayna, and Brinley) on the farm, close enough to town that I can take care of laboring women and my patients in the hospital and be available,” said Dr. Perkins. “We're trying to find a place that's going to be a permanent home for us – we don't ever plan on leaving.”

Dr. Toby Christie-Perkins

The ability to bring in two young family practice physicians at the same time is increasingly uncommon for rural hospitals, said Dr. Perkins. Medical schools aren't graduating enough family practice physicians – only about eight percent of current graduates go into family medicine – and those who do graduate often gravitate to big cities rather than rural hospitals. In rural areas in particular, when an older doctor retires, there just aren't enough young physicians available to step up and to continue and expand the clinic and hospital services. By hiring both, Dr. Perkins said, “SCMC CEO John Rau was ensuring the facility will continue to thrive years down the road.” Dr. Barnstuble and Dr. Perkins both also hope their addition to SCMC will help increase the number of babies delivered here in the community each year. Last year, SCMC delivered 100 babies and is wellstaffed to handle deliveries. Dr. Barnstuble has completed an • Stevens Community Medical Center, SCMC, is a non-foradditional training program in profit health care provider in west central Minnesota. obstetrics and gynecology • In 2011, SCMC was named a Top 100 Critical Access because he “thought in a small town we should still deliver Hospital by the National Rural Healthcare Organization. • In addition to the hospital and clinic in Morris, SCMC babies.” “My hope is that the community will realize they have a great place that provides a wide range of healthcare services,” said Dr. Barnstuble.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

owns and operates a clinic in Starbuck and New London. • Through relationships with other hospitals and clinics, SCMC specialists provide outreach services across the region. • SCMC also operates the Courage Cottage, a four-bedroom residence licensed as an adult foster care home that offers both short term rehabilitation services and end-of-life care. For more information visit www.scmcinc.org. To make an appointment call (320) 589-7600.

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, September 1, 2012

B

Morris, Minnesota 56267

S

usines Showcase

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Morris area Culligan has direct connections to Culligan founder The water softening business we know today began on the streets of a small town in Illinois. In 1936, Emmett J. Culligan perfected a solar drying process for manufacturing Zeolite, a man-made mineral used to soften water. After leasing unused, unpaved streets from the city council of Northbrook, Illinois, Culligan began to mass manufacture the mineral and expand his business. Soon, the streets of Northbrook were littered with piles of Zeolite, drying in the sun. Culligan's program for franchised dealers began in 1938. By the beginning of World War II, the number of dealers had grown to 150 dealers. Today, Culligan serves families in over 5,000 communities in the United States and Canada. The franchise that serves customers in the Stevens County area, Driessen Water Inc., was founded in 1962 when owner Gene Driessen purchased the Culligan business in Waseca, Minn. Driessen Water has a long connection with Culligan: founder Gene was married to Kate Culligan, Emmett Culligan’s daughter, and current president Chuck Driessen is Culligan's grandson. Despite that connection to an internationally-recognized brand, Driessen Water has remained a growing, family-owned business since 1962. Many of Gene Driessen's children and grandchildren are still heavily involved with the company. Today, Driessen Water owns 21 Culligan franchises in four states, serving 70,000 homes and businesses in Minnesota, Iowa, Indiana and Illinois. Stevens County is currently part of the Culligan franchise out of Benson, which Driessen Water purchased in 2000. The Benson Culligan franchise covers all of Stevens County, and parts of Traverse, Big Stone, Chippewa and Swift counties. Founded upon integrity, quality products and employee excellence, Driessen Water’s mission is to maintain those principles and to be a leader in the water treatment industry by continuing to expand and be profitable in our market segments while providing the highest level of customer service and earning customer loyalty. In addition to some aggressive advertising campaigns and adding designated staffing for the area, Driessen Water is considering rental options in Morris and will be working to regain a presence in the area. “We feel that Culligan is a good value for people,” said Kriss Peterson, General Manager of Culligan's Benson office. Culligan offers two primary services – water softening and filtration and reverse osmosis drinking water systems – for residential, commercial and industrial clients. “We do everything from houses to large manufacturing plants,” said Peterson. The water softening industry uses a scale of 1 to 5 to rate how hard the local water is, a measurement of the minerals present in the water. The Morris area is rated near the top of the charts at 4, which makes adequate water softening and filtration a necessity for customers. The process to install a home water system begins with an evaluation conducted by one of Culligan's water specialists. The home visit is a very important part of the process, said Peterson, because even within the same town water issues in each home or office can be different. “The specialist will come to your own home and do a full water analysis – specialists have a lab kit that would test the water to determine what the level of hardness is and what needs to get it down under the acceptable limits,” said Peterson. “We evaluate their water usage in conjunction with the number of people in their family and the different elements in their water, then specifically tailor treatment options to their conditions and their needs.” Customers have a number of financing options for purchasing a new water system – rental, rent-toown, or purchasing outright. Home salt delivery service provides more than a salt fill; drivers also perform a visual 7-point check to ensure the system is performing normally. In addition to water softening systems, more and more people in the area are choosing to add reverse osmosis systems to their homes because the systems offer the same quality of water that can be found in bottled water. Reverse osmosis systems can also be purchased with a maintenance agreement, which covers the annual cost of replacing the filter and any necessary repairs to the system. Unlike the water softening or purification systems that can be bought at big box retailers, Culligan offers personal service with quality products specifically chosen to provide the desired results. “What we're offering is the expertise to make sure that water is treated adequately,” Peterson said.

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, September 8, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

GLASS, AIR CONDITIONING & RADIATOR, INC. “One Call Does It All”

B

301 Broadway 320-762-5407

MORRIS

$XWR‡5HVLGHQWLDO&RPPHUFLDO

=HDUVRI)[SHULHQFH

ALEXANDRIA

S

3DFL¿F$YH 320-589-3570

usines Showcase

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

West Central Glass offers the best in glass replacement, radiator repair

127 Pacific Avenue, Morris Five years after shifting owners at their store in Alexandria, West Central Glass & Air Conditioning remains committed to offering more products and excellent service to their customers in the Morris and Alexandria areas. West Central Glass & Air Conditioning customers know that the company offers the best in auto and farm glass replacement and repair, commercial glass installation and air conditioning work. West Central Glass also is one of the few businesses left which do radiator repairs, said Ron Kill, owner of West Central Glass and manager of the Morris office. Five years ago, Kill’s niece Beth (Selk) DeWenter and her husband, Brian, purchased the West Central Glass’ Alexandria office from Dan Jost. Dan and Ron are cousins who started West Central Glass in 1979. West Central Glass celebrated its 33rd anniversary in April. “It seems like only yesterday,” Ron says. West Central Glass has seven full-time employees with the expertise and experience to handle any job. Changes in the industry have been dramatic in those 33 years, and West Central Glass’ employees are trained to handle the latest in materials and technology. West Central Glass is certified as a AGRSS shop, new standards set for the installation of automotive windshields, a standard developed by the Auto Glass Safety Council. “I have seen quite a transition in windshield installation since I started in the field in 1975 at Harmon Glass in Minneapolis,” Ron says. “The windshield used to just be there to keep bugs and rain out. Now, they can save your life.” Airbags deploy into the windshield, meaning that an improperly installed windshield will not take the force of the deployed airbag. That’s why it’s important to trust the skilled staff at West Central Glass, Ron says. Glass replacements or repairs can be done at West Central Glass’ Morris office at 127 Pacific Avenue, or at the Alexandria shop at 301 Broadway. For customers always on the go, technicians can install or repair windshields wherever the vehicle is. And West Central Glass can take care of customers’ insurance requirements, Ron says. West Central Glass can save customers time and money with its Glass Mechanix Rock Chip System. Chips in windshields can be repaired to like-new condition before the problem grows and a replacement is needed. Custom work also is a specialty at West Central Glass, helping customers with plexiglass and Lexan, mirrors, shower stalls and doors, shelving, thermal panes and commercial windows and doors. Glass replacement and repair is just part of West Central Glass & Air Conditioning’s business. Its technicians are among the few left who can repair today’s radiators. Technicians will also work on specialty radiators for old cars, repairing or rebuilding them as needed. They’ll also repair air conditioning units on farm, commercial and personal vehicles using a mobile AC repair truck. “We continue to expand our semi-truck and tractor glass, radiator and air conditioning parts and supplies so that in most cases we can provide same-day service,” Ron says. In the last five years, Ron has seen changes in windshield replacements for semi-trucks – windshields are bigger and take special skill to install. Suppliers for tractor cab glass have also expanded their offerings, making it easier and faster for technicians to make those repairs. And West Central Glass carries and installs Tormax handicap power commercial door operators. “Auto glass is still our main business but we’ve diversified over the years,” Ron says. So if you need help with any glass, air conditioning and radiator work, put your project in the hands of West Central Glass’ experienced, AGRSS-certified technicians. Ron, Shane Kolden, Charles Larson and Lance Longie work in the Morris shop, and Brian DeWenter, Heath Yochim and Austin Mettler work in Alexandria. Great products and customer service within a 60 mile radius of each store are the standard at West Central Glass & Air Conditioning in Morris and Alexandria. Call today at (320) 589-3570, or (800) 8223570 in Morris or (320) 762-5407, or (800) 7625407 in Alexandria.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

301 Broadway, Alexandria

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, September 15, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

usines

B

Showcase

S

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

New and renovated ‘Herman Bar and Grill’ set to open in October By M i ch a e l S t r a n d Every small town needs businesses and services. When a grocery store goes out of business or a restaurant closes its doors, small communities start to decline. In the city of Herman, Trish and Pat Haney are working to fight that trend by opening a brand new fullservice bar and grill. Crossroads Bar and Grill has been a familiar spot in Herman for decades. The building was constructed in 1966, and has been owned and operated by the city of Herman for the last 47 years. After purchasing the property, the Haneys got to work to transform the old building Trish and Pat Haney have purchased Crossroads in Herman, and are into a modern, full-service bar and renovating the space to become the community’s hot new hangout. restaurant to be called the “Herman Bar and Grill.” “The building was in dire need of some TLC,” Trish Haney said. “Things had gotten run down and really needed to be cleaned. It’s a good solid building though—90 percent cement blocks—I bet a nuclear bomb couldn’t knock it down.” The Haneys are well known in the community. Pat Haney grew up in Herman and is the owner of Haneyland Co., a farm management and insurance business. Trish also operates the Shade Salon and Fitness, which features 24 hours fitness, pedicures and manicures, with a room for massages coming soon. “I’m so excited to dig into this project. I want this place to be fun and up beat,” Trish Haney said, “We’re sourcing everything locally—from the construction crew to the employees.” Trish has worked at Crossroads nearly four years and has more than 30 years of experience in the hospitality and food service industry. The desire to improve the dining and entertainment in the community motivated the Haneys to purchase the building and begin the major overhaul. The remodeled building will feature a shiny new horseshoe bar, and an expanded selection of wines and spirits in the liquor store. A building addition will house a soundproof dining area, separate from the bar, for families and events such as parties and receptions. The new space will also feature a variety of music, comedy performances, dancing and raffles. The kitchen has been doubled in size, along with new bathrooms and other improvements. The restaurant will be full service and offer tasty food at reasonable prices. Trish has personally put together an updated and expanded menu including a full breakfast menu, a variety of new appetizers, and dinner options that include seafood and steak. The Haneys emphasized that their main goal is to foster fresh energy in Herman. “I’ve lived here all my life, I don’t want this town to begin to shrink. I want to see this town stay alive and grow and thrive,” Pat Haney said. “We chose to name it the Herman Bar and Grill rather than call it Haney’s because we want this to be a community place,” Trish added. “When somebody hurts in this town, everyone hurts. When something good happens, we celebrate together. We want to create a fun and family-friendly place for people in the community to gather, celebrate and enjoy.” The Herman Bar and Grill is open already at the American Legion in Herman, and is set to move into the renovated building at the end of October.

The Herman Bar and Grill is set to open next month, replacing Crossroads with a fully remodeled and expanded building.

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 14B - Saturday, September 22, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

usines

B

Showcase

S

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Heartland Motor Company plans for growth in Morris area

Heartland staff includes (front row) Kaylene Mecklenburg, Marv Westrom, Julie Sperr, Ken Keller, Angie Schmitz, Dean Schwagel, Michele Servantez, Joe Hermodson-Olsen, Dave Sayles, Bill Dripps, (back row) Dustin Clark, Erwin Anderson, Lynn Boots, Dane Halstead, Ryan Stout, Dan Dripps, Luke Schmitz, Mike Otto, Kyle Athey, Ron Towner, Mark Rode, and Doug Krueger. For the first time since 1979, Heartland Motor Company's facility will be getting an upgrade and expansion to improve customer satisfaction and the experience of purchasing a new vehicle. The expansion and upgrade is part of a national effort to develop consistency for the look and feel of all Chevrolet dealerships across the country. “Chevrolet has made a lot of advances with the vehicles themselves, so it seemed natural to improve the facility so the customer experience would match the quality of the products we sell,” says Dan Dripps, president of Heartland Motor Company. Starting next spring, Heartland will be making a number of major improvements to their facility – the biggest expansion in the company's history. One perk for customers will be an inside service drive, which will allow customers to drive their vehicle indoors before talking with a service advisor. “That's going to be a nice, convenient feature for our customers,” says Dripps. In conjunction with the facility expansion, Heartland Motor Company is also expanding their workforce, adding a service advisor, parts manager and sales consultant to grow their staff to 25 people. “I think it's a good sign that we're hiring,” says Dripps. “The fact that we're trying to expand and to grow says a lot for the community as a whole. We want to be a part of the local business recovery. We plan to be around for a long time, and so we're investing into our future and the future of the community.” The expansion will also include an improved lounge with wireless Internet and a play area for children, an expanded indoor showroom, and indoor delivery area for customers to pick up their new vehicles and learn about the new features. “There's a lot more to these vehicles now, so it takes longer to introduce customers to the new features – you don't just hop in because you've had one like this before,” says Dripps. Chevrolet offers technologically advanced vehicles for every use, from cars to pickups, with increased fuel economy and affordability. “We have something for everybody,” says Dripps. “I don't know of a vehicle on the road that Chevrolet doesn't offer a comparable alternative.” The most popular truck in the Morris area is the Silverado pickup, which will be getting a new design in 2014, along with redesigns for the Impala, Tahoe, Suburban and Colorado. The Chevy Volt – a vehicle that runs on either a plug-in battery or gasoline engine – is a leader in hybrid technology. It costs about $1.50 to fully charge the Volt's battery, and the car can drive about 40 miles on a single charge before the internal combustion engine kicks in. This year, Heartland again received Chevrolet's top honor by being recognized as one of their Mark of Excellence Dealers, an honor for dealerships that have committed themselves to unsurpassed performance and customer satisfaction. “Right now is a great time to buy a new vehicle,” says Dripps. September is Chevy Truck Month, which includes big discounts for customers. Heartland is also offering discounts on vehicles with minor hail damage from the most recent storm. “When you combine the rebates that the factory is giving with our discount and the storm savings that we have, it's one of the best times to buy a new Chevy,” says Dripps.

Thank you to all vendors and shoppers who visited us!

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, September 29, 2012

Morris, Minnesota 56267

usines

B

Showcase

S

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Prairie Ridge Hospital and Health Services Morris Clinic brings specialized care to patients Since Prairie Ridge Hospital and Health Services (PRHHS) moved to their clinic location on 7th Street in 2004, the practice has expanded. Each year, Prairie Ridge works to expand their services and the number of providers to bring local health care options to Morris and the surrounding communities. Specialty providers visit the facility on a regular schedule to offer sleep studies, mammography, ultrasounds, CT scans, MRIs, orthopedics, cardiology and general surgery. The facility also offers same day surgery for procedures like carpal tunnel relief, tonsillectomy, and gallbladder removal, among other offerings. For most of the specialized services, the provider or equipment for the procedure is scheduled on a regular basis at the facility. With CT, MRIs and Mammography, for example, the equipment for the procedure arrives at the facility along with technicians to perform the tests. Results are transmitted electronically to the radiologist, and results are generally provided to patients shortly. “Our goal is to bring specialty services here to the patients” said Missy Wetterling, director of marketing and public relations. “We are able to better serve our patients by having the specialty services come to them here. By doing this the patients don’t have to travel.” HEALTH CARE SERVICES Offering these services locally benefits people of all ages, Cardiac Services, Diabetic Services, from families with a sick child to aging patients who have diffiEndoscopy, Family Practice Primary Care, culty traveling. Lori Berg, clinic administrator, said providers Internal Medicine, Laboratory, Men's Health, will also make house calls in extreme cases to patients who can't Outpatient Services, Radiology/Imaging, travel to the clinic, for basic care or to evaluate whether the Sleep Studies, Women's Health, Wound Care patient should come to the clinic for more testing or diagnostics. PRHHS’s Morris facility currently has more than 10,000 active charts. Although their primary service area includes communities within 20 to 30 miles of Morris – Benson, Hoffman, Lowry, Chokio, Hancock and Kensington, for example – the clinic also draws patients from as far as Greece because of the reputation and care patients receive. “We strive to make things more comfortable and provide exceptional care,” said Berg. “That's one of the things our patients say – 'It's just like coming home because I know everybody here, I feel comfortable and I know they will take good care of me.”’ PRHHS’s Morris Clinic staff includes two physicians – Dr. Stock and Dr. Michael Busian. Dr. Stock is a board certified internist who specializes in endoscopy, colonoscopy, bronchoscopy, pacemaker and defibrillator insertions, cardiac stress tests, tilt table tests, and complex medical evaluations. Here in Morris, Dr. Stock also oversees the only independent pacemaker clinic between Minneapolis and Fargo. Dr. Stock and Dr. Busian have worked together since 1977. In addition to his work as a board certified family practice physician, Dr. Busian previously served as the director of the Stevens County Ambulance service and has been the coroner for Stevens County since 1978. In responding to a general shortage of family practice physicians available to work in rural areas, Prairie Ridge has been adding “non-physician providers” like certified nurse practitioners and physicians assistants to their staff. The clinic now has four of these providers: • June Zimmerman, RN, has been with Prairie Ridge since 2009 and specializes in diabetic education, hypertension and cholesterol management. • Stephanie Knobloch, RN, sees a range of patients, from infants to the elderly, and has become an important part of Prairie Ridge's diabetic education team. • Margie Nelson, RN, previously worked as a public health nurse with Stevens-Traverse Public Health in Morris. Today, Nelson maintains that connection while at Prairie Ridge by offering family planning services through Stevens-Traverse-Grant Public Health. • Alfredo Altamirano, PA-C, started his medical career as PROVIDERS a field medic and combat nurse in the U.S. Army. Internal Medicine: John Stock, MD Altamirano is fluent in Spanish and helps serve the growing Family Practice: Michael Busian, MD Hispanic community in Morris, and also serves as a consultMid-Level Providers: ant and lecturer for medical, EMT and paramedic educa• June Zimmerman, RN, CFNP tion. • Margie Nelson, RN, CFNP As PRHHS’s patient base continues to expand, the clinic • Stephanie Knobloch, RN, CFNP plans to add more services and more clinic hours to better • Alfred Altamirano, PA-C, MPAS serve patients. General Surgery: George M.A. Fortier, IV, MD “We strive to grow with people's needs,” said Wetterling. Cardiology: Minneapolis Cardiology “Our patients love the care they receive here, and that's Endoscopy: John Stock, MD what draws them to come back. Our mission is to serve the Physical Therapy: Big Stone Therapy Services Orthopedics: Jefferson Brand, MD healthcare needs of the people; when a patient leaves their Interventional Radiology: Vali Orandi, MD appointment we want them to feel like their healthcare conOB, GYN: Michael Norgard, MD cerns have been addressed.”

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.

MORRIS SUN TRIBUNE

Page 12B - Saturday, October 6, 2012

B

Morris, Minnesota 56267

S

usines Showcase

~ Fe a t u r i n g a d i f f e r e n t b u s i n e s s eve r y we e k ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Superior to celebrate 40 years in December

2012 In the months leading up to Superior Industries’ 40th anniversary this December, the company has not been content to simply sit by and continue as usual. Instead, they plan to celebrate how much they have grown by completing a major renovation and expansion to one of their core facilities – the Components Division. The original Components building, highlighted in red on the aerial images from 1980 and 2012, has been standing since before the company was founded by Neil Schmidgall in 1972. The expanded Components building will include an additional 31,454 square feet of manufacturing space, 7,000 square feet for offices, and a 7,000 square foot training center and and team memComponents Division expansion ber facility including a break room and locker room. At the same time, Superior Industries remains proud of their community, and hopes that the community will continue to grow with them. During the last 10 years, Superior Industries has extended outside of the Morris area, adding businesses in Arizona, Georgia, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa and Wisconsin. In 2008, the company acquired Westmor Industries. Two years later, Superior reconnected to its roots when Hancock Concrete joined the flourishing family of companies. Today, Superior has around 950 employees across their facilities, and around 50 percent remain in Stevens County.

1980

888-404-SOFT (7638)

If you are interested in participating in our next showcase, please call Linda Cook or Cheryl Busch at 320-589-2525.


Business Showcase July-September 2012