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Fall 2010

In MOLLI, curiosity never retires.

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Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

To learn more contact, 406.243.2905 or visit us online at www.umt.edu/molli The University of Montana, Continuing Education, MOLLI, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812

Welcome to the Time of Your Life!

s MOLLI Summer Adventures in Science: Connecting the Circle s Classic Mediterranean Cuisine: Chemistry in the Culinary day camp for grandparents and grandkids participants doing a Laboratory a free science course for members offered in mock dig in Bones and Stones with Garry Kerr, Summer 2010. conjunction with spectrUM Discovery Area, Spring 2010.

Initially funded by a grant from the Bernard Osher Foundation, The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM (MOLLI) is a lifelong learning program for adult learners +50. MOLLI’s goal is to create an accessible and innovative learning environment so that active older adults from all backgrounds and levels of education may pursue learning. MOLLI builds on the rich resources of The University of Montana to offer its members an array of educational and social opportunities. As a MOLLI member you have the opportunity to: • • • • • • •

Take a broad array of courses with distinguished UM faculty, emeritus faculty and other Missoula area teachers in a “no grade, no test” learning environment Keep active and enrich your life Meet new and interesting people Continue to learn and expand your horizons Explore new skills and develop new interests Travel and learn in new ways Stay mentally fit – and have fun

Membership is $20 per person and is renewable annually. Courses are $60 each. Some activities are free to members while others have a small fee. The benefits of membership include: • • • •

Access to the UM library Special member-only events Special “MOLLI only” parking permits during the MOLLI term 10% discount at the UM bookstore for textbooks and art supplies for MOLLI courses

MOLLI Council Members Sharon Alexander Cynthia Aten Gladys Considine Charlotte Hay Paul Lauren Patrick Mahoney Rustem Medora Dennis O’Donnell Ray Risho Kitte Robins Herbert Swick Burke Townsend Marta York Our Valued Partners The Missoula Symphony and Chorale spectrUM Discovery Area UM President’s Lecture Series The Springs Retirement Community First Night Missoula Montana Museum of Art and Culture International Wildlife Film Festival

+50

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

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Welcome to the Time of Your Life

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Course Overview

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Fine Arts

What is Jazz?

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Yes, You Can Draw

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Creativity and the Natural World

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Humanities

1910: What a difference a Century Makes...Or Maybe Not

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Photography: History through the Camera’s Eye

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Life Writing for Everyone

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Reconsidering Jesus: New Perspectives on Jesus and Christianity

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A James Joyce Miscellany

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Buddhism: An Introduction to One of the World’s Major Religions

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The Maltese Falcon: A Classic American Mystery

Current and Political Affairs

Obama and the Middle East: Between Iraq and a Hard Place

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Butte, America: The History of the World’s Greatest Mining Town

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Turning Life into Fiction: Moving Ahead

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Our 1972 Montana Constitution: Promises Kept or Opportunities Missed?

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High Asia and the Silk Road

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Deciphering North Korea: 1945 to the Present

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Natural and Social Sciences

The Face of Hunger in Montana

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Healthy Relationships with Increasing Age

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Jitterbugging across the Colorline: Sharing Heritage and Culture

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Cinema, Comedy and Social Conflict

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How Twitter Can Change Your Life: The Promises (and Perils) of Social Media

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Better Living through Geological Knowledge

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General Information

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Experience MOLLI

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Registration Form

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Table of Contents

Course Listings

Course Overview Early Start Dates

Thursdays cont...

• Our 1972 Montana Constitution: Promises Kept or Opportunities Missed? Sept. 22, 29, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 Wednesdays, 2:00 pm-3:30 pm

3:00 pm-4:30 pm • Deciphering North Korea: 1945 to the Present 3:00 pm-6:00 pm • Cinema, Comedy and Social Conflict

• What is Jazz? Sept. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Thursdays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm

Fridays

• Obama and the Middle East: Between Iraq and a Hard Place Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24 Fridays, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

9:00 am-12:00 pm • Yes, You Can Draw Five weeks only: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

• Butte, America: The History of the World’s Greatest Mining Town Sept. 24, Oct. 1, 8, 22, 29 and Nov. 5 Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm

Thursdays

Oct. 1 - Nov. 5, 2010

9:00 am-10:30 am • Reconsidering Jesus: New Perspectives on Jesus and Christianity • How Twitter Can Change Your Life: The Promises (and Perils) of Social Media

Sept. 30 - Nov. 4, 2010

11:00 am-12:30 pm • Creativity and the Natural World • A James Joyce Miscellany

9:00 am-10:30 am • 1910: What a Difference a Century Makes...Or Maybe Not Late Start Date, Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4, and (Friday) 12 • Photography: History through the Camera’s Eye

1:00 pm-2:30 pm • Buddhism: An Introduction to One of the World’s Major Religions • Better Living through Geological Knowledge

11:00 am-12:30 pm • Life Writing for Everyone • The Face of Hunger in Montana

3:00 pm-4:30 pm • Turning Life into Fiction: Moving Ahead

1:00 pm-2:30 pm • High Asia and the Silk Road • Healthy Relationships with Increasing Age • Jitterbugging across the Colorline: Sharing Heritage and Culture

3:00 pm-5:00 pm • The Maltese Falcon: A Classic American Mystery Four weeks only: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22

Upcoming Events MOLLI in conjunction with the Missoula Public Library and The Big Read

MOLLI is pleased to offer a course by Jon Jackson for The Big Read in conjunction with the Missoula Public Library. The National Endowment for the Arts’ Big Read is the largest literary program in the history of the federal government and is designed to revitalize the role of literature in communities. The goals of the Big Read are to reach lapsed or reluctant readers, have a wide range of imaginative activities related to one book, and involve the entire community with events in a variety of locations. For Missoula’s Big Read, the library has chosen “The Maltese Falcon” by Dashiell Hammett and programs will take place Oct. 4 – Nov. 13, 2010. The Big Read MOLLI course is The Maltese Falcon: A Classic American Mystery is four weeks, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 from 3:00 pm-5:00 pm in the Todd Building, UM. To learn more go to page 8.

MOLLI/Public Event: Sept. 23, 2010 at 7:00 pm Mark Blumenthal will be offering a free evening lecture, Sept. 23 at St. Patrick Hospital at 7:00 pm in the Broadway Building Conference Center Rooms. Blumenthal is the Founder and Executive Director of the American Botanical Council; an independent organization dedicated to disseminating accurate, reliable, and responsible information on herbs and medicinal plants. To Learn more visit at www.umt.edu/molli 4

MOLLI Fall 2010 Course Listings Fine Arts What is Jazz?

David Morgenroth Thursdays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Music Recital Hall, UM Early start date: Sept. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

About the Instructor: David Morgenroth is a pianist, arranger and composer living in Missoula. He holds MM degrees in both Jazz Studies and Piano Performance from the University of North Texas. Morgenroth has won acclaim for his solo piano recording “Alone with Duke,” and his next recording, “The Shadow of Your Smile: The Music of Johnny Mandel” will be released in the fall of 2010. A successful concert tour of Japan last year led to an invitation to return this fall to share his artistry once again.

Yes, You Can Draw

Marilyn Bruya Fridays, 9:00 am-12:00 pm, Dickinson Center, Missoula Starts Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29: five weeks only

All students must attend first class and bring supplies!

Set your pencils and doubts aside and try this series of exercises that will have you drawing in a few weeks! This non-competitive, self-paced course is a basic introduction to the practice of drawing. No previous experience is needed, but those with previous experience are welcome! Students must be able to attend the first class, which provides the foundation for all others. Supplies are available at the UM bookstore in the art department at a discounted MOLLI rate and a supply list is available online at www.umt.edu/ce/molli. About the Instructor: Marilyn Bruya, Emeritus Professor of Art, received an MA in Painting from Mills College in California and an MFA in Painting from Bard College in New York. She then continued her education at California State University summer workshops and at Schumacher College in Devon, United Kingdom and a residency at the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida. During her tenure at UM, Bruya received numerous grants.

+50 s MOLLI students in Yes, You Can Draw with Marilyn Bruya. One member noted after the class, “Yes, I could draw!” 5

Fine Arts

In the past hundred years or so, jazz has developed in extraordinary ways as an art form, but what exactly is jazz? This course will explore the music’s evolution and how the word “jazz” has come to mean many things to many people. Group discussion will be fomented by abundant listening examples, including live performances.

Fine Arts

Creativity and the Natural World

Lee Heuermann

Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

What is creativity and how do we perceive it? Have you ever had a brilliant idea you wish you could develop and share with others? Have you wondered if you are creative at heart, but never had the chance to explore your creative impulses? Creativity is a way to connect the mysterious and the mundane. In this class, we will use self-reflection, improvisation/play, meditation, journaling, and discussion to develop our creative instincts through listening to ourselves and the world around us. The class will also include selected readings and visits from guest artists who will talk about their own creative process. About the Instructor: Lee Heuermann is on the faculty at The University of Montana Music Department, where she has taught classes on the psychology of music, composition and women in music. In addition, she has recently joined the faculty of the UM Wilderness and Civilization Program, where she will teach courses on music in relation to nature. Heuermann composes music that reflects her interest in ritual, myth, and cultural commentary. Her most recent works include “Ridge of Blue Longing”, for which she was the commissioned Montana State Composer by the Montana Music Teachers Association, and “Montana Suite”, which was a collaboration with New York choreographer Donna Uchizono and Amy Ragsdale’s Headwaters Dance Company. Heuermann has a Ph.D. in Composition from SUNY at Stony Brook and a MM degree from the Yale School of Music.

+50 s MOLLI members enjoying a course at the Todd Building, UM.

Humanities

s MOLLI member in Behind the Scenes at the Symphony, 2010.

1910: What a Difference a Century Makes…Or Maybe Not

Donna Koch

Thursdays, 9:00am-10:30am, Todd Building, UM

Late start date: Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4 and make-up date, Friday, Nov. 12

Progressivism, conservation, international power struggles, immigration. Anna Pavlova, William Howard Taft, Jane Addams, Jack Johnson, Puccini. Glacier National Park, the Great Burn, Halley’s Comet. The events of 1910, the movers and shakers, and the forces pushing us into the 20th century still resonate with us today. In this course, we will return to that fascinating year and look at its politics, music, literature, social issues, and technology. A blend of lectures and lively class discussions will explore how those issues and events affect us today. The stage setting is 1910, and we the audience are sitting in the seats of a 2010 theater. About the Instructor: Donna Koch has taught both English and American history courses at Ball State University in Indiana and Tidewater Community College in Virginia. She was also an assistant to the president at Tidewater. She has led book discussion groups for Humanities Montana and has taught a World War II History and Novels course for MOLLI and the General Douglas MacArthur Foundation.

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Photography: History through the Camera’s Eye

Eileen Rafferty Thursdays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Photographic images shape our perceptions, memories and current lifestyles. This powerful yet ubiquitous medium has a rich history, even though it is less than two centuries old. Since its beginnings, photography has shaped, and been shaped by, contemporary events. This class will explore the history of photography in the context of world culture and history, as related to industry and technology, politics and war, art and science and social and cultural climate.

Life Writing for Everyone

Joyce Hocker Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Are you writing about your life? If so, keep it up! If not, why not? Write your defining stories, write to entertain, write to heal, write to learn. Writing helps to create, shape and transform our lives. Whether you are new to the process or are a long-time life writer, this class will offer creative ways to write about your life, using in-class and out of class writing opportunities, and with a stronger focus on your own writing than on published writing. Students who wish to do so may contribute and share brief portions of their writing, while the class listens with appreciation, support, and a non-critical stance. Bring a three ring binder and paper or laptop to class. About the Instructor: Joyce Hocker received a Ph D in Communication from the University of Texas, and a Ph D in Clinical Psychology from the University of Montana. She was a professor of communication for fifteen years. She is co-author of Interpersonal Conflict (Mc-Graw-Hill). Since the 1980’s she has worked as a clinical psychologist and communication consultant in Missoula. She has been keeping a journal for all her adult life, and enjoys memoir writing as an avocation. She has presented papers for the National Communication Association and has several life writing papers in publication.

Reconsidering Jesus: New Perspectives on Jesus and Christianity

Dan Spencer Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

Text: Marcus Borg: Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time: The Historical Jesus and the Heart of Contemporary Faith (HarperOne, 1995) This course draws on the recent scholarship of biblical scholars associated with the Jesus Seminar to take a fresh look at the historical person of Jesus of Nazareth, how he was understood by his early followers, and the implications of this for understanding Christianity today. We will supplement class discussions with selections from the documentary film, From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians. All faith and religious perspectives are welcome! About the Instructor: Dan Spencer is Associate Professor of Environmental Studies and has taught at The University of Montana since 2002. Areas of teaching and research interest include ecological ethics, ethical issues in ecological restoration, religion and ecology, and globalization, justice, and environmental issues in Latin America. Born and raised in California, Dan received his BA in Geology from Carleton College, Minnesota in 1979, and his Masters and PhD degrees in Environmental Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, New York.

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Humanities

About the instructor: Eileen Rafferty is a visual artist who creates work based on ideas of memory, history and visual culture. Using classic photographic techniques and digital technology, she combines archival and contemporary imagery to reposition the past into the present. She received her MFA in Photography/Film from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia and a BS in Human Physiology from Pennsylvania State University. She has been an educator and working photographer for over ten years. Currently, she is an instructor at the Rocky Mountain School of Photography in Missoula and an Adjunct Professor in the Art Department at The University of Montana, where she teaches the history of photography and advanced photographic techniques. Eileen Rafferty taught in last year’s MOLLI class on the Pulitzer Prize Photographs.

A James Joyce Miscellany

John Hunt

Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Text: Dubliners by James Joyce (Penguin Edition), A Portrait of the Artist by James Joyce (Penguin Edition)

Joyce’s prose fictions—Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake—were highly experimental, and each succeeding book was more ambitious and difficult than the last. This course will provide an introduction to all four, through increasingly brief selections (big chunks of Dubliners, smaller portions of A Portrait and Ulysses, tiny slivers of the Wake). We will talk about the design, content, and stylistic effects of each work on its own, but we’ll also consider one of Joyce’s enduring interests—the life of the nuclear family—as it appears in each fiction.

Humanities

About the Instructor: John Hunt is on the faculty of the Department of English at The University of Montana. He earned his BA from Williams College and his PhD from Stanford University. In addition to courses on James Joyce, Hunt teaches many courses in the literature of the Renaissance, with a focus on Shakespeare, on whose works he has just completed a book titled, “I nothing am: Shakespeare’s embodied selves.”

Buddhism: An Introduction to One of the World’s Major Religions

David Curtis

Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Text: Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction by Damien Keown (Oxford University Press, 1996)

The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of Buddhist philosophy and practice. Using a historical approach, we will focus on Buddhist tradition in three phases: the foundational teachings of the Buddha, the later philosophical developments of the Mahayana, and the ritual and creative visualization of Tantra. We will trace changes in Buddhism as it spread from its original home in India throughout all of Asia and ultimately to the West. We will discuss the rich literary tradition of Buddhism and look briefly at one of its most important texts, the Heart Sutra. About the Instructor: David Curtis graduated in Classics from The University of Montana in 1980. He attended the Collège Monastique de Kagyu Ling, France, for five years, completing the Tibetan Buddhist Seminary there in 1992. He taught Buddhism and Tibetan for ten years in Los Angeles, including six years for the Loyola Marymount University Extension Program. He founded the Tibetan Language Institute in 1995.

The Maltese Falcon: A Classic American Mystery

Jon Jackson

The Big Read in conjunction with the Missoula Public Library

Fridays, 3:00 pm-5:00 pm, Todd Building, UM

Four weeks only: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22

This four-week course will explore the literary and film career of Dashiell Hammett, especially in reference to The Maltese Falcon. We will read the novel, see the movie, and discuss two quite different expressions of this classic story. This course occurs at the same time as the Missoula Public Library’s Big Read program, which will offer students additional opportunities to learn about The Maltese Falcon. About the instructor: Jon Jackson has written 11 published novels, as well as articles on a wide variety of topics ranging from food, to golf, to fishing, and even including literature. “Jon A. Jackson is a master mystery writer with plenty of action, lots of low key black humor, and a perfect ear for the nuances of criminal speech.” - Chicago Tribune (http://www.jonajackson.com/ ). He graduated from The University of Montana and earned his MFA from the University of Iowa. He also hosts two radio shows -- ‘The Food Guys’ and ‘Jazz Sessions’ -- on Montana Public Radio.

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David Emmons

Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30pm, Todd Building, UM

Early start date: Sept. 24, Oct. 1, 8, 22, 29 and Nov. 5 [No class Oct. 15]

Butte has long held a special place in the hearts and minds of many Western Montanans. But by all that has been thought uniquely Western, Butte should never have happened as and where it did. This course will explore the history of the Summit Valley and Butte from the pre-settlement era to the present. The emphasis will be on the social, cultural, and political aspects of this unique place called Butte, America. About the Instructor: Dave Emmons is a Professor of History Emeritus at UM. He is the author of The Butte Irish: Class and Ethnicity in an American Mining Town, 1875-1925 (1990) and the just released Beyond the American Pale: The Irish in the West (2010).

Turning Life into Fiction: Moving Ahead

Kate Gadbow

Fridays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Good fiction writing depends on imagination, creativity and experience. In this workshop-style class, we will read published stories and discuss them as writers, and we will craft our own short stories in an interactive, dynamic setting. The course will be limited to twelve students. First preference for this intermediate level fiction workshop will be given to MOLLI students who have taken Kate Gadbow’s What If? Turning Life into Fiction. If spots remain, other MOLLI students with previous fiction-writing experience may enroll. About the Instructor: Kate Gadbow retired in 2007 after 23 years in The University of Montana English Department, including twelve years directing the Creative Writing Program. Her fiction has appeared in Epoch, Northwest Review, and other journals. She co-edited The Quill Reader (2000). Her 2003 novel, Pushed to Shore, won the 2001 Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction.

Current and Political Affairs Obama and the Middle East: Between Iraq and a Hard Place

Mark Johnson

Fridays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Early start date: Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24

Several months after an election, there is no stable government in Iraq. The Taliban remain restive in Afghanistan. The nuclear ambitions of Iran continue to defy a solution. The Israelis and the Palestinians still don’t like each other. Events and conditions in the Middle East will play a major role in determining the success or failure of the Obama administration’s foreign policy. Find out why. About the Instructor: Mark Johnson was one of the first instructors in the MOLLI program. He was a career diplomat for 30 years at the State Department and was involved with the 1979 Iran hostage negotiations, the Palestine-Israel crisis, Persian Gulf conflicts, and served as U.S. Ambassador to Senegal. He has spoken throughout the Middle East, including Egypt, Iran, and the UAE.

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Humanities

Butte, America: The History of the World’s Greatest Mining Town

Current and Political Affairs

Our 1972 Montana Constitution: Promises Kept or Opportunities Missed?

Jean Bowman

Guest speakers will include: Bob Brown, Margaret Davis, Royce Engstrom, Mae Nan Ellingson, Mike Kadas, James Lopach, Richard Opper, Jim Posewitz and Jennifer Jeffries Thompson.

Wednesdays, 2:00 pm-3:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

Early start date: Sept. 22, 29, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27

Our current Montana Constitution is generally considered the best state constitution. What makes it so good? How does it affect our daily lives? In this course, we will explore how the 1970 Constitutional Convention came to be and the special nature of the delegates to the Convention. We will focus on several provisions of the Constitution which most directly affect ordinary citizens. Every 20 years, Montana citizens vote on whether or not to hold a new Constitutional Convention. This issue will be on the November ballot. In the last class, a panel of experts will discuss the pros and cons of writing a new constitution, so students will be well informed on voting day. A special session will be devoted to showing a film about the creation of the 1972 Constitution. About the Instructor: A delegate from Billings to the 1972 Constitutional Convention, Jean Bowman was elected Secretary of the Convention, and served on the Judiciary Committee. She worked tirelessly to educate voters about the need to hold a Convention, and after the Convention, worked tirelessly to get it passed. Jean holds a BA with High Honors in Political Science, and a JD from The University of Montana.

High Asia and the Silk Road

Rick Graetz

Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

High Asia is a majestic land that holds the world’s tallest mountains (those over 7000 meters high) and cloud piercing summits draped with massive ice caps and rivers of ice - some of the longest glaciers on the planet. We will visit the highest reaches of the Himalaya, Karakorum, Tien Shan and other legendary mountains and we will travel the wildest segments of the Silk Road that passed thru the convoluted trails of these mountains that rise higher than any other on earth. We will consider the inhabitants of this remote and ancient region: the Sherpa, Balti, Kyrgyz, and Kazhak people. About the Instructor: Rick Graetz is professor of Geography at The University of Montana and founder of Montana Magazine. He and his wife, Susie, have authored almost 20 books about Montana, as well as many other areas of the United States and foreign countries, especially many areas of Asia.

Deciphering North Korea: 1945 to the Present

Steven Levine

Thursdays, 3:00 pm-4:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

North Korea has baffled foreign observers since its establishment. Often referred to as a “Stalinist state,” it is run by a family dynasty supported by a powerful party/military establishment. The regime rigidly controls a population largely cut off from the outside world, suffering from poverty and deprivation, and subjected to extreme forms of thought control and manipulation. North Korea has long been a “problem state,” disturbing peninsular peace and regional order. Its acquisition of nuclear weapons in 2006 has only made things worse. We will examine its evolution and prospects in the context of regional and global politics. About the Instructor: Steven Levine is Senior Research Associate in the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Center at The University of Montana. He has taught East Asian History and Politics at the university level for nearly forty years and has published extensively. Steven Levine has taught two previous MOLLI classes, most recently on Xinjiang in Winter 2010.

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The Face of Hunger in Montana

Minkie Medora

Thursdays, 11:00 am-12:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

This course looks at the status of hunger in Montana, the dynamics of why families are hungry, the challenges they face finding food, and efforts made in Missoula and around the state to provide food for hungry people. The course will explore the distinctions between short and long term solutions to hunger and food insecurity, as well as the differences between charitable efforts and the pursuit of food security and economic security by poor families. Stories of real people in Montana and the coping strategies they use to overcome hunger and poverty will be shared. The course includes a trip to the Montana Food Bank Network in Missoula. About the Instructor: Minkie Medora, MS, RD is on the board of the Montana Food Bank Network and chairs the Food Security Council. The Council pursues long-term, sustainable solutions to hunger through research, education and impacting public policy to reduce the growing need for emergency food in Montana. Minkie was also Director of Nutrition Services at Community Medical Center and at the Missoula City-County Health Department.

Healthy Relationships with Increasing Age

Philip Bornstein

Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

This class will focus upon creating healthy relationships in the years leading up to and following retirement. Emphasis will be placed upon characteristics of satisfying relationships with lifelong partners, children, parents, extended family, and friends. Some consideration will also be given to the “self” in retirement and how one can achieve a personal sense of fulfillment and happiness with increasing age. Though the class will be practical and applied in nature, Dr. Bornstein will provide a foundation which is based upon current research in psychological literature. About the instructor: Dr. Bornstein has a doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology. His current clinical practice has an emphasis in individual, couples, and family therapy. Dr. Bornstein is the originator of the UM undergraduate class entitled Psychology of Loving Relations. He was on The University of Montana faculty from 1973-1989 and is the founding partner of Garden City Professional Offices, a group practice comprised of psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers.

Jitterbugging across the Colorline: Sharing Heritage and Culture

Mark Matthews

Thursdays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

One of the great (still unfinished) stories of history is the integration of the races in America. Dance and music provided the first portals through which European colonists and African slaves could understand, or misunderstand, one another. Come learn how black slaves turned Irish jigging into buck dancing, tap dancing, and ultimately, into the Charleston; and how white dancers transformed black ‘’zoo’’ dances such as the turkey trot into modern ballroom dancing. Black social dances not only helped integrate society, they also allowed Victorian whites to rediscover their sexuality, as well as their hips. This course will include vintage film clips, but no dancing. About the Instructor: Mark Matthews worked for many years as a freelance reporter for national and local publications before concentrating on writing books. The University of Oklahoma Press has published his three non-fiction works: ‘’Droppers’’ (2010), ‘’A Great Day to Fight Fire’’ (2007), and ‘’Smoke Jumping on the Western Fireline’’ (2005). Additional books on the social and cultural history of dance in America are in the works. Matthews currently teaches writing at The University of Montana-College of Technology.

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Natural and Social Sciences

Natural and Social Sciences

Natu ral and Social S c i en c es

Cinema, Comedy and Social Conflict

Stan Roden and Phyllis dePicciotto

Thursdays, 3:00 pm-6:00 pm, Todd Building, UM

Mel Brooks said, “Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you walk into an open sewer and die.” Comedy takes us unawares and provides a rich opportunity to see universal truths about our world. “There is a thin line that separates laughter and pain, comedy and tragedy...” said Erma Bombeck. From the genius of the Marx Brothers, Mel Brooks, Woody Allen, Peter Sellers, Monty Python, Billy Wilder and the Coen Brothers we will examine comedic filmmaking, what such films reveal about social conflict, and the structural, strategic, psychological, institutional and cultural barriers that obstruct and hamper conflict resolution. About the instructors: Stan Roden is a lawyer, mediator/arbitrator and teacher of conflict resolution and negotiation; he currently teaches global conflict management, alternative dispute resolution and negotiation workshops at various institutions of higher education. Phyllis dePicciotto started and ran the Santa Barbara International Film Festival for 14 years; she currently operates an independent film consulting business. Stan & Phyllis are married, live part time in the Bitterroot and have four children and seven grandchildren.

How Twitter Can Change Your Life: The Promises (and Perils) of Social Media

Clem Work

Fridays, 9:00 am-10:30 am, Todd Building, UM

A cooking fire may have been the first social medium. Today, tens of millions around the world, young and old, gather around Facebook, MySpace, Flickr, Twitter and other 21st century social media to chat, share, gather information, brag, gossip, collaborate and otherwise communicate. But are these new tools the best thing since sliced bread or a sure sign of Armageddon? We’ll take a closer look at facets of contemporary electronic social media and discuss their pros and cons. About the Instructor: Clem Work has taught journalism at UM for 20 years, following a career as a reporter and editor. While his specialty is media law, he also teaches reporting and editing. He uses Facebook, Twitter and other social and news media to keep up with his students, and to learn what’s going on in the world.

Better Living through Geological Knowledge

Ian Lange

Fridays, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm, Todd Building, UM

As our world grows, especially its urban populations, countries are becoming not only more economically linked but also at the mercy of both man-made and naturally occurring catastrophic events. An understanding of these phenomena by both citizens and government officials is vital for our present and future well-being. This course will explore the sources and uses of some of the Earth’s finite mineral and fuel resources, how those resources are impacted by hazards such as earthquakes and flooding (many actually exacerbated by human activity), and how they govern our high standard of living and shape world foreign policy. About the Instructor: Ian Lange was a professor at The University of Montana for 30 years. He earned his undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College and his PhD in geology and geochemistry from the University of Washington. He was a Research Faculty Affiliate with the U.S. Geological Survey from 1978-1996 and has published more than 130 papers in national and international journals. He serves as a consultant for mining and exploration companies. 12

General Information Membership Dues $20 per person annually $60 per course

Fall Special Take two fall courses for only $100 This is a 33% savings on your second course!

How To Register

Online at www.umt.edu/molli

Please note the discount is for one participant enrolling in two courses.

Call us at 406.243.2905

About the Costs of MOLLI

Email us at molli@umontana.edu

Hand deliver your form to the UM Campus, Todd Building, adjacent to the UC.

Mail the registration form to: The University of Montana, Continuing Education, MOLLI, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812

Fax your registration form to 406.243.6224

Course Location

With a few exceptions, most courses are held in the Todd Building on the UM campus, adjacent to the University Center.

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance is available to ensure everyone +50 has the opportunity to engage in lifelong learning. To learn more call 406.243.2905.

MOLLI Gift Cards MOLLI membership and/or course gift cards are wonderful presents for family and friends. The cards are free except for the cost of the gift of membership ($20), MOLLI course ($60), or both ($80). To learn more about giving the gift of learning call 406.243.2905. Parking and Transportation Options

$25 Special MOLLI Parking Pass for Sept. 30 - Nov. 5 ONLY. This pass is good for use in pay-by-hour and decal parking lots at UM. $12 Special MOLLI Six Day Pass is good for six days of parking on campus. The pass is good for use in decal parking lots ONLY at UM. To purchase a pass call 406.243.2905 or add it to your registration form. To learn more about where to park on campus go online to www.umt.edu/publicsafety/ printpark.html or contact the MOLLI staff for a copy of the map. Please do not park in reserved spaces or your vehicle will be towed!

MOLLI tries very hard to keep costs at a minimum, so everyone can participate. However, we know that some people may need some help. Therefore, MOLLI is pleased to offer a tuition waiver program to ensure everyone +50 has the opportunity to engage in lifelong learning. This fund has been supported by donations from MOLLI instructors and generous members.

To learn more about financial assistance through the MOLLI tuition waiver program, or if you would like to consider a gift to this fund, so that others can enjoy learning, please call 406.243.2905.

Textbooks Textbooks for MOLLI courses can be purchased at the UM bookstore at a 10% discount. They are available in the general books section. Donations

Your tax-deductible donation to MOLLI will go a long way in support of tuition waivers, special events and courses. To learn more, call 406.243.2905.

Bernard Osher Foundation The Osher Foundation seeks to improve quality of life through the support of lifelong learning institutes such as MOLLI. The Bernard Osher Foundation was founded in 1977 by Bernard Osher, a respected businessman and community leader. The Osher Foundation has now funded more than 120 Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes on campuses of colleges and universities from Maine to Hawaii. Funding for MOLLI is contingent upon membership growth goals, so membership matters. To learn more about The Bernard Osher Foundation visit online http://www.osherfoundation.org/

Questions? The University of Montana Continuing Education, MOLLI 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 406.243.2905 Fax 406.243.6224 www.umt.edu/molli

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molli@umontana.edu

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General Informa ti on

Course Fees

MOLLI is pleased to offer the following special for a limited time!

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at

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MOLLI is an Experience...

s Walking through Missoula’s History with Allan Mathews, Spring 2010.

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Laughter and Theater, a Winning Combination with Margaret Johnson, Spring 2010.

Members playing music with wine glasses in Behind s the Scenes at the Symphony 2010.

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Experience MOLLI: Join Today!

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s Helena: Montana’s Very Special Queen City bus tour with Hal Stearns, Spring 2010.

s MOLLI Summer Adventures in Science: Connecting the Circle day camp for grandparents and grandkids, Summer 2010. s

Wonder Wheels, offered free to members in conjunction with spectrUM, Spring 2010.

Classic Mediterranean Cuisine: Chemistry in the Culinary Laboratory, offered free to members in conjunction with s spectrUM, Spring 2010.

UC Reserved MOLLI Social Tables

Starting Sept. 2, tables will be reserved in the University Center Food Court for MOLLI members to socialize from 8:00 am-5:00 pm before, during and after classes on Thursdays and Fridays during the Fall Term. The tables are located in the far South/East corner near the brick wall and will have signs noting the reservation. Please note: Members can exit through the door near the tables for easy access to the Todd Building. However, you may not enter through those doors as they are locked. Rest rooms are located in the North/East corner for your convenience.

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Non-Profit org. U.S. Postage

PAID

Missoula, MT 59812 Permit No. 100

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Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UM The University of Montana Continuing Education, MOLLI 32 Campus Drive Missoula, MT 59812 www.umt.edu/molli 406.243.2905

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Fall 2010 Brochure