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MOCA ART INSTITUTE

MOCAZINE

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Welcome to MOCAZINE 2011! Welcome to the 12th Year of the MOCAZINE! MOCA is delighted to work with the talented young people of our community to create an arts and culture magazine by and for teens. This publication is meant to serve as a teaching tool, and showcase the hard work and efforts of the actively involved teens that bring fresh energy to MOCA. The MOCAZINE enables teens to make connections with MOCA’s exhibitions and with one another, providing the opportunity to learn about the fields of art and communications, as well as introduce them to the world of contemporary art. . Please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments at LKEELER@mocanomi.org Looking forward, Lark Keeler Curator of Education

Printing Sponsor

Bonnie Clearwater MOCA Director and Chief Curator Joanne Katz Board of Trustees, Co-Chair of the Education Committee Cindi Nash Board of Trustees, Co-Chair of the Education Committee Lark Keeler Curator of Education Jillian Hernandez, Education Outreach Coordinator Karla Kennedy, Summer Journalism Instructor Meg Pukel, Summer Photojournalism Instructor Fiona Henderson, Fashion Design Instructor Mindyne Joseph, Journalism/MOCAZINE Instructor Gus Miranda, Drawing Instructor Noelle Theard, Photography Instructor Lisa Maggio, Painting Instructor Drake Demrovsky, Art Force Organizer Timothy Rush, Design Assistant Tommy Pace, Graphic Design Advisor Brandon Guzman Graphic Design 22

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This Page and Cover Art By: Timothy Rush

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ARTICLES MOCA ART INSTITUTE..............PG 4 I WAS THERE.....................PG 6 ORENGO AWARDED SCHOLARSHIP......PG 8 INTERVIEW JEN STARK.............PG 10 RUSH TO COLLEGE.................PG 12 WEBER AT MOCA..................PG 14

STUDENT ART PROFILES PHOTOGRAPHY STUDENTS............PG BRANDON GUZMAN..................PG VIVIAN AZALIA...................PG TIMOTHY RUSH....................PG ALYSSA PANGANIBAN...............PG

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MOCA PROGRAMS JR DOCENTS......................PG CONTEMPORARY ART CLUB...........PG SUMMER JOURNALISM INSTITUTE.....PG FASHION SHOW....................PG PHOTOGRAPHY.....................PG PAINTING & DRAWING..............PG WOMEN ON THE RISE...............PG MOCA TEEN ART FORCE.............PG

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MOCA Education programs are funded in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture, and the National Endowment of the Arts with the support of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners, the Irma Braman Creative Arts Scholarship Fund and The Children’s Trust. The Children’s Trust is a dedicated source of revenue established by voter referendum to improve the lives of children and families in Miami- Dade County, the Arnold S. Katz Endowment, City of North Miami, Jan & Dan Lewis, Bank of America, Ethel & W. George Kennedy Family Foundation, Peacock Foundation, the Columbine Foundation, The Fine and Greenwald Foundation, Bloomingdale’s and Macy’s. MOCA is accredited by the American Association of Museums.

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MOCAZINE 2011 MOCA ART INSTITUTE

770 NW 125 Street North Miami, FL 33161

The MOCA Art Institute offers an array of comprehensive educational programs in art and communications that promote a well-rounded understanding of art and the world. The MOCA Art Institute’s innovative programs for all ages use engaging curriculum and the dynamic museum environment to build skills and promote creativity through exposure, experience and discussion.

FREE programs for teens are offered throughout the school year and summer.

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I Was There Moca Art Institute

Dwinie T. Belledent North Miami Senior High 12th Grade

January 12th, 2010 was the worst day of my life. What happened that day changed me forever and I will never be the same. It started like a normal day. I woke up frustrated as usual, skipped breakfast, kissed my mom good bye and hopped into my dad’s car. I remember the monstrous traffic on my way to school, worrying about being late.

I was confused. I remember asking myself: What was that? Why is there so much dust in the air and I can not breathe? Why are so many people screaming?”

I remember wishing chemistry class was over, I recall being happy when the 3:30 bell rang. School was finally over, I thought. I said good bye to my friends without knowing it would be the I remember what I had seen in movies about earthquakes: the ground last time I would see them. moving, the houses swaying. Then it If only I had known that an earthquake all made sense to me. An earthquake had struck. The dust was from colwould destroy everything I knew and lapsed buildings, and the screams loved, there are so many things I were from trapped people. would have done differently. When I got home from school, I threw my bag on the floor and went to bed. Something woke me up, the wall next to my bed was moving back and forth. My heart was beating so fast.

I was horrified, but I did not show it. I did not want to scare my little brother and sister. We sat on the grass in the yard, far away from the house. We were too scared to move.

I sat there and stared at the wall as if paralyzed. I heard my dad screaming my name, but for some reason I could not move. Finally, he came in and dragged me out of the house.

We did not cry when our mom did not come home from work three hours later. We did not cry when we got word that my mom’s office building was in rubbles. We held each other’s hands and prayed just like she taught us to do.

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I burst into tears when she finally made it home. I held on to her and I cried for hours. We slept outside on our mattresses that night. It was very cold but I did not care. The floor shaking under me terrified me. People were screaming, crying for the loss of their loved ones. A gas station exploded and the air smelled. I did not know where most of my family members and friends were. I thought I would not sleep that night, but I did. When I opened my eyes the next morning I thought I had a nightmare. The horrible reality hit me when my mom told me my cousin Laurie died. I was mad, mad at God, mad at the rescuers. Why did she have to die? Why didn’t they get her out in time? She was eighteen, getting ready for college. She was my aunt’s only child. I did not go to Laurie’s grave when my family went to visit it. Since then, I have not talked to or seen my aunt. I do not have the courage to look her in the eyes. It became so normal to hear about disabled and dead people that I stopped crying by the third day. Port-au-Prince was all about rubble and decomposing bodies. No one imagined that the city could be rebuilt. Anyone that could leave, left.

Sixteen days after the earthquake, my family drove to the Dominican Republic. It took us one day to get to the capital. On January 30, we flew to the United States. I did not want to leave but staying was not an option anymore. Nothing will ever be the same. I turned fifteen. Adapting to my new home was not the hardest thing. I could not enter any building more than two floors high without thinking it would fall on me. I remember feeling the third floor of my school shaking one day and I ran with fear. I got over it, but I know I will never live in an apartment building. Looking back, I think the earthquake changed my life for the best. Living in the United States has provided me so many opportunities that I would not have had living in Haiti. Most of the time, I do not think about the negative effects of the earthquake. I focus on how strong it has made me, how I now have a more promising future. I have been told everything happens for a reason. I do not know why the earthquake hit Haiti, but I know how blessed I am.

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ORENGO AWARDED S Gabriella Nunez Miami Lakes Educational Center 11th Grade Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) intern, Yuberniz Orengo, received a scholarship to attend a pre-college summer program in New York City. Orengo was accepted into a program created by Dr. Mancuso, Design and Architecture Senior High’s principal. For funding, DASH collaborated with art advocates Carlos and Rosa De la Cruz and the Key Biscayne Giving Circle. “Dr. Stacey Mancuso has this dream of DASH students taking Manhattan and applied for a grant to help students get into a pre-college program at SVA (School of Visual Arts),” Orengo said. Being one of thirty students chosen for this new program, Orengo describes herself as “one of the lucky juniors.” She credits MOCA for part of her success. “I feel out of place in North Miami, but here [at MOCA] I feel at home,” she said. Participating in Advanced Drawing classes and the Fashion and Design class offered at MOCA, gave Orengo more artistic freedom. Eventually, she became a summer camp counselor and then an intern during the year. “I was also a part of Junior Docents, I even helped the program grow,” Orengo said. She saw potential in Junior Docents but a lack of attendance. Coming from an artistic school, she thought of ways to involve students from DASH in the program. She discussed the issue with her art history teacher and came up with an idea. If his students showed up to JD, they would receive a slip of paper worth ten points towards any test in art history. “Soon the students started coming because they liked the actual program, and the [attendance] lists would get longer,” said Orengo. 8

Orengo organized a field trip for MOCA students to attend National Portfolio Day

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SCHOLARSHIP Seeing the impact she had on Junior Docents and the “raw talent” that young MOCA attendees had to offer, she wanted to showcase their crafts. Orengo organized a field trip to National Portfolio Day.

Although MOCA may be part of her success story, Orengo’s talent is the true reason for her success.

“A lot of them didn’t even know about it. I was so surprised! How are you a talented student artist and you do not know about National Portfolio Day?” Orengo said.

Drawing and sketching since fifth grade, Orengo also has an interest in sculpture and fashion. Taking sculpting and fashion classes at DASH since her sophomore year, she found a connection between the two arts.

On National Portfolio Day, ran by the National Portfolio Day Association, representatives from colleges accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design critique a young artist’s portfolio and offer the artist feedback.

“I like making hats. Hats are the purest forms [of sculpture] in the fashion industry,” Orengo said.

Yuberniz Orengo saw an opportunity for young artists to pursue their passion. She hand selected 15 teen artists, mostly sophomores and juniors, to represent MOCA and helped them set up their portfolios. “They were all scared and nervous, but I saw positive reinforcement. There are a lot of genuine representatives there to help guide you along,” Orengo said.

Aspiring to major in Fashion Design, Orengo hopes to study millinery and hat making as well as accessory design. Orengo also hopes to minor in foreign languages. “I owe a lot to aptitude, talent and luck, and I hope none of them run out,” Orengo said. “I’m the person that’s trying to pursue the close to impossible, I’m trying to pursue a dream.”

Seeing positive reinforcement, Orengo was pleased to hear that student, Timothy Rush met a representative, developed a relationship and would, as a result, attend School of the Museum of Fine Arts with a $5000 a year scholarship. “This is a sign that this program could work. Out of 15 kids I took, one got accepted to a school with a scholarship. This could really work,” Orengo said.

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Christopher Small North Miami Sr. High 12th grade

This led her to study at Maryland Institute College of Art where she obtained a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 2005. While studying abroad in the Aix-en-Provence section of France, she began creating paper sculptures.

Jen Stark is up in space, but also here on Earth. Her kaleidoscopic artwork dazzles and confuses the mind. Sparkling with a rainbow of colors, it brings to mind fractals. “I’m inspired by all types of things, from plants to outer space, microscopic designs in nature, color and mystery.

A tight budget and the declining value of the dollar at the time forced Stark to search for various materials to work with. “The Euro was very high so when I went into the art store I decided to buy one of the cheapest materials but one that had potential,” Stark said.

I am also inspired by artists like Tom Friedman and Andy Goldsworthy,” Stark said. A native of Miami, Stark’s path to becoming an artist started when she was just a 4 year-old painting with her grandfather who did it as a hobby. “He used to paint landscape and sailboat scenes. He would invite me over to paint water color scenes with him,” Stark said. MOCA ART INSTITUTE

That cheap, high potential material turned out to be an assorted color pack of construction paper which she began experimenting with in her studio.

Plasmascopic

Using her vivid imagination and an X-ACTO knife she turned that stack of paper into 3-dimensional works like Plasmascopic and Rabbit Hole.

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STARK’S TRACK

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Her Technicolor Spin machine allows her to turn humble materials like construction paper and glue into the bedazzling sculptures. This process can be time consuming. Plasmascopic took several weeks to compose Anything larger would take about one to two months while smaller sculptures may take only a few weeks. “Because it’s so intricate I flip around on different projects so my hand doesn’t get too tired doing one thing every day.” Stark alternates between working on her paper sculptures and drawing in order to clear her mind and add variation to her day. “Yeah, [it involves] a lot of monotony but I like it,” Stark said.

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Gabriella Nuñez Miami Lakes Educational Center 11th Grade MOCA’s photography intern, Timothy Rush, received a $5,000 scholarship to attend School of the Museum of Fine Arts this fall. With help from friend Yuberniz Orengo, Timothy was accepted into the contemporary arts studio program because of his photography portfolio that he showcased on National Portfolio Day.

Timothy Rush claims that part of his success and his artistic growth is credited to MOCA. “I found MOCA through a friend who said there was a free photography class being taught by Noelle Theard. I was dropping out of the Art Institute of Miami to find a program that better met my needs and I wanted to keep on learning,” Rush said. Leaving his film school education behind, Timothy Rush educated himself in the art of photography while attending classes at the MOCA Art Institute.

“I don’t know my majors as of yet, “I can honestly say that I develbut what I hope to get out of college oped most of my artistic view while is a sense of direction,” Rush said. in Noelle’s class. They were inspirational, educational and funny. I learned most of what I know and use in those classes,” Rush said. 12 MOCAZINE2011.indd 12

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Although his interests range from music to fashion, Rush’s original love is film. He has written scripts including drama and comedy. “I write a lot of my ideas into scripts and one day I’d like to make those scripts reality,” Rush said. Comparing film and photography, Rush cannot pick one over the other. “I love how with photography you can tell a story in just four easy pictures. I also love how with film you can build up a climax and have a surprise ending. They both have their perks,” Rush said. His artistic talents do not end at film and photography though. Rush is also a musician who plays guitar, piano, and drums. “I produce art like a madman produces a manifesto. Once an idea enters my head I will work on it until my mind is satisfied with the result,” said Rush.

Rush also takes an interest in sports. Sharing his love for art with his favorite football team, the New England Patriots, Rush hopes that his future in photography somehow involves them. “I love the New England Patriots, and I figure I would produce my best work in the presence of something I love,” said Rush. Thinking of the future, Rush has not made up his mind just yet. “[I just want] to become known as an artist, but I’m not an artist, I’m just a creative guy who gets lucky... a lot.” Rush begins classes at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston this September.

His inspiration for such art comes from “just about anything”. Life and pop culture are two of the most prominent inspirers. “I am inspired by hatred, and love, by darkness, and by light. I am inspired by every aspect of any subject that MOCA ART INSTITUTE seems to spark my madman like 13 interest,” Rush said. MOCAZINE2011.indd 13

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Morgan Kidd Pembroke Pines Charter 12th grade “Liberty City is Like Paris to Me” Smiles, laughs, and parades fly across the screen showcasing the life and the culture of Miami’s very own Liberty City. Located in a dark room all alone, a short documentary film created by Bruce Weber titled “Liberty City is Like Paris to Me” captures events that take place in Liberty City and define its personality. The film opens up with video clips of the city of Paris while soothing music plays in the background along with a voice over of a man and woman having a conversation. There is then a smooth transition in scenery from Paris to Miami’s Liberty City.

WEBER AT MOCA The film shows the community’s ability to gather as one to create a loving bond with one another that Weber says he witnessed while visiting Paris. The film reaches out to an audience that has historically had negative views of this specific area of Miami. It raises Liberty City out of the dark by ignoring the negative and giving light to all the positives. “The piece captures the essence of a people who have long been ostracized. It gives others a chance to see that residents of Liberty City share the same hopes, dreams, and successes that everyone else experiences,” Mindyne Joseph, Mocazine instructor, said.

There is a bit of irony in the title of Weber’s piece. With all of the negative connotations associated with Liberty City, Sitting down to watch this 16 minute film, the viewer sees how the commu- comparing it to Paris, a place famous for nity’s residents celebrate Martin Luther its beauty, is like comparing apples to oranges. They seem to be total opposites, King, Jr. Day with such honor. The piece also documents how they gather at least on the surface. Weber craftily connects the two to offer a different view. and celebrate President Obama’s 2009 inauguration ceremony. Both are “Liberty City…opened its arms to me and clearly proud moments for the resimy camera just like Paris once did. And dents of this area. now they have both become to me the city of love,” Bruce Weber said.

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Keren Love Francois Miami,FL © Bruce Weber

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JUNIOR DOCENTS In this dynamic after-school program, students are exposed to careers in the arts as they gain behind-the-scenes access to MOCA. Participants receive instruction in art history and develop writing, research and public presentation skills.

Jr Docents can earn points toward Contemporary Art Club membership.

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BRUSHING UP

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Contemporary Art Club Members visited the Wynwood graffiti murals

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CONTEMPORARY ART CLUB

MOCA’s new membership group for young people ages 15-19 offers an exciting introduction to the dynamic art scene in Miami through studio visits, exhibition tours, special social events and much more. Contact MOCA’s membership department for more information at 305 893 6211 ext. 37. 19 MOCAZINE2011.indd 19

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Spectrum

Pardo, Round light…

Round light just there Normal unseen hanging there Shines the brightest Jackie Rotundo

Jorge Pardo Round Light, Darker on the Bottom, 1997 Museum Purchase with funds provided by Rosa and Carlos de la Cruz

I’m staring at the other end of the spectrum As it stares at me I usually have looked the other way all my life Encouraged by the undying years of racism. The other end of the spectrum stares at me Proud of who they are Pitying me for not knowing my place in the line From light to dark, shifting from one to another. I run from place to place Trying to find comfort in one color Not knowing what I am As strong as they do. I’m staring at the very end of the spectrum. But from where? Yuberniz Orengo Chris Ofili Untitled, 2003 Collection of MOCA, North Miami Gift of Douglas S. Cramer

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SkullDragged Oh, waxy tower of guts. Entrails rising to the heavens. Bloody vines falling and rising, grabbing hold of the pulsing Earth. A gust of blood erupting like a volcano. A geyser in distress. Human roots. The human bonds to an earth that heaves and breathes, that sighs and moans longing for a deeper connection. An attraction that glows red with the fiery embers of regurgitating love. Anarmily Nazir

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Ruby Sterling Monument Stalagmite/Skulldragged, 2008 Collection of MOCA, North Miami Gift of Roman Hinson

Attempt to Raise Hell Ding, Ding, Ding With every Ding my nose feels the pain The random force produced by the bell colliding My flesh peels as it is hammered. Impotence keeps me still As I wear away without fade. Laura Rodriguez Dennis Oppenheim Attempt to Raise Hell, 1974 Collection of MOCA, North Miami Partial Gift of the Oppenheim Foundation and Museum purchase with funds provided by Dennis and Debra Scholl

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SUMMER JOURNALISM INSTITUTE AND PHOTOJOURNALISM The MOCA Art Institute in North Miami introduces teens each summer to journalism and photojournalism in a FREE six-week intensive program. Under the direction of teachers, Meg Pukel, Karla Kennedy, and Mindyne Joseph, students learned to switch off the automatic settings on the camera and use the equipment manually. Photojournalism students explored black-and-white photography, depth of field, F-stops and a professional studio. Journalism students learned about writing leads, inverted pyramid style, researching and journalistic style and visited FIU’s Journalism and Communications Departments. Students were featured in an article in the Miami Herald’s “Neighbors” section. Journalistic work is featured in this MOCAZINE publication.

Photo by Laura Pineda, Grade 10, Mater Lakes Academy. Pictured : Sensei Joe Guadalupe and Sensei Bruno Penetra, Institute of Combat Science, 650 NE 125th Street.

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As a final assignment, students were asked to create a portrait of 125th Street by documenting the businesses and the people who operate them. Photo by Lisabet Esperson, Grade 11, Miami Lakes Educational Center. Pictured: Judith Benitez, Rucht D’Oleo Designs, 773 NE 125th Street.

Photo by Megan Miller, Grade 9, Dr. Michael M. Krop Sr. High. Pictured: Ivonne Ronderos, D’Kor Interiors, 709 NE 125th Street

Photo by Coswayne Palmer, Grade 9, Alonzo & Tracy Mourning Senior High, Pictured: Peter J. Graulich, owner Lala’s Bakery, 793 NE 125th Street. 23

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Photography collaborates with fashion

Problem solving and creativity merge in Teen Fashion Design classes afterschool on Mondays from 4-6pm. In this free class, students work with local fashion designer, Fiona Henderson and discover careers in fashion design while learning basic skills and techniques and exploring the industry as a whole. This year fashion students collaborated with the photography students to create an amazing fashion shoot experience.

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N Fashion Design class merges problem solving with fashion design. Students learn about the fashion industry, its vocabulary, and skills and techniques. To create a collection, students learn the elements and tools of fashion, illustrating and styling.

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David Baptiste

Khalid Godon

Daria Krylove

Kayla Delecerda

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STUDIO CLASSES Students learn about contemporary artists, styles, skills, composition and techniques while developing a body of work suitable for portfolios, exhibitions, and publications in weekly FREE classes. Teen drawing, painting, and photography classes teach students professional practices and give students materials and equipment to find new methods of expression and creativity.

Amanda Bradley

Aisha Daniels

David Baptiste

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BRANDON GUZMAN

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VIVIAN AZALIA

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TIMOTHY RUSH

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ALYSSA PANGANIBAN

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The images on this page were created by the teenage girls who participate in MOCA’s Women on the Rise! program. Women on the Rise! is an outreach program that presents the work of contemporary female artists to girls who are involved with community organizations such as Urgent, Inc. and Thelma Gibson Health Initiative. MOCA educators visit these institutions and use contemporary art to inspire girls to engage in critical dialogues about body image, relationships, and culture. Participants create multi-media artwork inspired by artists such as Lorna Simpson and Yayoi Kusama, meet with local and international women artists, and attend field trips to exhibitons.

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Artwork By: K.D. Thompson

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ART FORCE

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Free events created for teens by teens offer a safe and supportive environment in which they can network and participate in enriching experiences that promote creative expression. www.facebook.com/artforce

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PROMoca Art Institute

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Micheal Collins, Chairman Irma Braman, Chairman Emeritus Dr. Kira Flanzraich, Vice Chair Ray Ellen Yarkin, President Carlos J. Arrizurieta, Treasurer Cindi Nash, Vice Treasurer Francine Birbragher-Rozencwaig, Secretary Monica Kalpakian, At Large Sheldon Anderson Tom Bloom NORTH MIAMI Francie Bishop Good CITY COUNCIL Barbara Herzberg Rosalind Jacobs Peter Robbins Andre Pierre, Mayor Joanne Katz Michael Salke Micheal R. Blynn Dr. Shulamit Katzman Raquel Scheck Jean R. Marcellus Jan Lewis Jackie Soffer Scott Galvin Diane Lieberman Deepak Soni Marie Eriande Steril Janice Lipton Richard Shack, Sandra Muss Chairman Emeritus Beena Nagpal Lou Anne Colodny, Founding Director Harold Philipps Bonnie Clearwater, Director and Curator Evan Reed

EXECUTIVE COMMITEE

MUSEUM of CONTEMPORARY ART, Board of Trustees, FY 2010-2011

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