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Smoke-free campus next move for Tech SAWYER NEWMAN Lode Writer As early as this November, Michigan Tech will move ahead with a smoke free campus campaign. The initial stages of the campaign will focus on educating the relevant public on the reasons for such a movement, which according to administration, are due to rising health care costs, litter prevention efforts and the desire for a more welcoming campus environment. After the passing of Proposal 16-94 in 1994, 774 completely smoke free campuses have come into existence. In Michigan, there are already 21

Photo courtesy of clker.com

colleges that have gone 100 percent smoke free, including University of Michigan, Hope College and Northwestern Michigan College. In Arkansas, Iowa and Oklahoma, laws have been adopted that “require all college and universities within the jurisdiction be 100 percent smoke free with no exemptions.” One of the main forces behind anti-tobacco movements is an organization known as the Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights (ANR). The ANR describes themselves as being “the leading national lobbying organization dedicated to nonsmokers’ rights.” They strive to provide clean air for the public and focus on educating people on the health effects of smoking tobacco products. Currently, Michigan Tech’s Executive Team has charged the tobacco free campus team with the goal of becoming tobacco free by the fall semester of 2013. This may seem rushed for students who were unaware of this movement, but a 3 to 5 year plan had been made

in 2011 to assess the impacts of becoming a tobacco-free campus. Also the country, as well as Tech’s campus, has made legitimate efforts to become increasingly smoke free over the course of the past couple of decades. A smoking survey was conducted in the spring and summer semesters of 2012 that polled students and faculty. 36 percent of the graduate and undergraduate student population responded to the survey. Results showed that 40 percent of students surveyed thought smoking should be permitted on campus, 45 percent believed smoking should not be permitted and the remaining 15 percent responded with indifference. 23.3 percent of the students surveyed admitted to smoking and 8 percent have used chewing tobacco. The smoke free movement corresponds with the Counseling Services’ focus on holistic wellness. As seen on the Counseling Services Wellness information page, “A person who focuses on wellness: 1) avoids smoking;

2) drinks in moderation if at all; 3) limits his or her intake of fats, sugars and processed foods; 4) exercises regularly; 5) practices adequate relaxation; and 6) actively works with his or her doctor to prevent or manage disease.”

It is not clear how this policy will be enforced by administration or if there will be other health movements made on campus. More information will be given as the campaign progresses.

Women’s soccer still #1 ELLIE FURMANSKI Lode Writer The Michigan Tech Women’s Soccer team survived another weekend with the number one target on their back. With two home wins against the University of Findlay and Tiffin University, the soccer team now stands with a perfect 5-0 GLIAC record, 7-2 overall this season, making them first in the conference standings. The soccer team’s conference home opener was on Friday, September 28 against Findlay. A goal

scored by Danna Kasom in the ninth minute put the Huskies on the scoreboard early in the first half for a 1-0 lead. Two minutes later, teammate Lindsey Van Rooy put the ball into the back of the net to raise the score 2-0. The first half ended without any further scoring. The Oilers came out hungry and looking to score in the second half of the game. Findlay’s Megan Gallaway headed the ball in off of a corner kick in the 68th minute to tighten the gap 2-1. Luckily for the Huskies, a strong defensive effort held off the Oilers’ offense for the remainder of the game. Continued on page 14

News:

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Tech attracts women, especially in STEM

News: Wind Harp and new boulders help decorate

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Pulse: KSO begins concert season and anticipates tour

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Opinion:

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Replacement Refs aren’t to blame

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Huskies football game against GVSU draws crowd

Michigan Tech Lode

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Editor in Chief ...................................Krysten Cooper Business Manager............................Abhishek Gupta Design Editor.........................................Gabriela Shirkey News Editor..............................................Katelyn Waara Opinion Editor...................................Taylor Domagalla Sports Editor ......................................Jordan Erickson Pulse Editor...................................................Nick Blecha Advisor ........................................................Kara Sokol

Staff Writers - Jack Ammerman, Gianna Gomez-Mayo, Sawyer Newman, Jacob Shuler, Ellie Furmanski, Nicole Iutzi

Circulation - Christopher Fongers, Joseph Price

Visuals Staff - Alex Mager, Adam Marshall, Kevin Madson, Jacob Shuler, Ben Wittbrodt

Copy Editors - Michael Hilliard, Zach Ziemke Opinions expressed in the Lode are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty, staff or administration of Michigan Technological University or the Michigan Tech Lode. The Michigan Tech Lode is designed, written and edited by Michigan Tech students. The paper is printed every Tuesday during fall and spring semesters. The Lode is available free of charge at drop-off sites around campus and in the surrounding community. To the best of its ability, the Michigan Tech Lode subscribes to the Code of Ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists, the text of which is available at http://spj.org/ ethics_code.asp. The Lode is funded in part by the Michigan Tech Student Activity Fee.

1. lodecomment@mtu.edu for submitting comments to the Lode. Messages posted to this address are received by the editor in chief and faculty advisor and are forwarded to others on the staff as appropriate. 2. lodeads@mtu.edu for submitting classified ads to the Lode. Messages posted to this address are received by the business manager and secretary. 3. lodesubmit@mtu.edu for submitting articles and letters to the editor. Messages posted to this address are received by the editors and the faculty advisor. Work submitted to the Lode should be submitted with the understanding that it may be printed by the Lode and/ or posted to the Online Lode, www.mtulode.com. The Lode reserves the right to edit submissions for length, clarity and potentially libelous material. Submissions should not exceed 500 words.

NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

Preparing for Flu Season: Are you ready? KATELYN WAARA News Editor With summer winding down and fall setting in, members of the community are preparing for the wintery weather that isn’t far behind. Some look forward to the change in seasons, while others dread the sinus pressure, runny noses and cold and flu bugs that inevitably will affect so many. With the flu season upon us, it is time to think about educating yourself about the infection; what causes it and the options you have to protect yourself. Portage Health has partnered up with Krames Online, an educational resource for patients looking for more information on a wide range of health topics, including facts about the flu. According to Krames Online, influenza is an infection affecting a person’s respiratory tract, including your mouth, nose, lungs and the areas where air passes between them. The flu is different from a common cold because it can progress, causing pneumonia, which can be deadly for older adults if not treated early enough. Although the flu can affect anyone, those with a weakened immune system are more likely to contract the infection. If you are in close contact with young children, you too are at a higher risk of the flu, which is mainly spread through germs you come into contact with. Influenza is passed through the droplets in

the air that contain the infection. You may contract the flu if someone near you coughs or sneezes. Even having a conversation with someone with the flu puts you at risk. Especially for college students surrounded in classrooms and working with other students in groups, the possibility of coming into contact with a surface where the infected droplets/germs have settled is a real threat. If you think you have come down with the flu bug, some symptoms to look for include a fever and chills, sore throat and/or headache, a dry cough, runny nose, tiredness and weakness and muscle aches throughout the body. Krames Online also says that the flu can be more serious

At this time of the year, everyone is encouraged to receive a flu shot as a way to protect themselves from the infection for the entire flu season.

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for children under the age of five, the elderly or those people living with a chronic illness. At this time of the year, everyone is encouraged to receive a flu shot as a way to protect themselves from the infection for the entire flu season. Portage Health will be offering flu shot clinics in the coming weeks at their Express Care location on Sharon Avenue in Houghton, as well as at the new University Center located on Michigan Tech’s campus. Shots are $25, available by appointment. Walk-in hours are also in

place to ensure everyone has the opportunity to fight off the flu bug. If you are not planning on receiving a flu shot, there are other ways to protect yourself. Washing your hands regularly and using hand sanitizer are good ways to keep the flu away. Disinfecting your phone, doorknob or anything you touch on a daily basis is also a good way to be rid of germs. If you suspect that you have contracted the flu, you should not share food, drinking glasses or utensils with anyone. Stay home, drink plenty of fluids and get an ample amount of rest. If your symptoms persist or if they get worse, a doctor may prescribe you an antiviral medication to help speed the recovery process. For more information about influenza, visit Krames Online, partnered with Portage Health, at (portagehealth. kramesonline.com), simply search “influenza”. For the hours of operation of Portage Health’s locations or to learn more about their flu shot clinics, visit their website at (www.portagehealth. org). Students are welcome to stop into the University Center on campus, but if you are unable to make it up to the SDC, call them at (906483-1860).

Portage Health’s home

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NEWS

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

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Tech attracts women Lode Writer With any new school year, changes are bound to happen. One change in particular is that Michigan Tech has seen is a rise in the enrollment of female students, especially within the College of Engineering. “We’ve seen the most growth within the College of Engineering,” explained Allison Carter, Director of Admissions. In 2004, Michigan Tech enrolled only 108 new women undergraduate students into the College of Engineering, but this past fall 199 new women undergraduate students were enrolled. “Overall the number of all women studying within the College of Engineering has surpassed 20 percent.” There are many reasons for the increase of women in the College of Engineering; one is for the number of programs offered for women at Michigan Tech. One of the more prominent organizations on campus is the Society of Women Engineers. They offer many events for women in engineering such as Evening with Industry, which gives women —and men— the opportunity to meet with representatives from a variety of companies. SWE isn’t the only organization on campus that is womenspecific. Other examples would be the Women’s Leadership Council, Women in Computer Science and Women in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. “Tech is an exceptional University that offers rich and engaging experiences for women that you can not get anywhere else,” said

Assistant Vice President for Student Life Beth Lunde, “Ranging from active handson learning, to a wide variety of healthy choices of activities, to the many opportunities to build leadership skills in and outside of the classroom.” There are also a large variety of opportunities for women outside of technical degrees. Everything from sororities to women-specific activities at the SDC are open to all female students. The Love Your Body Action Team of the Women’s Leadership Council sponsors women fitness programs. For example, every Tuesday this fall, Zumba classes are offered and on Mondays and Wednesdays Yoga is available for women. It’s a great way to stay active and healthy in a fun and comfortable environment. Michigan Tech has also increased the number of women students due to recruitment strategies. “For several years we have worked had to depict the women of Michigan Tech in a more prominent way,” explained Carter. “For example, placing an importance on the types of images — specifically showing women on campus— used in our recruitment publications and online, hosting events that appeal to women such as personal visits at coffee shops near their home towns and sending a handwritten note to accepted female students from a current female student.” Not only is admissions working to increase the number of women in general, academic departments where women aren’t as prominent are also finding ways to attract women by increasing their recruitment efforts. They worked with

the Mechanical Engineering department to help increase female enrollment in their program. One way the department went about this was by creating a welcome video featuring current female students within the department. This video is mailed, with a message from the department, to the women who are accepted to Michigan Tech. Michigan Tech isn’t just focused on getting their number of females up, however. They are working hard to increase the amount of women in the science, technical, engineering and mathematical fields. Companies come to Michigan Tech looking for women to hire into these fields of study, which is one reason many colleges encourage women to consider enrolling into degrees that they will benefit from. Female

Number of new women enrolled in engineering

2004: 108 2012: 199 to choose two focus groups where they do a weeklong hands-on project within the field they choose. This allows for students to experience what working in that career field would be like. Students then have sessions where the youth learn about the different fields that Michigan Tech offers so that they will be able to experience a variety of career fields in science and technology. The young students also get the opportunity to meet and learn from women who are currently working in the various fields of engineering and technology. It is a great

Tech is an exceptional University that offers rich and engaging experiences for women that you cannot get anywhere else.

students benefit greatly from events such as the Career Fair because it helps companies know where to go to find well-educated female students. Michigan Tech has set up a variety of programs to encourage students to pursue the STEM career fields. One great program that Michigan Tech has designed for young women is the Women in Engineering summer youth program. Women in Engineering is a weeklong summer program that gives 150 female students the opportunity to explore the different fields of engineering and technology. They are able

ERIKA VICHCALES

way to give young women insight into what the fields of engineering and technology are like today. “Attending Women in Engineering allows young women to explore the options they have in their future,” said Steve Patchin, Director of Michigan Tech’s Center for Pre-College Outreach. “They do it with other girls who share their interests. They do it in an atmosphere free of some of the unintentional prejudices, gender role expectations and discouraging communication regarding their future that can exist in today’s classrooms, though that is beginning to change.”

Women at Michigan Tech have a multitude of opportunities before them. By putting a greater focus on making sure that women do not feel out of place, Michigan Tech ultimately encourages women to enter the science, technical, engineering and mathematical fields. With the variety of organizations, events, programs and activities designed specifically for women it is no surprise that the number of women is increasing every year. “I’d encourage them [women] to keep an open mind and be willing to explore all of the aspects of majors —especially those they don’t know much about,” advises Carter. “Talk with faculty members to get a good idea of the types of industries graduates can work in. Landing your dream job isn’t only about the degree printed on your diploma —it’s about how you position yourself in the market and the skill set you acquire along the way. Most importantly, do what you love and you’ll love the life you create for yourself.” The Michigan Tech community does a great job of supporting women on campus. With the support and advice from those on campus, Michigan Tech is doing its best to create an encouraging and supportive learning community for women.

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NEWS

Michigan Tech Lode

Singing in the wind JANE KIRBY Lode Writer

As many students have noticed while strolling around campus, specifically by the MUB or by Fisher, there have been a few new additions to the landscape. A new boulder garden and new wind harp have been welcomed to campus within the last two weeks. Lynn Watson, master gardener here at Michigan Tech, worked with artist Ashok Agarwol in order to bring the Great Lakes Area’s first wind harp to campus. Agarwol collaborated with Universal Metal Works, located in Calumet, as well as Superior Block, a masonry business here in the UP. In addition, Gail Mroz and Christa Walck started “Friends of the Gardens” and raised funds through this organization so the harp could become a reality. The design of the harp is inspired by the nature surrounding it, mainly flowers. The harp features 5 curly strips of metal on the top, which corresponds with the typical flower found in nature, which has 5 petals. Being made up of subtle, unsaturated colors, the wind harp is essentially, “married with the environment,” Agarwol says. He explains how the harp is “a shy flower ready to blossom,” as it continues to adjust to its new home. In addition to settling in, the harp is not yet completed. Agarwol plans on filling the space between the base of the harp and the boulder,

which it is mounted on with mortar, as well as tweaking a few other things before it is ready to sing. Once it does start singing, its music will be audible from the sidewalk, so everyone walking by can listen without straining. The overall theme of the harp seems to be “subtle,” which is not only found in the appearance and structure, but also written in a stone by the harp itself. The word “hiljainen” is the Finnish word for “quietly.” Despite all the crowd noise on a busy passing time between classes, the subtle song of the harp should still be audible from the surrounding area. If one wishes to examine the harp closer up, there are plans for a path to be built around it, as well as an addition of benches so everyone can rest and listen to its song in the wind. This is the first of many harps Agarwol plans on making. He stated that he was “very grateful for the opportunity,” to bring this piece of musical art to Michigan Tech. Large boulders located on the east side of Fisher Hall between the building and Hamar House are another addition to campus. These boulders came from all over the Upper Peninsula and are meant to illustrate the mining industry that once flourished in the area. A rare remnant of outer space is included in this new boulder garden. An article on the Michigan Tech website states that a “Sudbury Boulder” is part of a meteorite impaction

in Sudbury, Canada that took place about 1.8 billion years ago. The impact of this 6-mile wide meteorite left debris and pebbles raining down through hundreds of miles of air, eventually reaching places like the UP. The rock itself came from near Marquette before it made Michigan Tech its new home. Providing new places to relax, meet friends or study, the new landscaping additions of the wind harp and the boulder gardens are a great way to incorporate art into the campus landscape. To read more about the wind harp, please visit (http://www.mtu. edu/news/stories/2012/ september/stor y78663. html) To read more about the boulder gardens, please visit (www.mtu. edu/news/stories/2012/ september/stor y78688. html)

Photos courtesy of Jane Kirby

Michigan Tech Lode

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

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MTU Mobile Website NICOLE IUTZI Lode Writer Version 1.0 of the Michigan Tech mobile website was released in the first week of July 2012. The project initially began in May 2012 and upgrades are being worked on to continuously improve the site. Currently the mobile website offers a variety of information. A general search feature is in place to allow users to find specific information ranging from admissions to Michigan Tech news and athletics. Access to student and employee information is also available on the site. Devices can view the mobile website by visiting

(m.mtu.edu). “We automatically redirect devices going to www.mtu.edu based on their User Agent using a list of mobile devices provided by ITSS’s load balancer company,” said Web Developer Scott Shannon. To address issues presented by mobile websites, Michigan Tech took initiative and thought about how to solve them. “So we approached our mobile site from two perspectives, make sure we offer the most relevant content (based on analytics and usage) in an upfront and easy manner, but also allow users that want a full experience, access to all navigation and segments of the site in a mobile format,” said Brandy Tichonoff, Director of New Media and Creative Strategy.

As more versions of the mobile website are released there are plans for integration with the Michigan Tech mobile application. “For example, if someone is on the mobile site looking grades, we want to trigger a notice that the user can download the Michigan Tech app for quick access to all of their student/staff information,” said Tichonoff. In contrast, tablets and desktops are sent to the full website. Progress has been made on the mobile website. Problems occurring with iPhone and Android include incapability issues with the Opera Mini Browser. With the limited time in the design process there may be other issues said Shannon. “We always want to im-

Photos courtesy of the MTU Mobile Website

prove our site and welcome feedback for those purposes,” said Shannon. Tichonoff added, “So far, feedback has been really positive, and our analytics and mobile

site usage support what we are hearing. Of course we would love to hear more!” Contact Brandy Tichonoff at (tichonof@mtu.edu) with your feedback.

Call for musicians: Pine Mountain Music Festival Entering its 23rd season, Pine Mountain Music Festival (Hancock, MI) is looking for musicians to be a part of its UPstarts series. Musicians must be from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and either in or post-college pursuing careers in music. All instruments are considered including voice. If you’re interested or know someone who is interested, please email Jeni Jobst (jeni@pmmf.org). The UPstarts concert series feature professionally ambitious musicians from the Upper Peninsula. Artists perform in 7-8 concerts throughout the western and central U.P. For more information on the 2012 season performances, visit (http://www.pmmf. org/?q=season). Pine Mountain Music Festival is a classical music festival producing quality opera, symphony, chamber, and recital music in the Central and Western Upper Peninsula. Visit (pmmf.org) for more information.

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PULSE

Michigan Tech Lode

Keweenaw Symphony Orchestra to Begin Season with Russian Music, Tour NICK BLECHA Pulse Editor The Keweenaw Symphony Orchestra will perform its first concert of the 2012-13 season on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 7:30 p.m. “From Russia With Love” will feature Russian music from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including the famous “Sleeping Beauty,” RomskyKorsakov’s Antar Symphony and Shostakovich’s infamous Ninth Symphony. The concert will also kick off the KSO’s first-ever concert tour. The Sleeping Beauty Suite is one of the most famous ballets ever performed. It

was written in 1889 and was the second of three ballets written by Peter Illyich Tchaikovsky (the other two being Swan Lake and The Nutcracker), adapted from the traditional “Sleeping Beauty” fairy tale. Today, the music from the ballet seems to be more popular than the ballet itself, which has been supplanted in the popular memory by Disney’s adaptation of the tale. Interestingly, Disney’s film borrowed some of the music from the ballet. The performance’s second work, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s Antar Symphony, written about the legend of a man who is

permitted to receive life’s greatest pleasures. The first movement is about the legend as a whole, while the other three are each about one of the pleasures. The concert will only include the first movement. It was originally written in 1868, and revised in 1875 and again in 1897. The final version is mildly controversial due to R i m s k y- K o r s a k ov ’s redesignating the work as a “symphonic suite” instead of a symphony. The final work in the concert will be Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9. Premiering in 1945, during Stalin’s rule of the Soviet Union, the work was

written as a celebration of Russia’s victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. While the symphony was well-received by Shostakovich’s peers, it had a poor critical reception both in the USSR and in the West, with both sides claiming it to be too “light” and “childish.” The work was actually banned in the Soviet Union for “ideological weakness” from 1948 to 1955. The tour version of the concert will contain one additional piece: the Peer Gynt Suite No. 1: Anitra’s Dance and Aase’s Death. The tour will run from October 2528, and will have stops at the Norway-Vulcan Fine Arts

Center in Norway, the Kaufman Auditorium in Marquette, and the William Oliver Auditorium in Escanaba. Tickets for the Rozsa performance are $18.75, and may be purchased at the Ticket Office in the SDC, by calling (906-487-2073), or at (rozsa.mtu.edu). Tickets for the tour stops may be purchased through those locations. Although the performance is suitable for all ages, it is recorded and audience noise may ruin the recording, so parents of very young children are asked to take that into consideration.

Illusionist Mike Super Coming to Rozsa COREY SAARI Lode Writer Appearing at the Rozsa Center Friday, October 5th at 7:30 p.m. is illusionist Mike Super. A natural born entertainer, he has the ability to captivate nearly any audience. According to information found on his website, He recognized early in life that entertaining people with magic was something he was good at. This occurred after a visit to Disney World as a small child. Mike Super is an accomplished illusionist, having earned multiple awards over his career. Some of those are Entertainer of

the Year, Best Performing Artist of the Year and Best Novelty Performer of the Year. If asked about these awards however, he would say that the loyalty of his fans outshines them all. This humility sets him apart from some of his peers in the entertainment industry. Quite apart from some other entertainers, His style of performing and personality is reputed to be “down to earth”. This has endeared him not just to younger people, but older ones as well. For the curious, “Super” is not part of his stage name, it in fact is his given last name. Various celebrities have attended his performances, including but not limited to, Kenny Chesney, Criss

Angel, Regis Philbin, Carmen Electra, Jeffrey Katzenberg and Jay Leno. Providing his opinion of a performance he attended, Criss Angel is quoted in a testimonial as saying, “Very entertaining! Very engaging! He connects to the audience!” The preceding information and much more can be viewed at his website, ( w w w. m i k e s u p e r. c o m ) . Links to his Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and email are also conveniently located there near the bottom of the main page. Tickets are priced at $10.75 each and can be purchased in person at the Rozsa Center or online at (rozsa.tickets.mtu.edu).

Renowned Illusionist to visit Tech October 5th. Photo courtesy of http://www.mikesuper.com/

Michigan Tech Lode

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Tech’s Magic: The Gathering Club, Pre-Release Party ALEX SAARI Lode Writer Since Magic: The Gathering’s creation in 1993 by Wizards of the Coast, Michigan Tech has more or less had a devoted fan base for the popular card game. Starting with Friday Night Magic (FNM) where tournaments and free play occur, players meet each other and cards are traded. Started during the spring of 2010, the Magic club on campus was created to give players and enthusiasts a regular place and time to meet. Since its creation, the club has increased in member size and popularity. While seventeen members make up the active roster, the Facebook group currently has forty-seven members. This past Saturday, September 29th, a weekly meeting of the club took place at Sportscard Connection in downtown Houghton. Meetings are normally every Saturday starting at 6:00 p.m. in Fisher 129 but a scheduled prerelease party for a new core set took place that night. In addition, the pre-release of the Return to Ravnica core set prompted the owner of Sportscard Connection to host a tournament. The pre-release event was a sealed deck tournament where players prepare a deck with a minimum of forty cards. Each card in the deck is drawn from six booster packs. Fifty plus players were at the card shop during the event while a typical FMN session welcomes between twelve and twenty people. Magic enthusiasts from the local area and club enthusiasts

were present at the event. Return to Ravnica is scheduled to be released on October 5th and is the fiftyninth core set to be released. Set in the megalopolis of Ravnica, this core set focused on five different guilds (or houses) and their falls from power. Return to Ravnica will be followed up by Gatecrash which features the remaining five guilds of Ravnica. When asking about club members about their favorite expansions, most had no preference and preferred multi-colored decks, which determined the type of creatures, spells and artifacts used. Zachary Schneider, the main contact for Tech’s Magic Club, was more specific and gave a short biography of himself. He prefers a multi-color deck with blue and black cards and has been playing for almost three years. John Hillaker, another player attending the regular club event, also prefers a multicolor deck with white and some other random color (either black, blue, red, green or white). He prefers fairly aggressive all-creature decks. The Magic club sponsors tournaments and free plays during each regular Saturday meeting. Standard tournaments are the most popular among members while booster drafting also occurs. FNM events are held by both the club and Sportscard Connection. Tom Cowan, the owner of Sportscard Connection, reported that this was an average turnout for a pre-release party. In the card shop, three Magic events are held every weekend including Friday Night Magic.

Top: Various players participate in the Magic: The Gathering tournament. Bottom: Members of Michigan Tech’s Magic: The Gathering club play a match. Photo courtesy of Alex Saari

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Michigan Tech Lode

Comics courtesy of xkcd

Michigan Tech Lode

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Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Sudoku

Rules: Fill in the grid so that each row, column and 3x3 block contains 1-9 exactly once.

Last Week’s Solution...

No. 0930 CAR TALK By Elayne Cantor and Victor Fleming / Edited by Will Shortz

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RELEASE DATE: 10/7/2012

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m e d a l i st To m m y

1 2 1 A l m o st fo re v e r

OPINION

10 Tuesday, October 2, 2012 UnLODEing Zone Hi! I’m Taylor Domagalla, the Opinion Editor, and it’s my turn to introduce myself. I’m from about an hour south of Chicago, but that doesn’t tell you much. Honestly, I can’t even say I’m from a town. My dad’s house is on a white gravel road (Domagalla St.—it’s even on my driver’s license!), 10 minutes away from the nearest gas station and 12 minutes away from my high school. I grew up in the middle of corn fields and cattle and I own cowboy boots, which I go line dancing in when I’m home. During high school I was drawn to two things: Environmental Engineering and English. I’ve been writing for the Lode since September 2010 because, though I chose engineering for a career, I did not want to let go of my passion for writing. The Opinion Section has allowed me to share my views and become more mindful of what I say. I started as Opinion Editor near the end of Spring 2012. Becoming editor has changed my view of what the section should be; Opinion is meant to express the voice of the writers, but more importantly the readers. I want to know the things you love, hate and want to change. If something is bothering you, I want to have a writer skillfully express that frustration. The Lode has the potential to shake things up on campus, so if you have something you want to express, tell us about it at (lodecomment@ mtu.edu). I also love that I started dating my boyfriend of a year because of the Lode— being involved really does pay off! I wish you the best of semesters and hope you appreciate the opinions of my section.

Michigan Tech Lode

Whose fault is it anyways? Replacement Refs aren’t to blame. JACE FRITZLER Lode Writer NFL fans everywhere were happy to hear that the referee lockout ended Wednesday night. A lockout occurs when a union cannot come to terms on a contract with a company before a designated date. In this instance the NFL failed to make a contract that was accepted by the referees’ union, forcing them to hire replacement referees for the first three weeks of the season. The replacement referees took flak for almost every call from coaches, players or fans. The most infamous of these was the “Intertouchdown-ception” that gave the Seattle Seahawks the victory over the Green Bay Packers. To add insult to injury, the Packers players went to the locker room after being told the game was over only to be called back out to defend against the point

after attempt. Everyone is very willing to point fingers at those who made the call, but perhaps the NFL is to blame for allowing the lockout without properly training replacement officials. The lockout occurred because the NFL wanted the referees to switch from a pension plan to a 401k, reports NFL.com. The majority of those employed by the NFL have already switched to the 401k. A 401k is an investment plan offered by an employer that takes a percentage of an employee’s paycheck and puts it in an investment portfolio. The main difference being disputed is whether the referee retirement fund comes directly from the league or from the paychecks of the referees. I can’t blame the referees for resisting the change, but at the same time, 401k is the modern retirement plan offered by most companies. The lockout has tentatively ended because the NFL has

Both teams struggled for possession of the ball in the miscalled play. Photo courtesy of http://www.nfl.com

submitted a contract to the union, but the referees have yet to accept the 8-year agreement. After everything that has happened with the new referees, the NFL owes it to the players, coaches and fans to make an agreement to get the official officials back on the field. The replacement officials found by the NFL were college, high school and Lingerie League Football referees that were vastly under-qualified to be on a professional field. Some of the referees had actually been fired from the lingerie league for incompetency on the field, according to NY Daily News. It was also stated that a refereeing academy had to distance itself from a ref to avoid public embarrassment following the Monday night fiasco. The Stars and Stripes Academy for Football Officials stated: “There are no NFL officials on the staff, and training is focused solely on college rules, mechanics and philosophies.” This brings back the point that the NFL hired unqualified referees and put them in a no-win situation. The replacements had to adjust to the many rules in the NFL that are not in the games they were used to seeing. On top of that, they were suddenly witnessing the highest level of football with athletes capable of making amazing plays look simple. Many of them had their career dreams come true in week one of the season by having the opportunity to call a professional game only to be thrust into a nightmare of fast paced play and angry coaches.

Fans have voiced their disgust with the replacement referees through a variety of outlets. Scrolling down a social network after the Packers game showed an incredible amount of upset Packers fans, but also disbelief from fans of their conference rivals. On Monday night memes popped up all over the internet immediately followed by parody videos of popular songs entitled “Just bought a Whistle” and “Call it maybe.” The memes and videos were meant to make light of the situation while still pointing out that there was a dire need for a change in the officiating of the games. From the coaches’ and players’ standpoint, a bad call can hurt you even if the clock isn’t winding down. It is very frustrating for a player to put everything on the line and make a great play just to have it called incorrectly. It can be a momentum shifter, which could allow a comeback when a game should be easily put away. Even with my limited experience in sports from high school and club teams, I have seen bad calls cause a team to lose its gusto. Bad calls are part of sports. They happen and players must learn to shake them off and move on with the game, but it is also the officials’ job to minimize the amount of bad calls made. The NFL needs to provide its players, fans and coaches with personnel who can make good calls. This would limit the confusion, reduce the botched calls and allow everyone to enjoy the game.

Michigan Tech Lode

OPINION

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

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Computers, computers everywhere, not any available to use GIANNA GOMEZ-MAYO Lode Writer Before the eyes of approximately 5,381 undergraduate students on the Michigan Tech campus, new technological advancements have been made this year to our ever-growing university. As we praise the improvements, such as wireless internet in the residence halls, we cannot lose sight of the very necessary and much neglected system of campus computer labs. These labs are vital, especially as professors are encouraged to use email and Canvas as an alternative to paper homework. Access to computers and the internet has never been as important for students as it is today, but adequate access to the powerful tool of Michigan Tech computers has been slipping away. Before I arrived at Tech, I searched on the MTU website to see if I needed a specific laptop or if I needed one at all. There was no specific recommendation, just encouragement to bring technology I was comfortable using. This quote, from the Admissions page, made me feel as though I wouldn’t need to bring a laptop at all: “You’ll have 24/7 access to your department computer lab, including software specific to your classes/major and unlimited printing (though it’s convenient to have a printer in your room as well). You can also use your lab to check email, work on papers for other classes, and check facebook.” The promise of having 24/7 access to a lab in

your department is laughable at this point. Of the labs listed on (https://www.it.mtu.edu/ computer-labs/index.php), 16 of 40 are listed as “open.” Open labs are always available for student use. The MEEM and Chem Sci tie for the most open labs in a building at three each. The total number of available stations, which I added up from (https://www.it.mtu. edu/labstats.html), is only 244. How are 244 computers supposed to serve a student body of 7,031 students? Other computers are available as well. OpenSchedulable labs make up another 17 of the 40 computer labs listed on the website. Dan deBeaubien, Chief Technology Officer, asked the student body in a recent email to “Please note that some rooms, categorized as “open-schedulable”, are unavailable at certain times.” In the case of Grover C. Dillman Hall, all computer labs but the future wireless hotspot in 209 are open-schedulable. When asked how he felt about this, 5th year civil engineering student Kyle Pepin said, “It’s ridiculous. So many civils and environmentals come to Dillman to work, but they can’t. We used to have to deal with the fundamentals classes being taught in three labs here, but now every lab has classes in and out of it. 211 used to be a lab just for us, but it was turned into another classroom. Even the labs that haven’t been remodeled have classes in them. Forget doing work here between classes.” The irritation about the lack of lab space in Dillman isn’t limited to civil engineering students. Fourth year environmental engineering student,

Warren Miller, tells his story. “I was meeting with my Surface Water Quality group in (Dillman) 203 to finish up an assignment. We sat down and started to get to work. After about a half an hour Dr. Mattila walked in and asked the students if he should kick the people who don’t belong there out. We didn’t even know there was a class in there until my teammate asked the guy sitting next to her. She asked Dr. Mattila to let us stay in there. We were lucky he was cool about it and there were extra computers or we would have wasted time jumping from lab to lab trying to find a place we could work for a while.” The schedules for these labs are often posted on the door to the lab, but a search on the MTU website does not reveal when the labs are open. The number of open seats in a lab is available on (https://www. it.mtu.edu/labstats.html), but as Miller pointed out, not all computers in the lab during a class are necessarily filled. You could be looking for an open seat and go to a lab that has one just to find out you can’t do work there anyway because a class is going on in the lab. Furthermore, not all students have smartphones; they are not on the list of required electronics to come here either. If a student is looking for a computer to work on and don’t have a smart phone, how is a website going to help them? While this website is cool, its usefulness in a time of need is doubtful. Reliable open labs are a much more preferable option. Another solution to the shortage of computers seems to be to rely on students having their own laptop and providing

better access to internet and printing. It is true that many students have their own laptops and prefer to work on them. This seems acceptable when students are using Microsoft Word, Excel, or other programs in common use. It’s a different story when students need to use software that takes up a lot of memory on a laptop, like NX or other modeling software, or is expensive, like MATLAB. If a program is too expensive for the university to install on all of campus, not many students will be enthusiastic about purchasing it for themselves. Marissa Hintz, a 3rd year Computer Engineering student, said “If they are taking away labs and expecting us to use our laptops, they should provide us with the software for free.” Michigan Tech is moving

into the future. More and more professors are having students turn in their work on Canvas, which reduces our paper usage and increases our computer skills. Wireless internet is becoming increasingly available. More classes require student access during the class, which promotes hands-on learning. All of these advancements are a part of what makes Tech a great place to go to school. Still, access to computer labs is a critical part of our educational experience at Tech. The lack of computers and computer accessibility makes it difficult for students to complete coursework, especially during the day. Students pay to be able to use computers on campus; we should be able to find a lab to work in without jumping through hoops.

Crowded computer labs in Dillman cause frustration. Photo courtesy of Chris Fongers

Sports

12 Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Michigan Tech Lode

Athlete of the week: Cody Curtin Jordan Erickson Sports Editor At halftime of Saturday’s football game it seemed like there was nowhere for the game to go but up. The Huskies were down against

Grand Valley State 37-7, at the end of the first 30 minutes, when they began a comeback that would fall just short. Although the game ended in a loss, senior Husky Matt Curtin had a victory of his own, breaking a school record with his four touchdown receptions. The

wide receiver had 11 catches for an overall 190 yards. The senior earned his starting spot in his sophomore season, posting team-high 33 receptions, totaling 356 yards for three touchdowns. Curtin remained a top player last season, finishing second on

the team in receptions with 37 and third in receiving yards with 370. Previous to Saturday’s game, Curtin had 143 yards and 1 touchdown on the season. Curtin and the football Huskies return to play this Saturday at Northern Michigan for the Miners Cup.

By

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Home hockey game this weekend. The hockey Huskies take on Brock Saturday night in their only exhibition game of the season.

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Touchdown receptions from wide reciever Matt Curtin. Curtin set a school record for the category in the Husky’s 51-43 loss to Grand Valley State this past Saturday.

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Photos courtesy of MTU Athletics

Cross Country teams wrap up Roy Griak Invitational Jacob Shuler Lode Writer The Huskies returned from Minneapolis this weekend from the Roy Griak Invitational. With over 500 runners in the field, the Huskies were exposed to very good competition. With two weeks till their next competition, the Huskies have time to work on conditioning in preparation for the season’s final competitions. This month brings the

Huskies back to the upper peninsula for the UP Championships in Marquette, MI on October 12th. The Huskies have shown a lot of improvement since the beginning of the season. Last week, Bradon Kampstra was declared GLIAC Runner of the week . He finished in the top spot for the Huskies at the Blugold Invitational (13th). Amanda Halonen had a strong weekend finishing 29th (23:37). Next on the women’s team came Megan Smaby with a finish of 137th (25:22). Eric Parsell led the

men’s team finishing 56th (26:59). The rest of the men’s team finished within 17 seconds of each other. Overall the men finished 17th and the women finished 28th. “Everyone did a good job representing Michigan Tech,” commented head coach Joe Haggenmiller. Conditions for running were good on Saturday with a temperature of 82 degrees. This invitational provided the Huskies with a very difficult course that builds the experience level of all

the runners on the team. “It is definitely a deceptively hard course. You’ve really got to be feeling on top of your game,” said Coach Haggenmiller. This experience pays off later in the season. The teams will continue to work towards the season’s close as the GLIAC Championships and the NCAA competitions in November approach. Keeping everyone healthy and continuing to improve the next couple weeks will help the teams perform well at these last races.

The Michigan Tech Lode would like to apologize for the incorrect labeling in last week’s Sport’s article photo, ‘Husky Soccer at top of GLIAC’. The featured player, number seventeen, is Melanie Hoffman.

Confrence wins by Husky soccer this season. The team, only in their second year, remain undefeated in the GLIAC.

2

Losses by Husky volleyball this past weekend. The Huskies dropped their home opening weekend, falling to Wayne State and Findlay.

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Wins by Husky football. Their first loss of the season came on Saturday, but the Huskies are back in action this Saturday in Marquette as they take on rival Northern Michigan.

Michigan Tech Lode

sports

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

Huskies Football Inched out by the Lakers Jacob Shuler Lode Writer

This Saturday, the Huskies took on the Grand Valley Lakers in a record crowd at Sherman Field. A total of 4684 fans turned up to cheer on the home team. In the end, the Huskies were unable to come away with a win. With 3:51 remaining in the third quarter, the score was 51-14. A fourth quarter push left the Huskies with the ball with 12 seconds remaining. They were unable to score before the clock ran out ending the game with a Lakers win. The final score was 51-43. The Husky comeback started with Akeem Cason receiving a kickoff at the two yard line and taking it all the way to the end zone. Tyler Scarlett took the offense down a 60 yard drive. This concluded with a score by Matt Curtin after catching a 20 yard throw by Scarlett. The final scoring drive of the Huskies was an 80 yard drive over 10 plays. It ended with Scarlett throwing his 5th touchdown pass of the

night which went to Pat Caroll. With two minutes left, the Lakers made a 41 yard completion to the 25 yard line. This forced the Huskies to use their remaining timeouts. Both the Huskies and the Lakers have had very successful seasons up to this point. Both teams were 3-0 entering Saturdays game. Both have well established running and passing games. Their defenses keep opponents fighting for yardage. “They have great history. They’re going to win a lot of football games,” commented head coach Tom Kearly. The Lakers have been the Huskies largest competitor to date this season. Saturdays game, even though a loss, leaves no questions about the Huskies ability to compete with the top teams in the league. Several players had great games. Curtin set a school record for touchdown receptions (4). In total, Curtin had a total of 190 yards. One area the Huskies are looking for improvement is in the running game. The offensive power was limited this weekend

13

Tyler Scarlett looks for the open pass during Saturday’s loss against Grand Valley State Photo by Ben Wittbrodt as the Lakers were able to hold the Huskies to just 34 yards. The Huskies continue to work to prepare for the

remainder of the season. The next two weeks include very little travel for the Huskies. They play in Marquette next

weekend before returning home to play Northwood at the homecoming game.

Men’s Lacrosse club team suffers 3-2 loss to Northern Ellie Furmanski Lode Writer The Michigan Tech Men’s Lacrosse Team opened its offseason competition this past weekend with a 3-2 loss in a friendly dual against Northern Michigan University. This was the team’s first of two scheduled games this fall. With eleven new players on the roster this year, the team’s performance in their first match hints at a promising future.

The game was held in Marquette on Saturday, September 29. Despite the loss, the players demonstrated a strong team effort in their first competitive match. Club President Brian Dvorak noted, “Northern is one of the better teams in our division, and today was many of the new players’ first college level lacrosse game.” Sophomore attacker Spencer Olson and senior Kevin Hency posted scores for the Huskies. Also noteworthy, Tech’s goalie Elliot Vickers kept the team in the game with 27 saves.

Since the Tech and Northern lacrosse teams are each other’s closest opponent geographically, they have established a symbiotic relationship which has helped both teams to gain more experience, especially during the offseason. Both teams will face off again in a rematch on Saturday, November 3. This time Tech will host Northern at Sherman Field. Looking ahead, Dvorak predicts that “with more work, November 3rd will be a great game.” Men’s lacrosse has not been around at Michigan

Teach for very long. The team was established in 2006 and has been spreading awareness of the sport and competing since. The team is composed of nineteen athletes that practice two days a week, Monday and Wednesday, from 11-12 at night. They compete during the spring in the Great Lakes Lacrosse League. League play allows the team to compete February through April against other college club teams. This spring, the team hopes to compete in four or five tournaments and host two or three games at home.

If interested in joining the Men’s Lacrosse Team, contact Brian Dvorak at (bcdvorak@mtu.edu) or join the team at practice. No prior experience is necessary. All around, the team’s goal is to provide students with the opportunity to play lacrosse interscholastically while spreading the awareness of lacrosse throughout the university as well as in the community. “Michigan Tech Club Lacrosse hopes to bring together those who enjoy the game.”

14 Tuesday, October 2, 2012

sports

Michigan Tech Lode

Women’s Soccer Continued from front page Ellie Furmanski Lode Writer The Michigan Tech Women’s Soccer team survived another weekend with the number one target on their back. With two home wins against the University of Findlay and Tiffin University, the soccer team now stands with a perfect 5-0 GLIAC record, 7-2 overall this season, making them first in the conference standings. The soccer team’s conference home opener was on Friday, September 28 against Findlay. A goal scored by Danna Kasom in the ninth minute put the Huskies on the scoreboard early in the first half for a 1-0 lead. Two minutes later, teammate Lindsey Van Rooy put the ball into the back of the net to raise the score 2-0. The first half ended without any further scoring. The Oilers came out hungry and looking to score in the second half of the game. Findlay’s Megan Gallaway headed the ball in off of a corner kick in the 68th minute to tighten the gap 2-1. Luckily for the Huskies, a strong defensive effort held off the Oilers’ offense for the remainder of the game. Head coach of the Huskies Michelle Jacob noted, “We played a decent game. It definitely wasn’t our best, but the girls got two goals in and did what they needed to do to protect our goal.” The 2-1 win over Findlay was Tech’s fourth consecutive conference victory. After a day of rest, the soccer team made its way back to the pitch to take on Tiffin on Sunday, September 30. Unlike Friday’s game, the Huskies had a slow start against the Dragons. With few scoring opportunities and a couple of close calls, the Huskies were lucky to end the first half 0-0. At halftime, Jacob emphasized the need to come out tackling

harder and putting more pressure on the Oilers in the second half, and the Huskies came out doing just that. Midway through the half, Katie Boardman broke the tension of the game by scoring with an assist from Lexi Herrewig to put the Huskies up 1-0 in the 73rd minute. Boardman’s unanswered goal was just enough for the Huskies to post another win. “Our movement off the ball was key. It allowed us to possess the ball, pass around them and make them chase us,” said Jacob. The Huskies

finished with a 22-9 advantage in shots and 5-0 advantage in corner kicks over Tiffin. Looking ahead, the Huskies have yet to face eight teams this season. Without a doubt, it will be a challenge to protect their number one position in the GLIAC standings. After a six game winning streak, Jacob expressed, “We feel great! We take it out of stride though. We still have a lot of very good teams to play.” The Huskies will spend the upcoming weekend on the road. Friday, October 5 the soccer team will travel

“We feel great! We take it out of stride though. We still have a lot of very good teams to play.”

downstate to take on Saginaw Valley State University. The Cardinals are currently ranked third in the GLIAC with a 2-03 conference record. Next, the Huskies will face off against the Timberwolves of Northwood University who are 2-2-1 in the conference. Taking on one opponent at

Amanda Whiting keeps the ball in play in the Huskies win this weekend

a time is all the Huskies can do to protect their number one spot. If anything, however, momentum and confidence are in their favor. “We’re playing confidently but not overconfidently, which is important as we head into the next weekend.”

Photo by Ben Wittbrodt

sports

Michigan Tech Lode

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

15

Volleyball Drops Home Opener Jordan Erickson Sports Editor After spending their first four weeks of the season traveling from South Dakota to Pennsylvania, the volleyball Huskies made their long-awaited home debut this past weekend. The Huskies went 0-2 in play against their lowerpeninsula rivals, falling to 5-10 on the season. Friday the Huskies took to the court in the Wood Gym, squaring off against Wayne State Warriors. In the first match of the game, the Huskies were unable to defend the Warrior’s offensive pressure, falling 25-20. The second match the Huskies kept the score closer, never falling behind more than three points, but ultimately fell 25-21.

The Huskies had a chance to make a comeback in the third set, tying the score at 19-19, when the Warriors went on a fourpoint streak to take the set. The win for the Warriors preserved their undefeated status, while the Huskies fell to 2-4 in the GLIAC. Taking a day off, the Huskies returned Sunday afternoon to take on the Findlay Oilers for their final home game of the weekend. The first set started off slow, with the first serve going out of bounds and the Huskies were unable to transfer momentum to their side of the court, falling 25-23. Unable to catch up through the next two matches, the Huskies dropped in 2518 and 25-20 scores. The Huskies return home October 6 to take on Malone at 2 p.m

Madeline Haben sets the ball on Sunday’s loss to the Findlay Oilers Photo by Ben Wittbrodt

Men’s Lacrosse club team suffers 3-2 loss to Northern Ellie Furmanski Lode Writer The Michigan Tech Men’s Lacrosse Team opened its offseason competition this past weekend with a 3-2 loss in a friendly dual against Northern Michigan University. This was the team’s first of two scheduled games this fall. With eleven new players on the roster this year, the team’s performance in their first match hints at a promising future. The game was held in Marquette on Saturday,

September 29. Despite the loss, the players demonstrated a strong team effort in their first competitive match. Club President Brian Dvorak noted, “Northern is one of the better teams in our division, and today was many of the new players’ first college level lacrosse game.” Sophomore attacker Spencer Olson and senior Kevin Hency posted scores for the Huskies. Also noteworthy, Tech’s goalie Elliot Vickers kept the team in the game with 27 saves. Since the Tech and Northern lacrosse teams are each other’s closest opponent

geographically, they have established a symbiotic relationship which has helped both teams to gain more experience, especially during the offseason. Both teams will face off again in a rematch on Saturday, November 3. This time Tech will host Northern at Sherman Field. Looking ahead, Dvorak predicts that “with more work, November 3rd will be a great game.” Men’s lacrosse has not been around at Michigan Teach for very long. The team was established in 2006 and has been spreading awareness

of the sport and competing since. The team is composed of nineteen athletes that practice two days a week, Monday and Wednesday, from 11-12 at night. They compete during the spring in the Great Lakes Lacrosse League. League play allows the team to compete February through April against other college club teams. This spring, the team hopes to compete in four or five tournaments and host two or three games at home. If interested in joining the Men’s Lacrosse Team, contact Brian Dvorak

at (bcdvorak@mtu.edu) or join the team at practice. No prior experience is necessary. All around, the team’s goal is to provide students with the opportunity to play lacrosse interscholastically while spreading the awareness of lacrosse throughout the university as well as in the community. “Michigan Tech Club Lacrosse hopes to bring together those who enjoy the game.”

UPCOMING EVENTS October 2 - September 24 First Annual Lambda Chi Alpha Watermelon Bust

Come to the First Annual Watermelon Bust for a 3-story watermelon toss, watermelon eating contest, watermelon bowling, watermelon slip-n-slide, and watermelon shot put on October 6th at 11:00 AM. It is $30 per team of 5 participants to be paid at the event.Due to one of the Lambda Chi Alpha brothers being recently diagnosed with Leukemia, this is a charity fundraiser, the proceeds will be donated to his family as well as the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Register by contacting Alex Brown, agbrown@mtu.edu, by Monday October 1.

Color Run to benefit the Copper Country Humane Society

The run, which will consist of a 5k walk/run and a 10k run, is planned for Sunday Oct. 14, this is the last day of parents weekend and homecoming. It will take place on the Tech Trails, registration begins at 8 amd and the race starts at 9. Entry fees will be $30 and T-shirts will be awarded to all participants.

Exhibition Hockey Game vs. Brock University

Come watch the Huskies take on Brock University Saturday at the MacInnes Ice Arena in the SDC, October 6 at 7:00 PM. Homecoming court will be announced between periods. The Experience Tech fee covers student ticket cost, but the no cost tickets go fast pick up tickets at the SDC ticket office before Friday.

Family Weekend

Family Weekend will be held October 12-14, it is a Michigan Tech tradition every fall to allow parents, gaurdians, and family members the oppotunity to visit campus. Families can explore Tech and the surronding area while enjoying activities sponsered by Tech both on and off campus. For a list of activies and schedule go to www.mtu.edu/compass/parent/family-weekend.

WEEK BREAKDOWN

HOMECOMING

Don’t forget to register for Homecoming Events before Friday, October 5 at 5:00 pm! Go to: https://www.involvement.mtu.edu/form/start/14142

Sunday, October 7, 2012 Homecoming SDC Window Painting-SDC Windows from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

Monday, October 8, 2012 Homecoming Cup Distribution/Chinua Hawk Performance-Mub Circle from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Tuesday, October 9, 2012 Homecoming Kickball Championship Games-SDC Softball Fields 4 :30 PM to 5:00 PM

Thursday, October 11, 2012 Homecoming Games-Walker Lawn from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Friday, October 12, 2012 Homecoming Parade-Downtown Houghton from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM Homecoming Pep Rally-Chutes and Ladders on the Houghton WaterFront from 5:00 PM to 5:30 PM Homecoming Cardboard Boat Race-Chutes and Ladders on the Houghton Waterfront from 5:30 to 7:30 PM

Saturday, October 13, 2012 Homecoming Football Game-Sherman Field at 1:00 PM Homecoming Hockey Game-MacInnes Ice Arena at 7:00 PM Homecoming Alumni Broomball Tournament-MacInnes Ice Arena directly following the Hockey game


10/02/2012