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September / October 2012

Publisher and Chief Executive Officer

Art McCafferty artmccaf@glsp.com Scott Sullivan scott@glsp.com Editor

Jennie McCafferty jennie@glsp.com Associate Publisher

Ron Marinucci Riley McLincha Charles D. McEwen Gary Morgan Jim Neff Bob Schwartz Bob Seif Rachael Steil Tamara Steil Nick Stanko Anthony Targan Cregg Weinmann Amanda Weaver Jamie Fallon Composer

Dave Foley Mike Duff

Editors Emeritus

Pat Davies Peter Draugalis Jackie Gomez Don Kern Larry Maas Gary Morgan RunMichigan.com Greg Sadler Victah Sailer Flannery Sullivan Photo / Video

Carter Sherline

Senior Photographer

Paul Aufdemberge Desiree Davila Ian Forsyth Tom Henderson Scott Hubbard Herb Lindsay Laurel Park Robin Sarris Hallop Columnists

Tracey Cohen Cynthia Cook M.B. Dillon Brianne Feldpausch Heather Dyc Hanks Michael Heberling Jeff Hollobaugh Dean Johnson Bill Kahn William Kalmar Dr. Edward H. Kozloff Doug Kurtis Grant Lofdahl

Cheryl Clark

Chief Financial Officer

September - October 2012 Featured Future Events

Features and Departments

Editor’s Notes: Ice Cream Truck By Scott Sullivan

a member of

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p. 6 p. 8

Work, Fun Foundation Helps Cross Teams Achieve Success By Scott Sullivan

p. 10

2012 Michigan Runner Race Series

p. 11

Running Shorts with Scott Hubbard

p. 12

Soaring Race Fees: Why? By Ron Marinucci

p. 14

Beyond the Chip: A Zoo Story By Herb Lindsay

p. 16

50 Years of Motor City Marathons (The First 15 Years) By Dr. Edward H. Kozloff

p. 18

Remembering ‘Red’ Simmond: By M.B. Dillon

p. 22

In Red’s Own Words

p. 24

2012 Fall Shoe Review By Cregg Weinmann

p. 25

‘Patient Endurance’: Mantra of a Masters Racing Team By Anthony Targan

p. 32

Fifth Third Parade Company Turkey Trot: 30 Years Making History in Detroit By Doug Kurtis

p. 40

Running with Tom Henderson

p. 53

At the Races Michigan Girls Rule Track at Midwest Meet By Grant Lofdahl

p. 7

Father Knows Best: Families Flourish at Plymouth Dad’s Day Run By Heather Dyc Hanks

p. 17

Tougher Warrior Dash a Smash in Second Year By Bill Kahn

p. 21

Flirt with Dirt: Discovering Novi’s ‘Hidden Gem’ By Ron Marinucci

p. 31

Solstice Run Celebrates 10th Anniversary By Charles Douglas McEwen

p. 34

Liberty Run Statues Set World Mark By Tracey Cohen

p. 35

Michigan Athletes Compete: Scenes from U.S. Olympic Team Trials, Track and Field

Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

p. 36

Michigan Olympians: Scenes from London Olympic Games

Photos by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Michigan Runner © is published six times yearly for $17.00 per year by Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc., 4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. Third Class Postage paid at Dearborn, MI and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send Address changes to Michigan Runner,4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197. All contents of this publication are copyrighted all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without written permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. All unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, and illustrations will not be returned unless accompanied by a properly addressed envelope, bearing sufficient postage; publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions of the writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect endorsement and/or views of the Michigan Runner. Address all editorial correspondence, subscriptions, and race information to: Michigan Runner, 4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, (734) 5070241, FAX (734) 434-4765, info@glsp.com, www.glsp.com. Subscription rates: Continental U.S. $17.00 per year: Payable in U.S. funds. Single issue $3.00, back issues $5.00. Change of address: Send your magazine label and your new address to Michigan Runner, 4007 Carpenter Rd., #366, Ypsilanti, MI 48197.

p. 45 - 51 p. 52

High School Runner of the Year: Erin Finn By Jeff Hollobaugh

Contributors

Great Lakes Sports Publications, Inc. 4007 Carpenter Rd, #366 Ypsilanti, MI 48197 (734)507-0241 (734)434-4765 FAX info@glsp.com

Event Calendar

Vol. 34, No. 4

p. 38

Champs Make Splash in Aquathlon Heat By Charles Douglas McEwen

p. 42

Crosstown Kids Triathlon Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

p. 42

Volkslaufe Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

p. 43

Heart of Detroit Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

p. 43

Color Run: 15,000 Enjoy ‘Happiest 5K on Planet’ By Tracey Cohen

p. 44

Cover: Erin Finn wins the Nike Girls Elite race at the Spartan Invitational, East Lansing, September 16, 2011. Photo by Pete Draugalis / draugalisphotography.com

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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Editor’s Notes

Ice Cream Truck By Scott Sullivan

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© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

rowing old is hell. Say you’re waiting for one of your perks — OK, only perk — as editor of a famous … OK, Michigan Runner — magazine: getting a bag of new issues from the publisher, and don’t get it. There are a lot of things you don’t get.

Scott Sullivan

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You wait a few days, then remember your running dog’s habit of chewing open your front-porch mailings. Sure enough, there are the new issues in the back yard, rain-soaked and full of tooth holes. At least someone devours your writing.

The dog looks at you with a big grin and wagging tail. “Did I do good?” Sure. So you take him running. He would be heartbroken if you didn’t. He bounds along — all young energy, no sense of pacing — and here comes the ice cream truck behind you, playing “Polly Wolly Doodle” on its speakers, punctuated by handclaps and other noises. These drivers go slow or they make no money. As a dad you know: your kid hears music, commences begging and you dawdle, hoping to save $3 for a Binky Bar, but no, the truck is still in your neighborhood, right out front in fact … When you were young you could beat the ice cream truck as a runner. Now? Even with the dog to tow you, the thing is gaining. You speed up, thinking life has grown too complex. What changed? “In the old days,” you imagine your forebears lecturing, “we sang ‘Polly Wolly Doodle’ all day — and we were happy!”

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Now you try to escape the maze doing something simple like run your dog while this garish truck, playing sirens and whoopee cushion sounds, draws attention from everyone to how slow you are. It stops to serve customers and still gains on you. You recall how you ran with your dog last winter, when the ice was not in a truck behind you but underfoot; he got all fired up when he saw dog paw prints and just about pulled off your leash arm chasing them. “Maybe he’ll useful some day as a tracking dog,” you had hoped until you studied the paw prints further: his own, left yesterday when you ran here. Still he pulled, convinced he would catch his past self. “Fare thee well,” you say to the days as the truck passes. The driver, glazed from listening hours on end to the tape loop, points to the next overheated munchkin with a sweet tooth and change to spare.

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Midwest Meet of Champions, Fort Wayne, Ind.

Michigan Girls Rule Track at Midwest Meet FORT WAYNE, IND. (6/9/12) – It was a day of domination on the track for Team Michigan at the 39th annual Midwest Meet of Champions, but in the end Ohio’s depth and field-event strength were too much to overcome. The Michigan girls put on an impressive show, winning nine of the 12 track races. Excluding hurdles and relays, Michigan swept first place in everything from the 100 to the 3200 meters, but ultimately Team Ohio prevailed 185 to 184 1/3. Team Indiana was a distant third with 105 2/3 points. Ohio’s boys made it a sweep by tallying 178 1/2 points to Indiana’s 148 1/2 and Michigan’s 138 on a day that saw temperatures on the track approach 100 degrees.

Photo by Pete Draugalis

Kyra Jefferson of Detroit Mumford led Team Michigan to a win in the 800-meter relay, then returned to dominate the 200-meter dash. She was named Star of Stars for girls track events.

“I warmed up too early and it threw me off a little bit, but it all worked out,” said Redwine of his 100. The standout sprinter, who was thrilled to be a part of the meet, returned to lead Team Michigan to a win in the 400 relay and also won the 200. “It’s really fun, because you get a group of guys that you’ve been competing against all year and now you’re on a team together. It’s a really fun experience,” Redwine said.

Photo by Pete Draugalis / draugalisphotography.com

By Grant Lofdahl

Kyra Jefferson (white) of Detroit Mumford was named Star

Also excelling for of Stars for girls track events. the boys in white-andblue was White Lake in 54.91. Pontiac Notre Dame’s 1600/800 state “I didn’t get out like I wanted to, and had to Lakeland’s Garrett Zuk. The state Division 1 3200champion Sara Barron took to the track in her pick it up on the straightaway and work on my lift,” meter champion ran 9:03 in the extreme heat to win shorter event and led wire-to-wire for a 2:09.05 vicsaid Jefferson, who ran away from fast-starting Alithe eight-lap race by more than 10 seconds. tory. Detroit Country Day’s Brittany Mann procia Arnold of Ohio en route to a 200 meet record of vided Michigan’s lone field event title with an 23.81 seconds. “It’s really cool to be on a team with “I’ve been trying to break nine-flat all year, but impressive 165-foot, 2-inch toss to win the discus. everybody from Michigan who’s fast and good at I knew with this heat it would be a rough go,” said their events, and I’m happy to wear the Team Zuk, who was just six seconds off the meet record. With Ohio piling up points in the other field Michigan jersey.” “I stayed with the leaders, who set a pretty good events (including a 1-2-3 sweep of the high jump), it pace for the first mile, was up to the 3200 and 1600 relay runners to keep then tried to give it things close for Team Michigan. They responded, as everything I had during Allendale’s four-time 3200 state champ Ali Wiersma that last mile.” surged to a 10:35.82 victory and was followed by Hanover-Horton’s Lindsey Burdette in second. The remaining two victories for the Team “It was a tough race, pretty dry and hot, but it Michigan boys came in was a good way to end the season,” said Wiersma, the 800- and 3200-meter who echoed her teammates’ thoughts about the relays. meet atmosphere. “It was really fun; I got to know so many of the girls. It was cool to be surrounded by Rockford’s Taylor girls who are kind of just like me — they all love Manett was next on the running. It makes me really excited for college.” winning roll for Michigan’s girls, as she sped With the outcome still in doubt, Southfield’s away from the field and Latipha Cross thrilled the crowd by passing Ohio’s Michigan also got a Star of Stars performance from set a new 1600-meter PR anchor late in the 1600 relay to secure a narrow of 4:51.01, winning by Avondale’s Kyle Redwine (white). 3:50.15 to 3:50.71 win. more than seven seconds. “I wanted to do it for my team, that’s the only Cindy Ofili led things off for Michigan with a “I’m used to going out fast from racing against thing that came into my head. They worked so hard, win in the 100-meter hurdles, but a problem with the Meiers (Grosse Point South junior twins HanI had to bring it home for them,” said Cross, who the timing system caused both 100 hurdlers and nah and Haley),” said Manett, who went back-andfinished both the 400 dash and 1600 relay with sprinters to have to wait in the hot sun and made forth with Ohio’s Anna Boyert during the first half strong final stretches. warming up effectively quite challenging. Tiffany of the race before pulling away for a commanding Owens didn’t seem to mind, as the Ortonville-Branwin. “With 700 or 600 meters to go I just decided Her sentiments summed up what many of the don runner won the 100-meter dash over Indiana’s to kick it in. It was my last few hundred meters of young athletes from the Great Lakes State felt as the Katie Wise. high school, so I just wanted to go all-out.” meet concluded. “It’s great, it feels like I’m running for Team USA or something. I’m representing where I Michigan also got a Star of Stars performance Maya Long, teammates with Ofili at Ann Arbor come from, the state of Michigan,” Cross said. from Avondale’s Kyle Redwine, who matched Huron, gave the River Rats two individual event Owens with a win in the 100 meters. wins as she breezed to first place in the 400 meters - MR michiganrunner.net

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High School Runner of the Year:

Erin Finn

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

By Jeff Hollobaugh

Erin Finn placed second in the Footlocker National Cross Country in December 2011 after leading most of the race.

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hat Erin Finn is a very good runner is not why she has won honors as 2012 Michigan High School Runner of the Year. Honestly, she’s always been good. That 11:37 she ran for 3200 meters as a seventh-grader is proof of that. No, the reason Finn has won accolades is that she has demonstrated an ability to rise to greatness. She’s never been content with just being good. Now starting her senior year at West Bloomfield High School, she says, “It’s nice to be good, but the biggest thing for me is runner’s high. I feel so good when I get out there and test my limits. It’s a great stress reliever.” By “testing my limits,” Finn means that she likes to hammer the pace. Very hard. In training and racing. She likes to find the limits of her endurance and speed and push into the beyond that defines greatness. This year, after a winter of hard training and getting comfortable with her new fitness, she went out fast in the 5000-meter race at the New Balance Indoor Nationals. She left the field behind, and shattered the national record with her 16:19.69.

reflects. “I have been very blessed, especially with my cross country season. I do wish my outdoor track season had ended a little better, though.” Yes, cross country went well: she won the Michigan Division 1 finals with her 17:22.6, then clocked a 17:24 to finish second in the nation in the Footlocker race in San Diego, after leading most of the way. Finn wasn’t completely happy with her track season, despite some stunning high points. She won the D1 3200 in 10:17.86. She also traveled to New York for the adidas Dream Mile, where she finished in the middle of the pack but improved her mile best to 4:47.08, which converts to a 4:45.42 for the slightly shorter 1600 meters. However, she counts her fourth-place finish at the USATF Junior Nationals in Bloomington, Ind., as a bad race. “I was hoping to qualify for the World Juniors in Barcelona, and I didn’t,” she admits. Only the top two went to Spain; Finn made a few mistakes. “I learned to stay hydrated. I didn’t realize, but I was out the whole day before watching races, and getting too low on fluids,” she says, adding, “I’ve also learned that when I’m excited, I race a lot better.”

“I’m very very happy with how my year went,” she 8

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That Finn is turning disappointments into important learning opportunities should be worrisome for her national opponents. The tiny young lady with the innocent-looking face is ferocious in competition. She says thoughtfully, “When you’re racing, you’re not the same person you normally are.” In 2010, for instance, she had her first full season of running high school cross country (as a ninth-grader the year before, she started well but missed most of the season with a stress fracture). That year, she finished fourth in a tightly-contested D1 final in 17:31.0. Then she traveled to Kenosha, Wisc., for the Footlocker Midwest qualifier. There she stunned onlookers by finishing third in 17:34 on a very challenging course. Lest anyone was thinking that was a fluke, in San Diego the sophomore finished seventh in the nation. “Footlocker in 2010 was huge for me,” says Finn. “Making it there and placing seventh told me, ‘You can do this.��� That opened me up to being on a new level of running. Being there showed me that it was possible to run this fast. That’s the thing that’s affected me the most.”

Since then, her chances to race at the national level have increased, and Finn has rarely had a bad race. Later that school year, she ran a 10:22 two mile at an indoor meet in Seattle, and a 16:41.33 for 5000 meters at the New Balance Outdoor Nationals.

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inn also points to another possible factor in her improvement, one that may have had an effect on other elite Michigan girls. “I really think Megan Goethals showed us that being fast was possible,” she comments. Goethals, who dominated high school running in the state for several years and became the first Michigan girl to break 10 minutes for 3200 meters, finished second this year in the NCAA 5000-meter championship. “Michigan is strong, and she showed us we can be fast and compete at the national level,” Finn says. Indeed, this year fans in the state had a feast of fast performances to watch, including those by the Meier twins (Hannah and Haley) of Grosse Pointe South. Finn is looking to further improve by competing against them over the next school year — they will all be seniors. Certainly with Hannah Meier already having run the 1500-meter equivalent of a 4:37 for 1600 meters, the all-time state record of 4:39.4 by Laura Matson of

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

This last summer she got an invitation to attend the Nike Elite Camp in Oregon at the same time as the Olympic Trials. “We were at the Nike World Headquarters, which was amazing,” Finn says. “We played volleyball and there was a ton of stuff to do. It was so much fun. There were coaching sessions on diet and rest and other things. We met Shalane Flanagan and Matt Tegenkamp. It inspired me to watch races and people, and made me feel that the next time I want to be at the Trials as a runner. I need to keep pushing hard.”

Erin Finn flies above the Armory track enroute to the 5,000 meter national indoor record. Bloomfield Hills Andover in 1985 is in danger. With her  new 4:45 credentials, Finn could be in the mix. “It makes me wonder how next year will go, with running the 1600 and 3200,” says Finn. “If Hannah, Haley and I can all race in the state 1600, I will not be surprised if that record falls.”

For now, Finn is concentrating on cross country. “It’s my favorite,” she says. She is running about 50 miles per week (“a new high for me”) while incorporating fartlek and tempo runs. Her cruising pace? A daunting 6:40 to 7:10 for most runs. Under coach Nat Belill, she and her West Bloomfield teammates hope to make the most of another season, one in which the Meier twins are expected to lead another finals win by Grosse Pointe South. “We’re not the strongest team,” says Finn, “but we really have a lot of fun together.”

Photo by Victah Sailer / photorun.net

Then there’s that other part of her future she has to think about: college. Already she is being bombarded with contacts from recruiters — that tends to happen when you break a national record. “I’ve narrowed it down to about five schools,” Finn says. “Some schools are hard to say no to. Running is very important to me, but I realize that even if I’m fortunate enough to turn pro, then I might go to age 32 or so. I need a real career.” She plans to major in medical research or biomedical engineering, fine choices for a student who tends to hit straight As. “I think it’s important to work hard,” she says. “The effort I’ve learned to use in running carries over to my academics.” That Finn has a great perspective on her future at such a young age is reassuring. She knows she has something special, and she’s not about to throw it away. She finally says, “I thank God every day that he’s blessed me with this talent.” - MR -

Erin Finn shattered the national indoor record by 15 seconds. michiganrunner.net

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Work, Fun Foundation Helps Cross Teams Achieve Success By Scott Sullivan

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ou get out of running what you put into it. How do you sell it to teens, who want gratification yesterday?

30 for a min-triathlon in his family’s aboveground pool and on nearby bike paths — the reward being build-yourown ice cream sundaes?

Ice cream sundaes?

TenKate, a builder by profession and runner by passion, took the program’s helm six years ago. “There were 12 guys and five girls on the team that fall,” remembers his daughter, Melissa. “We couldn’t post a five-girl team score because of injuries.” “Two boys, Edwin Wainaina and Brian Clark, ran with Melissa and us that winter,” says Jan TenKate, Laurens’ wife and Melissa’s mother. “Then more students started buying into off-season training.” Why? Success breeds success, of course. It is fun being recognized as a winner. More students come out and they push each other. Calvin now has about 50 runners on its boys and girls teams drawing from a 375 enrollment: fine numbers for a “minor” sport competing each fall

“About 35 have trained voluntarily with us on Monday nights all summer,” said TenKate. “The kids run three to 10 miles depending on where they’re at in their training, then swim and eat snacks here or just hang out. It helps to make running fun.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

“That’s one way,” laughs Laurens TenKate, whose Grandville Calvin Christian boys cross country team won its second-straight Division 3 state championship last November so impressively that the National High School Coaches Association named the Squires its U.S. Small School champion and TenKate national coach of the year.

Coach Laurens TenKate (at right) starts the bicycles for the mini-triathlon. with football. I live near the school and have noticed sidewalks, streets and paths filled by more young runners. Some are fast, others less so but grow stronger. Wainaina, a two-time all-stater, led Calvin’s boys to sixth in the state in 2008. The next year, with their star graduated but a host of motivated new ones, the Squires finished second “and should have won it, but we got hit by the flu,” said TenKate. Which made the team even hungrier. Calvin won the 2010 title in a romp, then last year posted the lowest score (sum of their top five finishers’ places) of any team, boys or girls, in the state finals’ four divisions. “Lansing Catholic Central was right behind us,” remembered TenKate. “They had a terrific team and the rivalry pushed us. “Hats off to them,” he said. Four of Calvin’s top five runners last fall ran sub-16-minute 5Ks on turf, a feat rare among even much-larger D1 schools. Three — Justus Pinckney, Josh Kersjes and Simon Reidsma — graduated and plan to be college runners.

Photo by Scott Sullivan

“Now our younger guys have a chance to step up,” said TenKate. Calvin’s girls have placed 10th and eighth in the D3 state meet the last two seasons. “We lost our top girl but our next six are back,” said TenKate. “The success of both teams this fall will hinge on our summer training.”

Freshman Jillian Bos rewards herself with an ice cream sundae after the race. 10

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

So why was he hosting 30 team members July |

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“It’s been a hot summer and we’ll start team practices Aug. 8, so the mini-triathlon breaks things up. Some of the kids can’t swim or bike very well, but it’s always a blast,” he said. The tri started with 10 laps in “Lake TenKate,” whose four improvised lanes and octagonal shape called for strategy. “You get better push-off from both ends in the middle lanes,” noted TenKate. “But it’s shallower in the outer lanes. You can walk.” Skinny runners can be notoriously non-buoyant. Some zigzagged from lane rope to lane rope in non-Michael Phelps or Ryan Lochte fashion. Sophomore Emma Doorn’s goal for the swim leg? “Not to drown!” she said. Once all emerged from the water, TenKate lined them up on their bicycles — ranging from racing machines to, um, less — and released them in order, based on fastest to slowest pool times. Parents watched, kid siblings bounced on a back yard trampoline and Ginger, the TenKates’ 14year-old part-retriever, panted in the shade as if thinking, “What are these dumb beasts doing?” For as fun and informal as the event was, the hosts had installed an instruction board showing course maps and past year’s records, plus bannered chutes and a digital read-out clock at the finish to encourage everyone to close hard. Then ice cream sundaies. Senior-to-be Zac Nowicki, a two-time all-stater who’s the lone returnee from last year’s top four, showed that swimming and running are not his fortés. Of course he had won a 5K in Byron Center two nights earlier in 15:39, beating 694 participants.

“At least Zac is running fit,” TenKate said. As for “hungry,” senior-to-be Andrew Rylersdaam — last year’s No. 5 runner whose 17:03 at state helped the Squires hold off Lansing Catholic — won the triathlon in a new record time after having placed seventh at Byron Center, where he broke 16 minutes for the first time. Doorn made up for her non-Missy Franklin pool time to win the girls tri. “Emma was third on our cross team last fall,” said TenKate, “then placed fourth in the state at 800 meters during spring track season. She is still discovering what she can be.” You get out of coaching what you put into it. “The kids are like family to us,” said TenKate, “yet I have to be an authority. It is humbling.” It takes work and sacrifice to succeed, he went on, and progress is not always linear. Runners learn how to work through setbacks. “How will we do this fall? Well, I hope,” TenKate said. “There are other fine teams and runners. I hope we all do our best and kids learn the great things our sport can teach them. “If we have fun in the process, it’s even more sweet,” he said.

2012 Michigan Runner Race Series Corktown Race, 5K, Detroit - March 11 Martian Invasion Meteor 10K, Dearborn - April 14 Borgess Half Marathon, Kalamazoo - May 6 Fifth Third River Bank Run 25K, Grand Rapids - May 12 Dexter Ann Arbor 10K, Ann Arbor - June 3 Brian Diemer Amerikam 5K, Cutlerville - June 9 Plymouth YMCA Father's Day 1 Mile, Plymouth - June 17 National Cherry Festival 15K, Traverse City - July 14 Steve's Run 10K, Dowagiac - July 28 Crim Festival of Races, 10 Mile, Flint - August 25 Ringside Fitness Marquette Marathon - September 1 Mackinac Island 8 Mile Road Race - September 8 Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon - October 21

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Running Shorts with Scott Hubbard foot in the next meet, explaining that as a kid I’d felt faster without shoes. He agreed to let me try. I was lagging well back in our next meet at Battle Creek Lakeview when I had a “Eureka” moment and made a decision that changed things forever for me as a runner. I was unhappy so far back, asked myself why and, in all of three seconds, decided to chase after a teammate I’d beaten the last three races. I quickly caught him, then passed others until I reached our best runner. I paused and made the mistake of thinking — usually a bad thing to do while racing — “I can’t pass him; he’s good and if I do, I don’t know what I’m in for.”

Scott Hubbard Trivia: Who was the first man to break 4 minutes in the mile indoors?

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EMORIES ARE MADE OF THIS. Leafing through back issues of Distance Running News and Runner’s World is an amble down memory lane for me. I went through a bunch recently looking for column ideas and got “bogged” down reading old articles and looking at ads. It was time well spent but slowed the search for column topics. I’ll devote space this issue to looking back at what seemed important at the time and other things that helped shape the sport — sometimes in groundbreaking ways. It was fun to watch the sport grow up around me. My first memory of track and field as a sport is when I saw a San Diego newspaper headline touting the first man to pole vault 17 feet: John Pennel in August 1963. A couple weeks later I entered the sixth grade and in November President John F. Kennedy was killed in Dallas. A year and a half later my family moved from California to Ann Arbor. I didn’t play organized sports growing up; instead I played games with friends in the streets, canyons and Boys Club. My sport of choice was baseball, which I hoped to play in high school. Misunderstanding a sports recruiter for the new Ann Arbor Huron High School, I checked baseball and cross country on my “interest” card, turned it in and forgot about it in the spring of ninth grade. After the first day of school in 10th grade, cross country coach Des Ryan called and said he had a card with my name on it. We talked and I agreed to see what the sport was about. The meets were two miles in the day and think I ran just over 13 minutes the first two meets and 12:50 in the third. I asked coach if I could race bare-

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I finished with him and we all chattered about what I’d done. After that, I no longer ran to finish or for the experience; I ran to see how fast I could go! Our first-year team wasn’t that good, but, lucky for me, it worked in my favor. I competed barefoot through my junior year (even after getting spiked badly) before switching to spikes as a senior. I was the only person I knew of that raced barefoot. I am going to skip around now, topics appearing in no particular order: A. I was in my first year as assistant girls track coach at Ann Arbor Pioneer High School in May 1975 when I heard that Steve Prefontaine had died. The head coach asked if I’d “heard the news” when I arrived for practice. I said no and he told me about Pre dying in a car accident. I ran against him once: in the ‘73 NCAA national cross country meet, where I finished two minutes behind him. B. Before there were digital watches, there were sweep-hand stopwatches. By the late ‘70s, digital watches with split-time functions became more common and affordable. In recent years, Garmin GPS watches compile a bunch of info, including distance run. C. I owned sweep-hand wristwatches when I started running, but the wrist bands kept disintegrating. So I took to looking at a clock as I headed out the door and back in to track time, subtracting a couple minutes for hitting the road and my cool down. D. As of November 1970, only nine American men had broken 2:20 in the marathon, including Western Michigan University graduate Mike Hazilla. We’ve added a few since then. E. There weren’t any specialty running stores until the later ‘70s, so until then all my shoes came mail order. I saw a Runner’s World ad and ordered some Road Kings from La Mesa, Calif., for $13.95. They had a soft leather upper, soft midsole and bottoms that fell off on about my 10th run in them. Geesh. I didn’t know to take them to a shoe repair place to have the bottoms glued back on. F. More than 40 years before the minimalist shoe rage of today, Tiger (Asics) made the $9.95 “Marathon.” It couldn’t have weighed more than six

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or seven ounces with a flexible, paper-thin bottom and nylon upper (nylon being relatively new in shoes at the time). My favorite training shoes in the day, until they stopped making them, were the Tiger Bostons for about $15.95. Loved those shoes. I don’t think they had a heel counter. G. British distance star Bruce Tulloh ran across the United States in 65 days. He shared his journey with his wife and son in the book “Four Million Footsteps” in 1970. H. Events popular in their day were three-mile postal competitions, one-hour runs and 24-hour relays. The postal comps pitted individuals and teams against each other; all would run three miles on a track in a certain time period and send their results to a central location. From there, results were compiled and sent back out via that old-fashioned mode called the U.S. Mail. Twenty-four-hour relays featured teams made up of two to 10 runners going one mile at a time in relay fashion for one day. Fatigue was an issue. I. The NCAA Indoor Track & Field Championships were hosted by the University of Michigan in Detroit’s Cobo Arena from 1965 into the early ‘80s. It was great fun to see athletes you’d only heard about. I got to run in the meet in ‘74. J. My first brush with the marathon was as a spectator at the Seattle Marathon in November ‘77. I recall being impressed by the number of runners and winning times. Bill Glad won for the men in 2:18:48 and Gabrielle Andersen of Switzerland for the women in 2:57:53. In the ‘84 Olympic Marathon, Andersen-Schiess came into the stadium 15 minutes after Joan Benoit had won. The world watched, transfixed, as she staggered, fell, got up and continued in this fashion to the finish — the officials not allowed to assist her for fear of disqualification. She eventually finished in 2:48 and recovered quickly afterward with fluids. K. Bill Rodgers and Frank Shorter both owned apparel lines. Due to the archaic rules of the times, neither could appear in ads for the clothes. Though the lines were high quality, they fell victim to poor sales. Other good apparel brands in the day were Sub-4 and Dolfin. L. The Association of Road Racing Athletes pushed for open prize money in the early ‘80s in the face of rules forbidding such a thing. The rules soon thereafter were rewritten to allow prize money, with the Boston Marathon being the last major race in to go pro in ’86. M. Abebe Bikila won the 1960 Olympic marathon in Rome running barefoot, then the ’64 gold medal wearing shoes, helping open the door for the deep pool of east African distance runners. N. Muhammed Ali sponsored a track team and major indoor track & field meet in 1979. O. The Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

for Women sponsored national competitions from 1973-82, when the NCAA took over. P. Drink companies including Schlitz, Stroh’s, Diet Pepsi and Perrier sponsored national running series. Q. In the November 1978 Grand Valley Marathon, Dennis Rainear of Midland was struck in the head by a stray .22 bullet while running. He finished in 3:09 and was disappointed he’d missed the Boston Marathon qualifying time of 3:00. BAA officials let him in anyway. Rainear later recalled feeling an ache in his head, but didn’t think it much worse than others he was dealing with.

W. The American boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympic Games in Moscow. Russia led a boycott of the Los Angeles Games in 1984. X. Thirty years before Christopher McDougall’s “Born to Run� described running with the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico, there was a story about them in the October ‘79 Runner’s World. Y. The International Runners Committee worked to put longer distance races on the Olympic schedule and was largely responsible for the marathon getting the green light for the 1984 Games.

S. The Bonne Bell and Avon (cosmetics companies) running series for women. Kathrine Switzer was the main source of energy behind the latter.

Z. Terry Fox pulled Canadians together with his grit and determination while attempting to cross the country in 1980 running on one good leg and a prosthetic. He wanted to raise awareness about cancer, which had taken his leg. He was unable to continue past Lake Superior, but his effort inspires others to this day.

T. The Runner’s World Fun Runs, held at tracks across the U.S. in the mid to late ‘70s. Runs at various distances drew growing crowds new to the sport.

AA. Jim Fixx wrote “The Complete Book of Running� in ‘77. It remains the best-selling book on running.

U. The Runner’s World circulation was 3,000 in 1970, 500,000 by 1980.

BB. Canadian Brian Maxwell, tired of bonking in marathons, worked and worked until he came up with a food that was a good fuel source and easily digestible. Thus were born Power Bars. He sold his company in the ‘80s for $100 million.

R. The forgettable ‘79 movie “Running� featured Michael Douglas and Susan Anspach.

V. The International Track Association presented the first-ever series of track and field meets that offered open prize money to athletes between 1973 andhorizontal ‘76. half page horizontal template_half page 8/7/12 8:26 PM Page 1

CC. Nike first put “air� in the Tailwind in ‘79. In short order, the other major shoe companies began adding cushion-enhancing substances to their outer soles. DD. The Marathon (oil company) Marathon was held in Terre Haute, Ind., in 1979 with a $5 entry fee. EE. Wolverine Worldwide in Rockford once owned Brooks shoes. The firm is best known for its Hush Puppies. FF. Wheelchairs gained access to running road races with the Road Runners Club of America adopting competition guidelines in ‘79. GG. Title IX and other lawsuits led to inclusion of girls and women into previously all-male sports in the early ‘70s. To my mind, it’s the best thing to ever happen in sports. I’ve only scratched the surface of the sport long ago. We’ve gone from cinder to synthetic tracks, 10 kilometers as the most-popular distance to 5Ks and half marathons. Much has changed, but it’s revealing and important to recall the things that led to and shaped the sport as we know it now. Stay thirsty for the past, my friends! Answer: American Jim Beatty ran 3:58.9 on Feb. 10, 1962, in Los Angeles. - MR -

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Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

13

Soaring Race Fees: Why? By Ron Marinucci

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national running publication asked recently if race entry fees had become too high. A check of well-known American races showed the Boston and Chicago marathons cost $150 to run, the New York City Marathon $255 and the Las Vegas Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon $185. That’s a lot of money. Closer to home, the Crim 10-mile in Flint now costs $55, the Detroit Free Press Marathon $125 and its half marathon $110. Some local races still have entry fees under $20 but they are becoming harder to find. It’s not unusual for local race entries to cost $30 to $35, still a big chunk for a lot of folks.

“I see fees all over the map,” said Lipinski, director of Roseville’s Big Bird Run. “Reasonable fees can range from $15 to $30,” where he’s kept Big Bird costs. Amounts can depend on a number of factors, such as size — large or small race — and “if it is a fundraiser or a run that complements another event” (such as a community festival or parade). “Lower fees are often the result of being able to secure consistent sponsorship year after year,” said Lipinski. “Fewer sponsors mean higher fees to cover costs.”

Gone are “the good old days” recalled by Motor City Striders president Ed Kozloff. “The entry fee for the first Free Press Marathon in 1978 was $5 and included a shirt,” he remembered. “The dinner was $3.

Lewis, who co-founded and organizes the Feet and Friends Fighting Colon Cancer Run, said, “We have decided to keep our entry cost reasonable, $25 for early registration.

“This was actually quite an increase from the first Motor City Marathon in 1963, which cost 50 cents — or $1 with a shirt if you finished. And it was a club, not a race, shirt.”

“Our rationale is people will solicit or donate additional money to the cause,” she continued. “We are still able to provide participants a nice tech shirt and quality awards.

No one expects a return to those days and prices, however nice it would be. “If you don’t like the entry fees, don’t race,” one could say. But if we want running and racing to be inclusive, that doesn’t cut it. Nor is it fair to lump all race organizers as being “greedy.”

“All of our food is donated,” Lewis added. “What we have, we have. I don’t think people care what food is offered after a race that is 10K or shorter.”

I recently asked veteran runners and race directors about rising entry fees. Several voiced ideas I had not considered. Randy Step, Tony Lipinski, Kozloff and Karen Lewis have each organized and directed road races. Step, who organizes Running Fit events from 5Ks to ultras, noted, “Runners are value-conscious consumers. Perhaps it’s the nature of our sport: one that requires hard work and very little equipment.” His analysis focused on three types of races and their fees. “Local events put on by local organizers are still great deals for what we get,” Step said. “The pricing may have moved up a bit over the years, but all in all the entry fees are still less than a round of golf, a ski lift ticket or other sport spending. “The mega-event companies,” he went on, “are definitely gouging the participants. But we have the choice to enter or not. I’ve run in a couple of these events and once is interesting … “The obstacle-course races like Tough Mudder and Warrior Dash came out of the gun gouging and people still flocked to them. Novelty is a strong attraction. But they may be a short-lived fad. Once is enough, especially for purist runners. They are also getting bad press for being non-green.”

“This is the third ‘running boom,’” said the veteran Kozloff. “Fees have gone up with each. It’s a matter of basic economics: supply and demand.

Runners have different demands and expectations of modern races. “Refreshments seem more lavish,” Foley noted. “And I love those new polyprotype shirts you receive. But they all cost money. And let’s not forget prize money and finisher medals. Neither was to be found until about 1990.” “There’s no question fees have skyrocketed in the past dozen years,” said Hubbard. “I have no idea how races set them. Some charge a lot because others do. “Every race has a different scenario,” he went on. “I’m tempted to guess that some events make quite a bit of money. Is that good or bad? Why shouldn’t they make money? “How much is too much to make?” asked Hubbard. “Should I begrudge them that?” “As a runner, I’ve forgone races shorter than 10K if the price is more than $30,” said Lewis. “It’s not just the entry fees, but travel time, gas, etc. “The Riverbend Striders (a Flint-based running group) have an option of shirt or no-shirt at a reduced cost,” she noted. “Often I don’t take the tee shirts, especially the cotton ones. I have way too many to wear. But I do love tech shirts.” When Lewis helped organize the former Fantasy of Lights Race in Ann Arbor, costs were kept down by offering things other than shirts.

“The chip and disposable chip have expanded the number of groups that can put on a running event,” he continued. “When I talk to runners, most think many fees are too high, but they are still willing to go to and be a part of an event they don’t want to miss.

“We gave out gloves, which were a big hit and pleasant surprise to participants,” she remembered. “Another year we had knit headbands. I also did a couple trail runs in Grayling where they gave out nice non-cotton socks. Everyone needs socks.

“While runners are interested in low-cost events, it’s questionable if they would be well-attended due to lack of amenities. It is hard these days to put on a major, low-cost event without frills.”

“I will pay more for races of longer distances, say 10 miles and beyond,” said Lewis. “For a half marathon, I probably would not pay more than $50 if local, but possibly more if it is out of state.

Former Michigan Runner editor Dave Foley and longtime columnist Scott Hubbard are state sport veterans.

“I have not yet decided not to do a marathon based on cost. They are usually out of state, so that’s just the price to pay for an adventure.”

“I still race occasionally,” said Foley, a retired coach and teacher. “But race fees make me re-evaluate the number of competitions I choose.

Veteran runner and Dalmatian Run race director Riley McLincha said today’s race fees “seem pricey to me, but races are getting bigger. The market seems to say prices are not too high.

“We can long for the good old days of the ‘70s and ‘80s, when $4 to $6 could get you registered in a small race and the biggies like the River Bank Run and Crim would set you back $8 to $10,” Foley added. “But race directing now a much more expensive proposition. Paying police, buying insurance, hiring a finish-line service – these were rarely done years ago, except for the major big-city races. Now it’s standard practice.”

“You can put on 5Ks with shirts, refreshments, timing and awards, nothing fancy, for a $15 entry fee,” he went on, “if we only care about breaking even.” Cutting back on food is another option for lower costs, said McLincha. “It’s never the kind of food I want after a run. When I take it, I usually give it to someone else.” “Anyone who has put on a road race knows the

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expenses that can be incurred,” said elite runner Monica Joyce. “Costs – such as for insurance, city permits, police, barricades, printing for flyers and tee shirts, cost of tee shirts, awards and medals, supplies such as paper cups, and timing systems – may not be realized by most runners. “Participants expect so much these days that they should be prepared to pay for it,” Joyce continued. “I hope all the races can make some money for all the time and effort their organizers put in over the months.

“Sponsors aren’t willing to give hand-outs as in the past,” Joyce went on. “Pay the entry fee or don’t run.” “Some entry fees have gotten out of hand,” said Stu Allen, who sends out an e-mail newsletter for Flint area runners. “Other race organizers do a really good job of returning value to the people who participate in their events.”

nice basic race without frills and extras. “A fee of $20,” Mittman said, “is reasonable, with a no-shirt option to reduce fees further. I’d like senior discounts on more races, to encourage seniors to stay active and recognize the contributions they have made over the years in terms of registration fees.” Mt. Pleasant Striders runner and race organizer Harry Plouff uses www.marathonguide.com to seek bargains. “The current fees have gone crazy,” he said. “But races charge what the market bears.

a few dollars. With the increased interest in running and people having a marathon on their ‘bucket lists,’ race fees keep going up.” The Mt. Pleasant Striders, said Plouff, “sponsor numerous races, never charging more than $20, always giving group and family discounts. Fees need to match the purpose of the race. Some are fundraisers, others fun runs. Strider fun runs cost $1, $2 or $5, depending on cost to put them on. “Races need to break even or show a small profit,” he observed. “But money should not keep people from enjoying our sport.”

“This was once a poor person’s sport,” he continued. I needed were a pair page of shoes, shorts 8/10/12 and half page “All vertical template_half vertical 2:12 PM Page 1

- MR -

Allen cited a recent trail race in Lowell at which “the entry fee for the 100K was $62, $50 for the 50K. Each runner got a high-quality jacket, suitable for winter wear, and a shirt. The course was almost entirely on trails, which were very well marked. Stations had food and fluids. “At the finish the race director, his wife and family were grilling hot dogs and other goodies. Finishers got medals and almost everybody got some sort of award, even if it was a super-sized whoopee cushion. “Every person who ran this race got more than his money’s worth in swag, support and awards,” said Allen. “I’m sure that every nickel they took in for entry fees went back to the runners. “I also see lots of races that cost at least twice what I paid for this one that don’t give you much for your money. Some folks are out to make a quick buck and think putting on a race is an easy way to do it. “The races that have been around for a while have learned that they must deliver a good experience to get repeat customers,” he said. Jerry Mittman, who has run more than 850 races on practically every continent, called entry fees “a mixed bag, with a good number of ‘value races’ with entry fees of $20 or less.” Mittman’s best “value race” was a half marathon last April in Rabat, Morocco; he received a shirt, hat and medal for $3.60. “Once the fee hits $25 or more,” he said, “I question whether the race is worth it. I will look at alternative events or skip it. I’ve run enough races that I don’t have the feeling I must do another — and I definitely don’t need another running shirt! “There are many events I’ve stopped doing because the fees have risen too high. Some have gotten to be much more than races. That may be what some people want, but I am interested in a

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Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

15

Beyond the Chip

A Zoo Story By Herb Lindsay

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raining hard and racing even harder is what Jake learned to do and what he became well known for at the height of his career as a world-class road racer. A significant starting point of his extreme approach to racing is revealed here. Jake’s post-collegiate running career was ramping up with more opportunities to race elite rivals. He selfishly pursued his athletic goals and was boldly confident. Training and racing plans were put on hold to schedule the removal of his wisdom teeth. The rest following surgery coincided with four days of oppressive summer heat. The layoff felt much like tapering for a big race. Jake’s body felt light and springy as he ventured down unfamiliar streets for an early Sunday morning run in Richfield, where he was visiting friends. Temperatures climbed quickly into the 80s as Jake covered the first five miles of a planned 10-mile run. He ran shirtless, his dark tanned body slathered in sunscreen. Shorts, cap, dark shades, training watch and lightweight trainers were all he wore. As Jake approached the turnaround of the run, he realized the Richfield Zoo was nearby. He had boyhood memories of visiting there and could recall daylong visits that included riding the train that circled the expansive facility. He remembered winding trails leading to an amazing assortment of animals displayed in pleasantly laid-out paddocks and enclosures. As a hint of caramel corn wafted from within the zoo, Jake had an impulsive thought: “I want to run through the zoo today!” Smooth relaxed strides brought him to a closed gate and line of turnstiles. Nearby signs displayed hours and entry fees. Jake didn’t have money and, most importantly, the zoo wasn’t open yet. He continued, turned the corner and followed the towering wall which ran along the parking lot. The wrought-iron entry gates to the parking lot were closed. Ahead he could see another entrance. Upon arrival he read the bold lettered sign: “Zoo Employees ONLY.” Ignoring the sign, Jake ran through. He saw a blue uniformed security officer quickly emerge from the guardhouse. A walkie-talkie hung from his muffin-topped belt. He yelled at Jake, softly at first, then more insistently, “Hey, you! Stop. You can’t go runnin’ in here! STOP!” Jake never looked back as he made quick strides into the parking lot, then aimed for the entrance, a pedestrian viaduct beneath the train tracks. A canopy of trees provided welcomed shade over boulevard walkways lined with low-hung chain barriers, behind which signs directed patrons to 16

“Stay off grass.” The animal displays were near and Jake ran toward them. He ran past the giraffe paddock and marveled over the amazing reach of their long necks. He slowed as he passed the enclosure housing the Michigan wolverine but none could be seen. Jake’s enjoyment began to change when two blue uniformed men appeared on an electric golf cart coming directly toward him. He stopped briefly and pondered the penalty for trespassing. He did not want to be charged, so he decided he would not be caught. He turned and ran — fast and hard. The chase was on! At the moment, perceived risk of capture contributed to an element of fun for Jake. The guards called out orders to stop, expressing their anger and frustration with a litany of forceful commands. Jake didn’t speak and slowed just enough to make a hairpin turn on the paved boulevard. The move could not be matched by the cart, which resulted in Jake putting space between himself and the guards. The crackle of hand-held radio chatter made Jake nervous as he turned on the path leading to the lion enclosure. Soon another group of guards on a faster, gasoline-powered cart joined the chase and were quickly on his heels. Jake charged down the path that curved around the lion display, which narrowed, denying cart access. Did the path go through, or was it a dead end? Jake wondered. Again, the radios crackled with communications between guards. As Jake ran, he was relieved the path opened to the food court area equipped with stylish tables, chairs and shade umbrellas. Waiting for him there were the guards on the electric cart, who leapt off and gave chase on foot with billy clubs drawn. Jake eluded them by weaving between tables and chairs to make it look like a game of tag, but it was no longer playful or fun. Soon the guards on the motorized cart arrived to rejoin the intensifying chase. Now, with clubs drawn, guards shouted threatening descriptions of what they would do with clubs when they caught Jake. Fight-and-flight response was further activated when pursuers on the cart began crashing into chairs and tables, creating ever more frightening circumstances. Threatening words and details of the escalating standoff heightened Jake’s resolve to not be caught. Fearing bodily harm, Jake planned the most direct route back to the viaduct and ran with Pink Floyd’s “Run Like Hell” playing loudly in his head. With heart pounding and chest heaving as if in a race-ending sprint, he hoped his exit would not be blocked. This was not the time to slow down. His safe escape depended on running harder!

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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into the viaduct was a welcomed sight, but Jake nervously wondered, “Would the other end of the path be open, too?” With two carts and four menacing guards in close pursuit, Jake raced into the tunnel fearing the angry guards on the descending cart might catch up and run him over. They hadn’t been afraid to do damage when tables and chairs went flying! His fear made him run faster. Jake was relieved to find the exit into the open parking lot unguarded. However, the employee gate was now guarded by muffin top and another, taller, more-intimidating guard. Jake needed time to rest and plan an exit strategy. Running like a calf pursued by wranglers on horseback, Jake slowed pace and used unpredictable stops and turns on the open parking lot to allow his heart rate to slow and for calming breaths. The pursuit resembled slapstick cinema as carts weaved wildly in almost-colliding loops in pursuit of their prey. Jake welcomed the rest this delay provided, but feared waiting too long would allow more officers to arrive. He summoned all his courage, turned to the gate and charged, directly at the center of the opening. Just before reaching the breach he shifted his aim at the tall one on the left. He’d learned from basketball, “head and shoulder fake left, hard! — go right!” and that’s what he did. The intimidating man lunged but missed, while muffin top reached and gripped but could not hold Jake’s sweat and sunscreen-slick body. Both guards narrowly escaped being hit by the carts, which closely followed Jake onto a busy multi-lane roadway where approaching cars locked brakes in skidding stops. Jake bounded over a chain barrier like a white tail deer and escaped to a quiet side street. Glancing back, he was relieved that the guards were no longer pursuing, but he knew his escape would not be successful until he was safe at his friends’ home. He assumed the zoo guards had called police and would have his description. Jake added distance to the run to dodge potential capture to complete a grueling two-hour run that became the hardest run of his life. He was relieved and exhausted as his mind searched for lessons from the experience. The Sunday Richfield News featured a story about recent problems at the Richfield Zoo. Trespassing vandals had placed a plank over the moat that kept the Michigan wolverine in its enclosure and it had become road kill on the same busy street where Jake had narrowly escaped harm. Vandals also removed sheep from a paddock and thrown live treats to the lions. The blue uniformed guards almost certainly had been on high alert for “crazy people” in their zoo, so their intense reaction to Jake’s intrusion was understandable.

YMCA Father’s Day Run, Plymouth

Father Knows Best: Families Flourish at Plymouth Dad’s Day Run By Heather Dyc Hanks

PLYMOUTH (6/17/21) — A father’s job is never done. Ask Craig Dolecki, 38, of Redford, who ran this Plymouth Father’s Day Run as a first-time father. Dolecki was seventh overall in the MGD Triple, which consists of a one-mile run, a 5K and a 10K, with a combined time of 1:01.09. “I’ve done this race before,” he said, “and it’s always been just another race. But this time around it makes you think about your family and how much more important that is than racing.” Dolecki credits his wife Arianne for his ability to train with daughter Maggie, seven months, at home. “Arianne has been very supportive and cool, but I still always feel a bit guilty because I want to be at home helping with the baby,” he admitted.

Also representing for the fast fathers was 2010 Michigan Runner of the Year Eric Green, 43, of Pontiac, who was third in the triple in 58:15. Green was excited for his upcoming Great Lakes Maggie, Craig and Relay trip, which he Arianne Dolecki has taken for 13 years straight, joking that his wife relieves him from all parental duties during this annual race.

of Northville with a combined time of 1:11:58; Brianna Lax, 16, of Plymouth in 1:14; and Donna Olsen, 62, of Southgate in 1:16:36.

Curtis Vollmar, 25, of Ypsilanti defended his MGD Triple men’s title with a combined race time of 54:31. Vollmar, who claimed he is more of a miler to a 5K runner, ran 4:23 for the mile, 16:00 for the 5K and a 34:07 10K. James Gale, 27, of Rochester Hills took second in the triple with 56:15.

For a complete list of Plymouth Father’s Day Run results, visit http://gaultracemanagement.com.

Photo: Heather Dyc Hanks

”He opened the jar of pickles when no one else could. He was the only one in the house who wasn’t afraid to go into the basement by himself. He cut himself shaving but no one kissed it or got excited about it. It was understood when it rained he got the car and brought it around to the door. When anyone was sick he went out to get the prescription filled. He took lots of pictures but he was never in them.” – Erma Bombeck, journalist and best-selling author

It was a great day for Gavin Smith, 35, of Northville, the overall 5K winner in a personal record 15:55. Smith shattered his previous PR of 16:06 set at the Brian Diemer 5K June 9 during his first race of the season since November. First in the 5K masters division went to Vincent Jesudowich, 45, also of Northville, in 17:11. Jesudowich was aiming for a sub-17 after running 17:17 5Ks in his last two efforts at the Race for the Cure and Dexter Ann Arbor runs.

top three women weresquare Jessica Shehab, thirdThe square template_third 6/20/1236, 11:27 AM Page 1

Heather Dyc Hanks is a contributor to Michigan Runner magazine - MR -

Dolecki has competed in running events up to 100 miles as well as triathlons, aquathlons and duathlons.

A Zoo Story continues: Strange but true, Jake’s zoo run contributed to his developing career. His hard-charging race strategy was based on the vivid mental imagery of his fight and flight for survival. His body reacted automatically in races as he vividly recalled and imagined frightful menacing men in fast pursuit. It became a strategy he successfully applied when locked in intense duels with world-elite runners. He was able to adapt to the frantic chase no matter the circumstances. Like the run through the zoo, each race confirmed that training hard and racing harder — was possible!

Former Michigan State University All-American and world elite Herb Lindsay became the only man to win three consecutive Crim 10-milers when he did so from 1979-81. He is now an elementary teacher for the Fremont Public Schools. - MR -

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50 Years of Motor City Marathons (The First 15 Years) By Dr. Edward H. Kozloff

In 1959 the Michigan Road Runners Club (now Motor City Striders) was formed in Detroit and established a list of regularly-scheduled races. These events again brought in nationally-ranked athletes, with some events crossing the Ambassador Bridge. Many of the races were held on Belle Isle, a 982-acre island park in the middle of the Detroit River about three miles east of downtown. In 1963 the club, with about a dozen members, decided to add a marathon to its races. The event would be held on the 5.4-mile course that circled Belle Isle and consist of approximately 4 ¾ flat, fast laps. The race continued in this form the next 15 years. Today, sponsorship is an important consideration for any running event. However, for all of the Michigan Road Runners Club races leading up to this first marathon, it was unheard of. The few members and race entry fees paid for all prizes. There were no shirts or refreshments. The club asked Marathon Gas Co. in Findlay, Ohio, for a $50 sponsorship, but negotiations fell through. Looking at the entry fees of today’s races, it is hard to understand the excitement that was generated back then at the thought of receiving a $50 donation for a race. The inaugural race was held on Thanksgiving Day 1963, when 23 hardy souls paid 50 cents each to attempt the classic distance in cloudy, mid-40º weather with 15-mph winds coming off the river. Among them were four members of Wayne State University’s cross-country team who had finished their season and were looking to keep active. Three did not finish, including Goetz Klopfer, who eventually would compete in the 1968 and ‘72 Olympics as a race walker. None of the Wayne contingent had 18

During that race, I came through the 5-mile point in 29:39 and was able to continue close to that pace as I crossed 10 miles in one hour flat. Although that was the farthest I’d ever run, I was still feeling reasonably comfortable until about mile 18 when I hit the proverbial wall. After crossing the 20-mile mark in about 2:06, I ended up walking and was barely able to finish in 3:15:47. There were no water stations, nor water or refreshments at the finish.

Photo from the collection of Dr. Ed Kozloff

Detroit has a storied history of long distance running. The Auto City Marathon was run from the City of Pontiac down Woodward Avenue to downtown Detroit from 1920 through 1930. Some of America’s top runners of that era, including a Boston Marathon winner and world record holder, competed in the event. At one point the Detroit News sponsored this marathon, which, sadly, was ended by the Depression. Complete information about it can be found in the November/December 2007 issue of Marathon and Beyond. A scattering of distance races continued to be held in the area in the decades that followed.

run more than 10 miles on a training day — including this author, who was the only one to finish the race that day.

Winner Bob Berger of Lincoln Park took an early lead, which he maintained the entire race. His 2:32:50 finish made him one of only three runners who cracked the three-hour barrier. Twelve finishers completed the race in time to arrive home for turkey dinners.

Mike Hazilla, winner of the Motor City Marathon in 1964 and 1971, ran 2:16:20 in the 1971 race.

Eight race officials were on hand, including co-race directors Fred McGlone and Frank McBride. McGlone had finished eighth or better in the three Boston Marathons he ran in the early 1940s and was the national marathon champion in 1942. McBride, Wayne State’s track and cross-country coach, had finished seventh in the 1500 meters at the 1952 Olympic Trials. The timers were Ed Kozloff (88) leads Bob Berger (95), 1963 marathon winner, Ernie Smith, who could and Brian Moore (91) in a race on Belle Isle. be considered the grandfather of distance runclub’s early road races. ning for his involvement in the sport since the 1920s, and Dan Radnovich, to whom much is owed For the second Motor City Marathon in 1964, for producing and conserving the records of the

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

Photo from the collection of Dr. Ed Kozloff

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his year, The Detroit Free Press International Marathon celebrates the 35th anniversary of the newspaper’s sponsorship of the race. But the event’s roots reach back another 15 years to when its predecessor, The Motor City Marathon, was first held in 1963. This year marks the 50th consecutive running of the event, the eighth-oldest continuously held marathon in the United States.

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The Canadian invasion began in 1965. For the next nine years, our northern neighbors either won (six times) or placed second (three times). Ron Wallingford of the Hamilton Olympic Club started the string. When he attended the University of Michigan, he captained one of their Big Ten championship track teams. In 1964 he finished third at Boston, one of the two occasions when he established the fastest time by a Canadian for the marathon distance. Years later, in 1976, he became the director of the Montreal Olympic Marathon. In the 1965 Motor City Marathon, Wallingford led 33 finishers to the line in 2:21:27. Fifty-one started the race. Wallingford returned three times in the next four years. In 1967 he captured his second victory in 2:24:34. In 1966 and 1969 he finished second. Ron Warhurst finished second in 1964 with a 2:30:09 time. The member of Western Michigan University’s 1964 and 1965 NCAA cross country championship teams later became the longtime track and cross-country coach at U-M. WMU’s Mike Hazilla became the first man to crack the 2:20 barrier in Michigan when he set a course record of 2:18:47 in 1966. In doing so, he became just the third American to break 2:20. In the 1965 race, he had finished third in 2:34:33. Thirty-six of the 59 starters finished in 1966 on another cloudy day, with temperatures ranging between 38º and 44º. Finishing third behind Wallingford was Warhurst. Their times were 2:26:00 and 2:29:00 respectively.

would eventually win it three times, setting a Canadian record of 2:10:08 in 1975 that stands to this day. In 1977, he was the top finisher at the Boston marathon. Drayton defended his Motor City Marathon title in 1970, leading a Canadian sweep of the first five places in 2:23:08. Seventy runners started and 46 finished in sunny, 60º weather. Boychuk took second in 2:24:14.

Photo from the collection of Dr. Ed Kozloff

the size of the field and the number of finishers expanded to 33 and 24 respectively. The Thanksgiving Day weather was a cloudy, 36 degrees with 14-mph winds. Winner Scotto Gonzales of the Boston Athletic Association finished in 2:44:46. The first 10 runners broke three hours and only three exceeded the four-hour mark.

Sue Kozloff (left) runs with Alexa Kraft, winner of the 1976 race in 3:00.41.

Hazilla returned to the race and victor’s circle after a five-year absence in 1971, running the second-fastest time ever on the course in 2:16:21. Overcast skies and temperatures in the upper 50s offered some help for the 67 finishers. Of that number, 33 — almost half — finished in under three hours. Age group awards were given for the first time. Wallingford, fifth overall in 2:29:35, was the first 30-39 year old. Wayne State coach McBride led the 40-49 group by finishing 25th in 2:53:46, and Chicagoan Richard Kingwas tops for those 50 and older in 3:29:15.

40º, only 30 runners finished. Wayne Yetman of the North York Achilles Club won in 2:32:18. In 1976, he represented Canada running the marathon at the Montreal Olympics. In the 1968 Thanksgiving race, Lou Scott, a Detroit high school graduate who ran for Arizona State University, finished third in 2:44:14. He had run the 5,000 meters for the U.S. Olympic team in Mexico City the month before.

The Toronto Olympic Club lived up to its reputation on a rainy day in 1972. Members swept the first four places, led by a 2:18:46 effort by Brian Armstrong. A year later Track and Field News ranked him the third-best marathon runner in the world as he hit a best time of 2:13:30. By 1973, Drayton was the only Canadian with a faster marathon time than Armstrong.

In 1969 the race date was moved to the third Sunday in October to benefit from more-favorable weather. Drayton (formerly Buniak) took advantage of overcast skies and upper-40º weather to record the largest margin of victory ever in this race. His North American record 2:12:00 was 15 minutes faster than Wallingford’s time, which was nonetheless the sixth-fastest in state history.

The Striders conducted two additional marathons in 1973 and 1974. A March event was sponsored by the Detroit News in conjunction with the annual NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championship at Cobo Hall. In cloudy, damp, 40º weather in 1973, Norm Patenaude of the Laurentian Track Club won in 2:24:05. In addition to being a fine runner, Patenaude was one of the founders of the Ontario Roadrunners Association, organizer of the Voyageur Marathon, one of the chief measurers of the 1976 Montreal Olympic Marathon course and — eventually — a member of Canada’s Runners Hall of Fame.

Drayton’s time was not accepted unanimously. The National Amateur Athletic Union felt the course must have been short. After some angry corIn 1967 a conflict arose with the Road Runners respondence between the Striders and the national Club of America regarding the club’s use of the body, the AAU sent a representative to re-measure name “Michigan Road Runners.” In October of that In the race held in October 1973, 110 contestthe course, which was determined accurate. Drayton year, the club changed its name to the Motor City ants struggled to the finish line, led by Duane Spitz confirmed the authenticity of his effort in Fukuoka Striders and, having resolved the dispute with the in 2:23:05. In the earlier March race, he had fin(Japan), winning what was then considered the national body, continued conducting local road ished second to1Patenaude by 14 seconds. Later, world championship marathonhorizontal in 2:11:12.8. He sixth horizontal template_sixth 6/14/12 12:50 PM Page races. Wallingford returned to the victory platform in 1967, finishing in 2:24:35 as temperatures dropped to a frigid 18º to 22º. Only 36 of 62 starters completed the distance.

SEPTEMBER 22, 2012 HOLLAND, MI³8:30 START FLAT & FAST COURSE

On June 2, 1968, a pre-Olympic Trial was held on the Belle Isle course for Canadian runners. Peter Buniak (who later changed his name to Jerome Drayton) won by 25 seconds over Andy Boychuk in 2:23:57. Boychuk had won the gold medal at the 1967 Pan American Games held in Winnipeg. Both men went to the 1968 Olympics, with Boychuk finishing 10th overall and Buniak dropping out of the race. On this sunny, 70º day in June, only 17 of the 37 starters finished the race. The Thanksgiving 1968 Motor City Marathon saw the largest field ever, as 73 started. Running in driving rain with temperatures of

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Photo from the collection of Dr. Ed Kozloff

time of 2:14.9. She would go on to be one of the dominant female runners in the state, winning the Free Press Marathon three times and setting a record of 2:38:22 in 1989.

Motor City Strider and marathon founder Ernie Smith presents award to 1971 winner Mike Hazilla (2:16:20).

The March 1974 marathon was run in sunny, high-30º weather. Paul Pearson of the Toronto Olympic Club, who had finished second to Spitz the previous October, won in 2:29:02. Despite the popularity of the March event, the Detroit News decided to drop its sponsorship so it might better concentrate on the indoor NCAA track meet, which provided larger crowds and, consequently, a paying audience. In October 1974, Ed Griffis battled 60º temperatures on a sunny day to win the Motor City Marathon in 2:25:29. This was a banner year — the first in which women participated in the event. Eight women entered and six finished. Sue Mallery, 54th out of 149 starters, paced the women in 3:09:47, a 25-minute margin over runner-up Jeanne Bocci, who became the first woman member of the Striders. Fifty-five of the 112 finishers were under 3:10 for the distance. The field saw nearly 200 starters in 1975, with 151 finishing in nearly ideal 40º to 50º weather. Bill Stewart set a 30-39 age group record in racing to an overall 2:25:05 victory. Stewart had speed too at shorter distances. Eight years later, in 1983, he set the masters indoor mile record when he clocked 4:11.00. Ella Willis, the first female finisher in ’75 marathon, finished 90th overall in 3:13:51, only two minutes ahead of her runner-up as competition in the women’s division improved considerably. As an 18-year-old, Willis had distinguished herself as Michigan’s high school half-mile champion with a

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In the women’s division, Alexa Kraft just missed breaking the three-hour barrier as she clocked 3:00:41 to establish the women’s state record. Of the 179 finishers, 165 — 92 percent — were under four hours. An effort was made in March 1977 to reinstate a spring marathon into the program. The West Bloomfield Parks and Recreation Department assumed sponsorship and a course was developed in that area. The winners were Leo Desjardine in 2:29:53 and Alexa Kraft in 3:17:37. The race was subsequently dropped from the Striders program in 1978 because of traffic conditions that were difficult to control. In March of 1978 and 1979, the race was held on Belle Isle under the sole sponsorship and direction of West Bloomfield. The year 1977 saw the number of runners in U.S. marathons nearly double to 25,000 from the year before. Boston, New York and Chicago entrants made up nearly 60 percent of this total. The field also

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Ann Forshee, who placed 82nd overall, broke the year-old women’s record with a time of 2:55:59, placing her in the all-time top 25 performances by U.S. women. This was also the first year in which a wheelchair contestant entered the race. Randy Wix completed the distance in 3:05:32. Early in 1978, Free Press managing editor Neal Shine contacted the Striders about the newspaper possibly sponsoring a major marathon in the area. Since the Motor City Marathon was well known and successful, the thought was that the Free Press would assume its sponsorship, merging with the MCM and bringing it to a new level. Sports editor Ladd Neuman suggested that the event be international in scope, using both the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel and Ambassador Bridge connecting the City of Windsor, Ontario, with Detroit. It would start on Belle Isle, go through the tunnel into Canada, cross the bridge at about the 17-mile point on the way back to the United States, and finish back on Belle Isle. Both the tunnel and bridge were originally approved and the course was measured. Then, just a month before the race, the bridge authority nullified the earlier agreement, maintaining that the person who gave the original approval had not been authorized to do so. This, coupled with a labor dispute among bridge employees, removed the bridge from the course. Negotiations with the tunnel were also tenuous. It had never been closed, not even during World War II. However, Shine convinced those in charge of the tunnel that this would, indeed, be a special event … and an international race was born. It would be the only marathon to run through a mile-long underground tunnel and one of only two courses that crossed an international border.

Photo from the collection of Dr. Ed Kozloff

Spitz finished third in both the 1979 and 1980 races, the second and third marathons sponsored by the Free Press, in 2:18:15 and 2:18:23 respectively.

The 1976 Motor City Marathon was designated the Road Runners Club of America North Region Championship. The day was ideal for the 250 entrants as temperatures hovered in the 45º- to 50º-range in a misty atmosphere. Winner Gordon Minty ran the third fastest time ever on the course, 2:17:49. At Eastern Michigan University, Minty had been a 14time All-American and three-time Mid-America Conference cross-country champion. He would go on to win the second Free Press race in 1979 with a time of 2:15:24.

nearly doubled to 428 entrants for the 15th running of the Motor City Marathon, placing it among the 10 largest marathons in the country. On a windy day that saw low 40º readings, Bob McOmber from Bowling Green, Ohio, placed first in 2:23:37 followed by Tim Fox in 2:25:11. McOmber would win the following year in 2:17:37, and Fox would take top honors in the race in 1985 with a time of 2:23:58. Of the 328 who finished the ’77 MCM, 98 were under three hours.

Ron Wallingford, winner in 1965 and 1967, runs in a 1971 race.

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On Oct. 22, 1978, the 16th annual Motor City Marathon started in Windsor, under the shadow of the Ambassador Bridge — and the first Detroit Free Press International Marathon was born. The rich history of marathon running in Detroit continues to this day. Through the years, courses (including the Ambassador Bridge) and events have been added to the race, allowing not only marathoners but runners competing in other distances to become a part of this spectacular tradition. This year, on Oct. 21, entrants will celebrate the 50th running of the race as well as the long, proud history of running in Detroit. - MR -

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Warrior Dash, Genesee Township

Tougher Warrior Dash a Smash in Second Year By Bill Khan

Photo by Bill Khan

O’Mara doesn’t consider herself strong on the obstacles, but she was dominant in the run. There were three lengthy stretches that weren’t interrupted by obstacles. She ran in the U.S. Women’s Olympic Marathon Trials in January after qualifying with a 2:43:55 in a lastchance attempt at the California International Marathon on Dec. 4. Because she is one of the state’s top road racers, she was somewhat cautious to avoid injury. “I’m probably a little bit wimpy on the obstacles,” the former Goodrich High School The Warrior Dash featured 13 obstacles this year. runner said. “I could probably push a little bit harder, but I do keep in GENESEE TOWNSHIP (7/28-29/12) — The course mind that I don’t want to get hurt. I’m pretty cauwas considered more challenging, but that’s OK. tious about keeping my feet underneath me and I Erin O’Mara likes a tough challenge. just run as hard as I can.” Changes in the course for the second Warrior Dash obstacle race at the E.A. Cummings Center didn’t Hannah Brisson, a former Richmond High alter the outcome of the women’s race, as O’Mara reSchool runner who competes for the University of peated as the overall winner for the weekend. Toledo, won the Sunday portion of the Warrior O’Mara ran on Saturday, July 28, posting a Dash for the second straight year in 27:27.15. time of 26:59.45 to place 11th overall out of 8,040 finishers. Another 9,116 warriors finished the SunThe overall winner for the weekend was Alexanday, July 29 heats. Awards were given out each day der Townsend in 22:41.5. Townsend ran that time to the top three overall and age-group finishers. after taking second on Saturday in 24:17.8. This year’s course was listed at 3.25 miles, as opposed to 3.2 miles last year, starting and finishing Chad Anastaoff, the Sunday winner last year, took in different areas than in 2011. There were 13 obstasecond overall with a time of 23:03.95 on Sunday. cles this year, one more than last year. Kenny Wall of Flushing, a former Oakland University runner, won the Saturday race in 24:12.2. One obstacle, in particular, slowed down the “I thought it was more challenging this year, beproceedings. Capsized Catamaran required runners cause the toughest obstacle for me was the pond to get into water that was over their heads and climb where you jump onto the catamaran,” Wall said. onto a tipsy platform before walking across it to the “I’m not a very good swimmer. I almost felt like I other side. Except for the very fastest runners, most was drowning out there. That’s where (third-place people had to tread water waiting for a chance to get finisher) Adam Roach passed me. I had to catch onto the platform. Those who weren’t strong swimback up to him. It was a lot more competitive this mers were encouraged to bypass the obstacle along year. There were a couple of good guys in my heat.” the outside edge of the pond. O’Mara is a highly competitive triathlete, so combining running and swimming is nothing new — though tris aren’t quite like this. “That (the Capsized Catamaran) was pretty challenging,” she said. “I wouldn’t say I’m a good swimmer. It makes a difference when you have shoes on and your legs feel heavy. You’re not going anywhere. It was the hardest thing. Getting up on the platform was pretty tough.”

The Warrior Dash is returning for a third time to Genesee Township next year. Registration began less than 24 hours after the completion of this year’s event, and spots were already filling up. A second Michigan Warrior Dash will take place Sept. 15 in Walker, near Grand Rapids. - MR -

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Roseville Big Bird 0912_Roseville Big Bird 8/11/12 6:50

34th Annual

Nov. 11, 2012

Reg. Fees: $25 by 4pm Nov. 7 $30 on race day

Entry form & information: Recreational Authority of Roseville & Eastpointe 18185 Sycamore Roseville, MI 48066 (586) 445-5480 www.roseville-mi.gov Register online: active.com

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Remembering ‘Red’ Simmons: Athlete, Coach, Friend and Women’s Running Pioneer By M. B. Dillon fter Redford High School senior Kenneth “Red” Simmons captured two firsts in the high school state track and field championships in 1929 in Ann Arbor, he was offered the equivalent of a University of Michigan scholarship at the time: a job. Just before school began, the stock market crashed and the Great Depression hit.

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“As the word of Mr. Simmons’ passing came out, so many of us felt terribly. We were shocked and our eyes filled with tears,” said Williams-Hoak, a four-time Big Ten champion. “We then began to think about how Mr. Simmons had been a part of our lives, and now the dominant emotion became gratitude.

The U of M coach called Simmons to say there was no longer any job: The parents of the students Simmons was going to wait on went broke in the stock market, and the students needed jobs themselves.

“We were grateful that in some way, big or small, for a long or short time, Ken, Kenny, Red, Mr. Simmons, Coach … had made our lives better, and for so many of us contributed to the people that we are today. He was truly, truly a very special man. We are here today to celebrate an unbelievable man who led an unbelievable life.

Lloyd Olds, track coach at Michigan State Normal College (now Eastern Michigan University), told Simmons he couldn’t help him, but that if Simmons could come up with tuition, $18.50 a semester, he could enroll.

Meanwhile, Simmons had entered the interclass track meet, and beat the entire varsity. Olds and Bingo Brown, coach and dean of men, went to McKenny and told him Simmons deserved another chance. Simmons was given a job cleaning mats in the gym for $2.50 a week, and slept on a cot in the dean’s basement.

Founding the Michigammes Fast forward to 1960: Red Simmons — storied athlete, husband to Betty, father and retired decorated Detroit police detective — attended the Olympic Games in Rome, where the longest distance for female runners was 800 meters (anything longer was then considered too much for “delicate constitutions.”) “Coach Simmons came back knowing that women’s track needed to be pursued in the U.S. because we didn’t have women runners,” recalled Carol Frederick Poenisch, who as a youth ran for Simmons, winning the national 880-yard junior title and national cross-country championship.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Simmons borrowed the money from a Detroit principal he knew. Carrying his lunch, he hitchhiked from his Redford farmhouse to Ypsilanti and back each day. He had no money for books, and his grades suffered. College president Charles McKenny wrote Mr. and Mrs. Simmons saying, “We don’t think Kenneth can make it here; his grades aren’t very good.”

“He accomplished so much in his life, and was an amazing athlete,” she added. “He was an assistant professor emeritus at U of M, a Hall of Famer, a father, grandfather and great-grandfather. A loving husband to the late Betty and Lois, a friend and loyal supporter of athletics, an inspiration and a difference-maker. “When asked what he had to say about his life, Red replied, ‘I’ve been lucky with everything that has happened to me. There was no reason for me to be as good as I was. The only thing I can think of was I inherited it from my mom. She was only 5feet-1 inches, but she would pull her skirt up, race my brother and I around the farm and beat us.’

In 2010, at the age of 100, “Red” Simmons congratulates mile winner Danielle Tauro at the University of Michigan indoor track meet named in his honor, the Red Simmons Invitational. The Michigammes became a national powerhouse on the AAU track and cross-country circuit — producing three Olympians, including Francie Kraker Goodridge. In 1976, Simmons was selected as the first women’s track and field coach at U of M. Just four years later, his Wolverines won the Big Ten title at Wisconsin.

“His favorite food? Fruits and vegetables. The most exciting place he ever visited? The Louvre in Paris. The person who inspired him most? His seventh-grade teacher (a Carlisle Indian who convinced farmers to make a running track in the cornfields near the Redford schoolhouse, replete with hurdles made of sticks). The defining moments of his life? Being able to go to high school. “Coach Simmons’ family was very poor and when his parents decided that he would go to high school, it set the groundwork for a lot of great things that happened. And deciding to become a coach,” Williams-Hoak continued. “His life’s highlight? He said, ‘My two marriages. I was so fortunate to find such good mates. My children, their children and their children.’ His life’s regrets? Not keeping a diary and not getting to know his parents more.”

Celebration of Life Simmons visited local schools, inviting young women to join the Michigammes track club he and Betty were founding, Poenisch said. These were preTitle IX days, when athletic opportunities for girls and women were minimal. Simmons’ venture met with great success. During an 18-year run, 118 young women from a wide geographic area competed for the Michigammes, originally called the Ann Arbor Anns.

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Kenneth Simmons was born Jan. 5, 1910, in Cleveland, Ohio, and died of natural causes related to old age on April 13, 2012. On April 19, his family, friends, fellow coaches, athletes and admirers filled U of M’s Junge Family Champions Center to celebrate his life of 102 years. They were welcomed by Lake Forest golf pro Debbie Williams-Hoak, who competed for Coach Simmons and is writing a book about his life.

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Two-time Olympian Francie Goodridge’s voice cracked with emotion as she took the podium and eulogized Simmons, “our beloved coach, mentor, friend, family patriarch. Thank you for sharing Red with us for all these years,” she said to his family. “I think I was Red’s first girl athlete,” she went on. “As I became a coach myself, I often asked him, ‘How could you ever have managed and stood coaching me?’ because I think I was such a drama queen.

“But he was the most patient, wonderful coach you could imagine. He and Betty coached and mentored me all the way to the Olympic Games — a goal they proposed to me, a 14-year-old girl who knew nothing about what was ahead or what I was going to have to do,” said Goodridge, who coached the U of M women’s track team from 1981 to 1984.

one handmade by Olympian Jesse Owens, Simmons’ longtime friend and fellow competitor.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Lloyd Carr, among many U of M coaches present, recalled the day he was announced as head football coach. “Red came to my office, opened the door and said, ‘You got a minute?’ I said ‘Sure, come on in.’ He said, ‘Look, I want you to have this.’ “He gave me a medal he had won in competition at a senior race. He said, ‘I won this medal and I want you to have it. Someday, Lloyd, your coaching career is going to be over, and until it is, I want you to keep in mind what is on the back of this medal.’ It said, ‘Family, Friends and Health.’

“But just seven years after that, we found ourselves in MexMichigan women’s track coach, James Henry, speaks at “Red” ico City together particiSimmons’ memorial. The photo on the screen shows “Red” pating in the Olympic competing in the hurdles for Michigan Normal School, now Games. That seven-year Eastern Michigan University. journey was just an amazing time. We loved our workouts, we loved they are, and then take the time to listen. The one I the people we worked out with and we loved the like the most is: Just show up and cheer! Be somechallenges we faced every day. one’s biggest fan.” “He was an extraordinary man who gave so much to so many. His vital presence in our memories will never fade. There are people all over the world who were taught by him. All of us take comfort in the people he touched.” U of M’s women’s track coach of 28 years James Henry said, “Red is personally responsible for me being head coach. To this day, Red would help me coach; helping me in how I handle women and also, the most important thing, how to be a man. “I had no role model growing up. He was the sweetest, kindest man; he ever raised his voice. I have been married for 25 years and am the happiest person here because I never had a job in my life, because of Red. He taught me that behind every great man is a greater woman. He built a legacy of integrity, hard work and honesty. He has made my job easy because I live by his example as an individual and coach.” Sue Foster, six-time Big Ten champion who coached women’s cross country at U of M, said, “Mr. Simmons worked out almost every day of his life. He ate really well except when there were cookies, cakes and brownies around. He kept his figure nice and trim, and he was rewarded with a long, healthy life. There are two main lessons Coach and Mrs. Simmons taught me, and many of you, too. First is to keep fit, and second is to encourage and help others. Coach always told me, ‘Keep moving, Susie, just keep moving.’ If we are not fit, we have a harder time doing lesson number two. Both Coach and Lois have taught us many ways to encourage others: to treat all people with respect and kindness, to see the good in others, to share a positive story, to encourage people to do their best and then help them if they need it. Ask others how

Grandson David Simmons said, “My grandfather didn’t understand why so many rich and famous people wanted to spend time with him; he said he wasn’t anything special. I’d assumed the reason was all those great stories we enjoyed listening to — how he overcame adversity and achieved greatness by accident.

It’s amazing how many times I was reminded of that. Coaching is so intense; that advice was really important to me. Red could see the big picture, which is part of why he lived such a wonderful, long life.” Carr lauded Simmons for helping to launch women’s athletics at U of M. “He stepped outside the boundary. Who would have thought it would come to where it is today? Red was willing to coach them. It was a beautiful thing,” Carr said.

U of M football player John Ghindia recalled guiding a campus tour for fellow letter-winners from 50 Division 1 universities during Carr’s last year coaching. “These guys were from schools like USC, UCLA, Texas template_sixth and Florida. sixth vertical vertical 8/7/12 8:14 PM Pag

“I came to realize it was something much more. My grandfather achieved greatness by creating successful people. He had a unique ability to see the greatness in others and through his coaching, help that person.” Son Larry Simmons divulged his dad’s secret of longevity: “Surround yourself with young, attractive women and continue to do that all your life,” he said with a laugh. “You could go to any airport in the world, stand on a box and holler, ‘Anyone here know Red?’ and at least one hand would go up. “After 73 years as his son, the thing that stands out for me is the importance of loving and honoring the woman you choose for your wife. She shares your victories and soothes your defeats. Dad shared his life with two wonderful women; my mother for 44 years, and after her death, another 36 with Lois. What a legacy. My wife Nancy and I only have 30 more to go!” All-America high-jumper Joanna Bullard Mehall said, “Mr. Simmons touched my life as a coach and a friend. To me a coach is not measured by how many wins or losses he has, but by how he touches his athletes. Red cared for us like a father. He will inspire us for the rest of our lives.” Granting Coach Simmons’ wish, the throng sang “Hurrah for the Yellow and Blue” before dispersing to reminisce and peruse Red’s many writeups, photos, accolades and trophies — including michiganrunner.net

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© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“In 1930, Coach Simmons very much appreciated someone helping him find a job so he could cover the cost of his books,” said Szady, a star quarter-miler. “He always remembered that, and he emphasized the importance of education with his athletes. To tie it together, in his memory a book fund is being created in the School of Kinesiology, Red’s alma mater.” The idea is to help deserving U of M athletes pay for textbooks, but not necessarily just track and field athletes. “Red was very interested in the track kids and Michigammes, but he actually talked to and interacted with a lot of athletes across the board,” said Szady. “He was a big fan of women’s volleyball, basketball and softball. A lot of those kids talked to him about training, life and balancing academics. I think that was true with men’s athletics also.”

“Red” Simmons celebrates his 100th birthday with Debbie Williams-Houk. “We stopped at the track and showed them the plaque commemorating the day in 1935 when Jesse Owens set four world records at Ferry Field,” continued Ghindia. “Red came over and told them all about that day — he was there — and how he and Jesse Owens competed against each other, barnstorming around the country. They left the track in awe. “I loved everything about Red. I was blessed to know him. He was special.” Ann Forshee-Crane - coach, ultra-marathoner and first woman to break three hours at the Detroit Marathon — said, “No person in my life, other than my parents, influenced me more. I am still a fit person and I really value that. “Red was so ahead of his time when it came to women and people of color. There was never any thought as to what we couldn’t do or shouldn’t do as young women. “Challenging oneself physically makes life exciting,” she added. “Without Mr. Simmons and the Michigammes, I wouldn’t have discovered the passion of running.” World-class triathlete and duathlete Karen McKeachie said that when she began running with the Michigammes in 1969, “I wasn’t very good. Coach Simmons encouraged me all the time; he never discouraged me at all, so I stuck with it and became a halfway decent runner. “That experience changed my life; I became a complete athlete instead of one who always wanted to be an athlete.”

Giving Back Two efforts are afoot to keep Coach Simmons’ legacy alive. There are plans for a Ken Simmons Hall of Fame Room in U of M’s proposed new indoor track building. Former Michigammes including Sheryl Szady are working on another special project.

Former Michigammes coach George Heigenhauser, professor emeritus at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, is helping with the book fund. “Red was a groundbreaker. We want him to get some recognition for what he did with the Michigammes,” Heigenhauser said. “To Red, it didn’t matter what your background was. You could be a young woman from the projects. You could be a top athlete or just a plodder. He always encouraged people to do their very best. “He left a major legacy by pioneering women’s track and field, bringing these girls into womanhood so they could succeed in life — and all of them have done very, very well. He was just a good guy; everybody confided in him.” Red Simmons Scholarship gifts, made payable to the University of Michigan, may be sent to U-M School of Kinesiology, 1402 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. When Simmons turned 95, McKeachie and her husband Lew Kidder hosted a reunion of the Michigammes/birthday party, adding to festivities the weekend of the Big Ten Women’s Indoor Championships. More than 40 Michigammes attended, many from out of state. One by one, they told their former coach, Lois and each other what they’d done with their lives. Simmons, who had just returned from a mountainclimbing trip to Mexico, said later that evening, “I sat there tonight and listened, and it hit me then: I did affect all of them. “At the time you are doing it, you’re just doing something you like to do. You don’t realize you are actually making history. It took quite a bit of restraining to stop myself from tears. “It’s wonderful for me to see what they have done, and to realize I was a part of it,” said Simmons. “I wanted them to have the experience of companionships and togetherness. “To see that they still have it after 40 years indicates one of the values of sports,” he said. - MR -

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In Red’s Own Words “He was more than a teacher; he was a friend who inspired,” said Debbie WilliamsHoak of her late coach, Ken “Red” Simmons. Williams-Hoak — head teaching pro at Saline’s Lake Forest Golf Course, LPGA member and golf coach at Saline High School said, “Mr. Simmons led an unbelievable life with so many trials and tribulations in many walks of life. He was, and is, an inspiration to so many, and influenced people in a tremendously positive way. I owe so much of who I am and what I have accomplished to him.” An All-America in the javelin at the University of Michigan, Williams-Hoak is writing a book about Simmons’ life. She compiled these quips and quotes from her coach, who died April 13 at age 102.

“I’m interested in people being happy and succeeding, and I try to do what I can to see that I’m at least helping them in some way.” “I want to be remembered for helping a lot of young people, men and women, boys and girls.” “You don’t know when you are coaching athletes that you’re going to be part of their future. To see what they accomplish — that is the great thing.” “Everything that’s good and makes life good” (of what U of M meant to him). “Athletics always leaves you with the fact that you can always improve.” “Success is determination to do better and not accept where you are — persevere!” “I think I’m a better driver than most people” (said at age 97). “I was told to respect my elders, but now I have no one left to respect” (said at age 100). “I love music, but I don’t understand it.” Asked if he could have dinner with anybody, living or dead, who would it be? “My mother and father.” - MR -

Flirt with Dirt, Novi

Flirt with Dirt: Discovering Novi’s ‘Hidden Gem’ By Ron Marinucci dry spell meant no puddles, muck or slippery spots – not this year. The downhill start quickly circled an open field and took runners for a short jaunt through the parking area before reaching the trailhead. The 5K began 30 minutes before the 10K, but both races covered much of the same terrain. The finish was back up that sharp sled hill at the start, a sadistic end. Kevin Janette ran his first Flirt but noted, ”I’ve run Dances with Dirt (Running Fit’s trail ultra races) 13 times. This is my first race in two years after a back injury.

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“This feels good,” he said at the finish. “It’s a beautiful course, very scenic. The hills were a good challenge. There were lots of twists and turns, but the course was well marked. These guys (Running Fit) organize great races!” Ella Lynch, 9, and her brother, Brennan, 6, ran their first 5Ks here and were youngest finishers.

up at both distances. David Gould was the overall 5K winner in 20:31, while Daniel Shorin was third in 20:54. The masters winners were Kathy La Reau (27:52) and Mike Fisher (21:02). Fisher was fourth overall after winning the 5K outright in 2011. Shane Logan finished first in the 10K in 41:49. Pacing the masters were Angie McCalla (52:43) and Dan Vining (48:16). The 5K attracted 208 registered runners, 179 of whom ran and finished. The longer race counted 457 registrants, with 376 finishers. Limited parking at Lakeshore Park has restricted registrations to around 600, with entries closing several weeks before the race. “It’s a beautiful day,” said race director and trail running enthusiast Randy Step at the finish line. “How could anyone ask for more?”

Race results can be found at http://runflirt.com. “We run here all the time,” said Ella, smiling - MR - 8/11/12 6:56 PM Page 1 because she beat Dad. “It’s awesome. I liketurkey the upstrot 0912_quarter page template ann arbor and downs and all the twists and turns.”

Ella Lynch leads a pack through the trails in Lakeshore Park. NOVI (6/9/12) — Running a trail race is far different from running one on the road or track. Underfoot, there are roots, rocks and fallen limbs to avoid. Overhead, there are branches to duck. There are usually far more twists and turns, often tighter, too. Although there are few long, grinding uphills on the trails, short, sharp climbs and equally short, sharp downs are more numerous. That describes the eighth annual Flirt with Dirt 5K and 10K trail races put on by Running Fit at Lakeshore Park, a hidden gem in a city some view as “the land of malls and mansions.” Recent Flirts have been so hot and humid that clouds formed under canopies of trees and deer flies were in attack mode. Overnight storms have required steeplechase-like hurdling of downed tree trunks. Not so this year. The sky was clear with a few wispy clouds and temperatures in the 60s. A recent

“I run on the course a lot,” said Brennan, who calls it “my Magic Trail” because “on my first run here, I didn’t have to stop!” Father Tim Lynch said he fell in love with the trails after running last year’s Flirt with Dirt 10K. “I lived in (neighboring) Walled Lake all my life and didn’t know they existed,” he continued. “Now we train here all the time. It’s practically in our backyard.” Erin O’Mara has run and won both women’s races every year but one since 2008. This year she claimed the 5K in 20:52, more than three minutes ahead of runner-up Kelly Valente (24:07), and 10K in 44:53, six and a half minutes before secondplace Katherine Senne (51:12). O’Mara was also the overall runner-

Thanksgiving Day

November 22, 2012 www.theturkeytrot.com

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(248) 437-4524

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‘Patient Endurance’: Mantra of a Masters Racing Team By Anthony Targan gan since turning 40 three years ago and has been active in running circles for some time. He is a team player, always willing to lend a hand, always willing to do his part.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

It may seem contradictory that you need to be patient to run a good race. In an era when the “need for speed” is paramount and “nice guys finish last,” there aren’t many runners who emphasize patience when it comes to racing. But then again, there aren’t many runners like Steve Menovcik.

Risley credited Menovcik’s “upstanding reputation” for recruiting PER members who are “‘regular guys’ like me, Kevin Deyo, Scott Fiske, Rich Powers, Brian Mazur, Brian Fahey, Scot Ursum, Dan Dixon … guys with desk jobs and families.”

Menovcik founded the Patient Endurance Racing team this year with the goal of “providing an opportunity for Steve Menovcik master runners in Michigan to do team events.” A late bloomer, he did not In its first year, run in high school or college and has been running for the PER men’s masters finished 12th out of 68 only 10 years. Now 43, he has the maturity and experiteams at the Boston Marathon, led by Power ence to appreciate the benefits of being patient, even (2:53:13), Ursum (3:04:12) and Jay Steele though it is a challenge for him personally. (3:20:06).

After a run last Thanksgiving Day, Menovcik broached the subject of a masters racing team with Dave Peterson, who encouraged him to start one. The team has quickly grown to nearly 30 runners. Menovcik wants to keep numbers “kind of small so we all know each other,” since the team concept depends on a tight group mentality for mutual support. “Steve has a clear vision of what he wants PER to be in Michigan and beyond,” said teammate Lori Guthrie. “He is a huge advocate for masters running in this state. Every one of us has benefited from his unwavering support, humor, kindness and deep knowledge of running. “It’s exciting to be a part of the team in its early phases,” Guthrie continued. “PER, under Steve’s leadership, will be a force to be reckoned with in masters running.” Member Hank Risley discussed how Menovcik not only started the team, but is funding its fledgling efforts (at least until a team sponsor can be found). “Steve decided to underwrite the expense, recruit and assemble a team,” said Risely. “He has been one of the top-tier masters runners in Michi32

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At the Fifth Third River Bank 25K, the men’s masters won the USATF team title and was the fastest team overall. It finished fourth at the USATF Masters 10K Championship in Ann Arbor.  

© C. Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“I remember about 20 years ago someone saying you need to have patient endurance to get through life,” said Menovcik. “I always liked the phrase ‘patient endurance,’ especially since I am one of the least-patient people alive. Since the team is made up of mainly middle- to longer-distance runners who need patient endurance to get through their races, the name just seems appropriate.”

While the women’s teams have been plagued by injuries, they have experienced great individPeggy Zeeb sports ual performances such as the Patient EnMelissa Sundermann durance singlet at (3:20:39) and Mikelle the Masters 10K Adamczyk (3:37:19) at Championship. Boston, Amy Wing (1:45:06) at the River Bank 25K and Peggy Zeeb (50-plus age group winner) at the Masters 10K Championship.  PER planned to compete in the Crim 10-miler in Flint, the USATF Masters 15K Championship in Buffalo, N.Y., on Labor Day, and the USATF Cross Country Club Championships in Lexington, Ky., in December. Anthony Targan is a regular contributor to Michigan Runner magazine and a member of Patient Endurance Racing team. Interested team sponsors can contact Menovcik at smenovcik@gmail.com. - MR -

Solstice Run, Northville

Solstice Run Celebrates 10th Anniversary By Charles Douglas McEwen NORTHVILLE (6/23/12) — With the Kona 10-Mile, Aloha 10K, Honolulu 5K, Maui Mile and more than 3,100 participants (several wearing grass skirts and coconut bras), the Solstice Run packed Hawaiian punch into its 10th anniversary.

winner Patricia Murray, 41, of Redford also found good competition. “I passed another woman around mile five or six and kept working from there,” she said. “I’d like to mention the training group (Paul Aufdemberge, Marybeth Reader and others) that I run with,” added Murray, who was coming back from an injury. “Without their support, I wouldn’t be here right now.”

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

The event, presented by the Kona Running Club, was especially competitive in the 10-mile race as Luke Humphrey, 31, of Royal Oak, Clint Verran, 37, of Lake Orion and Richard Swor, 28, of Dearborn went head-tohead-to-head for the first three miles. “At that point, I made a little move and it was enough to get separation,” Humphrey said.

The women’s winner, timed in 1:06:17, was followed by Tammy Nowik, 38, of Clarkston in 1:07:23 and Jenni Culbertson, 27, of Northville in 1:09:32.

The sun shines high overhead as runners near the Solstice Run finish line.

He and fellow Hansons-Brooks Distance Project team member Verran have a friendly rivalry — well, mostly friendly.

Humphrey. “He planned to sit on me and out-kick me at the end. I wanted to take that (scenario) out of the picture.”

“Honestly, I wanted to bury Clint,” said

Humphrey eased away from the other men while climbing the hills of Northville, finishing in 52:26. Verran then used his kick to fend off Swor. “With 100 meters to go, we got into traffic on the jogging path,” Verran said. “I gunned it as hard as I could, darting through people, and was able to get away from Rich.” Verran finished second in 52:43, Swor third in 52:48. “It’s a tough, hilly course that never really gives you a break,” said Verran. “It was a little on the warm side, being in mid-June. But the heat could have been much worse.” Women’s 10-mile

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Chad Cini, 20, of Northville won the men’s 10K in a personal record 33:49. “My old PR was 36:30, which I did here last summer,” he said. Jackie Rzepecki, 33, of Rochester led the women in 37:49. “The hills were merciless,” she said. “I was hoping that the final downhill would help me, but it hurt just as much as the uphills.” Newlyweds Leo, 31, and Leah Foley, 35, of Clarkston each finished second overall in the 10K, with Leo timing 35:03 and Leah 38:47. Thirds went to Kirk Walrath, 42, of Fenton (36:11) and Nicole Mosteller, 16, of Northville (43:00). In the 5K, Adam Kern, 20, of Ann Arbor (16:00) and Victoria Voronko, 21, of Ypsilanti (18:10) took firsts; Daniel Snyder, 34, of Farmington Hills (16:53) and Brooke Kovacic, 16, of Oxford (19:00) seconds; and Dana Sims, 16, of Novi (17:14) and Brooke Scivillo, 20, of Ypsilanti (20:48) thirds. Race donations benefited the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Northville Parks and Recreation and the Northville Education Foundation. For complete race results, visit http://solsticerun.org.

- MR -

Liberty Run, Canton

Liberty Run Statues Set World Mark By Tracey Cohen

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

CANTON (6/16/12) — History was made at Heritage Park as nearly 1,000 runners and walkers competed in the Canton Liberty 10K, 5K and 1-mile fun runs. Most were dressed as the Statue of Liberty, setting a Guinness Book of World Record for the largest group assembled as a monument.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

“This was a hoot,” exclaimed 10K finisher Jocelyn Anderson. “It’s awesome seeing everyone running in costume with crowns; cracks me up.” Athletes enjoyed a largely flat and fast course ambling through subdivisions, parks and a pedestrian trail near the Lower Rouge River.

10K winners Lemon James and Billy Vanvianen have different takes on the costume the day. quarter page template_quarter pageof template 6/14/12 12:37 PM Page 1

Kathy Mitchell, a 5K finisher, appreciated the shady gravel trail and sunny, 70-degree conditions.

“I liked seeing the “This was a hoot,” exclaimed 10K country,” said Tom finisher Jocelyn Anderson. Liebelt, 9, having finished his second 5K. “It was a beautiful view, especially when we went over Patricia Murray led the bridges.” the 5K women in 19:46. Billy Vanvianen won the 10K in 37:21 despite Mandy Hetfield, a not having run all week. Running Fit stores events assistant who was “My father had a heart attack on Sunday,” said brains behind the Statue Vanvianen. “It was a freak accident. He’s a runner of Liberty concept, said too, but heart disease runs in our family. she thought it would add excitement to the “He came out of the coma Tuesday. I came to race. run because I knew he would want me to do the race. It was a beautiful event and I enjoyed the How to trump it course. I run on that trail a lot,” he said. next year? “Maybe have people dress as the LibWomen’s 10K champion Lemon James, who erty Bell?” Hetfield said. finished in 47:00, sped up when she hit the dirt, “her natural territory,” her husband, Gerry HerFor complete remann, said. “She took off when we hit the trail.” sults, visit http:// runningfitsites.com. Jacob Decahaye, who won the 5K in 18:01, said, “I was looking forward to the event. I trained - MR for it and had a good race for myself.”

MACKINAW FALL COLORS BRIDGE RUN

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Entry Fee: $40, if you register before September 1, 2012, $45 after September 1, 2012 & $50 onsite registration October 5, 2012 (includes breakfast, official race ±shirt, medal & transportation to starting area) T-shirts can not be guaranteed if registering after September 15, 2012 Bus transportation schedule staring times: 7:00 am-last bus 8:30 am. RACE LIMITED TO 1400 entries.

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Supported by: The Mackinaw Area Visitors Bureau

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Michigan Athletes Compete: Scenes from U.S. Olympic Team Trials, Track & Field Eugene, Oregon - June 21 - July 1, 2012 Photos by Victah Sailer, photorun.net

Ben True, Dathan Ritzenhein and Galen Rupp splash through the 10,000 meter final. Rockfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ritzenhein qualified for his third Olympic team with a third place finish, 27:36. 36

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Bette Wade, heptathlon, 4th, 6018 pts

Nicole Bush (r), steeplechase, 10:06.23

Craig Forys (r), steeplechase final, 8:46

Jeff Porter (r), 110m hurdles, 3rd, 13.08 - PB

Liam Boylan-Pett (r), 1500, 3:52.18, 800, 1:48.46; Will Leer (r), 1500, 3:46.75

Bridget Owens (l), 110m hurdles, 12.92

Jake Riley (l), 10,000, 28:08. Also, 5000, 13:59.

Anna Pierce, 1500, final, 5th, 4:07

Brandon Bethke (r), 5000, semifinal, 13:45; final, 14:03.

Not Pictured: Ali Arastu, 400, 53:12 Shayla Mahan, 100, 11.70 & 200, 23:62 Katie McGregor, 10,000, 33:11 Candice Davis-Price, 100m hurdles, semifinal, 12.85

Brian Richotte, hammer throw, 217-6 Corey Nowitzke, steeplechase, 8:53.58 Elizabeth Graney, steeplechase, 9:59.76 Tori Franklin, triple jump, 41-1 Beth Rohl, discus throw, final, 7th, 189-8 michiganrunner.net

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Michigan Olympians: Scenes from London Olympic Games July 27- August 12, 2012 Photos by Victah Sailer, photorun.net

Athletes assemble in the Olympic Stadium during the Opening Ceremonies.

Dathan Ritzenhein, 10,000, 13th, 27:45

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Nicole Edwards Sifuentes, 1500, semifinal, 4:06.33

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Lauryn Williams (pictured here at the US Olympic Trials) anchored 4 x 100 relay semifinal, gold medal

Tia Brooks (pictured at Olympic trials) shot put, 17.72, qualifying round

Desiree Davila, pictured at a kids run in New York in June, suffered a hip flexor injury during training and did not finish the marathon.

Nick Willis, right, competes for New Zealand. 1500 final, 9th, 3:36.94. Willis won the 1500 Silver medal in Beijing.

Tiffany Porter (left), pictured winning in Ostrava, 100m hurdles, semifinal, 12.79.

Jeff Porter, 110 meter hurdles, semifinal, 13.41

Geena Gall, 800m, semifinal, 2:05.76

Not Pictured: Uhunoma Osazuwa - competes for Nigeria Event: heptathlon, 4401 points - 5 events, DNF University of Michigan Doctor of Pharmacy student

Jamie Nieto, high jump, final, 2.29, 6th place.

Nate Brannen, 1500, semifinal, 3:39.26

Eric Alejandro - competes for Puerto Rico Event: 400m hurdles, semifinal, 49.15, personal best Eastern Michigan University alum Morgan Uceny Event: 1500 meter run, fell in final, DNF Trained in Ann Arbor 2007- 2009 michiganrunner.net

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Photo courtesy of Doug Kurtis

Fifth Third Parade Company Turkey Trot: 30 Years Making History in Detroit By Doug Kurtis

T

It has eloquently been called the “tradition before the tradition” and “the parade before the parade.” Runners and walkers have enjoyed the spirit of Thanksgiving while performing in front of several hundred thousand spectators. In 2011, Running USA called it the largest timed Thanksgiving Day race.

rade. Other unique plans will be announced. Last year the Fifth Third Turkey Trot became the largest race in Michigan based on timed finishers (17,339 plus 1,000 Mashed Potato Milers). One idea that took hold to help make this happen is remote packet pick-up. This year more than 80 percent of the participants are expected to pick up their bib numbers and tech shirts over a two-week period before the race. Ten local running stores and sponsor locations will be used to facilitate what organizers call “the race before the race.”

The Parade Company has instituted many creative ideas to attract runners and make the race fun. This year all runners will receive a commemorative medal to celebrate the 30th anniversary. A new Fifth Third Turkey Trot float will be unveiled in the pa-

Instituting the wave system has provided a way to increase numbers without bottlenecks. A Turkey Trot captain provided the idea for waves based on the names of Santa’s reindeer: Comet, Blitzen and Rudolph.

his Thanksgiving the Fifth Third Turkey Trot presented by The Parade Company will celebrate 30 years of racing history.

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The Fifth Third Turkey Trot with the support of the Parade Company is certainly a grass roots promotional team. The staff boasts more than 60 captains residing throughout the Detroit area. Fifteen of these captains are themselves directors of other races. More than 500 people volunteer their time to make the event successful. Last year saw the addition of cheer stations along the course. They tied in nicely with the cookie and candy stations that began two years before. Patrick Dantzer, a Pittsburgh medical student, drove all night to arrive at the starting line on time. He was rewarded with a victory in the 10K. Angela Matthews defended her 10K women’s crown. Ian Boyle, 15:29, and Shannon Osika, 17:00, both set new S3 Stuffing Strut 5K records.

The 2010 event saw a minor diversion when a police car entered behind the lead vehicles and sent the first wave of runners through the parade’s TV zone. It shortened the course by 100 yards but provided some fun theatrics for viewers as runners barreled past Silver Bullet Band sax player Alto Reed as he was rehearsing for the cameras. This year saw the addition of doggie water stops. Canine to Five, a Detroit dog daycare center, also provided treats to the four-legged finishers. Denisa Costescu defended her 5K title. Alex Bowman won the men’s race. Paul Heffron and Matthews were the 10K winners.

The rest of the decade featured many of Michigan’s top runners. Laura Murphy topped the podium in ’02, ‘00 and 1998. Olympian Brian Sell took the winner’s crown in 2001.

That year’s event also saw the introduction of the first running float. Blue Cross Blue Shield sponsored the building of a giant picnic basket that was pushed by its employees. A year later, Strategic Staffing Solutions built a sports car float that looked like it was being steered by a cat and dog.

The Turkey Trot has had several three-time champions. Verran won in ’96, ’97, 2003 and ’04; and Lisa Weidenbach in ‘83, ‘84 and 1993. Paul Aufdemberge’s longevity and talent were displayed at his victories in ’88, ’90 and 1998.

In 2009 The Parade Company made the race more parade-like by adding giant inflatables to the start and on the course. Remote packet pick-up made its debut. In her first race since giving birth to a daughter in May, Dot McMahan won her third Fifth Third Turkey Trot. Hansons-Brooks teammate Sage Canady took the men’s title. Costescu and Scott Setzke won the S3 Stuffing Stut. “S3” Strategic Staffing Solutions, home based in Detroit, graciously chose to title sponsor the Stuffing Strut 5K, which saw 1,450 finishers. It is now the largest 5K in Michigan (9,835 finishers in 2011). 2008: After several years of issuing sweatshirts to participants and volunteers, The Parade Company chose Leslie Jordan, one of the leading suppliers of technical shirts, to produce something cool and comfortable. The multicolored yoke-and-panel shirt turned out to be a winner. This year’s tri-colored shirt should be a standout. 2006: One of the warmest Turkey Trots produced a then-record field of 7,500. Tom Greenless outkicked Clint Verran while Laura Murphy beat all the women. Shane Logan and Danielle Hobbs were the inaugural Stuffing Strut 5K winners.

Participation in the ’90s stayed fairly consistent at about 5,000 runners, which was one of the largest fields in Michigan. The course varied from finishing in Cobo Center to Wayne State’s campus and continued to run along part of the parade route. Standout winners included Kyle Baker, Ann Boyd Stewart, Guy Murray and Ella Willis.

1997: Runners still talk about the race that became front-page news. A bystander who thought she knew the course sent everyone in the wrong direction. Lead runners were seen hurdling barriers to get back on the right course. It was more comical than devastating since the Trot is really considered a fun run. The ’80s marked the beginning of the Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot boom. It is now the biggest day of racing in the country. It’s also a “do I run or not run” day, weather-wise. Detroit’s Turkey Trot has seen every kind of weather. 1989 had a wind chill of minus 2 degrees, which didn’t stop 5,300 runners from showing up. Snowfall and slush covered the route in 1985. After a false start, Eric Stuber a nine-time All-American at Michigan State University, led 2,837 finishers with a best time of 30:27. Some of the stars of the decade included Olympian Todd Williams, Mindy Rowand-Schmidt, a five-time All-American, and three-time winner Cheri Sly. Last year’s official starter and former Boston and Detroit marathon champion Greg Meyer won the Turkey Trot in 1987.

From 1985 until 2004 the Motor City Striders and its president Ed Kozloff organized the race. Jeanne Bocci and the Belle Isle Runners managed the race in 1984. In keeping with my club’s (the Redford Roadrunners’) spirit, I sported war paint and a feathered Indian headband. It paid off with a victory. The Striders couldn’t direct the inaugural 10K run in 1983 due to a conflict with one of their own races. New York’s Super Race Systems produced the first race. More than 2,300 runners showed up despite 13-degree temperatures. The idea for Detroit’s Thanksgiving Turkey Trot came less than two months before that first race in 1983. Mike O’Hara, a runner and sportswriter for the Detroit News, was at the Anchor Bar with friend Jim Patterson, a former News photographer who had recently had been hired as the chief fundraiser for the Thanksgiving Parade. O’Hara suggested that since the parade route would already be closed and there would be a large captive audience, “it would be a great place to hold a running road race.” A 400-percent growth in participation says a lot about a running event. It means doing the right things to make it a great experience and instituting creative and artistic ideas that resonate with the local community to give the race a fresh look every year. Making it easy and convenient to participate is part of the success. There are many races to choose from, but few offer the spectacle of the Fifth Third Turkey Trot. Families and friends joining together in delightful costumes and crazy hats add to the event’s charm. Like America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and Detroit’s Target Fireworks, the 30th anniversary of the Fifth Third Turkey Trot has a lot of character and characters. Whether you run like a Comet, Blitzen or Rudolph, you’ll be moved by the sights and sounds of magic and sparkle. - MR -

2005: Despite a snow whiteout, almost 5,000 runners showed up. Fifth Third Bank marketing director Jack Riley couldn’t see the runners when he sounded the starting horn. RunMichigan.com’s Josh Eberly and Dot McMahon captured the winners’ laurels. 2004: After several years starting from Wayne State University the race returned to Cobo Center with new co-directors Alan Whitehead and myself. Icy streets prevented many runners from getting to the race, but it didn’t slow down winners Clint Verran and Melissa White.

michiganrunner.net

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Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

41

Independence Aquathlon, Howell

Champs Make Splash in Aquathlon Heat By Charles Douglas McEwen HOWELL (7/1/12) — First-time and veteran competitors Alex Russeau and Kelsey Calhoun both thrived in the sweltering heat at the 10th annual Independence Aquathlon, hosted by the Howell Area Parks and Recreation Authority at Howell City Park. Russeau, 23, of Lambertville was the men’s champ, while Calhoun, 18, of LaSalle paced the women. They mirrored each other in other ways. Both led after the first 2K run, were passed by two swimmers during the 750-meter water leg in Thompson Lake, then regained the lead during the finishing 2K run.

He won nonetheless in 27:49, well ahead of runners-up Spenser Swanton, 19, of Saginaw (29:18) and Shawn Jyawooh, 38, of Ann Arbor (29:30). Calhoun, a University of Toledo freshman, clocked 31:40, a dramatic improvement over her 35:21 last year when she finished third among the women.

No one, however, could catch Hendrick in the one-mile open-water swim, which she won in 22:34. She was also was the top woman in the swim last year and in 2009, plus won both the swim and aquathlon in 2010.

This year she finished 20 seconds ahead of runner-up Karin Hanisch, 21, of East Lansing (32:00).

“I look forward to this race every year,” said Hendrick. “Sometimes, it’s the only race that I do.”

“I felt pretty good. I feel like I accomplished a lot,” Calhoun said.

Mike Shuldinger, 51, of Waterford was the second open-water and first male swimmer, finishing in 23:06. Next was Steven Tarske, 16, of Pinckney in 23:09.

Heidi Hendrick, 31, of Ann Arbor, who led led the women out of the water, ended up third in 32:59.

“I wasn’t sure what kind of shape I was in,” Russeau said. “And (not having competed in the aquathlon before) I was sort of running the course blind.”

time before they caught me.”

“They (Calhoun and Hanisch) were pretty fast runners,” Hendrick said. “Even though I had a good lead after the swim, I knew it was only a matter of

As in the aquathlon, Hanisch was the second female in 25:30. For complete results, go http://www.everalracemgt.com. - MR -

Scenes from Summer Racing

Crosstown Kids Triathlon, Howell, July 22, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Hayley Jacobson, age 11, competes in the swim leg. 42

Anna Suranyi, age 8, was the first girl to finish.

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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michiganrunner.tv

Lara Zammit, age 12, and Nate Bowman, age 10, compete in the run leg.

Scenes from Summer Racing

Volkslaufe Frankenmuth, July 4, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Kathrine Zehnder (1883) welcomes spray from the firetruck in the 10K.

Mike Morgan doubles to win the 10K and the 5K.

Heart of Detroit, June 24, 2012 Photos by Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Cary Aurend of Bloomfield Hills finishes the 5K in 23:15.

A sizeable contingent of the Detroit FBI starts the 5K. michiganrunner.net

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Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

43

The Color Run, Ypsilanti

Color Run: 15,000 Enjoy ‘Happiest 5K on Planet’ By Tracey Cohen your friends and family.

YPSILANTI (7/22/12) — “The crowd here may be the happiest people in Michigan, even in the universe,” said Ron Suffolk, director of the firstever Color Run in the state.

“It’s about people of every speed, age, shape and size taking part.” Waves of 1,500 were sent on their way every five minutes to enjoy the flat, loop course where participants were sprayed with a special recipe of 100percent natural color dust along the way.

© Carter Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

Smiles, laughter and crazy-costumed crowds adorned Depot Town streets as 15,000-plus entrants ran, walked, skipped and danced five of the craziest kilometers ever completed amid calm skies, temperatures in the 70s.

“The Color Run,” said Suffolk, “is a oneof-a-kind experience that is less about speed and more about enjoying a color-crazy daytemplate_third with Runners pass through color zone. third square square 8/10/12 10:51 AMblue Page 1

There were no clocks, mile markers, awards or pressure. Entrants simply ran with friends and family, getting sillier and more colorful as they passed through four color zones, each featuring its own hue. Entrants enjoyed a Riverside Park post-race festival including music, conga lines, dance contests and the much-anticipated color throw, the most colorful zone of all. Patti Marentay, 50, ran the whole way in her housecoat and slippers. “I’ve been running a few years and wanted to do something different,” she said. “The people are great. I’m having an awesome time!” Fifth-year Michigan State University senior Travis Gordon agreed. “I absolutely loved it,” he said. “Love the color!” “We’re doing something no one else has done before,” said Color Run co-owner Jeff Suffolk. “Run a million people — many first-time runners — through our finish lines in 2012.” “My partner Travis Snyder came up with the idea. He was looking for a way to introduce running in a noncompetitive format to the masses. The goal is to produce the best events on the planet and make people fall in love with running.” For more information on next year’s Color Runs and cities across the country, visit http://thecolorrun.com. - MR -

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running fit template_running fit template 8/7/12 10:05 PM Page 1

September - October 2012 Event Calendar Sat, 9/1/12

Aliferis Memorial Races

13.1MR, 5KR, 2MW

Alpena

(989) 356-7351

alpenaregionalmedicalcenter.org

Sat, 9/1/12

Big Bad Wolf Adventure Race

5KR/ 6MB/ 4M canoe

Big Rapids

(231) 598-1918

bigbadwolf.eventbrite.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Cadillac Festival of Races

10K, 5K, Kid's, Tri: R/B/kayak

Cadillac

(231) 876-0010

cadillacfestivalofraces.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Grand Marais 5K

5KR

Grand Marais

(906) 494-2700

grandmaraismichigan.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Grand Marais Junior Triathlon

wade/swim, run, bike/trike

Grand Marais

(906) 494-2700

grandmaraismichigan.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Harrison Back to School Days 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W

Harrison

(989) 539-1872

harrisonschools.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Labor Day 30K Run & 10K Walk/Run

30KR/B, 10K, kids, 30KB Milford 5KR/W

Newaygo

(616) 866-6665

marshallrun.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Michigan Youth Arts in Motion 5K

5KR/W, 1MR/W

Royal Oak

(248) 545-9200

michiganyoutharts.org/5k/

Sat, 9/1/12

Mish Man DU - tentative

2.2MR/ 11MB, 2.2MR

tbd

(269) 978-2437

spiritracing.us

Sat, 9/1/12

Niles Triathlon

Tri. Du, 10KR, 5KR

Niles

Sat, 9/1/12

Over the River and Thru the Woods 5K

5KR

Big Rapids

(231) 598-1918

overtheriver.eventbrite.com

Sat, 9/1/12

Ringside Fitness Marquette Marathon

26.2MR, 13.1MR, 1/2MFR

Marquette

Sat, 9/1/12

Sat, 9/1/12

Run for River House

Run Like The Wind

5KR/W, 1MFR

10KR, 5KR/W

Grayling

Sat, 9/1/12

Swampfoot 4 Mile

4MR, 1MR

Saint Clair

Sat, 9/1/12

Witchy Wolf Marathon

26.2MR, 2 or 3 person relay

Sun, 9/2/12

Barefoot Triathlons

Sun, 9/2/12 Sun, 9/2/12

Sat, 9/1/12

Marshall Run

(248) 685-7580 .laborday30k.com

www.triniles.com

Westland

marquettemarathon.com

(517) 702-0226 runningfoundation.com

(989) 370-3636

riverhouseinc.org

Sterling

(989) 65-2690

witchywolfrun.com

Triathlon

Traverse City

(231) 546-2229

3disciplines.com

Ed Hansen Memorial Run/Walk

10KR, 5KR

Ontonagon

(906) 884-8108

northlandrunner.com

Grand Marais Triathlon

Tri: 300-yardS/ 14MB/ 5KR

Grand Marais

(906) 494-2700

grandmaraismichigan.com

Sun, 9/2/12

Hansons 16 Mile Marathon Training Run

4-16 MR

Lake Orion

(248) 693-9900

hansons-running.com

Sun, 9/2/12

Running Waters 5K

5KR/W, kids run

Gaylord

(989) 732-4038

Mon, 9/3/12

Big Little Labor Day Races

15KR, 5KR

Traverse City

(231) 946-2447

Mon, 9/3/12

Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Labor Day Bridge Run

5MFR

Mackinaw City (517) 347-7891 michiganfitness.org/bridgerun.html

Mon, 9/3/12

Hart Healthy Labor Day 5K & Bridge Walk

5KR/W, 1MFR

Hart

(231) 301-8449 facebook.com/hartmainstreet/

Mon, 9/3/12

Hillsdale Labor Day 5K Run

5KR/W

Hillsdale

(517) 439-4320

hillsdaleschools.org

Mon, 9/3/12

Labor Day Run & Potluck

10KR, 5KR/W, kids run

Midland

(989) 274--9495

www.barc-mi.com

Mon, 9/3/12

Mackinac Bridge Walk

5MW

St. Ignace

(906) 643-7600

mackinacbridge.org

michiganrunner.net

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swampfoot4mile.com

events.bytepro.net

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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Mon, 9/3/12

Path to Wellness 5K

5KR/W

Lansing

(517) 543-2313

Tue, 9/4/12

Hanson Speed Session -Tuesdays

training

Sterling Heights

(586) 323-9683

hansons-running.com

Tue, 9/4/12

Pink Arrow Quiver

10KR, 5KR/W

Lowell

(616) 862-8376

pinkarrowpride.org

Wed, 9/5/12

Hansons Youth Team

camp

Rochester

(248) 616-9665

hansons-running.com

Thu, 9/6/12

Hansons Group Run - Thursdays

Royal Oak

(248) 616-9665

hansons-running.com

Thu, 9/6/12

Island Lake Triathlon - Fall

Brighton

(734) 845-7559

elementevents.com

Fri, 9/7/12 Fri, 9/7/12 Fri, 9/7/12

Mt. Baldhead Challenge Little Feet, Big Feat kids run Run Woodstock - Day 1 100MR, 100KR Adventure Rage

28 hour adventure race

Cadillac

Sat, 9/8/12

3 Disciplines Triathlon Festival of Races

Triathlon, Duathlon

East Tawas

(231) 546-2229

3disciplines.com

Sat, 9/8/12

9-11 Memorial 5K

5KR/W

Brighton

(810) 333-5289

isupportbrighton.com

Sat, 9/8/12

COVE Benefit Beach Walk and Run

10KR, 5KR/W

Pentwater

(231) 869-5939

pentwater.org

Sat, 9/8/12

First National Bank of Wakefield Marathon

26.2MR

Wakefield

(906) 285-4711

northlandrunner.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Grape Lake 5K Run/Walk

5K R/W

Paw Paw

(269) 657-1326

wineandharvestfestival.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Harvest Stompede

7MR, 5KR, 3MW

Suttons Bay

(231) 357-3222

lpwines.com/harvest/

Sat, 9/8/12

Highland Conservancy 5K Cross Country Nature Challenge

Highland

(248) 887-8470

highlandconservancy.org

Sat, 9/8/12

Hume Home Run Fund 5K

5KR/W

Muskegon

(231) 755-5787

goracego.com

Sat, 9/8/12

K.L.A.A. Association Invitational

HS X-C 5KR

Belleville

(734) 416-7774

salemcrosscountry.org

Sat, 9/8/12

Kazoo Area Foot Chase

3.5 MR, 1MW

Portage

(269) 321-9264

www.kazoofootchase.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Live Life Nspired 5K

5KR/W, 1.5MW

Charlotte

(517) 543-9575

www.livelifeinspired.org

Sat, 9/8/12

Mackinac Island 8 Mile Road Race

8 MR/W, kids run

Mackinac Island

(810) 659-6493

www.runmackinac.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Mentor A Youth Circuit Run

5KR/W, 2MR, 1MR

Sault Saite Marie

(906)-789-0060

bbbsbayarea.org

Sat, 9/8/12

Mt. Baldhead Challenge

15KR, 5KR/W

Douglas

(616) 990-2371

mtbaldheadchallenge.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Mud Creek Crawl

10KR, 5KR/W

Sanford

(989) 493-9041

race-mrm.com/Schedule.html

Sat, 9/8/12

NSO Riverwalk 5K

5KR, 1MR

Detroit

(313) 961-4890

Sat, 9/8/12

Rhoades McKee Reeds Lake Triathlon

1/2MS/ 17MB/ 4.9MR

East Grand Rapids

(616) 949-1750

www.eastgr.org

Sat, 9/8/12

Run for Ryan

8KR, 5KR/W, 1MFR

Flat Rock

(734) 379-9200

ryansfriends.org

Sat, 9/8/12

Run for Your Heart

Sat, 9/8/12 Sat, 9/8/12

Sat, 9/8/12

Triathlon

5KR/W

Douglas (616) 990-2371 mtbaldheadchallenge.com Pinckney (734) 929-9027 runwoodstock.com

13.1M, 10K, 5K, 1M, kids Saginaw

(810) 287-5593

www.infiterrasports.com

nso-mi.org

(989) 754-7283 runforyourheart.org

10KR, 5KR, 2KW

Port Huron

50M, 50K, 26.2M, 13.1M, 5M Pinckney

(734) 929-9027 runwoodstock.com

Running with the Angels 5K and 1 Mile Walk

5KR/W, 1MW

Bad Axe

davina.maurer@att.net

St. Mary Fall Festival 5K

5KR, 2KFR

Morrice

(517) 625-4260 stmarymorrice.catholicweb.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Tunnel to Towers

5KR/W

Lake Orion

(718) 987-1931

Sat, 9/8/12

Walk/ Run To Remember

5KR/W

Sandusky

(810) 648-0330 sanilaccounty.org/events.shtml

Sat, 9/8/12

Sun, 9/9/12

Witch's Hat Run

Hartman Creek Trail Run

10KR, 5KR/W, 1 MFR

25KR, 10KR, kdis run

South Lyon

Sun, 9/9/12

Jaguar Harrier CrossCountry Classic

5KR/W

New Boston

(313) 382-2300

Sun, 9/9/12

Sparrow Women Working Wonders 8K/5K/OK

8KR, 5KR/W

Lansing

(517) 899-5211

sparrowfoundation.org

Sun, 9/9/12

St. Mary Mercy Hospital 5K Run/Walk for Cancer

5KR/W

Livonia

(734) 655-1593

stmarymercy.org

Mon, 9/10/12

Hansons Youth Team

camp

Sterling Heights

(586) 822-8606

hansons-running.com

Thu, 9/13/12

Fri, 9/14/12

Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics

Spartan Invitational

5.2MR

college, high school x-c

Lansing

East Lansing

(517) 431-1672

(517) 432-5510

www.somi.org

Sat, 9/15/12

Big Mac Shoreline Scenic Bike Tour

25MB, 50MB, 75MB, 100MB

Mackinaw City

(888) 455-8100

mackinawchamber.com

Sat, 9/8/12

46

Run Woodstock - Day 2

runningfoundation.com

Run to Remember

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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michiganrunner.tv

Waupaca, WI

(810) 987-6400

www.bluewaterymca.com

t2trun.org

(715) 701-0360 greatlakesendurance.com (248) 207-5135

www.slxc.com/witch

September - October 2012 Event Calendar Sat, 9/15/12

Chad Schieber Memorial Race

10KR, 5KR, 1MR, kids run

Midland

(989) 708-9445

Sat, 9/15/12

Clothing Optional Run

5KR/W

Union City

(866) 321-4710

turtle-lake.com

Sat, 9/15/12

Freddie Harris Memorial for Brain Aneurysm Awareness 5KR, 2KW

Belleville

(734) 612-3858

www.bafound.org

Sat, 9/15/12 Sat, 9/15/12

Grosse Pointe Run 10KR, 5KR/W John Rogucki Memorial Kensington Challenge 15KR, 5KR/W

Grosse Pointe Farms

Sat, 9/15/12

Kilometers for Cam

Milford

5KR/W, 3KFR

St. Joseph

race-mrm.com/Schedule.html

(800) 299-5007 active.com (248) 685-0043 aatrackclub.org

(269) 861-5284

iamcam.org

Sat, 9/15/12

Kinde Polka Fest Run

5KR/W,1MR

Kinde

Sat, 9/15/12

Live Centred Half Marathon

13.1MR

Adrian

(517) 403-7687

Sat, 9/15/12

Curamus Terram 5K & Half Marathon

13.1M, 10K, 5K, 1/2M

Oakland Township

(586) 484-4937

Sat, 9/15/12

Oh These Irish Hills

5KR/W

Tipton

(517) 467-2670

Sat, 9/15/12

Peacock Strut

10KR, 5KR/W, kid’s run

Portage

(269) 323-1942

portagecommunitycenter.org

Sat, 9/15/12

Riverbend 5K Run / Walk for MS

5KR/W, kids run

West Branch

(989) 225-9213

runningfoundation.com

Sat, 9/15/12

Rochester Rotary Run/Walk

10KR, 5KR/W

Rochester

(248) 327-4555

rochesterrotaryclub.org

Sat, 9/15/12

St. John Applefest

10KR, 5KR/W, 1MR

Fenton

(810) 735.9193

gaultracemanagement.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Big Mac Shoreline Scenic Bike Tour

Ride across the “Mighty Mac”

Mackinaw City

(888) 455.8100

mackinawchamber.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Bridge Run

10MR, 5KR

Grand Rapids

(616) 262-4124

thebridgerun.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Canterbury on the Lake 5K Fun Run/Walk

5KR/W

Waterford

(248) 674-5316

canterburyonthelake.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Capital City River Run and Cooley Law School 5K

13.1MR, 5KR, 1MFR, 1/4 MFR Lansing

(517) 332.2681

www.ccriverrun.org

Sun, 9/16/12

Charity Challenge

8KR, 3KR/W, kids runs

Windsor, ON

(519) 945.3786

Sun, 9/16/12

Driathlon

5K canoe/ 15KB/ 5KR

Bay City

Sun, 9/16/12

Hansons 16 Mile Marathon Training Run

4-16 MR

Royal Oak

(248) 616-9665

hansons-running.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Lung Cancer 5K & Little Lungs Fun Run

5KR/W, kids run

Milford

(313) 532-0983

gianniscause.org

Sun, 9/16/12

Michigan’s Triathlon & Duathlon Championship

triathlon, duathlon

Detroit

(231) 546-2229

3disciplines.com

10KR, 5KR, FW

Royal Oak

Sun, 9/16/12 Run Wild for the Detroit Zoo

runsignup.com www.oaklandtownship.org otih.org

www.runningfactory.com baycitymorningrotary.com

(248) 336-5735 detroitzoo.org/runwild/

Sun, 9/16/12

Romeo 2 Richmond Half Marathon

13.1MR/W, 5KR/W

Richmond

(586) 469-5065

romeo2richmondrace.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Timber Trail Races

8MR, 5KR/W

Harrison

(989) 386-6651

www.midmich.edu

Sun, 9/16/12

Tortoise and Hare Marathon Training Run

training run - 11M loop

Ann Arbor

(734) 623-9640

tortoiseandhare.com

Sun, 9/16/12

Tower Run for Education

8KR, 5KW

Michigan City, IN

(219) 874-8927

www.toweronline.org/run/

Sun, 9/16/12

Vision Builders 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W, kids run, dog walk

Dexter

(734) 660-9075

www.visionbuilders5k.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Sat, 9/22/12

5K Walk/Run and Remember

Sat, 9/22/12

Dances with Dirt - Hell

Deerfield Park Trail Half / 10K / 5K

50MR, 50KR, 100 K Relay Pickney/Hell

(734) 929-9027 danceswithdirt.com

Sat, 9/22/12

Sat, 9/22/12

Dunes Duathlon

Sat, 9/22/12

Great NorthernAdventure Race

5KR/W

Williamston

13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR

Mt. Pleasant

Fight for Air Run/Walk

5KR/W, 1MW

Detroit

(248) 784-2000 FightForAirDetroit.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Jefferson Cross Country Invitational

HS, MS XC meet

Monroe

(734) 289-5590

www.jeffinvite.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Komen Grand Rapids Race for the Cure®

5KR/W

Grandville

(616) 752-8262

komengr.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Lacks Kickin’ Cancer 5K

5KR

Grand Rapids

j.groendyke@lacksenterprises.com

Sat, 9/22/12

Lake Linden Wild Goose Chase

10KR, 5KR/W, kids run

Lake Linden

(906) 370-9657

Sat, 9/22/12

Madonna University 75th Anniversary Run

Park 2 Park Half Marathon and 5K

13.1MR, 5KR

Livonia

Holland

800-852-4951

Sat, 9/22/12

5MR, 17.8 MB

Saugatuck

Adventure, orienteering,MB, R/W Houghton

5KR/W 1MFR

michiganrunner.net

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kjos1207@hotmail.com (989) 289-2361

michiganhalfseries.com www.dunesdu.com

(906) 487-1963

oap.mtu.edu/adventurerace/

lakelinden5k10k.com

(616) 399-9190 park2parkrace.com madonna.edu/75years

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

47

Sat, 9/22/12

Pee Pants 5K Trail Adventure

5KR

Muskegon

(231) 557-6454

enduranceadventue.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Perryfest Rambler

5KR/W

Perry

(517) 974-1969

playmakers.com

Sat, 9/22/12

Run for Jesus

5KR/W

Wixom

(248) 945-4848

saintcatherineacademy.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Sault Area Chamber of Commerce Chase 26.2MR, 13.1MR, 10KR

Sault Ste. Marie, MI (906) 632-3301 saultstemarie.org Howell

(517) 546-0249

howellnaturecenter.org

(248) 818-0270

sawyersrun.org

(734) 953-6045

askforangela.com

Sat, 9/22/12

Sat, 9/22/12

Run the Pointe

10KR, 5KR, 2MFR

Save the Wildlife 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W, 1MW

Grosse Pointe Farms (248) 709-8816 gpsathleticboosters.com/content/

Sat, 9/22/12

Sawyer’s Run

5KR/W, FW

Shelby Twp.

Sat, 9/22/12

USA 50 km Trail Championships

50KR

Bend, OR

Sat, 9/22/12

Walk of Remembrance

2.3MW

Livonia

usatf.org

Sat, 9/22/12

Wellness Central Fitness Rat Race

5KR, 1MR/W

Mt. Pleasant

(989) 772-0323

www.cmch.org

Sun, 9/23/12

Fowlerville Football Fun Run

5KR/W,1MR/W

Fowlerville

(517) 223-6481

runningfoundation.com

Sun, 9/23/12

Kellie Sebrell DeWitt 5K Trail Run

5KRW

DeWitt

(517) 669.3418

Sun, 9/23/12

Leaders & Best 10 Mile

10MR, 5KR/W, 1MR/W

Ann Arbor

(734) 213-1033

Sun, 9/23/12

Oakville Half Marathon & 10K

13.1MR/W, 10KR/W, kids run

Oakville, ON

(905) 949-1910

oakvillehalfmarathon.com

Sun, 9/23/12

Race Judicata

10KR, 5KR, 1MFW

Bloomfield Hills

(248) 334-3400

www.ocba.org

Sun, 9/23/12

Run with Attitude 5K and 1 Mile Run/Walk

5KR, 1MR/W

Commerce Township (248) 568-4316

Sun, 9/23/12

White Pine Academy 5K

5KR/W

Leslie

Fri, 9/28/12

Run for Justice

10KR, 5KR, 1MR/W, kids run

Howell

(517) 546-4700

Sat, 9/29/12

Sat, 9/29/12

AQ Run Thru 5K Run and 2K Walk

5KR, 2KW

4MR, 2MW

Marshall

(616) 632-2989 aquinas.edu/health/aqrun.html

Bradapalooza Run on Faith

13.1MR/W, 13.1MB

Grand Rapids

Sat, 9/29/12

Baker’s Dozen Beer Run

Newport

(734) 770-2377

Sat, 9/29/12

Cedarville Jersey Mud Run

5KR

Cedarville

(906) 630-4683

Sat, 9/29/12

Chasing the Cure for Ovarian Cancer

5KR/W, 5K pump & run, 1MFR Sturgis

(269) 251-8740

chasingthecure.net

Sat, 9/29/12

Diehl’s Ciderfest Run

4 MR, 1MFR

(248) 310-9375

www.diehlsorchard.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Du North

du: 4.75MR/ 18.15MB/ 6.05MR Manistee

(616) 261-9706

stridersrun.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Foot Race for Our Future

5KR

Dryden

(810) 375-2021

villageofdryden.com

Sat, 9/29/12

West Side 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W, kids run

Traverse City

(231) 409-2804

Sat, 9/29/12

Genesys Athletic Club Dash for a Difference

5KR/W, 1MFR

Grand Blanc

(810) 606-7909

genesys.org

Sat, 9/29/12

Hansons Cross-Country Invitational

XC

Sterling Heights

(586) 822-8606

hansons-running.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Helluva Run 2012

5KR/W

Pinckney

(734) 730-7053

runningfoundation.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Kellogg’s Dig ‘em Dash

Oktoberfest Lagerlauf 5K Fun Run & Walk

5KR/W

Grand Rapids

Battle Creek

(269) 961-2411 (616) 890-5978

oktoberfestwestmichigan.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Pumpkinfest Run 5K and 10K

5KR/W, 1MR

South Lyon

(248) 207-5135

southlyonpumpkinfest.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Run for the Arb

5KR/W

Ann Arbor

lsa.umich.edu/mbg/default.asp

Sat, 9/29/12

Run for the Rouge

5KR

Canton

(313) 792-9621

www.therouge.org

Sat, 9/29/12

Run for the Son

5KR/W

Portage

(269) 344-7333

s-heights.org

Sat, 9/29/12

Run on the Rez 5K

5KR/W, 1MR/W

Sat, 9/29/12

Shoreline Sport & Spine Oktoberfest

Sat, 9/29/12

runwithattitude.com

(517) 403-8813 whitepineacademy.homestead.com

Holly

5KR/W

champsforcharity.com

runningfoundation.com

bakersdozenbeerrun.com

brotherbradflint.com

Mt. Pleasant

(989) 772-0323

26.2MR, 13.1MR, 5kR/W

Spring Lake

Lansing

(616) 844-2734

Sun, 9/30/12 Brooksie Way Half Marathon

13.1MR, 5KR/W

Rochester Hills

(810) 235-3397 thebrooksieway.com

5KR/W

Berrien Springs

Sat, 9/29/12

Team Playmakers 20 Mile Marathon Training Run

Sat, 9/29/12

West Side 5k Run/Walk and Children’s Run

Sun, 9/30/12

Farmington Fall Classic

Sun, 9/30/12

Fitness Expo and 5K Walk/ Run

48

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

20MR/W

5KR/W, kids run

5KR/W

|

michiganrunner.tv

Traverse City Farmington

edzone.net/~mphsstr/

(517) 349-3803 playmakers.com

oktoberfestmarathon.com

(231) 409-2804

www.tcwscc.com/

(248) 473-1800

runningfoundation.com

(269) 471-3370

andrews.edu/cas/

September - October 2012 Event Calendar Sun, 9/30/12

Great Grand River Paddle/ Bike/ Run

tri: paddle/ B/ R

Grand Ledge

(517) 627-7351

Sun, 9/30/12

Hansons 16 Mile Marathon Training Run

4-16 MR

Grosse Pointe

(313) 882-1325

hansons-running.com

Sun, 9/30/12

Komen Northwest Ohio Race for the Cure

5KR/W

Toledo, OH

(419) 724-2873

www.komennwohio.org

Sun, 9/30/12 Playmakers Autumn Classic 8K Sun, 9/30/12

Tri To Finish Birch Run Charity Run

8KR/W, 1MFR, 1/2 M FR

Haslett

Birch Run

(989) 397-8333

tritofinish.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Michigan State Police Fall Color 5K

5KR/W

Northville Township

(810) 664-2906

www.tblofmi.com

Sat, 9/8/12

Jamesers 5K for Kaleidoscope Kids

5KR/W

Brighton

Sat, 9/29/12

Sat, 9/29/12

Huskie Hustle

Run Vasa

5KR/W, 1MFR

25KR, 10KR, 5KR

Breckenridge

Williamsburg

(231) 932-5401 runvasa.com

Sat, 9/29/12

Steps for Sara

5KR/W

Harbor Beach

(248) 977-3307

Sun, 9/30/12

USA Masters 5 km Championships

5KR

Syracuse, NY

Tue, 10/2/12

Hanson Speed Session -Tuesdays

training

Sterling Heights

(586) 323-9683

hansons-running.com

Tue, 10/2/12

Hansons Group Run - Tuesdays

Grosse Pointe

(248) 693-9900

hansons-running.com

Thu, 10/4/12

Hansons Group Run - Thursdays

Royal Oak

(248) 616-9665

hansons-running.com

Thu, 10/4/12

White Pumpkin 5K

5KR/W

Caro

(989) 673-4241

tuscolapumpkinfest.com rp.lakeorion.k12.mi.us

10KR/W, 5KR/W, 1KFR

(517) 349.3803 playmakers.co

jamesers.com (989) 842-5806

huskiecrosscountry.net

stepsforsara.org usatf.org

Sat, 10/6/12

A Mother’s Wish Charity Run

10KR, 5KR/W

Lake Orion

(248) 693-5436

Sat, 10/6/12

Sat, 10/6/12

Bee Brave 5K Run/Walk

Bruckelaufe

5KR/W

13.1MR, 5KR

Caledonia

Frankenmuth

(616) 698-8054

beebrave.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Danae’s Race

5KR

Lansing

(517) 896-5257

runningfoundation.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Depot Days

5KR/W

Standish

(989) 714-2496

depotdaysrace.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Earleen Fox Memorial 5K Walk/Run

5KR/W

West Branch

Sat, 10/6/12

Fall Colors Bridge Race GRAAHI Rhythm Run

5KR/W

Grand Rapids

(616) 331-5872

Sat, 10/6/12

Hartwick Pines Challenge Trail Run

10KR, 5KR

Grayling

(989) 348-4945

Sat, 10/6/12

I Gave My Sole for Parkinson’s

5KR/W

Okemos

(800) 852-9781

playmakers.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Island Boodle 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W

Beaver Island

(231) 448-2505

www.beaverisland.org

Sat, 10/6/12

LakeVille’s 5K Run/Walk

5KR

Otisville

(810) 793-4188 lakevillesvisions.blogspot.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Lansing Christian School 5K

5KR/W

Lansing

(517) 719-0603

lansingchristianschool.org

Sat, 10/6/12

Petoskey Sunrise Rotary Bay Run/Walk for Charity

10KR, 5KR/W

Petoskey

(231) 838-5180

petoskeyrotarysunrise.org

Sat, 10/6/12

Portage Invitational

x-c meet, open 5K

Portage

(269) 323-5233

www.portageinvite.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Sat, 10/6/12

Red October Run

5.4MR/W

10K, 5K, 1M kid’s run

(800) 386-8696 bruckelaufe.org

(989) 685-2552 earleenfoxmemorial5kwalkrun.com

Mackinaw City

Wayne

(231) 436-5664 mackinawcity.com

(313) 586-5486

rhythmrun.com

grayling-area.com/pinerace/

oakwood.org/redoctoberrun/

Sat, 10/6/12

Sat, 10/6/12

Remembrance Run

Run Scream Run

5KR/W, 1MR/W

10KR, 5KR,1MR

Ypsilanti

Sat, 10/6/12

Run Walk for the Animals 5K

5KR/W, 1MW

Grand Ledge

(517) 626-6060, x 11 www.cahs-lansing.org

Sat, 10/6/12

Salmon Run/Walk

10KR/W, 5KR/W

Baldwin

(231) 745-8804

salmonrunbaldwin.com

Sat, 10/6/12

SOTL Storm Runners Race

5KR/W, 1MFR

Brighton

(734) 231-2792

sotlschool.com

Sat, 10/6/12

Stay Dry Tri

5K canoe/ 10KB/ 5KR

Milford

Sat, 10/6/12

The Crabby Apple

5MR, 2.5MR/W,1MFR

St. Ignace

(906) 430-5666

saintignace.org

Sat, 10/6/12

Wayne County Cross Country Championships

HS X-C 5KR

Belleville

(734) 416-7774

salemcrosscountry.org

5KR/W, 1KFR/W

Traverse City

(734) 929-9027 runscreamrun.com (231) 941.8118

(248) 660-4337

remembrancerun.com

sites.google.com/site/staydrytri/

Sat, 10/6/12

WMU Homecoming Campus Classic

Kalamazoo

(269) 387-8402

wmich.edu/race

Sat, 10/6/12

Zonta Walks for Women / Breast Cancer Awareness 5KR/W

Alpena

(989) 358-7297

alpenazonta.org

Sun, 10/7/12

Andy T’s Pumpkin Trot

St. Johns

(989) 224-7674

andyts.com

10KR, 5KR/W, kid’s run

michiganrunner.net

|

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

49

Sun, 10/7/12 Betsie Valley Run Sun, 10/7/12 Fall Fest Frolic Sun, 10/7/12 Great Prostate Cancer Challenge

13.1M, 10K, 5K, kids 10KR, 5KR/W, 1MFR

Thompsonville New Boston

5KR/W, kids runRochester (248) 336-3189

(231) 378-2000 betsievalleyrun.com (734) 282-1101 everalracemgt.com

Sun, 10/7/12

Green Space 5K

5KR/W

Mason

(517) 589-8159

inghamconservation.com

Sun, 10/7/12

KDB Melanoma 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W

MIlford

(313) 505-2445

melanomawalk.org

Sun, 10/7/12

MSU Federal Credit Union Dinosaur Dash

5KR/W, 1MR

East Lansing (517) 355-2370 museum.msu.edu/events/dinosaurdash/

Sun, 10/7/12

MSU Sprint Triathlon

400mS/ 20KB/ 5KR

East Lansing

Sun, 10/7/12

Race for Healthy Kids

5KR/W, kids run

Rockford

Sun, 10/7/12

Red, White & Blue 26.2 Marathon

26.2 MR

Findlay, OH

(419) 442-4424

redwhiteandblue26-2.com

Sun, 10/7/12

Sleeping Bear Marathon & Half Marathon

26.2MR, 13.1MR

Empire

(231) 715-1406

enduranceevolution.com

Sat, 10/13/12

Center of the World 5K

5KR/W

New Troy

(269) 426-4281

friendsofnewtroy.org/

Sat, 10/13/12

Dress Like Devils & Run for the Angels 5K

10KR, 5KRW, 1MR

Ferndale

(248) 914-4151

angelkisses.org

Sat, 10/13/12

Fall Color Tour Run or Relay

10KR or 2person relay

Falmouth

(231) 826-3854

fallcolortourrun.co

Sat, 10/13/12

Fr. Gabriel Richard HS Cross Country Invitational

hs x-c meet

Dexter

(734) 904-6431

www.rc.net/lansing/fgrhs/

Sat, 10/13/12

Living Hope International Run for Hope . . . Run for a Future

Novi

(810) 355-8459

livinghopeinternational.org

Sat, 10/13/12

OktoberFAST 5K Run Run/Walk

5KR/W, kids run

Oxford

(248) 628-2571

kingsburyschool.org

Sat, 10/13/12

Scary Halloween Hallow

5KR, 1.5MFR

Port Huron

(810) 984-4847

speedyraces.net

Sat, 10/13/12

SOS Animal Rescue Dirty Dog Run

10KR, 5KR/W

Midland

(989) 430-1148

sosanimalrescue.org/

Sat, 10/13/12

Top of Michigan 100K and Team Relay

100KR, team relay

Gaylord

(231) 348-8280

Sat, 10/13/12

United Way Charities Trail Run

10KR, 5KR

Houghton Lake

(989) 751-3968

Sat, 10/13/12

USA Masters 5 km Cross Country Championships

5KR

San Diego, CA

Sat, 10/13/12

Whistlestop Marathon and Half Marathon

26.2 MR, 13.1 MR, 10KR, 5KR Ashland, WI

(800) 284-9484

whistlestopmarathon.com

Sat, 10/13/12

Wolf Lake 5K

5KR

Brighton

(810) 231-4169

hamburgfitness.net

Sat, 10/13/12

Wolverine World Wide Family YMCA 5K

5KR, 1MFR

Belmont

(616) 855-1440

grymca.org

Sun, 10/14/12

D-Town River Run

10KR/W, 5KR/W

Detroit

(248) 318-8317

ewb-detroit.org

Sun, 10/14/12

Hidden Forest Trail Run

8.5 MR, 5.5 MR, 2.5 MR/W

Clarkston

(810) 487-0954

gaultracemanagement.com

Sun, 10/14/12

Portland St. Patrick Fall Festival Half Marathon & 5K 13.1MR, 5KR/W

Portland

(517) 647-1709

runningfoundation.com

Race for Ralya

Haslett

Sun, 10/14/12

5KR, Kids Run

Sun, 10/14/12 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon Sun, 10/14/12

5KR/W,1MFR

26.2 M, 13.1M, 5K, kids

Run at the Farm

5KR/W, kids run

Toronto, ON Waterford

greatprostatecancerchallenge.com/races/detroit/

(231) 546-2229

3disciplines.com

(616) 632-7296 actionforhealthykids.org/michigan

trailscouncil.org/events/100k usatf.org

runningfoundation.com (416) 944-2765 torontowaterfrontmarathon.com (517) 420-2198

www.fiftytwo4mom.org

Sun, 10/14/12 TCTC Lighthouse Half Marathon Sun, 10/14/12 Wild Life Marathon Tue, 10/16/12

13.1MR Traverse City 26.2M, 13.1M, 5K, kids run Concord

Hansons Youngsters Cross-Country Invitational (7-10 Grade), X-C Meet

Sterling Heights

Fri, 10/19/12

Frightful Friday Fun 5K Walk/ Run

5KR/W

Minden City

(989) 864-3123

mclions5k.webs.com

Fri, 10/19/12

Westside YMCA Boo Race Trail 10K/ 5K

10KR/ 5KR/W

Holt

(517) 827-9670

playmakers.com

Sat, 10/20/12

5K 4 Ed

5KR

Battle Creek

(269) 965-4051

www.st-mark.us

Sat, 10/20/12

Airport Mark of Excellence Invitational

X-C meet, 5KR, 2MR, 1MR

Carleton

(734) 654-6208

acspublic.com

Sat, 10/20/12

Baileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Doggie Dash

5KR/W, 1MR

Rockford

(517) 336-6429

Sat, 10/20/12

Clare Pumpkin 5K

5KR/W

Clare

(989) 386-9190

Sat, 10/20/12

Grand Valley Laker Homecoming 5K

5KR, kids run

Allendale

(616) 331-3360

gvsulakers.com/m-xc

Sat, 10/20/12

Manistee National Cross Country Invitational

5K Xc meet, Open 5K

Manistee

(231) 690-0596

manisteenationalinvite.com

Sat, 10/20/12

Mercantile Bank Run Thru the Rapids

10KR, 5KR/W

Grand Rapids

(888) 909-2267

runthrutherapids.com

Sat, 10/20/12

Michigan High School Cross Country U.P. State Finals 5KR

Munising

(517) 332-5046

www.mhsaa.com

50

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

|

michiganrunner.tv

(517) 392-8250 (586) 822-8606

lighthousehalf.com wildlifemarathon.org hansons-running.com

clarepumpkinrun.com

September - October 2012 Event Calendar Sat, 10/20/12

Over the Top

5K, kids run

Gaylord

(231) 546-2229

3disciplines.com/

Sat, 10/20/12

Pancreatic 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W,1MR/W

New Baltimore

(586) 306-2013

pancreatic5k.webs.com

Sat, 10/20/12

Run for Research

13.1MR, 10KR, 5KR

Mt. Pleasant

(989) 289-2361

michiganhalfseries.com

Sat, 10/20/12

St. Pat’s 24 Hour Trail Race

100KR/ 24, 12, 6 hour run/relay South Bend, IN

(574) 274=-6439

stpats24hour.com

Sat, 10/20/12

SVSU Healthy-U 5K Run & Walk

5KR/W

Saginaw

(989) 964-4215

svsu.edu/svsu5k

Sat, 10/20/12

The Great Pumpkin Pursuit

5KR/W, 1MR/W

Monroe

Sat, 10/20/12

U of M/MSU Tailgate Challenge

5KR/W

Flint

Sun, 10/21/12

Aubrey’s Butterfly 5K

5KR/W

Dimondale

Sun, 10/21/12

Detroit Free Press / Talmer Bank Marathon

26.2M, 13.1M, relay, 5K

Detroit, MI, Windsor, ON (313) 222-6676 freepmarathon.com

3MR/ 10MB/ 3MR 26.2 MR, 13.1 MR

Grand Rapids (616) 293-3145 grandrapidsmarathon.com

Sun, 10/21/12 Duathlon DU it for Fun! DU it for Life! Sun, 10/21/12 Metro Health Grand Rapids Marathon

monroeccc.edu (810) 487-0954

active.com aubreys5k.com

Stanwood

(866) 972-1177 tullymoregolf.com

Columbus, OH

(614) 421.7866

columbusmarathon.com 3disciplines.com

Sun, 10/21/12

Nationwide Better Health Columbus Marathon

26.2 M, 13.1 M, kids

Sun, 10/21/12

Racing for Recovery Run

10KR, 5KR/W, 1/4 MFR

Sylvania, OH

(231) 546-2229

Sun, 10/21/12

Road to the Broad 5K

5KR/W

East Lansing

(248) 613-3274

Sun, 10/21/12

Twin Rivers 5K

5KR/W, kids run

Muir

(989) 855-2646

Tue, 10/23/12

Cleft Palate Foundation of Smiles 5K Run/Walk

5KR/W

Manton

positiveplanningdesign.com

Fri, 10/26/12

Run 4 Your Life 5K

5KR/W, kids run

Holland

(616) 392-3610

hfhclinic.org

Sat, 10/27/12

Alger Heights Halloween 5K

5KR/W, kids run

Grand Rapids

(616) 929-0190

www.alger5k.com

Sat, 10/27/12

Cross County Classic

8KR, 5KR, 4KR, 3KR

Ann Arbor

Sat, 10/27/12

Emily Schmidt Memorial Trunk or Treat Trot

5KR/W, 1MFR

Clarkston

(248) 625-1611

clarkstonumc.org

Sat, 10/27/12

Frightening 5K and Haunted Hilly Half Marathon

13.1MR, 5KR

Middlebury, IN

(574) 293-1683

stonesouppromotions.com

Sat, 10/27/12

Headless Horseman 5K

10KR, 5KR

Sat, 10/27/12

Muddy Watters Cider Slam

4MR

Rochester Hills (248) 320-5705 jeffwatters.com/fall_cider_slam.html

Sat, 10/27/12

Prairies and Ponds Poltergeist Pursuit

5KR, kids run

Lapeer

(810) 538-1731

chatfieldschool.org

Sat, 10/27/12

Run Like Hell Halloween 5k

5KR/W

Ferndale

(248) 269-8759

.cff.org/Chapters/detroit/

Sat, 10/27/12

Run of the Dead, a Race Through Southwest Detroit 10KR, 5KR

Detroit

(248) 766-6485

savorsouthwestdetroit.org

Sat, 10/27/12

Scaredy Pants 5K Trail Adventure

5KR/W

Muskegon

(231) 557-6454

enduranceadventure.org

Sat, 10/27/12

St. Mary 5K

5KR/W

Williamston

(517) 803-5420

Sat, 10/27/12

Tecumseh Baseball Club 5K Run

5KR/W

Tipton

(517) 206-3668

Sat, 10/27/12

The Dark Side

adventure run

Brown City

(810) 886-1654

daredevildash.com

Sat, 10/27/12

The Headless Horseman Chase

10MR, 5KR/W

Belmont

(616) 365-2936

headlesschase.com

Sun, 10/28/12

Big Ten Cross Country Championships

8K Men, 6K Women

East Lansing

Sun, 10/28/12

D.O. Monster Dash

5KR/W

East Lansing

(509) 991-0492

www.com.msu.edu/ss/

Sun, 10/28/12

Group Run

Lake Orion

(248) 693-9900

hansons-running.com

Sun, 10/28/12

Hansons Group Run

Lake Orion

(248) 693-9900

hansons-running.com

Sun, 10/28/12

KAR Halloween Hash & Kids Trick or Treat Mini Hash Run

Kalamazoo

(269) 833-8211

kalamazooarearunners.com

Sun, 10/28/12

Monster Mash

5KR/W

Woodhaven

(734) 675-4926

woodhavenmi.org

Sun, 10/28/12

Run Thru Hell on Halloween Eve

8KR, 5KR/W

Pinckney

(517) 702-0226

10KR, 5KR/W, 1MFR

Plymouth

Sat, 10/27/12

Sat, 10/27/12

Great Turtle Half Marathon

MAC Cross Country Championships

Sun, 10/28/12 Wicked Halloween Run Sun, 10/28/12

Scare Away Hunger 5K Run /Walk

Howell

13.1 MR, 5.7 MR/W

(517) 546-0693

training 3-7MR, 1/2MFR, kids

5KR/W

michiganrunner.net

.aatrackclub.org/events/

howellrecreation.org/HeadlessHorseman5K.html

Mackinac Island Buffalo, NY

Rochester

|

www.ionia.k12.mi.us/

(810) 487-0954

runmackinac.com

bigten.cstv.com

(248) 345-6168

(248) 651-5836

runningfoundation.com wickedhalloweenrun.com scareawayhungerrun.org

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

51

Featured Future Events Sun, 10/7/12

Betsie Valley Run

13.1MR, 10K, 5K, kids

Thompsonville (231) 378-2000 betsievalleyrun.com

Sun, 10/14/12 Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon 26.2, 13.1, 5K Sun, 10/14/12 Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

5KR/W, 1/4M kids run

Toronto, ON

torontowaterfrontmarathon.com

Sun, 10/14/12 Wild Life Marathon

26.2, 13.1, 5K, kids run

Concord

(517) 392-8250 wildlifemarathon.org

Sat, 10/27/12 Sat, 11/10/12

Headless Horseman 5K

10KR, 5KR

Walt Disney World Wine & Dine Half Marathon Weekend

Sun, 11/11/12 Roseville Big Bird Run Sat, 11/17/12

Portage

Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

Howell

(517) 546-0693 howellrecreation.org

Lake Buena Vista, FL

10KR, 1MR/W, 4KR

disneywinedinerun.com

Roseville

(586) 445-5480 roseville-mi.gov

10KR, 5KR, 1/4M kids

Bloomfield Hills (248) 269-2895 Detroit

(313) 247-4149 detroitturkeytrot.org

5KR

Sylvania, OH

(419) 841-5597 eliteendeavors.com

Thu, 11/22/12 5/3 Bank Thanksgiving Turkey Trot 10KR, 5KR/W, kids run Thu, 11/22/12 Smoke the Turkey 5K

(248) 649-2891 arthritis.org

Sat, 12/1/12

Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis

5KRW, 1/4M kids run 5KR, 1MR

Dexter

(734) 929-9027 www.runholiday5k.com

Sat, 12/8/12

Run Like The Dickens

10K, 5K, Tiny Tim Trot

Holly

(248) 328-3200 runlikethedickens.com

Sat, 12/1/12

Holiday Hustle

Mon, 12/31/12 5/3 New Year’s Eve Family Fun R/W 5KR/W, 1MR/W

Northville

arthritis.org

Detroit

(248) 269-2895 arthritis.org

(313) 886-5560 belleislefunrun.com

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Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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Running with Tom Henderson By Tom Henderson

A

© C. Sherline / Frog Prince Studios

hh!

Is there anything more frustrating than finding out some of your favorite races have ended up being scheduled for the same time and day?

Tom Henderson

Well, maybe having your teenager roll his or her eyes every time you make a declarative state-

ment, but not by much. I have written the last two years about a great trail race for a great cause in the Leelanau Peninsula, the Port Oneida Barn to Barn Trail 5K run and walk. It took place in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore toward the end of September, on a really cool, really tough kick-butt trail course through grassy pastures and up and down steep hills in the forest, with some spectacular views of Lake Michigan. I loved the course so much I’ve made it a regular snowshoe route when I feel like a tough workout. The event started and finished at a historic barn just off M-22 and offered a great race on a weekend when not much else was going on. This year, an email arrived in May proclaiming the news: The date was being changed to early August! Aug. 4, to be exact! Hip hip hooray! “Hopefully we will be able to reach the summer visitors still here in August. We’ll see how it goes,” wrote race director Sarah Pocklington. One small thing. Well, big thing, actually. Aug. 4 was the date for the hugely-popular Harbor Days 5K and 10K in Elk Rapids, a longtime favorite of the vacationing and up-north running community. With a carnival down the street and a day filled with activities, including a big fireworks show on the beach after sunset, the Harbor Days Festival is a huge draw, and its runs, outside of the Cherry Festival and the Bayshore runs, are the most popular and best attended in northwest Michigan. Some 800 do the runs, and my guess is many of those who did Port Oneida last year did not do it this year. They were at Elk Rapids instead. At least four who did the Oneida run last year – me, my wife and a couple we know who also take their dog to the local runs — didn’t go there this year. The Harbor Run is just too much a can’t-miss. Coincidentally, once upon a time the Harbor Days runs used to have another scheduling conflict that drove me crazy, a 5K and 10K run in Alden. Both Alden and Elk Rapids are great tourist towns, with Alden on the eastern shore of Torch Lake and its sur-

real blues, and Elk Rapids nestled between Elk Lake and Lake Michigan.

One last word about frustrations over scheduling conflicts. Randy Step, through his Big Foot snowshoe races at Timber Ridge in Traverse City, got me hooked on snowshoe racing a few years ago. What a great way to torture your heart while getting somewhere slowly.

Both have mid-summer festivals and fine races, the ones in Elk Rapids as flat and fast as they come, and the Alden 5K and 10K runs on courses as hilly and challenging as any in the state. For years, the race organizers dumbly planned their events on the same Saturday, either bullheaded from a sense of small-town competition that went back generations or merely unaware or uninterested in what else was going on that day and unable to avail themselves of the Michigan Runner calendar. Finally, they came to their senses and agreed to hold the runs a week apart. Now the Alden runs are on the last Saturday in July and the Elk Rapids runs on the first Saturday in August, and both races have dramatically increased their entries in the years since. Enter the Fishtown 5K in Leland. Me and the dog ran the third annual version of the race for the first time last year and had a blast. The race starts and finishes at the historic Fishtown marina district in a small town on Lake Michigan that epitomizes what a quaint summer tourist town should be. And we planned to go back this year. Except they decided to move their race, and apparently didn’t ask any local runners for advice, or check the Michigan Runner calendar or go to runmichigan.com. Because they moved the race to July 28, the same day as the much-bigger and long-popular Alden runs, and for those who make Alden a must-run event, there would be no Fishtown.

So Kathleen and I and the dog, too, go to all such races we can find, which is usually four or so a year. Last year I found six in northern Michigan. Two were on the same Saturday in February and two more on the same Saturday in March. Couldn’t the organizers of such a niche sport at least figure out a way to spread six races out over the three-month winter season so you don’t have to choose between races? ~~

A

s I write this, the Olympics have just begun. The men’s gymnastics team choked, big time. Michael Phelps began showing his age. And track and field has yet to start. Along with gymnastics and swimming, track and field is one of the Olympic headliners on American TV. It gets great ratings and people love to watch it. And then they don’t love to watch it, or can’t find it to watch, and it’s almost impossible to follow on TV for the next four years. ESPN used to do a pretty good job of showing the big American indoor and outdoor meets, and even showed the big meets of the European outdoor summer circuit. Sure, the European meets were usually shown at 3 in the morning, but you could tape them and watch them later.

As I said, Alden is special. The courses are crazy tough and beautiful. The start and finish area is in the heart of town, next to the big town-wide garage sale for charity, with its great bargains; just down the road from great post-race coffee and baked goods at the Muffin Tin shop; and just down the road from the small park on Torch Lake.

And then along came the Universal network, which bought the rights to the European meets and the Boston Marathon and is available to like six households in the U.S.

The 5K was made extra special for me this year. My sister and her husband were up at our cabin for the weekend with their small kids, and the whole family decided they wanted to come watch me and Maddie — actually, they didn’t care about me, it was Maddie they were dying to see — run a race.

The few American meets that are shown on NBC or ESPN are never listed in the sports-on-TV sections of the local sports sections.

They got a huge kick out of watching her howl in the seconds before the start of the race, and a bigger kick out of the way she grabbed her leash at the start and took me off at breakneck pace for the first 100 yards, and another kick watching us pass a couple high school kids in the closing stretch, only to get nipped by both of them at the finish line as they found a gear that went out on me years ago. A great sprint duel and who could blame them? What teenager worth a darn wants to get passed by an old man and a black lab with a gray muzzle?

michiganrunner.net

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In the last few years, I’ve had Comcast cable, Dish Network and Direct TV, and have never had Universal.

The Detroit Free Press or News will list 14 niche sports that are televised over the weekend, but almost never list any track and field, even when it’s on. They’ll list the nightcrawler-catching regional championships on NatGeo, but not the Penn Relays or the indoor American track and field championships. Thank goodness for Google. I can find all the track and field not on (Non)Universal and program them to be taped weeks or months in advance. Enough complaining. It’s 5 p.m., 85 and sunny out, time to go for a run and a swim with the dog and wonder how the heck it got to be the last day of July. - MR -

Michigan Runner - September / October 2012

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Michigan Runner, September / October 2012