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Erinn Hasselgren ’09 in front of her dams display Faculty Awards This year’s recipients of annual faculty awards were Jane Crosthwaite in religion and Paul Staiti in art, for teaching; and Lilian Hsu in biochemistry, and Fred Moseley in economics, for scholarship. Tops in Peace Small-scale hydropower turbines on campus dams was the focus of senior Erinn Hasselgren’s project in the Environmental Studies Senior Seminar on view at Blanchard Campus Center first semester. The college has investigated the idea, which could reduce the campus’s carbon footprint by about 270 tons of carbon annually. But installation costs of dams on Upper and Lower Lakes would be about $1.2 million, and the project would not break even for at least two decades. If public funding for small renewable-energy projects becomes available, or electricity costs spike, the college may reconsider, says John Bryant, director of facilities management. Seminar students also researched local food options in dining halls, a solar photovoltaic energy system on top of the athletic center, and a campus bikeshare program. 8 4_11 CC.indd 8 Noble Notions from the “dismal science” Professor of Economics Fred Moseley and a group of progressive economists were invited by the Political Economy Research Institute at the University of Massachusetts to develop policies for economic revival. Read their wonderfully clear statement of principles at http://www.peri.umass. edu/fileadmin/pdf/other_ publication_types/PERI_ SCEPA_statementJan27. pdf. Zoe Darrow Student Edge Not Just Fiddlin’ Around With a sweetness that mimics the Celtic musical traditions she embraces, Zoe Darrow ’11 is describing a summer she spent playing her fiddle on the street in Northampton, Massachusetts. She was about eight years old. “The first couple of times were nerve-wracking,” she recalls. “I was nervous [about] performing and also my dad was nervous— he knew that on the streets you are exposed to all sorts of characters. “But it was so wonderful. You’re not performing quite yet. You don’t have a standing crowd. You can play one song as many times as you want. It was a really awesome step and it helped.” Helped Darrow establish her fiddling career, that is, which included the release of a CD at age twelve, comparison to Celtic fiddling star Natalie MacMaster soon after, sold-out performances around the Northeast, and the desire to study ethnomusicology at MHC. Darrow was homeschooled by her mom in rural western Massachusetts and started taking classical violin lessons when she was four. But after hearing the performance of a Prince Edward Island fiddler, she was drawn to the lively dance music that moved her in a way the classical tradition did not. She began taking lessons in the different Celtic fiddle styles and over the years has taken classes and attended workshops given by masters of the Cape Breton Island and Prince Edward Island musical forms that are most to her liking. Her energetic performance style on stage, with her band—Zoe Darrow and the Fiddleheads, which includes her dad, a substitute teacher, on guitar, and friend Tom Colburn on piano—has been likened to Hasselgren by Tekla M acInerney • Darrow by Andrea Burns Powerful Ideas MHC remains on the Peace Corps’ top twentyfive list of small schools producing volunteers. With fifteen alumnae currently serving as Corps volunteers, the college is twentieth in the rankings. Since the Corps’ inception, 152 alumnae have joined the Peace Corps. They are currently serving in Cameroon, Jamaica, Jordan, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Paraguay, Romania, Senegal, Togo, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine on projects related to education, the environment, and health and HIV/AIDS. w w w. a l u m n a e . m t h o lyo k e . e d u 4/5/09 12:48 PM

Mount Holyoke Alumnae Quarterly Spring 2009

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