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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Supercenter Redux Walmart takes another whack at its Rohnert Park expansion scheme

BY RICK LUTTMAN our years ago, Rohnert Park–area citizens stopped Walmart’s plans for expanding its store into a Supercenter. But Walmart’s back at it, with the same proposal, and citizens must say no again.

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The expansion plans are a bad idea for Rohnert Park and all of Sonoma County. Walmart workers make far less than a living wage for Sonoma County, and the company is in the midst of a California lawsuit over gender discrimination. Less than half of Walmart workers have employer-provided healthcare insurance and many rely on taxpayer-funded medical services. An expanded Walmart means more traffic, more greenhouse gas emissions and extra burdens on local law enforcement. There’s even more reason to oppose Walmart this time around. The company is already building a neighborhood market in the Mountain Shadows Shopping Center. How many grocery stores does Rohnert Park need? We already have more than most communities our size. There are those who claim Walmart will bring jobs to the community. They are wrong. Walmart will take jobs from other stores, and the principal effect will be to lower the quality of the jobs. Walmart’s practices drive low-end wages even lower. When it comes to promoting fairness, eco-sustainability and democracy, Walmart jobs are triple offenders: they are nonunion, poverty-wage positions that support a corporation with a climate footprint half the size of France and that undermines Main Street jobs all over the world. Last time around, some residents supported Walmart because they wanted access to Walmart’s low prices. Rohnert Park already has its fair share of discount grocers: FoodMaxx, Grocery Outlet and Costco. Consumer Reports surveyed 10 stores, including Walmart, Sears, Target, Kmart and Sam’s Club, and only Costco earned an outstanding grade for the quality and value of its merchandise. The Rohnert Park planning commission will consider Walmart’s expansion application at a public hearing in the council chambers at city hall, Aug. 14 at 6 pm. Show up and say no to the Supercenter! Rick Luttmann is a Rohnert Park resident and retired mathematics professor at Sonoma State University. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Bond—JC Bond

I’m writing to let readers know about the extensive public oversight of a potential Santa Rosa Junior College bond measure (Debriefer, July 30). If voters approve the SRJC bond this fall, there will be an independent citizen bond oversight committee whose meetings, minutes and annual reports will be public, and there will be annual independent, public audits (as required by state law). Members will be required to come from throughout the community. All of the funds from this measure will stay local and will be spent to improve the JC—none of it can be taken by the state government, and Sacramento politicians will have no say in how the funds are used. These bond revenues may be spent only for facilities and technology. They may not be used for any salaries or other college operating expenses.

ELLEN MAREMONT SILVER Director of Communication & Marketing, Santa Rosa Junior College

Drakes Bay

heavy plastic mesh. For the first three months that this plastic sits in salt water, it releases petrochemicals. We find these bags and their remains from Sonoma to Monterey. We have personally picked up thousands. Albatrosses take parts of these killing machines back to Midway Island and feed them to their babies. Drakes’ operation was not pristine. DDT was sprayed around the dairies. Plastic has PCBs as one of its components, and it has been proven that DDT combined with PCBs condensed in the flesh of aquatic animals consumed by marine mammals causes cancer, and we are marine mammals. To get a real awakening, Google “what is plastic made of” and then Google “affects on humans.” Pay special attention to phthalates. To Drakes Bay Oyster Co., it has been about jobs and money. To the hundreds of sanctuary volunteers that carried out the studies that found Drakes a threat to our environment, it’s about the ocean, always has been, always will be.

KEARY SORENSON Sebastopol

Double Standards in Gaza

I would like to respond to Mr. Gogola’s thoughts on our oyster industry (Open Mic, July 30). So you went down there and observed the oyster farm. Did you take a ride out on the oyster boats into their “fields”? I did. We went through the harbor seal rookery at 15 to 20 mph; every seal head was erect, a sign of alert. Several slipped into the water. This is harassment of an animal that exactly 100 years ago numbered 30 along the entire California coast. The highly alerted in harbor seals causes cortisol to run through them, which in large amounts can kill.

Yes, Norman Solomon, Israel should apologize to Hamas and the unfortunates of Gaza, but only when the British, Australian and American governments issue avowals of retrospective contrition for the carpet bombing of German and Japanese cities to “rid them of arms manufacture placed in civilian neighborhoods,” then go on to destroy rocket launch sites. (Letters, July 23). And we need to accept that more non-combatants than soldiers died on D-Day, Okinawa and many of the other battles that contributed to the defeat of fascism and our national identities.

We were part of the study to find out if Drakes Bay Oyster Co. posed a threat to the bay or the ocean. We specialize in plastics. The plastic bags that the oysters are grown in are made of a

On that note, let’s keep thinking about this implied double standard between now and when the commemorative ceremonies extolling the end of the Good War are unfurled later next year.

THIS MODERN WORLD

More to the point, if Allied commanders had applied the same standards we’re now demanding of Israel, we’d all be speaking German or Japanese (while, undoubtedly, some of my family and, I suspect, yours would be in or near a Nazi gas oven). Ah, the unintended consequences of purity!

THOMAS RICHMAN Brisbane, Australia

Live Vegan, Protect Water Last weekend, the drinking water of 400,000 Toledo residents was fouled by animal waste. With unfettered growth of animal agriculture and ineffective discharge regulations, it will happen again in our own state. The problem has become pervasive. Waste from chicken farms has rendered the ocean off the East Coast unfit for fishing. Waste from Midwest cattle

By Tom Tomorrow

ranches carried by the Mississippi River has created a permanent “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico larger than that of the infamous 2010 BP oil spill. Animal agriculture dumps more pollution to our waterways than all other human activities combined. Manure and fertilizers promote growth of toxic algae that poison drinking water supplies. Effective regulations to limit dumping of animal waste into water supplies have been blocked by the meat industry. Fortunately, every one of us has the power to stop this outrage three times a day by saying no to polluting meat and dairy products. Our local supermarkets offer ample alternatives.

LARRY ROGAWITZ Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

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Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Newsom High on Pot

Photo courtesy Boys & Girls Club

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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State Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom told an enthusiastic crowd in Marin County last week that he supports legal weed, with the usual and expected caveat: Keep the boo away from junior until he’s at least old enough to drive. Our bud Newsom’s long-held prolegalization posture is at odds with ol’ Gov. Jerry Brown, who opposes legalization and whose economy-boosting priorities these days revolve around the great cosmic death frack. If Newsom were running the show, he’d let the Cali-cool freak flag fly proud, pungent and profitable. Legalization is a far more popular stimulus option among the progressive base that Brown’s been bogarting all these years. But Brown’s a shoe-in for reelection this year, he don’t need no stinkin’ progressives, and the pot issue is neutralized anyway since Brown’s opponent in the fall election, Republican Neel Kashkari, also opposes legalization.

THEY ARE NO. 1 One of the Boys & Girls Club of Central Sonoma County’s sites was named the best in the country.

In Da Club The Boys & Girls Club picks up the slack when education cuts hit home BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

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n 2008, the California Teachers Association declared a “state of fiscal emergency” when the state’s education budget was slashed by $18 billion. Libraries went unstaffed, teachers were laid off and schools closed, including some in the North Bay. Enter the Boys & Girls Club,

whose Roseland Elementary School site was honored in June by the Boys & Girls Clubs of America as the best in the country—out of more than 4,000 contenders. “It’s almost like winning the best movie award at the Oscars,” says Jason Weiss, co-CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Sonoma County. “What’s unique for us is we run the same program at all our club locations. For us, it felt more

like an organizational award.” The Boys & Girls Club steps up when budgets are slashed and programs cut. It’s more than just a place for kids to hang out until parents can pick them up—each club tailors its offerings to fit the needs of each site. If a school had its physical-education program cut, a club can offer it as an activity. Library shut down? The club will put extra attention on reading and literacy ) 10

Yet Kashkari made headlines of late when he “dressed up” like a homeless person in order to, you know, get a feel for the street life. We think he might have been trying to score some Mexican dirt-weed as a way to take the sting out of his party’s anti-immigrant animus, but that’s just us. Get yourself a dispensary card, brother. That street stuff is bunk. For Gen X pol Newsom, this is no mere dab into pot politics. The Kentfield resident lit up the joint in Marin when he told the crowd, as reported in the Marin Independent Journal, that he’d stump around the state for a 2016 legalization ballot measure. Newsom’s pro-pot speech came on the heels of a stunning recent New York Times editorial that laid out the rolling-paper of record’s ) 10

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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tutoring. Art program canceled? You get the picture. “We have more flexibility than the school does during the day,” says Weiss. “Our whole goal when we open on a campus is to be a partner at that school. We have a lot of communication with the principal and teachers.” If programs are cut, he says, “we can very often fill some of those gaps for the kids.” The club serves at least a hundred students at each site, says Weiss, most of whom are from disadvantaged circumstances. “We’re filled to the max at these places,” he says. The Sonoma County program came about through a years-long centralization process that put 28 individual clubs in the county under one umbrella organization, which is by far the largest in the North Bay. There are also independent groups in Sonoma and Petaluma, the latter of which has eight clubs in Petaluma and three in Marin County. The Boys & Girls Club of Napa Valley has 11 clubs in Napa and American Canyon. At Roseland Elementary, principal Dana Pedersen says the club serves about 200 of the school’s 650 students, 90 percent of whom are Hispanic. “And we always have a waiting list,” she says. “It gives students, especially secondlanguage learners, access to important skills and language practice.” Roseland’s was the first on-site club in the district, and its success spawned other clubs. Now it’s an essential part of the school. “It’s just an extension of who we are,” says Pedersen. “Our students would really suffer without them.” The club takes great care to integrate the school’s curriculum with their own. “They have their own services, but they complement our services really well,” says Pedersen. “For us, it effects the wholeness of a child, in a certain way,” says Weiss. “If they’re missing out on things that kids 30 years ago used to get in school that really completed their childhood, that’s something we try to pick up the slack on.”

The club’s funding comes mostly from government grants and private donations; 10 percent of its budget comes out of fees and dues charged to members. . The Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Sonoma County runs on an annual budget of just over $5 million and doesn’t have to worry about state budget crises. “The government funding we receive from the state of California is designated for after-school programs and would require a vote of the people to overturn,” says Weiss.

‘Our whole goal when we open a campus is to be a partner at that school. We have a lot of communication with the principal and teachers.

The investment has paid off. The group has the 12th largest daily attendance among 1,000 clubs around the country, and serves almost 3,500 after-school students each day at 28 sites, 20 of which are located at the schools themselves. And they’re making the most of the centralized organization. The group received a recent grant for 50 iPads and created a mobile technology center that rotates between clubs, which gives all students access to the tools, instead of just those lucky enough to attend a certain school. “They pride themselves on providing quality programming,” says Pedersen.

DEBRIEFER

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newfound pro-legalization posture, despite Maureen Dowd’s recent and hilarious psychotic encounter with a pot-laced candy bar in a Colorado hotel room. If the gray lady can get with the greenery, can the S.F. Chronic be far behind? Newsom has on occasion huffed and puffed about running for higher office—he would have run for governor this year if Brown had bowed out of the race—and Debriefer’s down with that plan: Aim high, sir! The people are with you on this one.

Dogs at the Table Speaking of Jerry Brown going completely to the dogs, the governor has a bill headed to his desk that he better sign—oh, but he better! Yes, Debriefer is referring to our favorite bill outta Sacramento this year, our pet bill, Napa assemblywoman Mariko Yamada’s dogs-in-restaurants bill, which would localize decisions about whether Fido’s welcome in al fresco dining settings. Her office e-blasted Debriefer with the news last week that the bill made it through both houses in Sacramento. Roll a bone and go for it, Gov.

Pension Puffers And in other wacky-tobaccy news we first read about in the Marin IJ, Nels Johnson had a great zinger in his piece last Friday about Marin County supervisors barring the sale of tobacco in unincorporated parts of the county. Johnson took the opportunity to remind readers about the county’s pension fund: “The supervisors barred tobacco sales without mentioning the county pension system’s $8.7 million investment in tobacco stocks, half of it in Philip Morris.” Love that unfiltered reporting, Nels.—Tom Gogola

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That feeling you get when you find a great booth at your favorite summer festival, is the best way to describe a visit to Native Riders. From custom made leather clothing dripping in fringe to colorful feather accessories, the store feels like a rare journey back to a time when quality and originality matters. The experience continues with every new treasure you discover. There’s leather hides, turquoise and silver jewelry, Tandy products, craft findings, bohemian clothing, sage, sweetgrass, incense, Panama hats, hand-crafted knives, Mountain T-shirts, custom leather belts and Native American art. The list could go on and on but suffice to say, this is definitely the most enjoyable place to shop for yourself or buy that unique gift for that special person. They’re enviro-conscious too! Between the nostalgic tunes playing and the friendly faces, it just doesn’t get better than Native Riders. They making going local so easy. Enjoy!

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Dining JoshuOne Barnes

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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CULINARY EDUCATION Claire Anderson sometimes joins her dad, Brian Anderson, in the kitchen at his restaurant Bistro 29.

Gourmet Raised

Local chef-parents eschew the culinary crime of chicken fingers at the home table BY JESSE BELL

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restaurant’s kitchen is no place for kids. Typically, it’s an intense maelstrom of activity with battle-scarred hands intensely absorbed in the craft: they chop and measure, they mince and mix.

There are knives, flames and pots boiling water everywhere, and the din of voices is barely audible over the soundtrack of

Metallica or Mozart (depending on the tastes of the chef). While the atmosphere of organized chaos may not be the ideal setting for children, for some, it’s the only life they know. “We had a crib in the restaurant,” says Karen Martin, chef and co-owner of K&L Bistro in Sebastopol. Martin recollects the early days when she and her husband, Lucas, were starting out. The couple has two sons, Jack and Lucas Jr. “I worked the line with

[Lucas] on my back,” says Martin. “We couldn’t afford to have a babysitter, so the boys were here every night. It’s been a long haul for them.” But she said the experience was positive because they were always together. In a culture that encourages instant gratification, particularly when it comes to food, kids of chefs have a kind of built-in gratitude that comes from being around all that good food and learning its source first-hand.

For these kids, a suppertime special of soubise of duck is as commonplace as the reliably kidfriendly mac ’n’ cheese. Martin says her boys, now age 10 and 13, eat junk food on occasion but they “both have an exquisite palate and will eat stuff that other kids won’t.” Growing up gourmet has meant her sons understand “food in its rawest form,” says Martin, who beams with pride at her sons’ appreciation of that fact. Louis Maldonado, executive chef at Spoonbar and a Top Chef finalist, says his five-year-old son, Benjamin, has been exposed to a variety of foods and ingredients not typically seen on the kids’ menu. His mother, who is Korean, introduced him to kimchi. The Korean staple is typically served with a nutritious accompaniment of rice and vegetables. “[He] doesn’t shy away from anything.” Maldonado says. “He is huge on raw food, [but] not really crazy about steak.” Maldonado says his son also understands where everything comes from, which results in a deeper appreciation of the food put before him. When the family does go out for dinner, Maldonado says it’s mostly for Mexican or sushi. The family has a threetimes-a-year policy when it comes to In-N-Out Burger or McDonald’s. The cuisine at Santa Rosa’s Bistro 29 emphasizes regional French (Bretagne) food, but owner Brian Anderson mixes it up for his two teen children at home, where Thai noodles are a house fave. Anderson opened Bistro 29 with his wife, Francoise, in 2008— daughter Claire worked in the kitchen when she was 13—and wanted to expose Sonoma County residents to cuisine local to Brittany. (Buckwheat crêpes are a specialty) In that time, Claire and her brother, Tom, have both developed sophisticated, adventurous palates. “They love oysters and tongue tacos,” Anderson says. “My son is a big meat eater—duck, steak,” while Claire is more likely to enjoy “salad and a charcuterie plate with some nice cheese. “They are very expensive to take out,” he says.

킬킹 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

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Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663. 90 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1575.

Corks American. $$.

Serving S erv rving Lunch Lunc nc h & D Dinner inn er Lu n c h : M Lunch: Mon, on , W Wed–Sat ed–Sat • 111:30–2pm 1:30 –2pm Happy H appy Hour: Hour: Wed–Mon Wed– Mon • 4–6pm 4 – 6pm Dinner: D inner: Wed–Mon Wed– Mon • 5–9pm; 5 –9 pm; Fri Fri & Sat Sat until until 10pm 1 0 pm Closed C l ose d T Tuesdays uesdays

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The restaurant at Russian River Vineyards sits in a 19th-century farmhouse, with food, from chef Ruben Gomez, equally down-toearth. Comfort-food favorites are taken up a notch with attention to detail. Lunch and dinner daily. 5700 Hwy. 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

1170 70 PPetaluma etaluma BBlvd lvd NNorth or th • PPetaluma et a l u m a

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American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955. Dierk’s Midtown Cafe, 1422 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

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Asian-Italian. $$. Southeast Asian street food served alongside rustic Italian in unique two-in-one restaurant. Heart-warming Italian from Forchetta, while Bastoni’s focuses on Vietnamese and Thai. Lunch and dinner daily. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Graffiti Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Jazzed-up waterfront destination really is all that jazz. Big menu focuses on creative seafood dishes, also steak and lamb. Variety of indoor and outdoor seating; wide selection of appetizers– half vegetarian–can make the meal. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Jennie Low’s Chinese. $-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

La Hacienda Mexican. $$. A family-style Mexican eatery with a Michoacan touch. Lunch and dinner daily. 134 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.9365. McNear’s Alehouse. $. Sports bar: barbecue, big appetizers, burgers. Lunch and dinner daily. 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Parish Cafe Cafe. $$. Authentic po’ boy sandwiches elicit the sound of a big brass marching band with every bite. Breakfast favorites include shrimp and grits, but don’t forget the beignets. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Sun. 60-A Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.431.8474

The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Sapporo Japanese. $$. An excellent choice when the sushi urge hits. Lunch and dinner daily. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.0631.

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes

daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Dinner daily. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.9430.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,� Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St, Napa. 707.224.0800.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and

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SMALL BITES

Eat a Peach Dry Creek’s other fruit deserves notice, too. Healdsburg’s Dry Creek Valley is known for its Zinfandel, but this fertile region of Sonoma County has more than just grapes to give—the peaches may be even more incredible. Dry Creek Peach and Produce grows some of the finest—and highest priced— peaches around. But don’t let the price tag scare you. In the mood for peach jam, I spied the stand at the farmers market and boisterously proclaimed, “Ah-ha! Exactly what I’ve been looking for!” I put the jar of jam in my bag, and the vendor flatly asked for $10. I’m sure my face went pale, but I forked it over in shock. My wife even joked that I was “suckered” into paying way too much for a standard jar of jam. But then we tasted it, and our minds were blown. The next week we went back and told the vendor this story, and he listened with hesitation, probably wondering why we were exuberantly telling him he charged way too much for his own product. But he finally smiled when we suggested he change the name to “$20 Jam,” because, in all honesty, it’s worth that much. We bought peaches that day and found the jam’s secret was not in its other three ingredients (sugar, pectin, acid), but the fruit itself. Pair a peach with some goat cheese and a lush Dry Creek Zinfandel, and prepare for a magical mystery tour of delicious proportions.—Nicolas Grizzle

serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch

at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

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20 Years Strong in Sonoma County County! y! Serving authentic Thai cuisine 707.829.8889 In Downtown Sebast opol Sebastopol 707.575.9296 Santa Rosa M–F 11–3 & 4:30-9pm, Sat 12-9p pm 12-9pm thaipotrestaurant.com

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY D’Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Enkidu Wines Savage, dark Rhône-style wines and floral, seductive rosé star in this Sonoma winery named for a supporting actor in the epic of Gilgamesh. Enkidu, a hairy wild man who drank from watering holes with the animals, was domesticated by love and introduced to the pleasures of wine. Get introduced to toothsome Syrah and other pleasures at this comfortable tasting room located in genteel Kenwood. 8910 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open 11am–6pm, Tuesday– Sunday. Tasting fee $10. 707.939.3930.

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040. SL Cellars & Muscardini Cellars Cal-Ital wines at the old red schoolhouse—yes, this is for the test. Framboise Sparkling Wine for the bubbly set, Monte Rosso Zinfandel for the rest. 9380 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Daily, 11am–6pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.833.5070.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590. Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern

tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

Wind Gap Wines Onetime vintner of big, opulent Pax Syrah refocuses on coolclimate locales that yield a more savory, European style. New tasting room at the Barlow, Sebastopol opens in late 2014; or by appointment. 707.887.9100.

MARIN CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

N A PA CO U N TY Artesa Winery Yet another treeless hilltop in the windswept Carneros turns out to be a striking, temple-like visitor center, with fantastic views. Spanish varietals Tempranillo and Albariño; Pinot, too. 1345 Henry Road, Napa. 10am to 5pm daily, $10– $15 fee. Chocolate, cheese and food pairings by appointment. 707.224.1668. Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection

of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Frog’s Leap Winery A good story is nearly as important as good wine; Frog’s Leap does a neat job on both. As you wind through the vineyard, the frog pond and the rustic 1884 winery, your tour guide finds bottles along the way, like Easter eggs. Dry-farming, who knew, can produce a beverage more thirst-quenching than water. 8815 Conn Creek Road, Rutherford. Daily, 10am–4pm. Tastings, $20; tours Monday– Friday, $20. 707.963.4704.

Inglenook Vineyard What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Another Savvy Swirl Worldwide 2013 Sauvignon Blanc challenge BY JAMES KNIGHT

F

or a remote archipelago in the South Pacific, New Zealand has had an outsized impact on the world of wine. Tardy to the party, the Kiwis had such good luck in the export market with Sauvignon Blanc that it’s hard to talk about the varietal without clarifying whether it’s a “New Zealand–style,” i.e., an overtly fresh, fruity, but dry wine with aromas of gooseberries and fresh-cut green grass—things that many of us in California either know nothing about or that threaten to become increasingly rare.

Or is it more of a Sancerre style? Similar to Sauvignon Blanc from France’s Loire Valley, these are, broadly speaking, supposed to be lean and highly acidic, and with more of a sense of “minerality” (i.e., sucking on rocks) than fruit flavor. Stuck in the middle, many North Coast producers seem to be chasing one style or the other. But are these regions so distinct that someone with a little knowledge can identify two randomly purchased wines in a lineup with North Coast Sauvignon Blanc? Let’s find out. Murphy Goode 2013 Fumé North Coast Sauvignon Blanc ($14) This one’s lightly toasty and subtle in aroma, with lemon blossom and unripe pear. The smoky splinter of oak in the nose comes from the portion of this blend that was fermented in barrels, à la Fumé Blanc (a California term invented by Robert Mondavi). An altogether agreeable sipper. Guess: California. Rodney Strong 2013 Charlotte’s Home, Northern Sonoma Sauvignon Blanc ($17) Floral aroma with odd hint of cherryflavored mineral water. Tart lemon, pear flavor, and a little smoky. Guess: California. Chateau Montelena 2013 Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($35) Canary melon, cantaloupe, lemon candy; just enough banana chip, melon, and sweet-sour lemon to round out a pleasant palate. Guess: California. Domaine André Vatan 2013 Sancerre, Les Charmes (around $17) With green aromas of grass and watermelon rind leaping from the glass, this is a sure-fire New Zealand Savvy, I guess. I’m wrong—the palate-scouring acidity might have been the tipoff. Matua 2013 Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc (around $8) With its musty aroma, more than a hint of vomitus—surely the French have a prettier word for it—and gumballs, this comes from an award-winning New Zealand producer. I guess Sancerre, but I’m three for five on the “California style” Sauv Blancs, which are bright and zippy, all. Distinct, yes; lesser, not at all.

ųŻ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Photos by JoshuOne Barnes

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The Digital Divide Waldorf educators confront the era of iPads and the Common Core BY TOM GOGOLA

‘T

here was one student in the class who was media-free,” recalls veteran Waldorf educator Jamie Lloyd. “There was such a difference in attention span between him and the rest of the class.” Lloyd, who taught for 14 years at Summerfield Waldorf School

and Farm in Santa Rosa, says the fourth grader could hear a lesson once, remember and learn it, “and he could tune out any distracting behavior in the classroom. He was much more put together, and it appeared it was because he was living much more as a child, as a fourth grader,” says Lloyd. That’s the dream Waldorf child: fully engaged, unmediated at home, and tuned in to the hands-on, gadgets-off—or

completely gadget-free— education. The North Bay is a mecca for Waldorf education, an experiential, humanistic pedagogy developed by the Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner early in the last century. There are seven Waldorf-inspired public charter schools in Napa, Sonoma and Marin counties and two private Waldorf schools. There’s even a Waldorf training

academy near Sacramento, the Rudolf Steiner College. Outside of California, there are about 20 Waldorf charters spread around the country. The popularity of Waldorf schools is unsurprising. The education can be a great and natural match for North Bay ethics of sustainability, selfreliance and respect for the natural world. The school traditionally delays exposure

to technology until the eighth grade in favor of an unplugged education, and for many parents, that’s part of the appeal. They don’t want their kid reading My Side of the Mountain on a Kindle, at least not yet. But that core tenet is being tested, as public Waldorf-inspired schools raise questions about the pros of technology in the classroom.

‘T

he parents who come into this are choosing a lifestyle,” says Lloyd, who is now in his first year as Summerfield’s lower-school coordinator. “They are keeping things much simpler, and keeping the media out.” But Waldorf–inspired public charter schools in the North Bay brought the media in—or at least the laptops—under new state Common Core computer-testing mandates set to go live in 2015. The Waldorf charter movement in the North Bay bridges a gap for parents who shy away from the private-school tuition that comes with the independent Waldorfs

but who want their kids exposed to Waldorf values. The added costs for those parents are compromises over technology, given the reality of the new mandates. Common Core is a set of education standards developed by states and promoted by Obama’s education department. The standards de-emphasize failed “teach to the test” models that arose from George Bush’s No Child Left Behind Act. “The public charters’ problem is computerized testing,” says Will Stapp, the new business administrator at the private Marin Waldorf School in San Rafael. The state field-tested the standardized-test infrastructure this spring and summer in preparation for limited computerized testing for grades three and up. “It’s been a real debate in the public Waldorfs,” says Stapp, who came to his post two months ago from the Waldorf-inspired Novato Charter School. “More than anything, there was

federal money pumped into the system,” he says, “to make sure they had the capacity online to do this. As officials tested capacity, the Sebastopol Charter School, a Waldorf-inspired K–8 school, took the federally funded laptops that came with the Common Core mandate to expand computer studies for middle-schoolers. The school will also offer a class on social-media ethics, its first, starting this fall. Common Core “triggered an in-depth conversation,” says the school’s executive director Chris Topham. “Maybe it’s time to embrace this and figure out how we are going to teach computer skills. Let’s go even beyond that: sixth graders can learn about media ethics,” says Topham, who until a year ago was in the Summerfield post now held by Jamie Lloyd. For one Waldorf student, the arrival of laptops and computerized tests this spring was cause of great consternation. “My son burst into tears about

21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

PUTTING TECH TO THE TEST Sebastopol Charter School executive director Chris Topham sees an opportunity in federally mandated computerized testing.

this,” says Loretta Mijares, who has two children in the Sebastopol charter. “He said, ‘It’s not a real Waldorf school!’ He was not happy—he wanted to be transferred to Summerfield.” But her fifth grader got used to the idea, she says, and when the computers and tests were fieldtested, “he was intrigued and interested.” Mijares says many of her media and technology worries are aimed at smartphones and parents. “My biggest concern is what the kids are going to be handed by their own parents,” she says. The Waldorf approach to technology in school, and at home, says Mijares, is “no media or technology through the eighth grade—but that’s a guideline, not a policy. Very few families abide by it 100 percent, and there’s a range of views among families about what’s appropriate and at what age.” Topham says he took pains at Summerfield to tell parents to teach their kids word processing and other basic computer skills, with an emphasis on supervision. “Because it wasn’t forced upon us, we really did not take it on,” he says. Topham says he now takes equal pains with the younger students at the public charter. “The middle-school-age kids had already been exposed to computers at home, but it was much trickier for the third and fourth graders,” he says. “We taught them some very basic computer skills in order to do the tests. We did it in a slow, sensitive way, like the way we teach writing, so that they had the basic skills to do the test without feeling traumatized.” “I felt that they did it very sensitively,” says Mijares. But the Common Core mandate was for Topham “a blessing in disguise,” given the difficulties parents face with at-home computer supervision. “It gets very hard for a parent to restrict it, because of all the entertainment,” Topham says. Stephen Mucher, director of Bard College’s master ) 22

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

The Digital Divide ( 21 of arts in teaching program in Los Angeles, says that Common Core has helped to blur the lines between a child’s at-home life and what goes on during the school day. The addition of technology in schools complicates a traditional dynamic, Mucher says, where kids were basically left to their own devices at home, whereas school is “the one place you are forced to react and adjust to other people and their interests and desires. “What happens in the classroom,” Mucher adds, “should be unique to what’s going on in the rest of society. The world within your home life is where you could be self-absorbed and take whatever path you wanted to choose.” In recent years, school districts across the country have leaned on technological teacher proxies to deal with monstrous layoffs and cutbacks plaguing the U.S. education system. Mucher supports technology in the classroom when it “makes students learn in a more public, transparent way.” Otherwise, he says, “it appeals to our narcissistic side and limits the very social possibilities of schooling: the exchange of ideas between students and the adults.” The beauty of Waldorf, says Mucher, is the school’s traditional investment in teachers over “teacher facilitators” whose role is essentially to direct students toward short-cut technological solutions. “You’ll never meet a more committed or busy teacher,” he says. “That’s true of all teachers, but you can’t do it on the cheap.”

P

arental tech-angst is not limited to the Waldorf School. Donations from the private Healdsburg School’s fundraiser over the last couple of years have been used to buy computers and, this year, iPads, for third graders and up. The school’s pro-technology posture raised red flags among some parents.

“Moms and parents were upset at the push for the iPads in K-5,” says Elizabeth Hawkins, who has a seventh grader in the independent, non-Waldorf school. “In these primary years, it’s really best-suited for the kids to not be using so much technology,” she says. Hawkins and her husband, a tech-sector worker in the Bay Area, are concerned about overexposure to technology at an early age. “We bicker. Our debate is on how much technology, and when,” says Hawkins, who chose the Healdsburg School when the couple moved here from Palo Alto. Incoming head of school Nicholas Egan says the emphasis at Healdsburg is on creation, not consumption, when it comes to the school’s dance with technology. As a private school, Healdsburg is providing iPads to students without any of the overhanging Common Core mandates. And, in contrast to the public Waldorf school’s limited engagement with technology and media, this year the Healdsburg School will offer an “integrated technology program” for fourth through eight graders. Translation: Students will create applications for mobile devices. “It’s project-based learning that centers on the iPads, and looks at content creation on multiple levels,” says Egan. “It’s not about technology per se. When I am in the classroom, I tell this to students, and I tell it to parents: ‘If all the technology went away, this school would still exist.’” Hawkins believes that kids get into the habit of “going so easily to the iPad to look for the answers, and not looking deeper or making mistakes. Having an iPad and a Smart Board doesn’t make you a technical school,” she says, “but everyone is in this race to be on the cutting edge.” Egan says he’s tuned in to dangers of an excessive fealty to technology. “If it’s not used right, it can be a distraction,” he says.

23

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing magical about technology, but any time that it increases collaboration, critical thinking and creativity is a good time to use it. The thing about technology is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so enticing with the wizardry, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very easy to get blinded by that.â&#x20AC;? Egan adds that the Waldorf model has a lot going for it but may suffer for its slow-roll on technology education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like it, I like it as a pedagogy, the emphasis on the experiential model, but, like anything, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too rigid or you overdo it, it can be dogmatic,â&#x20AC;? he says. Children share common traits in critical thinking, adaptability and resilience, says Egan, and the Healdsburg School emphasizes lessons that develop those skills. Whatever the pedagogical model, he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it really does come down to teaching those other skills and then applying it to the technology, the experiential, or the pencil and paper.â&#x20AC;? Egan says Healdsburg parents that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heard from arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so much concerned â&#x20AC;&#x153;about earlier or later adoptionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about usage,

and they want to be reassured that we are using technology for its highest and best potential.â&#x20AC;? Caroline Otto enrolled her ďŹ fth grader in the Healdsburg School this year. Her daughter spent her ďŹ rst years at the Cali Calmecac Spanish-immersion school in Windsor, â&#x20AC;&#x153;which was very different from the Healdsburg School,â&#x20AC;? says Otto. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The technology problem there was there was no technology,â&#x20AC;? says Otto. Otto is still weighing the iPad issue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been sold on the concept that iPads are going to really improve things,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I do think that now that my daughter is in the ďŹ fth grade, that access is important. Otherwise, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be left behind.â&#x20AC;? Otto notes, with a laugh, that her volunteer job is hands-on and dirty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the garden coordinator at the school, so I am at the lowtech end of it,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But you have to have both. You need to get your hands dirty, yes, as long as there are enough other people pushing the technology.â&#x20AC;?

) 24

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t the Waldorf-inspired Sebastopol public charter, Topham is pushing the technology, even as, he says, he was loathe to introduce computers to third and fourth graders. For him, the Common Core mandate was an opportunity for Waldorf educators to engage with the 21st century. One of the classic knocks on Waldorf is that it provides a great education—for a 19th-century child. “Maybe in the North Bay we are in the forefront,” says Topham. The new social-media class, he says, “involves conversations with teens about so-called social media and the trappings of Facebook, and what it means to put up a picture or you or yourself that is up there permanently.” All of this, says Topham, was “triggered by the requirement. Before last year, we did not have a single computer in the school for student use, K–8. We never felt that we were lacking by not having computers for student use, and we know that our students have been doing well in high school and college. “The Common Core lines up with Waldorf very nicely as a concept,” Topham adds, given its emphasis on nurturing problem solvers and on an educational model that teaches “how to address a problem from multiple directions.” But Mijares believes Topham went one new direction too many when he planned for a class in social-media ethics. “I know that when the computers came in as part of the standardized testing, he spoke about introducing a computer curriculum,” says Mijares. “My sense of it was that it was very moderate and not a doorway for kids to be on computers at home.” The proposed social-media ethics course, says Mijares, is “more than I’m aware of, and that’s one that I’d have issues with, frankly.” But Mijares appreciates Topham’s effort to manage the mandate. “He is dealing with reality,” she says. “I think the school is doing its very best to come up

with a moderate curriculum given the state mandates. It’s unfortunate that as a charter school we don’t have the choice to opt-out.” Mucher says the social-media course at the Waldorf charter is probably a good idea. “In a world where social media looms large,” he says, “there is something productive to be gained in problematizing it. You don’t need to have technology to have a class on technology ethics, and that could be usefully weaved into the curriculum. It can be a humanities-type course.” Summerfield administrator Lloyd credits Topham for having “weathered the transition” at the Sebastopol public charter. “There’s always been some sort of standardization that charters need to address, and technology is one of them,” he says. Lloyd notes that “the very first Waldorf in Germany had to make compromises in the administration of its curriculum in the teens and ’20s, and that was part of getting along with the rest of the world.” Lloyd is a Waldorf traditionalist who sees the value in an expanded presence in the charter school movement. “I believe in this education,” he says. “Both of my kids have gone through K-12 at Waldorf; I like what I see in them, and the kids I see who go through it. And I appreciate that Waldorf can get to the average parent—it’s not a private school.” Stapp at the Marin Waldorf is less convinced about compromises made in the service of the Common Core—and, as a parent, he’s skeptical of quickie tech solutions over critical thinking and problem solving. “Education has gotten overexcited about technology as a tool,” he says. “I call it the ‘search generation,’ and I notice it with my daughter. She pushes the internal button, the ‘Ask Dad’ button before she gives the question a fundamental thought,” he says. “Technology is superficially social,” Stapp adds. “In my experience with it, it allows people to isolate.”

Crush C h 25 NORTH NO R TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BO H E M I A N | AUGUST A U GU S T 13-19, 1 3 - 1 9 , 201 2014 4 | BOH BOHEMIAN.COM EMI AN . C O M

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide M I L L VA L L E Y

Up and Coming From New York City comes a powerful new voice in the classical jazz scene. Bria Skonberg looks like a Nordic princess, and her lithe voice and blazing trumpet elevate the jazz pop she plays with her band, the Bria Skonberg Quintet. Her 2014 release, Into Your Own, is a swinging and soulful collection of tunes with myriad influences channeled into a mix of world rhythms, jazz-fusions and even electronic elements. The Bria Skonberg Quintet swing into the North Bay Friday, Aug. 15, at 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $24–$38. 415.383.9600.

YOUNTVILLE

Walker, Napa Ranger As outlaw musicians go, Jerry Jeff Walker is a “Most Wanted” man. The prolific songwriter and country artist is best known for his 1970 hit “Mr. Bojangles,” though Walker’s rep as a renegade rocker is solidified by the annual big bash shows he’s hosted in Texas, Belize and now Napa. For the second summer, Walker will bring his band to the Napa Valley for a special Summer Camp show. He loves Napa Valley so much, he gathers fans from around the country for parties and events held throughout the area. The Summer Camp show goes down on Saturday, Aug. 16, at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Drive, Yountville. 7pm. $45–$75. 707.944.9900.

S A N TA R O S A

Pig Out! Food, drinks, art, vendors—there’s something for everyone at this year’s Sonoma County Wine & Swine event. Pork is highlighted in a delectable selection of locally sourced pig catered by a bevy of barbecue masters. Sonoma County fine wines are paired with artisan plates, and activities abound in this family-friendly atmosphere. The North Bay Hootenanny curates an afternoon of homegrown music with Mississippi Mike, the Sam Chase and the Easy Leaves rocking out on the outdoor stage. Vendors from Railroad Square will be out with a big sidewalk sale, and local celebs face off in a charity pie-eating contest. Saturday, Aug. 16, in Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa. 11am. Free. 707.490.5039.

GLEN ELLEN

Bear Witness Playwright-composers Matt Gould and Griffin Matthews have paired up for a compelling performance piece that’s already won awards and earned accolades. ‘Witness Uganda’ made its world premiere at the American Repertory Theater earlier this year under the direction of Tony winner Diane Paulus. Now, Gould and Matthews bring the show to the intimate settings of the Sonoma Valley. As part of the summer-long Transcendence Theatre series, this one-of-a-kind concert experience combines Afro-pop music with personal stories and world-changing ideals. Witness Uganda plays under the stars on Tuesday Aug. 19, at the Atwood Ranch, 12099 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen. 7:30pm. $35–$60. 877.424.1414.

—Charlie Swanson

MIND OF MENCIA Comedian Carlos Mencia comes to Sally Tomatoes in Rohnert Park for two shows on Aug. 19. See Comedy, p34.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

Arts Ideas DOWN BY THE RIVER A model of the Russian River beckons a young visitor at the Children’s Museum of Sonoma County.

New Discoveries Children’s Museum of Sonoma County finds a home BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

ifteen years ago, mother and Petaluma native Collette Michaud encountered the age-old question: “What to do with the kids?” There’s a lot of ways to kill some time, but Michaud wanted her two young sons to engage in meaningful activities. That’s when she heard about Sausalito’s Bay Area Discovery

Museum, a place that sparked imaginative thinking and highlighted the natural wonders of the bay. “I fell in love with the Discovery Museum,” says Michaud, who was immediately taken by the museum’s engaging exhibits. Soon she started looking for ways to bring that same experience to Sonoma County. “There was something in me saying it’s going to happen [in Sonoma County], and if you don’t do it, someone will. So it might as

well be you,” Michaud says. “But it has become so much bigger and better than I could imagine it would be.” In 2005, she and a small staff started a mobile museum that became popular in schools and parks throughout Sonoma County. For Michaud, that was the first step in establishing a permanent space. Michaud’s vision finally found a home in 2010, when Jean Schulz gifted the Children’s Museum of Sonoma County a 30-year lease on the 4.2-acre property adjacent to

the Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa. As the lease was being negotiated, Michaud and her staff were also applying for a grant to make use of the outdoor space. After an impassioned presentation, the California Parks and Recreation Department awarded the museum $1.8 million for an outdoor exhibit. “I wanted it to be a garden first, as opposed to an exhibit with outdoor features,” says Michaud. The garden’s theme revolves around the life cycle of the butterfly, and taking the Spanish name “Mariposa,” the space is called Mary’s Garden. “I always wanted to have a creek with natural features that show what makes Sonoma County special,” explains Michaud. Today, a 60-foot-long recreation of the Russian River centers the garden. Inside, the museum’s Ella Art Studio and Dow Events Center cater to children 10 and younger, though parents are able to enjoy and engage as well. The museum went full-time last June, and is still raising money to finish the space, with an $8.3 million capital campaign nearing completion. Next month, the museum hosts its annual “Time to Wonder” luncheon on Sept. 18 to help raise funds for ongoing programming. For now, Michaud is focused on completing the museum’s next phase, the indoor Science and Imagination Gallery set to open in 2015. The character and flavor of Sonoma County will be highlighted once more in a main street exhibit that offers kids and parents more ways to engage in meaningful fun. The Children’s Museum of Sonoma County, 1835 West Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Tuesday–Saturday, 9am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $7. 707.546.4069.

STEPPIN OUT Roscoe Orman is

back as Steppin Fetchit.

Knock Out ‘Fetch Clay, Make Man’ brings two legends to life BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘W

hen I was first asked to play the character of Steppin Fetchit, my initial reaction was shock,” says actor Roscoe Orman, describing the moment, in 1993, when he was given a one-man play titled The Life and Times of Steppin Fetchit. “I was a little bit offended,” Orman admits. “I didn’t really know that much about Lincoln Perry,” Orman continues, “the real man behind the character of Steppin Fetchit. I knew that he was a controversial figure, an actor who had been seriously criticized for creating a negative portrayal of black people. But that was about all.” The playwright who asked

Orman to play the part was Matt Robinson, who originally created the piece for himself. A longtime writer and producer for television, Robinson was the first actor to play the beloved character of Gordon on the PBS children’s show Sesame Street. The second actor to play Gordon was Roscoe Orman, who went on to play Gordon for 40 years. As it turns out, Orman was impressed with Robinson’s play. After a successful run in New York City, he went on to tour it internationally, off and on, for the next 12 years. This week, he steps into the character again. This time, though, it’s in a powerful new twoactor play by writer Will Power. Titled Fetch Clay, Make Man, the play—kicking off the Marin Theatre Company’s new season— explores the real-life friendship between Perry and boxing legend Muhammed Ali. “It was an interesting, intriguing, extremely dramatic relationship,” says Orman, who saw the play in New York last year and immediately knew he wanted to appear in it the next time it was produced. “Having played the man himself for such a long period,” he says, “I think you could say I’m bringing a certain expertise to my portrayal of the character. So here I am, appearing as Steppin Fetchit for the season opener of the Marin Theatre Company.” Asked to illuminate any differences in character that might exist between the two very different plays, Orman says it’s not easy to compare them. “Perry was a controversial figure, but he was a very important figure: the first black actor in Hollywood films to have an extended and successful career,” Orman says. “Both playwrights have discovered the man behind the myth—and let me tell you, he was quite an amazing man.” ‘Fetch Clay, Make Man’ runs Tuesday– Sunday, Aug. 14–Sept. 7 at the Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $20–$58. 415.388.5208.

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Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic, Alicia Baker, Bruce Gassman, Jet Black Pearl, Polkacide, Tara Linda, Motor Dude Zydeco, The Great Morgani, The Mad Maggies, Sourdough Slim, Paul Betken, The Steve Balich Sr. Polka Band AND SO MUCH MORE!

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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“An INVENTIVE WHODUNIT With a PITCH-BLACK HEART.” Rodrigo Perez, INDIEWIRE

Film

MEET YOUR MAKER Brendan Gleeson and Chris O’Dowd discuss Good Friday supper in ‘Calvary.’

Brave Hearts EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT

STARTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 15

SANTA ROSA Summerfield Cinemas (707) 522-0330

‘Calvary’ cleverly restages Jesus’ fate BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

R

eviewing the first Narnia movie, critic Anthony Lane mulled over the mixed metaphor of making Aslan the Lion a leonine Jesus. Conditioned like every ex-Catholic to tear up at the Passion, I still snickered when the Ice Queen Tilda Swinton ordered, “Let him be shaved!” Elton John’s hit “Someone Shaved My Lion Last Night” came to mind, but Lane put the problem more coherently. Is it better to have a lion representing the Divine, persecuted by humanity? Would such a Christian critter be more like the abused, patient Balthazar the donkey in Robert Bresson’s 1966 classic Au Hasard Balthazar? The Irish import Calvary restages Jesus’ last climb as a week on the Irish coast, with a baffled accidental martyr, played by the great Brendan Gleeson, much like poor Balthazar in gentleness, animal strength and, of course, shagginess. Gleeson’s Father James is a priest of County Sligo; as told here, the town he serves has pretty much given up on Catholicism as a bad joke. James is informed by a parishioner

(whose face he cannot see in the confessional booth) that he is to be shot next Sunday. James is an innocent who will die for the sins of the Church— punishment for all the pedophiliac rapes the bishops covered up. The Father has a week to figure out who his assassin might be. Suspicions arise that director-writer John Michael McDonagh is doing what novelist Patrick McGinley does—that is, using a less-than-airtight murder mystery to serve as a study of rural Irish awfulness. Still, the suspects are anything but usual. They include Chris O’Dowd as a cuckold who runs a grisly butcher shop, and the ineffable Dylan Moran as a millionaire swine, boozing away the shame of having driven the Irish economy straight into the bog. The final dirge by the Paraguayan folk band Los Chiriguanos fails to make this too sad to watch. Title aside, Calvary is tragic-comic. Like the old story from which it takes its title, it turns mysterious and brave. ‘Calvary’ is showing at the Century Regency, 280 Smith Ranch Road, San Rafael. 415.479.6496.

Music

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The long-standing legacy of Built to Spill BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

’ve never been to Idaho, but based solely on the state’s greatest export of the last two decades—the expressive, expansive Built to Spill—Idaho seems like a strange and wonderful land. Founder and frontman Doug Martsch has led the group in an ever-evolving experiment of expertly crafted rock and roll since forming the band in Boise in 1993. Built to Spill play the Uptown Theatre in Napa on Aug. 15. At first, the group existed as a sprawling jangle of messy guitars and off-tempo grunge, taking cues from influences like Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr. Eventually, Built to Spill found their own sound, first heard on their breakthrough 1994 album, There’s Nothing Wrong with Love. Here, the band effortlessly focused their multi-guitar approach into a fragile and bouncy album of indie pop. The track “Car” hooked a whole fan base who to this day call for the song at the end of every concert. Suddenly, Built to Spill was in the national spotlight. Soon, Martsch and company were signed to major label Warner Brothers, and based on their previously poppy release, were

poised to offer radio-friendly rock. What they produced was instead a conceptually immersive and radiounfriendly effort that was also easily their best yet. Nineteen ninety-seven’s Perfect from Now On is only eight tracks long, yet it’s an epic record; its shortest song clocks in at over five minutes. This album showcased the band’s ability to build on melodies with a three-part guitar interplay that eclipses normal guitar solos the way the moon eclipses the sun. Through the next decade, Martsch continued to evolve, from fractured alt-rock to polished pop and beyond. The band’s most recent album, 2009’s There Is No Enemy, is another step into uncharted realms of pulsing, fuzzed riffs and catchy melodies. For all the acclaim their albums receive, Built to Spill is a band that needs to be heard live. This week, the group makes their way to the North Bay before playing several shows in San Francisco. This chance to catch the band in the intimate setting of the historic Uptown is not to be missed. Built to Spill appear on Friday, Aug. 15, at Uptown Theatre. 1350 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $25. 707.259.0123.

515 Ross St, Brickyard Center, Santa Rosa (707) 542-5588 802 4th St, San Rafael • 415-457-7600

bananasmusic.com

HHonorable onor able AUG 15 > $12 adv / $15 door

Notorious 80’s rock band

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Aqua Nett 80’s

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Rock Skool rock band

TBD

AUG 29 > $12 adv / $15 door

The Cheeseballs dance band

AUG 30

TBA

Magic in Magic in the the M oonlight PPG13 Moonlight G13 (11: 00-1:15-3 : 30 ) -7: 00-9 :15 (11:00-1:15-3:30)-7:00-9:15

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30 Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 8:00pm

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Israel Vibrations with IrieFuse

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Mustache Harbor 6DW$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Vinyl www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Wed, Aug 13 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, Aug 14 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 15 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 7:30-10:30pm NORTH BAY COUNTRY DANCE SOCIETY/ CONTRA DANCE Sat, Aug 16 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts a TOP 40 DANCE HITS! Sun,Aug 17 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Aug 18 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, Aug 19 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Against Me!

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED A AUG UG 13 13 BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EEDM DM

NASTYNASTY: N ASTYNASTY: A TAHOE TAHOE TESSIE'S TESSIE'S FINAL FINAL VOYAGE VOYAGE FUNDRAISER FUNDRAISER $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 1 15 5

Showtimes: Sun 12pm/Thur 8pm/Fri & Sat 9pm

>=i`/&(,Â&#x203A;Mystic Roots, IrieFuse, Dewey & The Peoples >JXk/&(-Â&#x203A;Paulies Garage >Jle/&(.Â&#x203A;Shuck & Jive Backyard

Oyster BBQ

>=i`/&))Â&#x203A;Lorin Walker Madsen & Riva

Rebels

>JXk/&)*Â&#x203A;Clear Conscience, Iron Rythm, Animo

IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK O CK

MANZANITA M ANZANITA FALLS FALLS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 1 16 6

2014 2 014 NORTH NOR TH BAY BAY MUSIC MUSIC AWARDS AWARDS AND AN D 24-HOUR 2 4- HOUR BAND BAND CONTEST CONTES T

NOR N OR BAY BAY MUSIC MUSIC AWARDS AWARDS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Built to Spill

Chris Botti

Bettye LaVette

AMERICANA A M ER I C ANA | R ROOTS O OTS | ACOUSTIC ACOUS TIC

PREP RE- EARLEFEST EARLEFEST FUND FUND RAISER RAISER

$$10 10 DONATION/DOORS DONATION / DOORS 2PM/ALL 2PM/ALL A AGES GES

SUN SU N AUG AUG 17 17

SINGER | SONGWRITER SINGER SONGWRITER | ACOUSTIC ACOUSTIC EARL E ARL BAUM BAUM CENTER CENTER OF OF THE THE BLIND BLIND BENEFIT BENEFIT WITH W ITH R RAMBLIN AMBLIN JACK JACK ELLIOT ELLIOT O

$$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 7PM/ALL 7PM /ALL A AGES GES

MON M ON A AUG UG 1 18 8

REGGAE R EGG AE | D DANCEHALL A N CEH A L L | H HIP IP HOP HOP

MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT

FEAT F EAT S SATELLITE ATELLITE SO SOUND UND (BOSTON) (BOSTON)

$$10/ 10/ LLADIES ADIES FFREE REE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ookk yyour our

next ne x t eevent vent with with u us, s, u up p tto o2 250, 50, kkim@hopmonk.com im@hopmonk .com

Aug 14, 7:30pm $10

Bethanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Story

An empowering film of healing too dramatic to be ignored Aug 15, 7:30pm Donation

Chad Wilkins

On tour from Australia Interactive upbeat melodious grooves Aug 22, 8pm $5 Donation

Redleg Husky

On tour from No. Carolina Boot-stompin' folk music with soul

Indie music icons have spent 20 years making guitar-bending rock and roll. Aug 15, 8pm. $25. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Grammy-winning trumpeter and composer fluidly blends jazz and pop music. Aug 16, 4pm. $75-$100. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Motown vocalist belts it out in Napa Valley. Aug 16, 8pm. $30-$40. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Cotati Accordian Fest

Part-time Napa resident and outlaw countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s founding father plays his second Napa Summer Camp. Aug 16, 7pm. $45-$75. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic headline this weekend of music benefiting local youth groups. Aug 16-17. $15-$25. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati.

Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons The original Jersey Boys are back. Aug 15, 7:30pm. $25-$55. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

24-Hour bands performing, NorBay winners announced, Gold Records awarded. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all happening at the 2014 Norbays. Aug 16, 8pm. $10. HopMonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Heart Hoedown Americana and folk music festival features the Crux, Bohemian Highway and more, benefiting KWTF 88.1FM. Aug 16, 1pm. $20. Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Heart Ranchito, 361 Lawndale Rd, Kenwood.

Summer of Soul & Reggae Love Concert

SUN SU N AUG AUG 17 17

NAPA COUNTY

Punk rockers from Gainseville, Fla, return to the North Bay with Philadelphia noise rock band Creepoids opening. Aug 16, 8pm. $18. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

North Bay Music Awards & 24-Hour Band Contest 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 707.829.7300 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

questions. Aug 19, 6pm. $35$60. Atwood Ranch, 12099 Sonoma Hwy, Glen Ellen.

British reggae legend Carroll Thompson headlines with support by HoneyRose & Sistah Corinna. Aug 14, 9pm. $8. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Witness Uganda Told through personal stories of triumph and tragedy against the backdrop of heart thumping Afro-pop music, Witness Ugandaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young creators tackle challenging

Jerry Jeff Walker

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY

6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Frontier Room Aug 19, Rotties with Hellbomber and Throwing Rocks. 300 South A St, Suite 3, Santa Rosa.

HopMonk Sebastopol Aug 15, Manzanita Falls with Lungs and Limbs. Aug 17, Ramblinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jack Elliott. Aug 18, Monday Night Edutainment with Satellite Sound. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma Aug 15, Nate Lopez. Aug 16, Ricky Ray. Aug 17, Anthony Presti. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Aug 16, Mark Levine Trio with Noah Schenker and Peppe Merolla. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Ives Park Aug 13, David Luning Band. Aug 20, Studio E All Star Review. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Jack London State Park Aug 14-16, Broadway Under the Stars: Music of the Night. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Andrews Hall

Lagunitas Tap Room

Aug 20, A Grand Night. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. Aug 19, the Highway Poets. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Aug 13, Michael Bloch. Aug 14, Lowell Levinger. Aug 15, Mad Maggies. Aug 16, Jinx Jones. Aug 17, Levi Lloyd. Aug 20, Jason Bodlovich. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Cloverdale Plaza

Last Record Store

Aug 15, Jeffery Broussard & the Creole Cowboys. Cloverdale boulevard between First and Second street, Cloverdale.

Aug 16, 2pm, Doug Adamz. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Mavericks

Downtown Guerneville Plaza

Aug 15, Wonderbread 5. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Bergamot Alley

Aug 14, Brothers of Siren. 16201 First St, Guerneville.

Epicurean Connection Aug 15, Natty Lite Ensemble. Aug 16, Gayle Skidmore. Aug 17, Larry Potts. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Ferrari-Carano Vineyards & Winery Aug 16, Chris Amberger & His Hot Dogs. 8761 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 800.831.0381.

Flamingo Lounge

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Aug 14, JayDub & Dino. Aug 15, Out of the Blue. Sun, Vanguard Jazz Ensemble. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Aug 13, the Original Wailers. Aug 16, Reckless Kelly. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Osmosis Day Spa

Aug 15, Notorious. Aug 16, Aqua Nett. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Aug 14, 6pm, Irish Storytelling and Celtic Harp with Patrick Ball. 209 Bohemian Hwy, Freestone. 707.823.8231.

Forchetta / Bastoni

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Aug 14, Heather Van Cleve.

Aug 16, Da Prezident with J

Stalin. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

31

Napa's premier intimate intimate concert conceert venue,e, resta restaurant, venu urant, tap wine bar b and private event space.

Aug 13, Pete Delaney and Sean England. Aug 15, Greenhouse. Aug 20, Alison Harris. 4550 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.861.9338.

your

Rio Nido Roadhouse Aug 16, the Sorentinos. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

BERLIN BERL LIN WWITH ITH SSAD AD ROBOT ROBOT

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Aug 16, the Leftovers. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

NorBay Boogie

The Sunflower Center Aug 15, Chad Wilkins. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Tradewinds Aug 13, Ralph Woodson Unplugged. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Whiskey Tip Aug 15, Mystic Roots. Aug 16, Paulies Garage. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Zodiacs Aug 15, SambaDa with Afrofunk Experience. Aug 16, Mark Karan. Aug 17, 6pm, Sheldon Bermont & the Outcrowd. Aug 19, DJ Chalice & DJ Sizzlak. Aug 20, David Thom with Ultra Grass. 256 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 15, Bria Skonberg Quintet. Aug 16, Red Skunk Band. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Fenix Aug 14, Harold Day and the Experience. Aug 15, Soul Power. Aug 16, Miles Schon Band. Aug 17, Lee Waterman and Jazz Caliente. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Aug 18, Red Raven Follies variety show. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato Aug 15, Hadley Hill. Aug 16, Iriefuse. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Center Exhibit Hall Aug 18-19, Bay Area World Guitar Show. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. ) 415.499.6800.

34

The Boho’s annual music bash is back! Saturday, Aug. 16, marks the Bohemian’s annual music event. That’s right, it’s the NorBays, and it’s taking over the HopMonk Tavern in Sebastopol with beloved bands going head-tohead for fan-voted music awards and a packed roster of 24-hour bands showing off their day-old jams. Gold records will be awarded to NorBay winners in categories ranging from folk to electronic, and two NorBay nominees will be taking the stage. There will be performances from the Easy Leaves (pictured), the songwriting duo of Kevin Carducci and Sage Fifield who perform an acoustic distillation of Americana music. M.C. Radio Active will also be onstage, dropping beats and fusing rap, hip-hop and electro beats with a soulful performance. In between sets will be the spin styles of DJ Zack Darling. This year’s 24-Hour band signup exceeded all expectations, and the musicians are chomping at the bit. On Friday evening, Aug. 15, the prospective band members will be partnered up and given rehearsal space at the Live Musician’s Co-op in Santa Rosa. Under extreme time constraints, the bands will bring a completely unpredictable set of songs to the stage on Aug. 16, as they play their rapid-fire sets throughout the evening. The event will also feature a giveaway raffle from South of Heaven’s Craig Ahart, who was featured on last week’s cover. Three of his hot rods will be on site too. All this and more is happening at the NorBays—don’t miss out. The NorBays and 24-Band Concert takes place on Saturday, Aug. 16, at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $10.—Charlie Swanson

8.13

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Red’s Apple Roadhouse

Music ( 33

32

Marin Country Mart

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Aug 15, the Jake Botts Quartet. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

19 Broadway Club Aug 13, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. Aug 14, Sol Doc & the Optimystics. Aug 15, the Mermen. Aug 16, Tom Finch Group. Aug 17, Eugene Huggins Band with Felix Bannon. Aug 19, Soul Discipilz. Aug 20, Voodoo Switch. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino

Vibrations. Aug 15, the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Aug 16, the 85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Aug 17, Eric Lindell & Co. Aug 20, Steep Canyon Rangers. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Aug 13, Terrapin Family Band. Aug 14, Terrapin Family Band with Lebo. Aug 15, Go by Ocean. Aug 17, Midnight North. Aug 19, Stu Allen and friends. Aug 20, Terrapin All-Stars with Lebo. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Aug 17, Lila Downs. Aug 20, Mads Tolling with Wesla Whitfield. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Aug 14, Jimmy James Band. Aug 15, Ragtag Sullivan. Aug 16, Mutha Cover Band. Sun, DJ Aurelio. Wed, open mic. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

FARM at Carneros Inn Aug 13, Carlos Herrera Trio. Aug 14, Dan Daniels Trio. Aug 20, Trio SoleĂĄ. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Aug 13, Deborah Winters. Aug 14, Jay Sanders Trio. Aug 15, Lavay Smith. Aug 16, Joan Getz Quartet. Aug 17, Marcelo Puig & Seth Asarnow. Aug 19, James Moseley. Aug 20, Open Sky. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

The Garage

Goose & Gander

Aug 14, Dirty Cello and Lisa Marie Johnston. 2000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.846.1713.

Aug 17, Marty Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Town Center Corte Madera

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Aug 17, Lovinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Harmony. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

Aug 14, Todd Morgan & the Emblems. Aug 15, Daline Jones. Aug 16, the Boys of Summer. Aug 17, Syria T Berry. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Aug 13, Natalie John. Aug 14, Wanda Stafford. Aug 19, Swing Fever. Aug 20, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Aug 13, Silver Dollar Soul Snap. Aug 14, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. Aug 15, Bonnie Hayes and friends. Aug 16, Lumanation. Aug 17, La Mandanga. Aug 19, Tommy Odetto and Tim Baker. Aug 20, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Aug 17, Trio Solea. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

City Winery Napa Aug 13, Berlin. Aug 14, San Geronimo and Bobby Bare Jr.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Uva Trattoria Aug 13, Bob Castell Blanch. Aug 14, Three on a Match. Aug 15, Fundz Jazz. Aug 16, Bernard & the Old School Band. Aug 17, Bob Castell Blanch. Aug 20, Tom Duarte. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Rancho Nicasio Aug 15, Dore Coller & Bermuda Grass. Aug 16, Jeffrey Broussard. Aug 17, 4pm, Wanda Jackson & Red Meat. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

3F14 by Mary Jarvis, 2014

Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original Roadhouse Tavern

5FOUI4U 4BOUB3PTBt5VFo4BUo 707tcalabigallery.com

Shows: 21+ 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Great Food & Live Music

Now Open, our newly remodeled patio! Every Wednesday Country Jam Night plus Fried Chicken Dinner Special 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Thu 8â &#x201E;14 Â&#x2DC;Karaoke Party with DJ Huey Dawg Fri 8â &#x201E;15 Â&#x2DC;Dream Farmers feat. The Blazing Saxes Sat 8â &#x201E;16 Â&#x2DC;The Honey Dippers plus Mike Saliani Band 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 Sun 8â &#x201E;17 Â&#x2DC; Blues & BBQ with Stax City 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 Tue 8â &#x201E;19 Â&#x2DC;Levi's Workshop

Lunch served Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2:30pm Rasta Dwight's BBQ Fri, Sat & Sun Night 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

i

707.795.5118

k

Sausalito Seahorse

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Paul McCartney McCartney returns to the site of the Beatles final concert for one more show before the stadium bids farewell. Aug 14 at Candlestick Park.

Aug 14, Jamie Clark. Aug 15, Lumanation. Aug 16, Fito Reinoso y DJ Ruiz. Aug 17, Orquesta Bembe. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Le Gente

Sleeping Lady

Japanese pianist and composer is as renowned for her humanitarian efforts as her music. Aug 15-16 t Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s S.F.

Aug 14, Bill Hansellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guitar Pull. Aug 15, Danny Clickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Texas Blues Night. Aug 16, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Aug 17, Tracy Blackman and friends. Aug 19, Jojo Diamond. Aug 20, Rory McNamera and friends. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 14, ELI. Aug 15, Jim Vest Memorial Jam. Aug 16, Swoon. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 13, Beso Negro with Slim Jenkins. Aug 14, Israel

Bay Area band blends unique multilingual mix of reggae, hip-hop, salsa, rock and world music. Aug 15 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Keiko Matsui Lynyrd Skynyrd Celebrated Southern rock band bring their classic hits and blistering guitars. Aug 16 at the Warfield.

Man Man Fiercely unique band from Philadelphia brings a psychedelic edge to their pounding rhythms. Aug 18 at the Chapel.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

33

Galleries RECEPTIONS Aug 16 Backstreet Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Works in Glass and Paintings,â&#x20AC;? a solo show by Kate Black. 5pm. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa.

Aug 17 Marin Society of Artists Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fall Rental Show,â&#x20AC;? original works from MSA members may be rented. 2pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Aug 14 Napa Valley Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;By Nature,â&#x20AC;? photographer Michael Schaer displays black and white shots of vistas and landscapes from the Napa Valley and Lake Tahoe regions. 5:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Through Sep 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;David Meirik Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? the artist revels in juxtaposition in his mixedmaterials artwork. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am to 4:30pm. 707.827.3600.

Eggen & Lance Chapel Through Aug 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Petal to the Metal: Scrapture,â&#x20AC;? exhibits recycled-metal art by local artist Ron Petty. 1540 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3747.

Finley Community Center Through Sep 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Quilts,â&#x20AC;? presented by Santa Rosa Quilt Guild. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery One Through Aug 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma Scapes,â&#x20AC;? collects several artists works in a multi-media show. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300

SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Through Aug 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chopped & Screwed,â&#x20AC;? artist Mary Roll displays her body-centric paintings and drawings. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through Aug 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ceiling to Floor,â&#x20AC;? work by Jennifer Hirshfield, Alejandro Salazar and C.K. Itamura. Aug 16-Sep 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raw,â&#x20AC;? latest works by Jennifer Hirshfield, C.K. Itamura and Alejandro Salazar in their raw studio form. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

New Leaf Gallery Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpture Within Reach,â&#x20AC;? fun, accessible fine art sculptures. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Colors of Summer,â&#x20AC;? juried art exhibit featuring local artists. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.542.7143.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Sep 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;(n) Collage,â&#x20AC;? new works in mixed-media collage art. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Pie Eyed Open Studio Aug 16-17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carol Benioff,â&#x20AC;? the artist is the guest for this weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibit. 2371 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. Most Saturdays from 12 to 3 and once a month on Sundays too! 707.477.9442.

Redwood Cafe Through Sep 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;August Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Christine Kierstead and Carole Barlas, with photos by Rita Salluzzi and sculptures by Rick Butler. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

RiskPress Gallery Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stumbling Toward Ecstasy!â&#x20AC;? showing the book art of artist and poet Mark Wangberg. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Graton Gallery

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Sep 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teachers and Influences,â&#x20AC;? featuring paintings by Sandra Rubin alongside works by artists who have influenced and inspired her. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Showinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the River,â&#x20AC;? exhibits more than 40 artists work in a juried show. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Through Aug 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Descendants of Light,â&#x20AC;? Penny Wolinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photos, from her upcoming book, looks at American photographers of Jewish ancestry. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Charles M Schulz Museum

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Aug 13-Dec 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Punchlines in Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? 70 original strips look at the art of joke-telling that kept â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;? readers laughing for decades. 2301

Through Sep 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clay & Glass,â&#x20AC;? exhibits the works of artists Bill Abright,Terry OwWing and many others. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily,

Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;August Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? displaying the artwork of KC Winston and Lyn Swan. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery

Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cry, Love Lifeâ&#x20AC;? exhibits artist Jenny Honnert Abellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playful collage work. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events

Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play It Again, Samâ&#x20AC;? exhibits collage and recycled art. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Snydder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFH H  VSUHFNHOVRQQOLQHFRP HÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQ QOLQHFRP

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Sebastopol Library Through Aug 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Books & Boxes,â&#x20AC;? a library art show. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. Mon-Tues, 1 to 5 and 6 to 9; Wed-Sat, 1 ) to 5. 707.823.7691.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 17, “Siberia: In the Eyes of Russian Photographers,” spans a century of images from rural and urban Siberia. Through Aug 24, “From Hogarth to Hundertwasser,” features a rich collection of fine art prints dating from the 15th century to the present. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Aug 21, “Works of Nature,” melds nature photography and handstitched canvas work by Danielle Joy Reynolds. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Thumbprint Cellars Through Sep 11, “New Works by Molly Perez,” displaying expressive images from the Sonoma County artist. 102 Matheson St, Headlsburg. 11 to 6, daily 707.433.2393.

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Through Aug 17, “Risha Arts,” prints and paintings that revolve around themes of transformation and healing. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.542.7729.

Works,” late summer exhibition features Mark Jaeger, Ayumi Weissbuch, Ken Belluci and Jean Capron. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Aug 21, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Aug 28, “A Sense of Place,” abstract landscape exhibit features Jeffrey Beauchamp in the gallery’s last exhibit at the current location. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Dennis Rae Fine Art Through Sep 7, “Sensations,” mixed-media works by Edward Barrett, Francesco Cafiso, Lars Johnson and others. 1359 Main St, St Helena. Daily, 10am-6pm. 707.963.3350.

Napa Valley Museum Through Sep 14, “Wayne Thiebaud: Works on Paper,” exhibiting nearly 50 years of Thiebaud’s work and reflecting his passion for art education. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

MARIN COUNTY Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 15, “Reflections,” presenting ceramic pieces that reflect thoughts and expression. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

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Gallery Bergelli Through Aug 31, “Group Show,” new paintings by gallery artists. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Sep 14, “The Box Show,” annual exhibit features 150 artists creations from a plain wood box. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 24, “Motion/ Emotion,” juried show features 150 artists working in a variety of media. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

MINE Art Gallery Through Aug 31, “Exciting New

Comedy Below the Belt Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper O’Farrell’s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Chelsea Handler The comedian, actress and talk show host makes for a funny night of adult-only material. Aug 16, 7:30pm. $25-$65. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

I Ink Alone One-man comedy show from MAD and McSweeney’s cartoonist Mike Capozzola. Aug 14, 5pm. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Carlos Mencia The Latino stand up star appears for two shows, one night only. Aug 19, 7:30 and

10:30pm. $35. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Events Connect with the Women for WineSense Community Networking event for administrative-level women in the wine industry. Aug 14, 6pm. St. Clair Brown Winery, 850 Vallejo St, Napa. 707.255.5591.

Customer Appreciation Day Vendor Booths, classes, music, prizes and more. Aug 16, 9am. Free. Harmony Farm Supply, 3244 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.823.9125.

Family Summer Festival Peaceroots Alliance offers live music, guest speakers, food and dricks and silent auction to help fund PRA projects. Aug 16, 12pm. $20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Galley Tour Discover the art, history and environment of the Napa Valley. Third Sat of every month, 11am. Free. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Pacific Coast Air Museum Third weekend of every month from 10 to 4, folks are invited to play pilot in a featured aircraft. Third Sat of every month and Third Sun of every month. $5. Pacific Coast Air Museum, 2330 Airport Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.575.7900.

Paws for a Cause Dinner from Garpevine Catering, music from Ten Foot Tone and auction benefits our animal friends. Aug 16, 5:30pm. $95. Vintage Kennel Club, 22071 Bonness Rd, Sonoma.

Sonoma County Bicycle Expo Celebration of everything bicycle, including vendors, food, exhibits, a bike ride, racing, bike building, raffles and more. Aug 17, 10am. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fifth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Sonoma County Wine & Swine All-day event brings together foods of the pork persuasion and wine pairings from celebrated local vendors, with live music curated by the North Bay Hootenanny. Aug 16, 11am.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Plant Sale & Tour

35 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Aug 16-17. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

Stewardship Day Fri, Aug 15, 9am. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Weekend Here: Exploring Fermentation

Get Out of Town

Weekend-long trip will experiment with various types of fermentation, including veggies, kombucha and making hard apple cider. Registration is required. Aug 15-17. $200-$300. Rancho Mark West Farm, 7125 St Helena Rd, Santa Rosa.

Restored resort celebrates Woodstock anniversary

Film

It’s not often we look to Lake County for events, but this weekend marks a weekend-long concert and event in a historic setting with a brand-new look.

Documentary screens with producer Janet McKee for Q&A and discussion. Aug 14, 7:30pm. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Set in a beautiul mountain setting, Hoberg’s Resort & Spa has reopened under new ownership, and this weekend the proprietors are throwing a huge bash marking the 45th anniversary of the Woodstock festival. On Saturday, Aug. 16, the Heroes of Woodstock concert celebration features classic rockers Canned Heat, Big Brother & the Holding Company and Tom Constanten from the Grateful Dead. The next night, the Summer of Love celebration continues when Elvin Bishop (pictured) headlines a day of music that also features Lydia Pense & Cold Blood and It’s a Beautiful Day. The Heroes of Woodstock and Summer of Love concerts take place Aug. 16–17 at Hoberg’s Resort & Spa, 15205 State Hwy. 175, Cobb. Doors open at noon. $35–$45. 1.877.277.8922.—Charlie Swanson

Free. Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa.

Field Trips Bohemia Hiker Series Bohemia docents share the beauty of this property through the changing seasons.

Registration is required. Third Sat of every month, 10:30am. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Latino Outdoors Campout Educational overnight camp out for Latino youth leaves from Santa Rosa and exlores the coastal park. Registration is required. Aug 16-17. Pomo Canyon Campground, 10439 Hwy 1, Jenner.

Bethany’s Story

Bullitt Screens as part of the Vintage Film Series. Aug 18, 7pm. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Movie & a Meal Community event for all to share in. Third Fri of every month. $5-$10. Sonoma Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 W Napa St, Sonoma. 415.412.8570.

Movies in the Park Recent, family-friendly releases play out in the park. Fri through Sep 19. Howarth Park, 630 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa.

Pantani: The Accidental Death of a Cyclist Documentary follows the rise and tragic fall of popular and flamboyant cyclist Marco Pantani. Aug 16, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Tired of Yelling at Your Kids? We can make parenting pleasurable AGAIN. $ 50 per session for 10 sessions Call Now: 707.595.5637

The Center for Body Oriented Psychotherapy & Wellness 1626 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa sonomawellness.org

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Watershed Documentary screens with Q&A with the filmmaker. Aug 20, 8pm. $5. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. ) 707.431.7433.

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37 Days Political thriller that explores the outbreak of WWI screens to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the war. Aug 13, 1pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

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Food & Drink

Dance Palace

Beer Fest Block Party

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Craft beer vendors, live music and silent auction raise funds for the museums educational programs. Aug 17, 4pm. $35$50. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Vin Rose et Cuisine Provencale A taste of Provence wine and food. Aug 13-16. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

The Whole Fish with Maria Finn

BILL CHAMPLIN AUGUST 16 T H

During, After” with Richard Bausch. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Learn from the fisherwoman and author about wild salmon and its vital role in the ecosystem. Aug 17, 3pm. $35. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

FOR TICKETS: WWW.SONOMACUTRER.COM/EVENTS (707) 237-3489

Lectures

All concerts are $49 per person. All concerts start at 5pm. Winery terrace opens at 4pm. Open seating. Seating is provided for each paid ticket holder. Please no outside food or alcohol. Concerts are rain or shine.

Aug 20, 12pm. Free. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519.

Helping Our Aging Community Live Safely

Master Your Emotions, Love Your Life Led by Anne Marie Clear. Aug 15, 7:30pm. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Your Unique Spiral Artist and teacher Margot Schaal leads the workshop. Aug 16, 1pm. $25. Yoga Community, 577 Fifth St W, Sonoma. 707.935.8600.

Readings Book Passage Aug 13, 7pm, “Painted Horses” with Malcolm Brooks. Aug 14, 7:30pm, “Dark Lands” with Tony Wheeler. Aug 15, 8pm, an Evening with Deanne Fitzmaurice. Aug 16, 8pm, a conversation on travel writing with Andrew McCarthy and Tim Cahill. Aug 18, 7pm, “City of Ghosts” with Kelli Stanley. Aug 19, 7pm, “California” with Edan Lepucki. Aug 20, 7pm, “Before,

Aug 16, 7:30pm, “Braiding Sweetgrass” with Robin Wall Kimmerer. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Aug 14, 7pm, Love and Loss, local women writers series. $10. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley 415.388.4331.

Readers’ Books Aug 14, 7pm, “Steelies and Other Endangered Species” with Rebecca Lawton. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

15-Sep 27. $12-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Old Money The Ross Valley Player presents the clever comedy by Wendy Wasserstein. Through Aug 17. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Oliver! Spreckels Theatre Company presents this musical classic with members of their Youth in Arts program. Aug 15-31. $22-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

On the Verge

Theater The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee The Raven Players present the Tony Award-winning musical comedy of adolescent overachievers’ angst. Aug 15Sep 7. $10-$35. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Alice: The Rebellion of Wonderland Narrow Way Stage Company presents the new original play. Through Aug 24. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Completely Hollywood (abridged) Hilarious rapid-fire scenes from hundreds of flicks. Aug 15-24. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Fetch Clay, Make Man The West Coast premiere of this play follows and unlikely friendship of the Civil Rights era between young heavyweight champ Muhammad Ali and disgraced actor Stepin Fetchit. Aug 14Sep 7. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

How Shakespeare Won the West Play follows A ragtag troupe of actors heads West during the Gold Rush, seeking fortune and fame performing Shakespeare for enthusiastic ‘49ers. Aug 14-17. Free. Veterans Memorial Park, Third and Main, Napa.

An Ideal Husband Oscar Wilde’s witty play is performed by the Marin Shakespeare Company. Aug

The Curtain Call Theatre presents this play of language, that follows three Victorian era lady adventurers as they spin through time travel. Through Aug 30. $15-$20. Hall for Performing Arts, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.524.8739.

Phoenix The romantic comedy written by Scott Organ and directed by Beulah Vega plays Through Aug 24. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Romeo & Juliet Vacant Lot Productions presents the premiere event at the former California Packing Company’s Plant No. 5, with an outdoor space within the remaining walls of the old Cannery. Through Aug 23. Shakespeare in the Cannery, 3 West Third St, Santa Rosa. Presented by the Marin Shakespeare Company. Through Sep 28. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

The Taming of the Shrew Sonoma Shakespeare’s annual under the stars production is presented by Avalon Players. Through Aug 24. $20-$25. Buena Vista Winery, 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma. 800.926.1266.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

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ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Researchers in Peru have recently tracked down many previously unknown varieties of wild cacao plants. What that means is that there are exotic kinds of chocolate that you and I have never dreamed of, and they will be commercially available within a few years. As delicious as your Chocolove XOXOX Extra Strong Dark candy bar may taste to you now, you will eventually journey further into a new frontier of ecstatic delectability. I propose that we use this theme as a metaphor for the work you have ahead of you right now. It is time for you to make good things even betterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to take fun diversions and transform them into experiences that engender transcendent bliss. Turn â&#x20AC;&#x153;yesâ&#x20AC;? into â&#x20AC;&#x153;YESSSS!!!!â&#x20AC;? TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

At your next meal, imagine that the food you are eating is ďŹ lled with special nutrients that enhance your courage. During the meal after that, fantasize that you are ingesting ingredients that will boost your perceptiveness. The next time you snack, visualize your food as being infused with elements that will augment the amount of trust you have in yourself. Then you will be ready to carry out your assignment for the coming weeks: Use your imagination to pump up your courage and perceptiveness as you carry out smart adventures that you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trusted yourself enough to try before now.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) The leaves and berries of the deadly nightshade plant are highly poisonous. If ingested, they cause delirium and death. On the other hand, a drug obtained from the same plant is on the World Health Organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list of essential medicines. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helpful in treating many illnesses, from gastrointestinal and heart problems to Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Is there a metaphorical equivalent in your life, Gemini? An inďŹ&#x201A;uence that can either be sickening or healing, depending on various factors? I suspect that now is one of those times when you should be very focused on ensuring that the healing effect predominates. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

A New York doctor offers a service he calls Pokertox. Jack Berdy injects Botox into poker playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; faces so as to make their expressions hard to read. With their facial muscles paralyzed, they are in no danger of betraying subtle emotional signals that might help their opponents guess their strategy. I understand there might sometimes be value in adopting a poker face when you are in the midst of trying to win at poker or other games. But for the foreseeable future, Cancerian, I recommend the opposite approach. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re most likely to be successful if you reveal everything youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling. Let your face and eyes be as eloquent as they can be.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) When we are launching any big project, our minds hide from us the full truth about how difďŹ cult it will be. If we knew beforehand all of the tests we would eventually face, we might never attempt it. Economist Albert O. Hirschman called this the principle of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;hiding hand.â&#x20AC;? It frees us to dive innocently into challenging work that will probably take longer than we thought and compel us to access new resources and creativity. To be clear: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hidden from us are not only the obstacles but also the unexpected assistance we will get along the way. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) The literal meaning of the Swedish word smultronställe is â&#x20AC;&#x153;wild strawberry patch.â&#x20AC;? Metaphorically, it refers to a special place that feels like your private sanctuary. It may be hard-to-ďŹ nd or unappreciated by others, but for you itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a spot that inspires you to relax deeply. You might have had a life-changing epiphany there. When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in this refuge, you have a taste of what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to feel at home in the world. Do you have a smultronställe, Virgo? If not, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to ďŹ nd one. If you already do, spend extra time there in the coming week. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m reading the astrological omens correctly, the bells are about to ring for you. The festive lights will ďŹ&#x201A;ash. The celebratory anthems will throb. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to win a fortune on a TV quiz show; like you will get an A+ on your ďŹ nal exam; like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be picked as homecoming king or queen. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a bit off in my

projections, and your success will be subtler than I anticipate. Maybe, in fact, you are about to accomplish the Healing of the Year or discover the Secret of the Decade or enjoy the Most Meaningful Orgasm of the Century.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

A teenage Pakistani boy decided he wanted to help his countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government clean up the local internet. Ghazi Muhammad Abdullah gathered a list of over 780,000 porn sites and sent it to the Pakistan Telecommunication Authority. Big job! Hard work! I would love to see you summon similar levels of passion and diligence as you work in behalf of your favorite cause, Scorpio. The coming weeks will be prime time for you to get very excited about the changes you would like to help create in the world.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Working as a journalist for the Papua New Guinea Post-Courier, Simon Eroro wanted to interview a group of indigenous rebels in a remote jungle. He decided he was willing to do whatever was necessary to get the big scoop. After making a difďŹ cult journey through rough terrain to reach them, he was told he would be given the information that he sought on one condition: that he be circumcised with bamboo sticks as part of a cleansing ritual. Eroro agreed to the procedure, got the story and ultimately won a prize for his report. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend that you go quite that far in pursuit of your current goal, Sagittarius. On the other hand, it might be wise for you to consider making a sacriďŹ ce.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Kintsukuroi is a Japanese word that literally means â&#x20AC;&#x153;golden repair.â&#x20AC;? It refers to the practice of ďŹ xing cracked pottery with lacquer thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blended with actual gold or silver. Metaphorically, it suggests that something may become more beautiful and valuable after being broken. The wounds and the healing of the wounds are integral parts of the story, not shameful distortions to be disguised or hidden. Does any of that resonate with you about your current experience, Capricorn? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing it does. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call this the kintsukuroi phase of your cycle.

AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Near the end of his career, the painter Henri Matisse created a paper-cut composition he called Le Bateau (The Boat). It is an abstract piece that does not depict a literal boat. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why the Museum of Modern Art in New York should perhaps be forgiven for mistakenly hanging it upside-down back in 1961, upon ďŹ rst acquiring the piece. Fortunately, after a month and a half, a knowledgeable person noticed, and the position of Le Bateau was corrected. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wondering if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a comparable phenomenon going on with you right now, Aquarius? Is it possible that a part of your life got inverted or transposed? If so, will you be sharp enough to see the goof and brave enough to ďŹ x it? I hope you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow this error to persist.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice,â&#x20AC;? said British author G. K. Chesterton, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and then going away and doing the exact opposite.â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to endorse that approach for you, Pisces. In my astrological opinion, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anyone can possibly give you accurate counsel in the coming weeks. Your circumstances are too unique and your dilemmas are too idiosyncratic for even the experts to understand, let alone the people who care for you and think they own a piece of you. I do suspect it might be useful for you to hear what everyone has to say about your situation, though. Seeing their mistaken or uninformed perspectives should help you get clarity about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žŝ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | AUGUST 13-19, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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