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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies In Praise of Wild Plums BY LOLLY MESCHES

W

hen we first moved to Santa Rosa, a town of 30,000 amid ranches, orchards and redwoods, I didn’t realize that the neighbor children who were attacking passing cars and yelling, “Throw bombs!” were hurling wild yellow plums. Later, after we moved deeper into the valley, away from the child soldiers, and settled into country living, I began to roam the fields and noticed the wild yellow plum trees growing without fertilizer and no other water than what was provided by the winter rains and dense foggy nights. The children and I gathered the plums and found them to be tasty when ripe, and we tried to harvest them before the birds devoured them. Then one day, leafing through Barbara Kafka’s cookbook Microwave Gourmet, I read: “If you find those little gold-yellow plums called mirabelles, cook them for 12 minutes. The jam will be a wonderful yellow color and smell like honey.” Our plums do not smell like honey, but are yellow and edible when cooked with sugar or honey. Those days when the children and I picked plums and wild berries, and planted tulip bulbs, sugar snap peas, mache, Italian parsley and asparagus fern, have linked me to living more fully. I wake with the rising sun and in the evening look to the west for vivid sunsets. l watch birds build nests, stop to smell the sweet fragrance of daphne blooming in early spring, and much more. Now the wild yellow plum trees dot the landscape, thanks to the birds who eat them and drop the seeds wherever. The mother tree still stands at the foot of our drive, dropping her fruit when ripe. One day, my husband of 60 years pointed out a wild yellow plum growing in the midst of a large California black oak. The plum pushed her way through the dark dense undergrowth of the oak, seeking the sun. And there she stands near our pond, displaying her white petals, like a beautiful older woman who has just had her hair styled and likes the way she looks. Lolly Mesches lives in Bennett Valley, Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Chuck the Revolutionary

Funny to think of Charles “NRA” Heston being an unwitting revolutionary (“Gorilla Warfare,” July 2). Not the first time he played straight man without being aware of the joke (clueless gay crush object in Ben Hur). I don’t disagree with the analysis here, but it should be said that none of the original sequels were exactly good movies. Tim Burton’s Planet is destined for the shelf of “never watch again” next to Ang Lee’s Hulk movie. In fact, it wouldn’t surprise me to hear that Tim Roth is buying up all the copies because he gets a muscle spasm any time someone sees it. Despite any firehose references, the new Rise wholeheartedly replaced genuine political content with CGI. I’ll probably go see Dawn, but my expectations are low.

NORTALLY Via online

Free to Pee Why is this a story (“Camp Koch,” July 2)? Every year, we’re treated to the same conspiracy/99 percent-ers’ rant; i.e., rich white guys who control the world, have shown up to pee on trees, smoke cigars, burn owls an in general, do what guys do. The horror. Is it that they’re rich? White? Have views that our county in general disagrees with? You mention Dixie cups and Angel Soft toilet paper, but have you looked in your own kitchen and bathroom lately? Frankly, has any of us? The larger question is always the same: Do we want to reduce our consumerism to purchase only products made by those who supposedly agree with us in every aspect of life. Oh no, just the biggies: healthcare, abortion, same-sex marriage, immigration, coal burning, and Prius buying, of course. Should we change to Democrat and Republican toilet paper? Should we paint our

houses and dress our children red and blue? I thought we were supposed to be progressive and open? Earth to the people who are angry that some people are rich, choose to smoke cigars and pee in the woods: there are 7 billion–plus people on the planet, and not all of them see the world as you do!

Last week at the amazing Michael Franti and Spearhead concert in Berkeley, I witnessed a crazy spectacle— young, white (and black) girls, peeing in the mens’ bathroom. All of us peeing together, one big happy family. And I didn’t even check who they voted for. Now that’s a story.

ALDEN OLMSTED Cotati

Peace Not Bombs The Peace and Justice Center of Sonoma County supports the peaceful resolution of conflict in Iraq and opposes any U.S. bombing or military intervention. Some of the dispute can be traced to the 2003 U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq. We mourn the deaths of Iraqis, Americans and others. While the resolution is unclear, we hope the U.S. has learned from the recent past, and the pitfalls of military action.

TOMAS PHILLIPS, PEACE & JUSTICE CENTER BOARD MEMBER Sebastopol

Something Fishy It sounds like George Neillands (“DFW Skeptical of Record Coho Salmon Migration,” June 25, Boho Blog) hasn’t evaluated the data, and yet he’s telling the public to doubt the results. Is he acting as a spokesperson for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, or offering his own opinion? The article doesn’t say. I like seeing the Bohemian report on a scientific debate, but not if it’s just speculation by a scientist not involved in the research.

SPRECKLEDDACE Via online

Rants By Tom Tomorrow

Are You Listening?

One who asked how long the board was going to block the foundation’s plan to reopen the hospital was ruled “out of order.”

I’ve recently attended two “community listening” meetings by the Palm Drive Hospital District board of directors. Many people expressed dismay that the board seemed to be promoting everything but reopening the hospital. While concerns for teenage smoking and nutrition are important, the parcel tax initiatives specifically direct hospital funds be spent on acute care and local emergency services.

Comments by community leaders in a Sonoma County assessment indicate that public safety officers need the hospital to be reopened. The board maintains that the hospital had to be closed, but financial statements indicate that without excessive administrative salaries and expenditures and elimination of a citizen financial review committee, the hospital could have remained open.

Many people said they want the hospital reopened, and some wondered how much money was spent by the board on attorneys and PR. Constituents want medical professionals on the board, people who are familiar with the issues facing hospitals today and who are committed to resolving them. More than 15 people left because reopening Palm Drive Hospital was off the table.

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THIS MODERN WORLD

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We need a real discussion of the facts, not ancillary, choreographed “brainstorming.” One comment summed it up: a teenager hit by a bus needs immediate ER care, not nutritional or anti-smoking advice.

SUSAN MOULTON Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

the Pa t in r rk A Benefit for A Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve, Guerneville Celebrating the 150th Anniversary of State Parks and the 50th Anniversary of Austin Creek State Recreation Area

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Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Lopez Aftermath Activists in Santa Rosa who organized protests around the police shooting of Andy Lopez last year had a busy and unsatisfying couple of days this week. Sonoma County District Attorney Jill Ravitch on Monday said she wouldn’t pursue charges against Sonoma sheriff’s deputy Erick Gelhaus, who shot and killed the 13-year-old Lopez in Roseland last October. Ravitch’s afternoon press conference was held after her office errantly sent out an e-blast about her decision Monday morning, then took it back in a follow-up email. By then, local media had jumped on the story—and Ravitch was left in the unenviable position of having to call Lopez’s parents with the news after it had already broken.

LET THE SUN IN Sonoma Clean Power’s mandate to develop more local energy appears to be leaning toward solar power.

Growing Power

Sonoma Clean Power tunes in to new, local energy sources BY TOM GOGOLA

S

onoma Clean Power will vote July 10 to add county-generated renewable power to the new public utility’s energy mix, with a likely emphasis on local solar power. The process is aimed at making good on pledges to create local jobs and energy.

Under the so-called feed-in tariff program, renewable-energy applicants will help fulfill a statemandated goal that requires utilities to provide 33 percent renewable energy by 2020, as Sonoma Clean Power (SCP) promises service that is cheaper and cleaner than PG&E. The vote comes after recent

moves by the nonprofit utility to strengthen its bank of bigkilowatt renewable sources. In May, the utility rolled out service to its first 25,000 businesses and residents, and SCP just fought off a push in Sacramento to end a piece of the state legislation that created the Community Choice Aggregate model for ) 10

The Justice Coalition for Andy Lopez (JCAL) had previously scheduled a protest for outside Ravitch’s office early Tuesday afternoon, before any decision had been announced. Activist Mary Moore says she was perplexed by the roll-out of Ravitch’s announcement. Moore had assumed, she says, that the timing of Ravitch’s announcement meant the district attorney would be going for an indictment of Gelhaus, as a way to defang the promised protest. Monday, Ravitch defended her decision and the investigation, and encouraged Santa Rosa’s Latino population to come together and move forward. Ravitch said State Attorney General Kamala Harris had been sent a copy of her 52-page report exonerating Gelhaus, and that it was sent to the Sonoma County Grand Jury and the U.S. Department of Justice. Any of those entities might choose to act on the Lopez shooting—and the JCAL pledges to ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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public utilities. The legislation, approved by lawmakers in 2001, allows localities such as Sonoma County to create its own utilities. Big Energy fought against the portion of the law that automatically signed customers up for the new utility, known as the “opt-out” option. But PG&E failed to get lawmakers to pass an “opt-in” amendment. It’s been a busy time for SCP. It made geothermal deals in recent months with the bigindustry likes of Calpine and Constellation/Exelon in the Geysers. On the solar front, Recurrent Energy, a subsidiary of the Sharp Corp., will provide solar power from an as-yet-unbuilt array in Fresno County. How will the feed-in tariff work? The utility has $600,000 “for purchasing new, local renewable electricity from entities that enter into a wholesale power purchase agreement,” says Sonoma Clean Power feed-in tariff program manager Amy Rider. “The proposed feed-in tariff allows for as few as three applicants to participate,” she says. “The smaller the projects, the more that can participate.” The criteria for selection, says Rider, include a demonstration by applicants that “an interconnection agreement with the grid operator [e.g., PG&E] is in progress.” Applicants have to be able to provide wholesale power to the SCP mix. The state set a standard in 2013 for fuels that can count toward that 33 percent renewable goal: biomass, landfill gas, ocean thermal and tidal currents, small hydroelectric plants, wave power, solar photovoltaic, biodiesel, wind and solar thermal. The Sonoma County Water Agency tried to get wave power going in the county, but permits were yanked by the feds in 2011. The following year, the water agency’s board of directors moved to create Sonoma Clean Power under the CCA law passed in the wake of the 2001 statewide

brownouts. The power company serves all towns and cities in Sonoma County except Rohnert Park, Petaluma, Cloverdale and Healdsburg.

Applicants will help fulfill a statemandated goal that requires utilities to provide 33 percent renewable energy by 2020. “There are several types of renewable-generation technologies allowed by our feed-in tariff program that are unlikely to participate due to long development lead times,” says Rider. “However, we allow for them within the program to maximize participant flexibility.” The water agency already has a couple of renewable-fuel projects in its portfolio. In 2011, the agency contracted with a company called OHR Biostar to build a chickeneffluvia “farm to fuel” biogas converter at its wastewater plant on Aviation Boulevard. The agency also utilizes energy from the Petaluma biogas filtration plant, at the county-run landfill. Those projects now send power to the PG&E grid and fuel for county vehicles. But all signs lead to an emphasis on solar energy to maximize the feed-in tariff renewables, a refrain repeated in online public comments on the SCP site and, notably, by the chair of Sonoma Clean Power’s board of directors, Susan Gorin. “We look forward to the development of new Sonoma County solar that Sonoma Clean Power’s feed-in tariff will facilitate,” says Gorin via email.

DEBRIEFER

(8

keep the pressure on until one of them does. “We want the Department of Justice to look at this,” says Moore. —Tom Gogola

Play It, Schroeder After the idea was suggested almost 20 years ago, the Green Music Center will become a reality with the opening of Schroeder Hall. “Everything on site is now 100 percent complete,” says GMC spokeswoman Jessica Anderson. The exterior of the 250-seat performance center has been complete since before the 1,400seat main hall was built, though the interior required about $5 million to finish when the main hall opened two years ago. “I think we all would have liked to have seen it completed sooner,” says Anderson, who suggests that a sluggish economy slowed down donations to the project. The hall will mostly be used for music education, says GMC co-executive director Zarin Mehta, who has booked a strong lineup for the Aug. 22–24 opening. Pianist David Benoit, known for his recordings from the Peanuts music library, will perform a private show Friday night for major donors that include Jeanie Schulz, widow of Peanuts creator Charles Schulz (the hall is named after the Beethoven-obsessed character from the comic strip). Joining Benoit through the weekend are pianist Jeffrey Kahane, organist James David Christie with soprano Ruth Ann Swenson, and others. Green Music Center will also feature a “Sundays at Schroeder” event with up-and-coming musicians. “I want to develop an audience and see what kind of music suits the acoustics best,” says Mehta.—Nicolas Grizzle

STATE OF THE PLATE La Toque’s ‘protest’ lunch included six courses of foie gras prepared by six chefs.

Liver Lovers Foes of state foie gras ban stage an edible protest BY STETT HOLBROOK

I

n the annals of civil disobedience, the lunch on July 5 at La Toque in Napa surely ranks as one of the most delicious—if you like eating fattened duck liver, that is.

Executive chef Ken Frank offered a free, six-course meal at his Michelin one star restaurant. The catch? Diners had to submit a 100word post on La Toque’s Facebook page on the topic “Why California’s foie gras ban is foolish.” More than 200 people submitted

entries. The lunch, dubbed the “State of American Foie Gras,” was part marketing stunt and part protest. July marks the second anniversary of California’s ban on foie gras, SB 1520. The law prohibits “force feed[ing of] a bird for the purpose of enlarging the bird’s liver beyond normal size” and the sale of foie gras in the state. But it can be given away and imported. Frank is an outspoken critic of the ban, which he variously calls “stupid,” “unenforceable” and “unfair.” Joining Frank in

the kitchen were five fellow chefs and comrades-in-arms: Patrick Mulvaney of Mulvaney’s Building & Loan in Sacramento, David Bazirgan of San Francisco’s Dirty Habit, Douglas Keane, former executive chef at Cyrus and owner of the Healdsburg Bar & Grill, Victor Scargle of Yountville’s Lucy and Mark Dommen of One Market in San Francisco. Instead of banning foie gras, Frank said California could lead the way in creating ethical standards for foie gras production. Foie gras is produced by force-

feeding ducks through a tube to enlarge their livers. While guests were mingling, waiters passed tiny duck sausages served on equally petite hot dog buns and a black tea shrub topped with foie gras foam. Once seated, a succession of dishes came out the kitchen that featured foie gras as the star ingredient. Chef Keane served an impossibly rich and creamy parfait of foie gras with a cherry blossom gelée for the first course. The standout for me came a few dishes later: Dommen’s seared foie gras in a light, but deeply delicious duck-dashi consommé. Duck de Jour, Sonoma Artisan, Hudson Valley Foie Gras and La Belle donated the duck livers and duck. In order to avoid any appearances of selling foie gras, nothing was available for purchase, including the restaurant’s vast selection of wine. Instead, guests brought their own wine and shared glasses of Sauterne, Pinot Gris, sparking wine and other foiefriendly wines. The free-flowing food and wine made for an overthe-top lunch. So what is the state of American foie gras? The industry appears to be thriving everywhere except in California, but opponents of the ban have been unsuccessful in overturning it. Last August, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously upheld a district judge’s refusal to block the law. And the two sides of the debate are sticking by their positions. Bruce Friedrich, senior policy director for Farm Sanctuary, a national animal rights group that helped enact the ban, called the lunch “a temper tantrum by chefs who are behaving like babies.” He believes there is no way to humanely produce foie gras: “It’s simply not possible to force an animal’s liver to expand by 1,000 percent without the animal being in agony.” Critics of the ban say ducks and geese naturally gorge themselves and grow their livers in advance of migratory journeys. “There is no good case that these ducks are mistreated,” says Frank. “We will continue to protest to keep foie gras alive.”

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COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Applewood Inn California cuisine. $$$. California wine country food inspired by European traditions. Dinner daily; midweek locals’ specials. 13555 Hwy 116, Guerneville. 707.869.9093.

Dine with us soon!!

20 Years Strong in Sonoma County County! y! Serving authentic Thai cuisine opol 707.829.8889 In Downtown Sebast Sebastopol 707.575.9296 Santa Rosa M–F 11–3 & 4:30-9pm, Sat 12-9p pm 12-9pm thaipotrestaurant.com

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

es alades Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Niçoise French Green Lentil Full Catering Orchard Harvest Menu Available Salade Verte

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage • improves mobility in

Hosted by: Hosted by: Steve S teve Jaxon-Vicario Jaxon-Vicario

neck and shoulders • relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis

Saturday S aturday nights nights 6pm 6 pm to to 8pm 8pm

ON SITE MASSAGE AVAILABLE

Margery Smith 707.536.1797

Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663. 90 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1575.

style. That means tofu is more prevalent than pork, and it’s all organic. Fresh fish, too. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Thurs; lunch and dinner, Sat; dinner only, Fri. 915 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.829.9037.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Two Sonoma County locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 1774 Piner Road #B, Santa Rosa. 707.521.0890. Two Marin County locations: 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.898.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

Royal China. Chinese. $$. Smart décor, professional service, very solid wonton soup. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 3080 Marlowe Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2911.

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. Lunch and dinner daily. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

$$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no small part to the fresh seafood bar. Dinner daily. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.9430.

The Girl & the Fig

Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosa’s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner daily. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Le Bistro French. $$. A tiny space, simple menu, excellent food–and a reasonable price. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 312 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.8292.

Papas & Pollo Mexican. $. Tasty burritos, West County-

Thai Taste Restaurant

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Wolf House Californian. $$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401. Yao-Kiku Japanese.

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 6770 McKinley St #150, Sebastopol. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast and lunch daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

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SMALL BITES

Street of Eats If you need an excuse to get an early jump on the weekend, the Barlow’s Thursday night Street Fair is a good one. The Barlow, Sebastopol’s quadrant of retail shops, winetasting rooms, breweries and restaurants, debuted the Street Fair last week, and it was a hit. Granted, people were already amassing in advance of the fireworks display at nearby Analy High School, but I’m guessing the crowds will be back every week because of the sheer quantity of good food and drink available. I counted about 20 food vendors hawking everything from paella to oysters and pizza to Thai food. The streets are blocked off to cars, and dining tables are set up. In addition to scores of food tents, local artists and vendors have a presence at the fair while Barlow-based wineries and restaurants open their doors to the multitudes, too. Live music adds to the street-party vibe. “I have no reason to go home,” said wellsated fairgoer. The Barlow Street Fair runs 4–8 pm every Thursday through October 30. —Stett Holbrook

neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Compadres Rio Grille

La Toque Restaurant

Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Celadon Global

French Laundry

comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate

Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

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Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 316 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

Breweries

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SONOMA CO U N TY

Hairy Eyeball, Pils . . . you are getting verrrrrryyy thirsty . . . 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 707.778.8776. www. lagunitas.com.

Bear Republic Brewing Company

101 North Brewing Company A new addition to

One of the originals on the North Bay craft-beer scene, this family-owned brewery only gets better with age. Most famous for Racer 5, the Healdsburg location offers a surprisingly diverse selection of beers beyond the better-known names. 345 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.2337. www. bearrepublic.com.

Dempsey’s Restaurant & Brewery Give your palate a rest from the hopped-up West Coast ales and try the maltier Irish ales at one of Sonoma County’s oldest breweries. Or just go for it and get a Boneshaker, a big IPA at 8.7 percent ABV—but you may need to take a dunk in the nearby Petaluma River to recover. 50 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 707.765.9694. www. dempseys.com.

Fogbelt Brewing Company Born from winemaking families, brewers Paul and Remy mix rich flavors and hop-driven beers to form complex and tasty brews. Each release from Fogbelt is named for North Coast Redwood trees, from the Armstrong Stoutchocolaty and balanced- to the Hyperion Red Ale-with roasted malty flavor highlighted by crisp citrus undertones. 1305 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.978.3400. www.fogbeltbrewing.com.

JOSH AND REGINA NA S SILVERS I LV E R S PRESENT PRESE NT

Hopmonk Tavern

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Founded by Dean Biersch of Gordon-Biersch, Hopmonk offers house-brewed beers Kellerbiers and Dunkelweizens, in addition to an impressive rotating list of seasonal craft beers from California and beyond. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. 691 Broadway. Sonoma. 707.935.9100. www. hopmonk.com.

Lagunitas Brewing If you haven’t hit up the beer garden at the North Bay’s most laid-back brewery, waste no time and get down there, preferably on one of the many nights of live music. Sip on a Little Sumpin,’ Hop Stoopid,

live music and absolutely zero TVs. 401-B Bel Marin Keys Blvd., Novato. 415.883.2040. www.baeltanebrewing.com.

Broken Drum Brewery & Wood Grill Voted

the North Bay craft beer scene, this brewery’s Heroine IPA has 101 North winning at the beer game just out the gate. Based in Petaluma, put it on your “oneto-watch” list. 1304 Scott St., Ste. D. Petaluma. 707.778.8384. www.101northbeer.com.

Best North Bay brewpub by Bohemian readers in 2011, the time is right to stop in for a handcrafted German lager, bock or summer golden ale at San Rafael’s friendliest beer establishment. 1132 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.456.HOPS. www. brokendrum.com.

Russian River Brewing Co Tasty pizza

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Pub grub gets

and excellent—and worldfamous— brews. Two words: beer bites! 725 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337. www. russianriverbrewing.com.

a pub-cuisine facelift. Fun specials, great live music. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

St. Florian’s Brewery Started by local firefighter Aron Levin and his wife, Amy, St. Florian’s Brewery has exploded of late. The company has plans to expand their space, staff and line of beers, with a brown ale coming soon. St. Florian’s also gives back, donating 5 percent of all profits to community and fire-related organizations. 7704-A Bell Road, Windsor. www.stfloriansbrewery.com.

Third Street Aleworks Third Street is sometimes overshadowed by a worldrenowned brewery just around the corner, but their Bombay rouge—a malty, drinkable IPA—can hold its own in a roomful of crowded beers. 610 Third St., Santa Rosa. 707.523.3060. www. thirdstreetaleworks.com.

Woodfour Brewing An artisan brewery located in the Barlow in Sebastopol, Woodfour is one of the only completely solar-powered breweries in the country. 6780 Depot St., Sebastopol. 630.854.1721. www. woodfourbrewing.com.

MA R I N CO U N TY Baeltane Brewing & Tasting Room Marin brewery proudly produces artisanal ales specializing in Belgian, French and West Coast Ale styles. Enjoy a pint in the inviting tasting room featuring

Moylan’s Brewery & Restaurant At Moylan’s, the M stands for malty. Hit up this Novato landmark for traditional ales that won’t fail the taste test. 15 Rowland Way, Novato. 415.898. HOPS. www.moylans.com.

Pizza Orgasmica & Brewing Company What goes together better than beer and pizza? Not much. Wash down a hefty slice of pepperoni with an Orgasmica kolsch, a cold-aged ale with a crisp, refreshing finish. 812 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.457.BEER. www. pizzaorrgasmica.com.

N A PA CO U N TY Downtown Joe’s Restaurant & Brewery Boasts a brewery built by Chuck Ankeny—the great-grandson of Adolf Hamms—this Napa mainstay has serious historical chops. Try the palate-altering Golden Thistle Very Bitter ale, and prepare to be amazed. 902 Main St., Napa. 707.258.2337. www.downtownjoes.com.

Napa Smith Brewery Brewer Don Barkley was part of the revered New Albion Brewery, America’s first craft brewery since Prohibition, back in 1978. He’s now part of the team creating goldmedal winning IPAs, wheat beers, pilsners and more at Napa Valley’s only production brewery. 1 Executive Way, Napa. 707.254.7167. www. napasmithbrewery.com.

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Embittered Giants

The hopyards meet the redwoods at Fogbelt Brewing BY JAMES KNIGHT

S

uch a difference between a taste and a tap. At most winetasting rooms, where alcoholic beverages made on the premises are for sale by the taste, by the glass or to go, serving food is mainly forbidden.

The taprooms of craft breweries, on the other hand, are permitted to dish out nachos and sandwiches, no problem—well, after the usual interminable permitting process, that is. So what’s the difference between the once-popular designation brewpub and the now-ascendant taproom? Seems to be just a matter of taste. Six tastes of Fogbelt beer, served on a wine barrel stave tray, costs just $6. Owners Paul Hawley and Remy Martin, who grew up in and work in the wine industry, turned a decade-long homebrew hobby into an enterprise that includes growing their own hops (see “The Next Step,” Bohemian, Sept. 18, 2013). Taking over the space briefly occupied by the Wineyard winetasting room, Fogbelt opened in early 2014. The location will never be tops, but the outdoor seating is set back from the road enough, and the coherent interior, furnished with sofas, tables for two and a four-sided, brushed-metal bar, is plenty comfortable. On a recent visit, the space was filled with the aroma of smoked kielbasa ($6) from Sonoma County Meat Company; other nosh includes nachos ($6), a Mediterranean plate ($5), and nice looking salads ($6–$7) and sandwiches ($7-$8) that round out the menu. Growlers are available to go; local ciders and wine by the glass. The Armstrong stout, named after local giant the Colonel Armstrong tree, is light-bodied and malty. (Fogbelt beers are named for large and notable redwood trees in the North Coast.) Lost Monarch is a snappy and refreshing take on the Belgian witbier style; the cilantro and Kaffir lime added to spice it up are barely on the horizon of my taste perception. More citrusy still is the Atlas blonde ale. The Del Norte IPA shows off its hops in a sweetly fruity style, with caramel softening the latent sensation of astringency. With nearly as many IBUs (international bittering units, listed on the chalkboard menu, as nearly all breweries are compelled to do these days) as the IPA, Hyperion red ale has the blunt bitterness of an ESB, but a rich, malty and long palate. It’s named for the world’s tallest known tree, and here’s my bet that it becomes Fogbelt’s best-known beer on tap around the Redwood Empire. Fogbelt Brewing Company, 1305 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Open Wednesday, 3–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, noon–10pm; Sunday, noon–8pm. 707.978.3400.

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar) ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

Inn at the Tides 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

Song Yang

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16

MICROBIAL PROCESSING

UCSC’s Hanyu Wang worked on the new solarmicrobial device for generating hydrogen fuel.

The Power of Poop

Researchers have discovered an innovative way to make hydrogen fuel from sewage and sunlight BY HANAE ARMITAGE

I

t’s midnight on the bottom floor of UCSC’s physical science building. The doors are locked and the motionsensor lights have been dim for hours, but doctoral student Hanyu Wang is still in the lab, compelled by a scientific pursuit so gripping, sleep seems trivial.

After five years, Wang and Yat Li, chemistry professor at UCSC, have successfully engineered a device that converts, literally, what we flush down the toilet into a zero-emission hydrogen fuel that could power a rocket ship. But here’s the best part: the hydrogen-based fuel comes from purely natural resources— sunlight and wastewater. In other words, it’s entirely sustainable. Sustainable, and pretty disgusting—at least, as far as the raw materials go. They’ve made this an unusual and downright odiferous project for Wang, but she does her best to take the funk in stride. Because even though the sewer water smells awful, it contains the cornerstone of the entire operation: a special type of electricity-generating bacteria. “I like my project a lot,” says Wang. “I really feel like I’m interacting and connecting with the bacteria. I just really enjoy the process.” Her lab mates, however, don’t share the same connection with the electrogenic bacteria that Wang has forged over the years, and support their fellow researcher from a respectable distance. “The wastewater always smelled weird when I was working with it,” Wang recalls. “You’ve smelled the sewer before, right? It was just like that. People didn’t like to go around my bench, because it was just too smelly.” But it’s all in the name of science. One day, Wang’s research may hugely impact the way we think about energy production. There is poop-to-power innovation happening in the North Bay too. The Sonoma

in golden California, so we take advantage of that.” The project started in 2009, when Li’s wife, Fang Qian, staff scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, saw potential for a groundbreaking collaboration. Li and Qian both specialize in devices that create hydrogen gas—Li’s using the sun, and Qian’s using bacteria. Led by Li, the UCSC research team has coupled the two devices—a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) and a microbial fuel cell (MFC)—to make one self-sustaining, water-treating, hydrogen-fuel-producing megadevice. We’ll call the hybrid device the PEC-MFC. The PEC captures sunlight, and uses its energy to kick-start a process known as electrolysis. During electrolysis, water is split into hydrogen and oxygen, and then released as gas. The MFC not only creates hydrogen gas, but also uses electrogenic bacteria to produce electrical energy. While splitting water to make hydrogen seems reasonable, Li recognized that California is in a drought and water regulation is tight, so they tweaked their initial approach. “The idea is to replace the MFC ‘solution’ [pure water and cultured bacteria] with wastewater that contains these kinds of bacteria naturally,” says Li. To ensure authenticity, researchers swapped the pure water solution with wastewater directly from the water treatment facility in Livermore, Calif. If you know someone who lives in Livermore, thank them—they may have unknowingly contributed to this research. Though it may be counterintuitive, Livermore’s dirty water is what makes the clean energy process sustainable. Human wastewater naturally contains organic

The hydrogenbased fuel comes from purely natural resources— sunlight and wastewater.

17

WHAT SMELLS? A sustainable-energy future, that’s what.

material and electricitygenerating bacteria. Separately, the PEC and MFC both require an additional energy boost to drive full-fledged hydrogen production, and the added voltage is pricey. But putting them together creates a symbiotic solution: the bacteria in the MFC feed off of the organic matter in the wastewater, and during digestion, produce energy in the form of electrons. These electrons are channeled to the PEC, supplying the final electrical nudge needed to create the hydrogen fuell source. In that sense, the MFC acts as a battery, providing energy and enabling the PEC to continuously make hydrogen gas. Essentially, as long as wastewater is available to the bacteria in the MFC, the PEC bubbles out hydrogen at a fairly constant rate. On the flip side, as the PEC splits water, the hydrogen is stored in a cylinder and doled out as useful energy for the MFC. Between the chemical fuel-kick from the PEC and the bacteria-generated electrical jolt from the MFC, the hybridized device can take care of itself. It’s a self-perpetuating cycle that works to balance and propagate its counterpart. But that’s not to say Li and his

team didn’t experience their share of unique issues. Occasionally, and for no apparent reason, the PEC-MFC simply stopped working. Wang suspects that the different bacteria in each batch of wastewater may have caused the PEC-MFC to briefly misbehave— some pools may have more electrogenic bacteria than other, especially because the wastewater is allocated for a small-scale setup. “Each batch of wastewater is different. Maybe the bacteria aren’t happy that day, or are feeling lazy. They are live cells—they have their temper too,” Wang jokes. “There wasn’t a clear reason why some batches were better than others. So I’d try again, and it’d work.” With the overall striking success of the PEC-MFC in the lab, Wang and Li have big plans for future projects. Literally. The ultimate goal is to create a large-scale PEC-MFC that harnesses the same stinky raw materials and functions in the same self-perpetuating cycle—the only difference being the sheer quantity of hydrogen gas produced. A PEC-MFC that’s large enough to convert and pump hydrogen directly from a wastewater treatment facility is still just a schematic, but Li and Wang are actively taking steps toward achieving such a mega-device.

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County Water Agency has a couple of rank assets in the renewable-fuels portfolio. In 2011, the agency contracted to build a “farm to fuel” chickenexcrement biogas converter at its wastewater plant. There’s also a Petaluma biogas filtration plant at the county-run landfill. Those systems feed the PG&E grid and create fuel for county vehicles. In western Marin County, the Straus and Giacomini dairies use methane digesters to convert cow manure to power, enough to run the dairies and put some back on the grid. Best of all, brags the Straus website, the digester takes the stink off the barn as it generates power for owner Albert Straus’ electric car. But hydrogen packs a bigger wallop as a fuel source. With a potential to power cars and industrial machines without harmful emission, hydrogen is an extremely appealing alternative fuel. Though it’s often touted as a fuel of the future, it’s actually been recognized as a viable energy option for more than 50 years—and NASA has safely used it as a power source for missions since its inception in 1958. With its promise of drastically cut carbon emissions, labs across the country have been working for years to make hydrogen fuel accessible to the masses. So what’s the hold up? Cost, for one thing—the production of hydrogen fuel has been prohibitively expensive, so far. Which is precisely why the research at Li’s lab stands out: the project runs on sunlight and sewage—two energy sources that are not only cheap but virtually unlimited. Once the device is built, the raw materials cost next to nothing. “We use what’s naturally available to us—the wastewater and sunlight,” says Wang. “We’re

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18

CULTURE

N A PA

S A N TA R O S A

Let the Sun Shine

A True Original

Founded in 2006, the Festival del Sole is one of Napa’s defining cultural celebrations. Over the course of 10 days, music and dance performances accompany art and cuisine in a swirl of community activities. The event kicks off with a concert by classical violinist Joshua Bell at Castello di Amorosa, includes a Sophia Loren film fest at Jarvis Conservatory and features more dance galas and luncheons than you can shake a vine at. Festival del Sole runs Thursday, July 10, to Sunday, July 20, throughout Napa Valley. More info is available at festivaldelsole.org.

Powerhouse blues and roots singer-songwriter Janiva Magness’ latest album, Original, pushes the boundaries of the artist’s soulful style and emotive lyrics. Magness, who performs with collaborator and producer Dave Darling, presents originals and covers in arrangements that span the traditional to the experimental. This week, the “Blues Female Artist of the Year” performs as part of the summer concert series in the backyard of the KRSH studios for a special album release show. Magness plays on Thursday, July 10, at KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave., Santa Rosa. 6pm. Free. 707.588.9999.

The week’s events: a selective guide

SEBASTOPOL

Better Than Ever The stage has been dark for a while now, but the vintage couture shop Aubergine reopens its “After Dark” space with a bigger stage, better sound and a kick-off show this week that features every facet of the Sebastopol space’s offerings. It all begins with a free afternoon show featuring bluegrass band 6 Mile Station and punk outfit Screaming Mimis playing for all ages. Then the action shifts to a 21-and-over night show that boasts steam punks El Radio Fantastique, rocker Frankie Boots and others playing along with belly dancing, burlesque, standup comedy and marching bands. The soiree happens on Friday, July 11, at Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 4pm, free; 8pm, $5. 707.827.3460.

SA N R A FA E L

Masterful Moment The moody, deceptively simple music of pianist Cava Menzies and trumpeter Nick Phillips is taking the jazz community by storm. The slow roll of the duo’s subtle and nuanced energy manifests splendidly on their latest album, Moment to Moment, a reflective and gentle collection of ballads and fiery tunes that recalls greats like John Coltrane and Dave Brubeck. Cava Menzies and Nick Phillips perform on Sunday, July 13, at Fenix, 919 Fourth St., San Rafael. 6:30pm. $15–$20. 415.813.5600.

—Charlie Swanson

TROPICAL BREEZE Hawaiian songstress Anuhea brings her tropical flair to the Mystic Theatre on July 10–11. See Concerts, p24.

READY, AIM . . . Pat Bohn, archery expert and Dry Creek Gun Club member, shows a fellow member how to use a homemade hunting bow.

Gun Clubbers

Healdsburg social club blends love of food, DIY and firearms BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

T

wo years ago, Jennifer Durban and Stephanie Callimanis were coming home from a trap-shooting event in Mendocino County when they decided to organize a gun-safety project near their hometown of Healdsburg. “We had a strong interest in hunting, from the food perspective, and networking to

increase our knowledge about it,” says Durban, “so we pulled community resources together.” The idea took off and has grown into a different kind of social club: the Dry Creek Gun Club. Durban is a set decorator who divides her time between Healdsburg and Los Angeles. Callimanis is a project manager and nonprofit coordinator who lives in Dry Creek Valley, home of the club’s unofficial “office”—the Dry Creek General Store bar in Healdsburg.

“We had this goal of hunting a wild boar and breaking it down ourselves,” explains Callimanis. “The club evolved from there. That’s why you see the boar on our logo.” In the age of Meetup.com, where anyone can find a social club for the most esoteric interests, the Dry Creek Gun Club (DCGC) is deliberately low-key and based on good old word of mouth. Every new member must be endorsed by an existing one, and three hours of volunteering for the club

each year are required. An annual membership of $30 partially finances keynote speakers and activities, as well as cool T-shirts. The age of the club’s members ranges from 20 to 70. Half are women. The humble website (drycreekgunclub.com) announces future events, but joining takes more than just filling out one line. Questions range from “What homesteading, survival or other skills can you offer?” to “What do you think about guns?” The latter question addresses the inevitably loaded context surrounding gun ownership and regulations. “A love of guns is definitely not a requirement,” stresses Callimanis. “Many people in the club do not own guns. However, we do ask that people respect hunting and the right to hunt for food.” Accordingly, some members stress firearm education and diplomatically differentiate “hunting” from “self defense.” “I never grew up with guns and was scared of them due to lack of information,” says Healdsburg member Lindsay Jackson. “However, DCGC changed my viewpoint on firearms, and safety is key.” Passion for food and the will to get close and personal with its origins seem to matter more. A gun club meeting is rarely complete without a meat-oriented buffet, with the occasional abalone or seaweed feed thrown in the mix. “Every event, members bring something they harvested themselves in the area and create mind-blowing recipes to share,” says Jackson. In Ohio, where she grew up, such abundance didn’t come as easy, and certainly not when it came to the wine. “It’s really homegrown and casual, a good introduction to country living,” says ) 20

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Jennifer Durban

Arts Ideas

19

Gun Club ( 19

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Enter to Win Enter to win tickets to an exclusive Meet & Greet party hosted by the Bohemian prior to show time. Visit the Deals & Giveaways Channel on www.bohemian.com for all the details.

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Durban. “Our membership has this specific combination of oldtime agrarianism, a streak of independence and creativity, a love of food and farming and an insider’s view on the wine country lifestyle,” adds Callimanis. This lifestyle is a major draw for the city folk as well. Besides the core local members, the club also has members from San Francisco and Oakland, plus supporters in Los Angeles and Boulder, Colo. All of them, according to Durban, share an “independent spirit” and a knack for homesteading. And while members say they join for community networking and learning new skills, there’s a healthy amount of social interest—friendships and even the occasional spark of romance are not out of the question. For Carl J. Bowers, a paint salesman and musician from Rohnert Park, it’s not about the activities or people alone. “The DCGC’s core values are much like those that shaped my life throughout my Midwest upbringing, grounded with a strong moral compass, love of the outdoors and self-reliance,” he says. For him, “semi-primitive camping, late-night talks at the campfire, eating to excess and a day at the gun range” is the dream ticket. Other monthly activities could easily satisfy a seasoned Midwesterner: turkey plucking, crawdad catching and bow making are good examples, but kombucha and gravlox workshops keep the California foodie spirit alive. On the lighter side, there are festive “white elephant” parties, where members often surprise each other with beer holders and carving knives, and the “haunted barn” Halloween party, where a slightly ironic costume might be a turkey or a wild boar. “At members’ initiation, you have to drink from a gun-shaped [tequila] bottle. We went through the whole bottle already,” says Durban. Time to reload.

Eric Chazankin

MIXER Taylor Bartolucci DeGuillio

and John Browning get personal in ‘Becky Shaw.’

Dark Wit ‘Becky Shaw’ is challenging and painfully hilarious

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

D

ark family comedies always start small, establishing the broken dynamic between two characters before introducing the rest of the bickering, disjointed family. Then, almost always, an outsider slips in, and suddenly everything gets worse. Occasionally though, the stranger makes things better. In Becky Shaw, directed with wicked glee by Barry Martin— playing one more week at 6th Street Playhouse before moving to the Napa Valley Playhouse for two weeks—playwright Gina Gionfriddo takes both of those approaches, adds some of the most scathingly hilarious dialogue in recent memory and somehow mashes it all together into one riveting, weirdly funny story.

‘Becky Shaw’ runs Thursday–Sunday through July 13 at 6th Street Playhouse (52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa; Friday– Saturday, 8pm; 2pm matinees, Saturday–Sunday; $15–$25; 707.523.4185) and July 18–27 at the Napa Valley Playhouse (1637 W. Imola Ave., Napa; Friday–Saturday, 8pm; 2pm matinees, Sunday; $12–$20; 707.255.5483).

VICTOR HUGO’S

LES MISÉÉRABLES MIS JUNE 27–JULY 20 “An uplifting theme of heroic human commitment and to stirring music... an enthralling stage spectacle. Songs that hit the audience where it lives.” ~ Richard Hummlet, Variety

Presented by the Raven Players.

1115 15 N North th St St., H Healdsburg ldd b 7 0 7 - 4 3 3 - 6 3 3 5 www.raventheater.org

21 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JU LY 9 -1 5, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Stage

Suzanna (a first-rate LC Arisman) is an aimless college student wrestling with the fact that her late father squandered the family fortune, her mother Susan (Mollie Boice, her usual ball-busting magnificence played to full hilt) has taken up with a much younger man—and she’s just had a one-night stand with her adopted brother Max (a steadily seething John Browning). Urged by Max to take some time to find herself, Suzanna impulsively meets and marries the amiable Andrew (Skylar Evans, all selfishsweet and puppy-doggy), who works with a fragile but interesting woman he thinks might be a good match for Max. When Becky Shaw (Taylor Bartolucci DeGuillio) arrives for the blind date, overdressed in a fluffy pink dress that Max derides as looking like a birthday cake, it’s clear that things are about to go south. For one thing, something is clearly very wrong with Becky Shaw. There are two ways to play a character like Becky. Some would make her seem as normal as possible, and then gradually reveal little hints as to exactly how weird—and potentially dangerous—she might be. Others will let you know from the first entrance that we are looking at a mad woman. That’s the approach Bartolucci DeGuillio takes, and she runs with it, giving Becky a wild series of ticks and jitters that will delight some while making others wish she’d taken the more subtle, gradually unfurling approach. That is just one of many juicy topics audiences will want to debate after catching Becky Shaw, a play that is deeply challenging, charmingly infuriating and always painfully hilarious. Rating (out of 5): ++++

Film

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22

11am to 5pm • Kentucky & 4th PRETTY TUNE Keira Knightley shows a vulnerable side in ‘Begin Again.’

Fresh Start

Director John Carney hits high notes with ‘Begin Again’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK SPONSORED BY: Friedman’s Home Improvement Petaluma Refuse & Recycling, Lagunitas Brewing Company Produced by Petaluma Downtown Association

J

ohn Carney’s follow-up to his 2006 hit Once is similarly slight and caramel-hearted, but it made me a new fan of things I thought I was over: New York, popular music and Keira Knightley. And unlike Once, Begin Again isn’t in love with hopeless pathos.

The film opens with wooly old A&R man Dan (Mark Ruffalo) at the end of a day spent drinking away his career. At a nightclub, he hears a singer-songwriter named Greta (Keira Knightley), who has been pressured by a friend into performing a song. Greta is a visiting Londoner who’s recently been dropped fast and from a great height as the former consort and collaborator of a world-famous rocker played by Adam Levine of Maroon 5. Together, Dan and Greta try to heal their own demoralization, working from the ground up. Using a portable studio and New York ambient locations, they make their own demo. It’s rare in 2014 to see a film with even one determined woman in it, and Begin Again has three: Catherine Keener as Dan’s estranged wife; Hailee Steinfeld, believably fierce as Dan’s angry daughter; and Knightley. Posh and brittle, the too-perfect-looking Knightley shows an aspect of appealing crumbliness as she hits 30. Begin Again had me at the late-night scene where Greta drunkdials Dan with a song she’s written titled “Like a Fool,” and the song’s good—Carney is himself enough of a musician to know the difference between something distinctive and popular audio oatmeal. Like Jersey Boys, Begin Again doesn’t go inflationary about how wowed we’re supposed to be by this music. During the scrappy recording sessions, shot in well-picked, Brooklyn and Manhattan locations, rooftops and alleys, what we hear is a sound, not the sound. ‘Begin Again’ opens July 11 at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0712.

your SOLDT OSIGUNT-UP

LEWIS WIS BLACK BLACK THE RANT NT IS DDUE UE

PURPLE REIGN Marshall Charloff and Dr. Fink keep the Revolution alive.

Feeling Purple Dr. Fink and the Purple Xperience get princely at the Phoenix BY PRYNSS

H

ey all, this is the Purple One writing to U under one of my many pseudonyms. You may also know me as the leader of the Revolution and . I need U 2 hear what I’m about 2 say about my best physician friend, Dr. Fink.

The keyboard player in the Revolution didn’t stop when I changed the band. Even though I don’t still perform with everyone I’ve played with, Dr. Fink is 2 good not 2 love. And as a doctor, he knows all about women’s health. Just look at what insights he has in my movie Purple Rain, when diagnosing my band members Wendy and Lisa. Speaking of Purple Rain, the album turned 30 years old last month. It was born on June 25, 1984, making it just old enough to look older than me. (U know I stopped aging just before that album came out.) It was a big deal for the music world, because nobody had done music like this before. Rock, funk, a little country, even, all wrapped up on the dance floor. And the movie made it so much bigger; nobody expected it 2 be as big as it was—except me, of course. Dr. Fink helped write some of those songs, like “Computer Blue,” and it was his idea to do the weird piano banging in “Let’s Go Crazy,” which is so much fun to do live. We had a good time playing those songs. I know we’ve all purified ourselves in the waters of Lake Minnetonka, but it can’t hurt to do it again. That’s why Dr. Fink is still doing his funky thing with the Purple Xperience, in his scrubs and everything, to make sure U don’t lose Ur mind over not seeing all that sweet, sticky, funky, nasty music performed live. He even pulls off the crazy solos in “The Beautiful Ones” and “When Doves Cry”—after I taught him, of course. I recently had Bobby Z onstage to play drums with me again, and who knows, I might reach out to Dr. Fink one of these days too. I like what he said about Purple Rain in his recent Vibe interview: “We really did make history. Thirty years later, Purple Rain is still a very highly influential piece of work. It feels good to be a part of something so important.”

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Music

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Music

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JU LY 9 -1 5, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

24 7th Annual

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Anuhea Hawaii’s number one female artist blends sultry vocals and signature rhythms. Jul 10-11, 8pm. $26-$36. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Aubergine Grand Reopening Free day show is followed by concert with El Radio Fantastique, the Crux and others along with burlesque, standup and more to celebrate the venue’s re-opening. Jul 11, 4pm. $5. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

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Singer-songwriter appears in a special afternoon performance. Jul 13, 4pm. $75-$115. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Legends of Jazz Grant Green Jr., Donald Harrison, Wil Blades & Brandon Etzler form an all-star quartet. Jul 12, 9pm. $15-$20. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Paul Barrere & Fred Tackett The members of renowned band Little Feat play with opener Matt Jaffe. Jul 10, 8pm. $22-$27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Joshua Bell Festival del Sole opens with the virtuoso violinist described as the rock star of the classical music world. Jul 11, 6pm. $150$350. Castello di Amorosa, 4045 N St. Helena Hwy, Calistoga. 707.967.6272.

Martha Wainwright The expressive songwriter from the Wainwright musical family performs. Jul 15, 8pm. $20$30. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Wynonna & the Big Noise Award winning singer

Wynonna Judd makes her Uptown debut. Jul 13, 8pm. $50-$85. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Jul 10, Acoustic Soiree. Jul 12, Road King show with Rasta Luie. Jul 14, Tiny Ruins. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Brixx Pizzeria Jul 12, Black Star Safari. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

D’Argenzio Winery Jul 10, Jeff Walters. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Epicurean Connection Jul 11, Keady Phelan. Second Thursday of every month, open mic with Josh Windmiller. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Ferrari-Carano Vineyards and Winery

Ives Park Jul 9, John Allair and Wendy DeWitt. Jul 16, Uncle Wiggly and Solid Air. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

KRSH Jul 10, Janiva Magness. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.9999.

Lagunitas Amphitheaterette Jul 14, J Roddy Walston & the Business. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 9, Joe and Vicki Price. Jul 10, Jason Bodlovich. Jul 11, JimBo Trout. Jul 12, Jinx Jones. Jul 13, Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys. Jul 16, Royal Dueces. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Jul 9, Greg Hester. Jul 10, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. Jul 11, Bruce Halbohm & the Blue Jazz Combo. Jul 12, Wendy Dewitt. Jul 14, the Cazadero Jazz Project. Jul 15, Vernelle Anders. Sun, Kit Mariah’s Open Mic Night. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jul 11, the Hellhounds. Jul 15, the No Buenos. Wed, trivia night. Second Saturday of every month, Bluegrass Night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Jul 12, Michael Coleman Trio. 8761 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 800.831.0381.

Jul 9, The Reunion Fantasy Tribute. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

French Garden

Petaluma Library

Jul 11, Susan Comstock Swingtet. Jul 12, Joel Kruzic and Hanna Mignano. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Jul 16, 11am, Thiessen Brothers. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Green Music Center

Jul 11, Prince Tribute feat Dr. Fink. Jul 12, Explosive Hip Hop Showcase. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Jul 15, the Sphinx Orchestra. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jul 11, Kingsborough. Jul 12, Sambada. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jul 11, Clay Bell. Jul 12, the Hillwilliams. Jul 13, Matt Bolton. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jul 12, Hamir Atwal Trio with Michael Coleman and Rob Adkins. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Phoenix Theater

Ray’s Deli & Tavern Jul 12, the Hots. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe Jul 10, Sound Kitchen. Jul 12, Gator Nation. Thurs, Open Mic. Second Sunday of every month, trad Irish. Third Wednesday of every month, Prairie Sun. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jul 12, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

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25

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Jul 12, Guitarmageddon 2. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

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Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Jul 11, Ten Foot Tone. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

Tradewinds Jul 11, the Fabulous Bio Tones. Jul 16, Ralph Woodson Unplugged. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Jul 10, Tommy Rox. Jul 11, Uncle Wiggly. Jul 12, Foxes In the Henhouse. Jul 13, Blues and BBQ with The Hell Hounds. Jul 16, Biscuits and Gravy. Every other Tuesday, Country Night with the Kickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Country Girls. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Vino di Amore Jul 11, Oscar Calderon. Jul 10, the Josh Bishop Band. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Whiskey Tip Jul 11, Phony Abalone. Jul 13, Sunday Bumps. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Zodiacs Jul 9, Rumpke Mountain Boys. Jul 10, Gary Vogensen. Jul 11, Willie Waldman Project. Jul 12, the Fall Risk. Jul 15, Prezident Brown. Jul 16, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix Jul 10, the Urban Bushmen Band. Jul 11, Papaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bag. Jul 12, Mari Mack and Livinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Like Kings. Jul 13, Cava Menzies and Nick Phillips. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Hopmonk Novato Jul 11, Lovefool.

) 26

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing Rich Robinson has never let a little thing like fame get in the way of doing what he loves most: making music. He achieved an intoxicating level of fame at the tender age of 21 when he formed the Black Crowes in 1984 with brother and snake-hipped, swaggering collaborator Chris Robinson. In 1990, the band signed with Def Jam Records and released the hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shake Your Money Maker. â&#x20AC;? A career hell-bent on classic, Southern/electric/blues/rock was born. Songs such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hard to Handle,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remedyâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes Salvationâ&#x20AC;? propelled the band into headliner status. After releasing the 2001 album Lions, the Black Crowes went on an indefinite hiatus. After a brief respite from the spotlight, Robinson, playing every instrument except drums, released his first solo project, titled Paper, in 2004. The Crowes reformed for a short while, releasing several albums, but went back on to-be-determined status in 2009. Now Robinson seems to have finally found his niche in the recently released solo album The Ceaseless Sight. He showcases the cumulative efforts that a life devoted to music can produce. He remains true to his Southern roots, while still extolling the sublime virtues of the humble electric guitar. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a Robinson fan, enter to win tickets to an exclusive meet-and-greet party hosted by the Bohemian. Visit the deals and giveaways page on www.bohemian.com for details. Rich Robinson plays Saturday, July 19, at the Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. Tickets, $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$30. 707.259.0123.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jesse Bell

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Jul 12, New Skye Band. Jul 11, live music. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

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Jul 12, Before the Brave. Jul 13, Chuck Prophet. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

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19 Broadway Club Jul 9, Chrissy Lynne Band. Jul 10, High Tide Collective. Jul 11, the Grateful Bluegrass Boys. Jul 13, J Boog. Jul 16, Sans Pablo. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino Jul 9, Noel Jewkes. Jul 10, Hippopotamus Trio. Jul 11, Ken Cook Trio. Jul 13, Joan Getz Duo. Jul 15, Ken Cook. Jul 16, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jul 9, Harley White Sr. Jul 10, Wanda Stafford. Jul 15, Swing Fever. Jul 16, J Kevin Durkin. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn and Tommy Odetto. Second Sunday of every month, Sexy Sunday: Women Rockers. Second Wednesday of every month, Silver Dollar Soul Snap. Third Wednesday of every month, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. Second Thursday of every month, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

A Musical Science & Philosophy Salon July 13, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm

Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Express Grand Opening & Gravenstein Station Celebration Music! Games! Fun! 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol July 19, 7pm FREE Stand Up Comedy

Funny At The Flower

Jul 11, Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jul 11, Pablo Moses. Jul 13, Rue â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;66. Jul 15, the Loyal Scam. Jul 16, Jason Crosby, James Nash and friends. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Jul 9, Terrapin Family Band. Jul 10, San Geronimo. Jul 11-12, the Infamous Stringdusters. Jul 15, Stu Allen and friends. Jul 16, Terrapin Family Band with Lebo. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Town Center Corte Madera Jul 13, David Rocha. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Jul 13, Trio Solea. 2000 Main St,

Goose & Gander Jul 13, San Geronimo. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Lincoln Theater Jul 12, Pinchas Zukerman and the Sphinx Orchestra. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Robert Mondavi Winery Jul 12, Five For Fighting. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jul 10, Tom Duarte. Jul 11, Briefcase Full of Blues. Jul 12, the Fabulous Screwtops. Jul 13, Larry Vuckovichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crosswinds. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jul 11, Lou Gramm. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Uva Trattoria Jul 9, Trio SoleĂĄ. Jul 10, 3 On a Match. Jul 11, Nicky DePaola. Jul 12, Fundz Jazz. Jul 13, James & Ted. Jul 16, Bob Castell Blanch. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Tony! Toni! Tone!

San Geronimo Golf Course

Oakland R&B trio has been at the heart of the neo-soul sound for a quarter of a century. July 11-12 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s S.F.

Jul 11, Domestic Harmony. 5800 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.4030.

Silver Snakes

Jul 10, Gini Wilson Trio. Jul 11, Doc Kraft. Jul 12, Ricardo Lemvo and Makina Loca. Sun, live salsa music. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

The MetaQuizzical CafĂŠ

Studio 55 Marin

St Helena. 866.708.9463.

Jul 11, Sara Laine and friends. Jul 13, Petty Theft. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

July 12, 7:30pm $10

Friends. Jul 12, Blackwater Gold. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sleeping Lady Jul 10, Bill Hansell. Jul 12, Songbook Night with Matt Herraro. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of every month, Acoustic Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jul 10, Jimi James. Jul 11, Just

Post-hardcore indie band plays with local favorites the New Trust opening. July 12 at El Rio.

Magic Man Boston-based electro pop group plays off their just-released and already acclaimed sophomore album. July 13 at the Independent.

Melted Toys S.F. psychedelic pop outfit return after three-year hiatus with up-tempo beats and serene hooks. July 14 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Planes Mistaken for Stars Essential melodic metal band reunites with blazing summer tour. July 14 at Elbo Room.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Jul 9 Steele Lane Community Center, “Works of Nature,” melds nature photography and hand-stitched canvas work by Danielle Joy Reynolds. 4pm. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Jul 10 Finley Community Center, “Ships of the Ages,” features model ships built by members of Redwood Empire Model Shipwrights. Reception, Jul 10 at 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “Clay & Glass,” exhibits the works of artists Bill Abright,Terry Ow-Wing and many others. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Jul 11 Chroma Gallery, “The SOFA Show’” a showcase of art, photography and crafts by SOFA district artists. 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051. Occidental Center for the Arts, “Colors of Summer,” juried art exhibit featuring local artists. 5pm. 3850

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Aug 30, “Summer Selection Exhibition,” showing new works from gallery artists and an inventory of vintage pieces. 456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Aug 11, “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392. Seager Gray Gallery, “Figures in Abstract,” fresh works that free the figure with abstract compositions. 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

Jul 12 Backstreet Gallery, “Bear,” new solo show from Kristen Throop explores a year spent studying bears. 5pm. Art Alley off South A St, Santa Rosa. Gallery One, “Sonoma Scapes,” collects several artists works in a multimedia show. 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277. Riverfront Art Gallery, “Showin’ on the River,” exhibits more than 40 artists work in a juried show. 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Jul 13 San Geronimo Valley Community Center, “The Paintings of Sarah Spector,” the colorful, avant-garde artist displays. 4pm. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Christie Marks Fine Art Gallery Through Aug 11, “Alejandro Salazar-Selected Works, 20112014,” expresses the artists unique and abstract figures. 322 Healdsburg Ave, 2nd Floor, Healdsburg. Thursday through Sunday, 1:00 to 5:30 PM and by appointment. 707.695.1011.

East West Cafe Through Jul 31, “Eleonore Miller Exhibit” 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily 707.829.2822.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 3, “Scenes from the Road,” art by Pam Powell, Linda Ratzlaff and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Jul 11, “The Art of the Young Child” SRJC, 680 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974.

Pie Eyed Open Studio Jul 12-13, “Guest Artist Weekend,” brings together the diverse work of Mardi Storm, Elaine Greenwood, Colleen Werner and Maris Peach. 2371 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. Most Saturdays from 12 to 3 and once a month on Sundays too! 707.477.9442.

MARIN COUNTY Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery Through Jul 27, “Chuck Eckart Exhibit,” the painter shows works from his rarely seen Ground Cover Series. 18856 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Art Works Downtown Through Jul 25, “Printing the Bay Area,” featuring local artists. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

RiskPress Gallery

Falkirk Cultural Center

Through Jul 26, “Critters,” exhibiting the work of Jann Aanestad and papier-mache artist Nancy Winn. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Through Aug 15, “Reflections,” presenting ceramic pieces that reflect thoughts and expression. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Aug 31, “Group Show” 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Through Jul 18, “Bibliophoria III,” in the Galletta Gallery. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 17, “Siberia: In the Eyes of Russian Photographers,” spans a century of images from rural and urban Siberia. Through Aug 24, “From Hogarth to Hundertwasser,” features a rich collection of fine art prints dating from the 15th century to the present. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma State University Library Art Gallery Through Jul 12, “Divergent Acts,” displays current works by SSU sculpture alumni. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jul 27, “Wall and Ardor,” paintings by William T Wiley in the 21st century. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Jul 27, “Bling,” displays stained glass and unique jewelery from local artists. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. Thurs-Mon, 10am to 7pm. 707.894.4229.

Gallery Route One Through Jul 27, “Open Secrets” is the annual members exhibition, featuring contemporary works from 20 artists. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 13, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” including 45 works from around the nation in a wide variety of mediums from glass to 3D printers to Swarovski crystals. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Gallery Through Jul 12, “Solstice,” artists choice exhibit features a wide range of works in various media, all inspired by the longest day of the year. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11am to 4pm; Sat-Sun, noon to 4pm. 415.454.9561.

MINE Art Gallery Through Aug 3, “New Art Works Worth Seeing” brings together a collection of art that challenges and inspires. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jul 24,

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Pedal for Preservation Tour de MALT takes to the roads for land trust For the last 34 years, the Marin Agricultural Land Trust (MALT) has been a leading force in the protection of the natural landscapes that define the West Marin County. Preserving family-run farms and open spaces from development, MALT’s coalition of ranchers and activists is still hard at work. Of the many events the nonprofit organization holds throughout the year, the annual Tour de MALT offers the most compelling argument for agricultural protection. It’s also one of the most popular, as Marin County is a hub of adventurous cyclers. After all, the mountain bike was invented here. This year, the tour features two routes, each winding through western Marin’s Nicasio Valley. A 40-mile tour offers views of Tomales Bay and historic parks, and a 60mile trek takes you through the same sights and goes even farther north. Along the way several ranches and family farms will offer stops with refreshments and entertainment. At the end of the journey, a fresh, farmto-table meal is provided. Registration is limited to 300, so get in on it before it’s too late. The Tour de MALT takes to the road Saturday, July 12, starting at 5300 Nicasio Valley Road, Nicasio. 8am. $85/$125. 415.663.1158.—Charlie Swanson

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JU LY 9 -1 5, 2 0 14 | B O H E M I A N.COM

RECEPTIONS

Through Aug 17, “Risha Arts,” prints and paintings that revolve around themes of transformation and healing. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.542.7729.

Erin Wrightsman

Arts Events

Unity Church of Santa Rosa

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“Water,” presents the element in all its forms. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Red Barn Gallery Through Sep 28, “West Marin Views,” the photos of Art Rogers. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

NAPA COUNTY

Don’t miss an electrifying high-style sshow how w with ith P Pride ride & JJoy— oy a lleading e ading B Bay ay Area A rea pop/soul pop /soul music music group group who who will will make m ake yyou ou d dance ance ttilil tthe he e end! nd !

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Oma Village Groundbreaking Party Live music from Brass Magic, presentations from local officials, and refreshments celebrate the new site offering rental homes for families transitioning out of homelessness. Jul 11, 3pm. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

Star Compass

Through Jul 20, “Sophont in Action,” Desirée Holman’s art mixes New Age and sci-fi. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Learn how the stars have guided the way for wayfinders since the Polynesians navigated the oceans centuries ago. Through Jul 18. $7-$10. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Napa Valley Museum

Tour de MALT

di Rosa

Friday July 11

headlining acts Loverboy, Three Dog Night and others. Jul 1620. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa.

Through Sep 14, “Wayne Thiebaud: Works on Paper,” exhibiting nearly 50 years of Thiebaud’s work and reflecting his passion for art education. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Bicycle ride through west Marin farms benefits the Marin Agricultural Land Trust. Jul 12, 8am. $85-$125. Nicasio Valley Farms, 5300 Nicasio Valley Rd, Nicasio.

Field Comedy Trips Lewis Black

Jul 10-12, 8pm. Sold-out. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Dave Burleigh Standup star was recently seen on “America’s Got Talent.” Jul 12, 7pm. $20-$25. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Events 10th Anniversary Celebration

Saturday July 12

Rock with Fleetwood Mask, a Fleetwood Fleet wood Mac M ac tribute t r i b u te b band and w who ho throws throws down down a party! par t y !

IN THE LOUNGE OUNGE DOORS 8 PM, S HOW 9 : 30 DOORS 8PM, SHOW 9:30 TICKETS TICKETS $1 12 2 ADV ADV / $15 D DOOR OO R

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Daylong open house and screening of locally filmed noir thriller Impact (1949) commemorates a decade of the theater. Jul 9, 1pm. Free. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

MetaQuizzical Cafe Music and lectures series that is dedicated to the advancement of extra sensory curiosity. Jul 12, 7:30pm. $10-$20. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

The Napa Town & Country Fair Big fun at the fair, with

Free Days at the Park Free parking and tours with special focus on familyfriendly, educational activities. Mon, Jul 14. Free. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Naturally Fit Trail Running Group Focusing on running, lactate threshold training and the forgotten art of stretching. Tues, 8:30am. through Jul 29. Spring Lake Park, 391 Violetti Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Tai Chi & Poetry Experience Nature and culture come together for a day in the park. Jul 13, 9am. $20. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Film Cat Ballou Screens as part of the Vintage Film Series. Jul 14, 7pm. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Pet Premiere Classic family-friendly films screen with adoptable pets on hand and available to loving families. Jul 12, 11am. Free. Airport Cinemas, 409 Airport Blvd, Santa Rosa.

Redwood Highway The indie film, about a woman who journeys 80 miles on foot to the coast of Oregon, screens. Jul 12, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show Plays as part of the Rock Cinema series. Jul 16, 7pm. $5. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Sophia Loren Film Celebration Double bill screening of Arabesque (1966) and El Cid (1961) presented as part of the Festival del Sole. Jul 10, 4pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Food & Drink Appetizer Showcase & Contest Culinary contest judges hot, cold and sweet appetizers from the community. Jul 12, 4pm. Robert Rue Vineyard, 1406 Wood Road, Fulton. 707.578.1601.

Bastille Day Celebration Special menus, festivities and live music. Jul 14. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Benefit BBQ Dinner, local wine offerings and silent auction benefit the center’s agricultural program. Jul 12, 6pm. $50. Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.996.6767.

Brews & Bites for Bounty Food and drinks and music from the Highway Poets benefits Petaluma’s community garden network. Jul 15, 5:30pm. $20. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Dakine Vineyard Tour, Tasting and Picnic Sat, Jul 12. $40-$45. Longboard Vineyards, 5 Fitch St., Healdsburg. 707.433.3473.

Olive & Beer Pairing Advanced tickets or RSVP

required. Jul 13, 3pm. $20. Rincon Valley Wine & Craft Beer, 4927 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707-595-5516.

Book Passage Jul 9, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Big Manâ&#x20AC;? with Alex Tizon. Jul 10, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meister Eckhartâ&#x20AC;? with Matthew Fox. Jul 11, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The French Houseâ&#x20AC;? with Don Wallace. Jul 12, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sicilian Mafia: A True Crime Travel Guideâ&#x20AC;? with Carl Russo. Jul 13, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Josey Baker Breadâ&#x20AC;? with Josey Baker. Jul 16, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goddesses in Everywomanâ&#x20AC;? with Jean Shinoda Bolen. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center Jul 10, 7pm, Books on Stage, new series debuts with Katherine Hastings and Gilbert Mansergh. Free. 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale 707.829.2214.

Flamingo Resort Hotel Jul 13, 2pm, Redwood Writers Author Launch. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa 707.545.8530.

Napa Bookmine Jul 10, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wingerâ&#x20AC;? with Andrew Smith. 964 Pearl St, Napa.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jul 11, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Following Hayâ&#x20AC;? & â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doll/Moonâ&#x20AC;? with Donna Emerson and Phyllis Meshulam. Free. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

San Rafael Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jul 9, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beautiful Oblivionâ&#x20AC;? with Jamie McGuire. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

presented by Sonoma Stage Works. Jul 10-27. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Brace Yourself

Menopause the Musical

Lexy Fridell presents her onewoman-show about dating and performing in NYC while facing braces and a chronic drooling problem. Jul 12-13, 7:30pm. $35-$60. Chateau St Jean, 8555 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.833.4134.

A Chorus Line SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the beloved Broadway musical. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

The Fellowship World premiere performance. Inspired by J.R.R. Tolkein, a small-town misfit sets out on a quest. Through Jul 13. AlterTheater Ensemble, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2787.

Fools Mass Brooklynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dzieci Theater returns to the North Bay for a one-time performance of this play of a plague-era choir who must enact their own mass. Jul 14, 8pm. $20. Belrose Theater, 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422.

Grease Head â&#x20AC;&#x153;greaserâ&#x20AC;? Danny Zuko and new (good) girl Sandy Dumbrowski try to relive the high romance of their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Nights.â&#x20AC;? Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jul 20. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

La Cage aux Folles SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the acclaimed comedy musical classic. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Les MisĂŠrables

Theater 9 to 5: The Musical SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the musical based off the 1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

As You Like It Marin Shakespeare Company kicks off its 25th Silver Season with the classic comedy from

The epic musical is produced by the Raven Players. Through Jul 20. $25-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

A Man Walk Into a Bar Melodrama with local flavor goes behind the scenes of a local theater group trying to save their beloved home. Jul 10-20. Casino Tavern Theatre, 17150 Bodega Hwy, Bodega.

The Many Faces of Love An evening of one acts

29 IN THE

The musical parody is set to classic tunes. Jul 16-17. $39$55. Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

A NEW Shakespeare festival in the heart of downtown Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic cannery ruins in Railroad Square!

The Odd Couple SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents Neil Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seminal comedy about mismatched roommates Oscar and Felix. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Present Laughter SRJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the witty 1939 comedy about a comedy actor facing a bizarre series of events. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

Seasons of Love

Jul 18-Aug 23 FRI & SAT 8pm

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Picnics, blankets, and lawn chairs welcomed! ____

Seating is first come, first serve. Grounds open @ 6pm ____

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ULIET

Directed by David Lear

3 W. Third Street, Santa Rosa For Information & Entry/Parking/Wheelchair Access: www.shakespeareinthecannery.com or the Arlene Francis Center: (707) 528-3009

Get your TICKETS! $25 General -- $20 Seniors (60+) and Guests who CYCLE to the show! $15 Students (14-25yrs) -- $5 Children (under 14) www. brownpaper tickets .com or

Canner y Box O ffice (day of )

The Rohnert Park Kut-Ups present a spirited revue of song, dance and comedy. Jul 12-19. $16. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Thoroughly Modern Millie Roustabout Theater presents the musical with frisky flappers, dashing leading men and family fun. Jul 11-13. $16$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Two Gentlemen of Sonoma

Sweet Hay by Carolyn Lord, Watercolor 5FOUI4U 4BOUB3PTBt5VFo4BUo 707tcalabigallery.com

Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Verona-based comedy is set in 1840s California. Jul 11-Aug 2, 7pm. $20-$25. Sonoma Barracks, 36 E Spain St, Sonoma.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Go to bohemian.com for your Awards | Photos | Plaques

Wed, Jul 9 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, Jul 10 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Jul 11 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 7:30-10:30pm CALIFORNIA BALLROOM DANCE/SALSA LESSON Sat, Jul 12 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE 12:30pm class 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES HOEDOWN Sun,Jul 13 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Jul 14 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, Jul 15 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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Readings

the Bard. Through Aug 10. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

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BOHEMIAN

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of July 9

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

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Open Your Home and Your Heart to an International Student Studying at SSU!

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Students from all over the world come to study English at SSU and are in need of host families. If you would like to share your home with a student and receive $700 a month for room & board or $550 for room only, please contact Debra Crow at 707.664.2742 or debra.crow@sonoma.edu

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Fall 2014: Sept 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dec 19, 2014

Restaurants Events Clubs Museums Shopping

gg Adult Entertainment

A Wild Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

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Psychics

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

Alternative Health Well-Being

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SPIRITUAL

Connections Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Ready for Growth? Meet "Meditations of a Modern Mystic," author Maurine Doerken to explore and discover your inner potential. July 17 at 7:30. Many Rivers Books & Tea, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871. Ms. Doerken recently received an Honorable Mention at the 2014 New York Book Festival for her work. maurinedoerken.com

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SUBUTEX/ SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

Healing Bodywork Deep Swedish, Reiki Bodywork. Therapeutic. Experienced professional CMT. Santa Rosa. $50 Special. Edward. 415.378.0740. after 10:30am. 707.793.2232

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Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

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ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) What are the sources that heal and nourish you? Where do you go to renew yourself? Who are the people and animals that treat you the best and are most likely to boost your energy? I suggest that in the coming week you give special attention to these founts of love and beauty. Treat them with the respect and reverence they deserve. Express your gratitude and bestow blessings on them. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect time for you to summon an outpouring of generosity as you feed what feeds you. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Why do birds ďŹ&#x201A;y? First, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how they look for and procure food. Second, when seasons change and the weather grows cooler, they may migrate to warmer areas where thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more to eat. Third, zipping around in mid-air is how birds locate the materials they need to build nests. Fourth, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite helpful in avoiding predators. But ornithologists believe there is yet another reason: birds ďŹ&#x201A;y because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun. In fact, up to 30 percent of the time, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their main motivation. In accordance with the astrological omens, Taurus, I invite you to match the birdsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; standard in the coming weeks. See if you can play and enjoy yourself and have a good time at least 30 percent of the time.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Is there an important resource you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have in sufďŹ cient abundance? Are you suffering from the lack of an essential fuel or tool? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not talking about a luxury it would be pleasant to have or a status symbol that would titillate your ego. Rather, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m referring to an indispensable asset you need to create the next chapter of your life story. Identify what this crucial treasure is, Gemini. Make or obtain an image of it, and put that image on a shrine in your sanctuary. Pray for it. Vividly visualize it for a few minutes several times a day. Sing little songs about it. The time has arrived for you to become much more serious and frisky about getting that valuable thing in your possession. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Since 1981, Chinese law has stipulated that every healthy person between the ages of 11 and 60 should plant three to ďŹ ve trees per year. This would be a favorable week for Chinese Cancerians to carry out that duty. For that matter, now is an excellent time for all of you Cancerians, regardless of where you live, to plant trees, sow seeds, launch projects or do anything that animates your fertility and creativity. You now have more power than you can imagine to initiate long-term growth.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) The weeks preceding your birthday are often an excellent time to engage the services of an exorcist. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to hire a pricey priest with dubious credentials. I can offer you my expert demon-banishing skills free of charge. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s begin. I call on the spirits of the smart heroes you love best to be here with us right now. With the help of their inspirational power, I hereby dissolve any curse or spell that was ever placed on you, even if it was done inadvertently, and even if it was cast by yourself. Furthermore, the holy laughter I unleash as I carry out this puriďŹ cation serves to expunge any useless feelings, delusional desires, bad ideas, or irrelevant dreams you may have grown attached to. Make it so! Amen and hallelujah! VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) You know what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to get your mind blown. And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure that on more than one occasion you have had your heart stolen. But I am curious, Virgo, about whether you have ever had your mind stolen or your heart blown. And I also wonder if two rare events like that have ever happened around the same time. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m predicting a comparable milestone sometime in the next three weeks. Have no fear! The changes these epiphanies set in motion will ultimately bring you blessings. Odd and unexpected blessings, probably, but blessings nonetheless. (P.S.: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure you are familiar with the tingling sensation that wells up in your elbow when you hit your funny bone.) Well, imagine a phenomena like that rippling through your soul. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) Since 2008, Marvel Studios has produced nine movies based on characters from Marvel Comics. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing well. The Avengers earned $1.5 billion, making it the third

highest-grossing ďŹ lm of all time. Iron Man 3 brought in over a billion dollars too, and Thor: The Dark World grossed $644 million. Now Marvel executives are on schedule to release two movies every year through 2028. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to see you be inspired by their example, Libra. Sound fun? To get started, dream and scheme about what you want to be doing in both the near future and the far future. Then formulate a ďŹ&#x201A;exible, invigorating master plan for the next 14 years.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

While in Chicago to do a series of shows, comedian Groucho Marx was invited to participate in a sĂŠance. He decided to attend even though he was skeptical of the proceedings. Incense was burning. The lights were dim. The trance medium worked herself into a supernatural state until ďŹ nally she announced, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am in touch with the Other Side. Does anyone have a question?â&#x20AC;? Groucho wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is the capital of North Dakota?â&#x20AC;? he asked. As amusing as his irreverence might be, I want to use it as an example of how you should not proceed in the coming week. If you get a chance to converse with higher powers or mysterious forces, I hope you seek information you would truly like to know.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) In one of her poems, Adrienne Rich addresses her lover: â&#x20AC;&#x153;That conversation we were always on the edge / of having, runs on in my head.â&#x20AC;? Is there a similar phenomenon in your own life, Sagittarius? Have you been longing to thoroughly discuss certain important issues with a loved one or ally, but havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t found a way to do so? If so, a breakthrough is potentially imminent. All of life will be conspiring for you to speak and hear the words that have not yet been spoken and heard but very much need to be.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) This would be a fun time for you to brainstorm about everything you have never been and will never be. I encourage you to fantasize freely about the goals you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to accomplish and the qualities you will not cultivate and the kind of people you will never seek out as allies. I believe this exercise will have a healthy effect on your future development. It will discipline your willpower and hone your motivation as it eliminates extraneous desires. It will imprint your deep self with a passionate clariďŹ cation of pursuits that are wastes of your precious energy and valuable time. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

Expect nothing even as you ask for everything. Rebel against tradition with witty compassion, not cynical rage. Is there a personal taboo that no longer needs to remain taboo? Break it with tender glee. Do something playful, even prankish, in a building that has felt oppressive to you. Everywhere you go, carry gifts with you just in case you encounter beautiful souls who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lost in their own fantasies. You know that old niche you got stuck in as a way to preserve the peace? Escape it. At least for now, live without experts and without leadersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with no teachers other than what life brings you moment by moment.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Every year, the U.S. government spends $25,455 per capita on programs for senior citizens. Meanwhile, it allocates $3,822 for programs to help children. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only 15 percent as much as what the elders receive. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I believe your priorities should be reversed. Give the majority of your energy and time and money to the young and innocent parts of your life. Devote less attention to the older and more mature aspects. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need to care intently for whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing most vigorously.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Astrology

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FREE WILL

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