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Carrillo’s Chances p9 Rancho Obi-Wan p26 ‘12 Years a Slave’ p29

WHAT NOW?

A community grasps for answers in a deputy’s shooting of 13-year-old Andy Lopez p20

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2013 Metrosa Inc.

Cover portrait of Andy Lopez by Emily Horstman. Design by Kara Brown.

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This photo was submitted by Kristen Newsom of Sebastopol. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

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‘He was real good kid. He wanted to be a boxer, he wanted to do a lot of things.’ COVE R STORY P20

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Lit p30 Concerts & Clubs p31 Arts & Events p34 Classified p39 Astrology p39

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ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST This week’s cover art is by Emily Horstman, a 19-year-old artist born and raised in Santa Rosa who practices fine portraiture and apprentices at Avenue Tattoo on Santa Rosa Avenue in Santa Rosa. Follow her on Instagram at @emtatuajes.

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Tragedy Again BY ADRIANNE DESANTIS

M

y heart goes out to the family and friends of Andy Lopez. The finality of Andy’s passing from this life, like that of my own son, brings another terrible wave of urgency that we keep our fingers on the pulse of what is happening around us, and that we express our love often, before it is too late. Regarding the many unnecessary deaths by law enforcement, given that the policies in place bring cruel results, why do we let them continue? There’s something backward and very inhumane about shooting first then handcuffing the dying or already dead person and then administering first aid. All lives have worth, so we must insist on policies that attempt to save all lives. To accomplish that, law enforcement officers must act under the assumption that people are not robots, but are thinking, feeling individuals. When weapons are aimed by police, and orders are shouted, we can expect that fear, confusion and a desire for self-preservation will be one natural reaction. A delayed response is another possibility, while the person is processing what is happening. It is not reasonable to insist under those conditions that commands must be obeyed or else the person annihilated. How about talking to the person in question, in a nonthreatening manner? How about asking relevant questions? The old refrains of “I thought he had a gun” or “It was a quickly evolving situation” just don’t wash any more. We pay officers to think on their feet and to be courageous. Responders must take an honest look at their part in how things evolve, and comprehend that by taking a threatening posture toward citizens, the officers themselves are escalating the situation. I know the difference between a competent response by police and a disastrous one. I have had both. And when it was unexpectedly helpful, I took the time to say so to the responder’s supervisor. If police want to be respected and trusted in the community, they must not only be courageous and respect the people they are paid to serve, but also be truthful when things go wrong, and refuse to align themselves with indefensible patterns of conduct that give the whole profession a bad name. Let’s work together for positive change. Adrianne DeSantis is the mother of Richard DeSantis, who was shot and killed by Santa Rosa police in 2007. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Justice for Andy

This story makes me heartsick (“13-YearOld Boy Fatally Shot by Sonoma County Sheriff’s Deputies,” Oct. 23). All of the details will be analyzed by those investigating, and the public will only hear about the most obvious and least critical details. There is so much that is not published, not shared and can’t be rationalized; few people ever hear the whole story unless it goes to a jury. The debates over “toy vs. replica” or “shoot first ask questions later” ultimately are just factors in the more important issue of the lack of communication. My prayers are with the Lopez family and all others who are feeling pain at the loss of Andy Lopez. My prayers are with the investigators, that they will look into every factor and truly find where justice lies. My prayers are with the officers that if or when they return to duty, it will be with a greater sense of diplomacy and compassion.

PATRICIA DESANTIS Via online

I think that the police officers need to adopt the policy from the military: do not fire unless fired upon. This will 100 percent designate who is an enemy. I can tell from the picture that this is a toy gun. If you ever held an AK-47, you know this is a bulky heavy weapon and not easily carried. I feel for the parents for their loss; I played with toy guns all the time, and never did I have an issue with cops or any law enforcement over it. This officer now has to live with knowing he gunned down a child because he couldn’t tell a toy from the real thing.

JAKE BAUER Via online

The Personal Is Political

It made me sad to read Rachel Kaplan’s snarky reaction to your article on Bea Johnson (“Refusing Waste,” Oct 23). Full disclosure: I own Kaplan’s book and admire her work. But I live in a regulated senior mobile home park, and can’t raise chickens or even have a compost pile. I’ve enjoyed Johnson’s blog, “Zero Waste Home,” for the past year. It has given me many great ideas, which I have implemented to pare down my own waste. Scientist Jane Goodhall recently stated that “the world is in a terrible mess, but the place to start making change is in your own life.” I don’t choose to go up against Big Oil, Ag, Pharm and Coal, since these are remote entities to my every day struggle to buy food, pay the bills and keep a roof over my head. Rather than diss Johnson for being a “material anorexic,” Kaplan should keep in mind that we are all in this world together, doing our best to evolve and change as rapidly as the circumstances around us. Please keep publishing articles about local people contributing their own unique skills to creating positive change.

SUSAN L. MILLER Novato

People Movers Veolia provides essential human services to both Israelis and Palestinians (“Bus Stop,” Oct. 23). I traveled on the light rail, as it twisted through Arab and Jewish neighborhoods. It was filled with all sorts of people, and was lovely, efficient and affordable—just what you’d want people-movers to be. I hope that, ultimately, our elected officials make their decision based on what’s good for Sonoma County—not on some conflict thousands of miles away.

SAM XIE Via online

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five

Fun With Data Mining

1

This idea might actually work (“Monkeywrenching the Data Mines,” Oct. 16). I’m nervous that if I like everything, my pages will be full of stuff I don’t like, like Michele Bachmann. But I can see how snoops and commercial profiling would fail if I feed the beast way too much. If we all do it in a short period of time, ya never know: it might back up like a cybernetic sewer.

GEORGE LEDDY Via online

Elsie Allen High School empties as students join marches for Andy Lopez

2

Sunday Mourning: irascible, visionary rocker Lou Reed dies at age 71

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Guy Fieri testifies in trial for Lamborghini-stealing Max Wade: ‘Brave kid.’

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Petaluma’s Jonny Gomes hits three-run blast in the World Series

5 Bob Barker to return to Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

host ‘The Price Is Right’ one day only, Dec. 12

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Time Tim me forr Charges Cha arges s Doess E D Doe Efren f en fr nC Carrillo arrillo ill h hav havee a political liti l ffutu future? ture? BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

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he morning he morn ning after S onoma County County Sonoma S uperviisor Efr en Supervisor Efren C arrillo w as arrested arrested Carrillo was on A ug. 20 on ssuspicion usspicion of Aug. pr owlin li g an db urrgllary y, prowling and burglary, infam ously clothed clothed e in only only infamously hi socks an d un d derw ear hiss socks and underwear after reportedly reportedly attem aattempting pting to enter a woman’s woman n’s bedr oom bedroom at 3am, h dmittted th at hee aadmitted that aalcohol lcohol w was as involved involved an and d

said, “I rrealize said, ealize th that at my my behavior was embarrassing.” beh aviorr w as em barrassing.” But B ut em embarrassment barrassment might be th ast o arrillo’s tr oubles. thee le least off C Carrillo’s troubles. Sin ce his his arrest aarrest and and subsequent subsequent Since tri ip to rehab, reh hab, he’s he’’s heard heard his his fellow fello ll w trip ssupervisors upervisorrs ccondemn ondemn hi ctions hiss aactions an d question questiion whether whether he’s he’s fit to and sserve erve on th he bo ard. A dd to th at a the board. Add that m ounting rrecall ecall eff ort an d possi ble mounting effort and possible crimin al ch harges at an upc oming criminal charges upcoming ccourt ourt date date this t s week, thi week, an d it aappears ppears and C arrillo has has much more more to to worry worry Carrillo

aabout bout th an em barrassment. than embarrassment. B ut even even so, so, C arrillo’s goose goosse But Carrillo’s might n ot be ccooked. ooked. not “H can weather weather this,” this,” says says “Hee can S onoma State U niversity poli itical Sonoma University political sscientist cientist D avid M cCuan. uan Th ough David McCuan. Though a ffelony elony conviction conviction would would mean mean aautomatic utomatic rremoval emoval fr om offic e, from office, M cCuan ssuggests uggests C arrillo’s ccareer areer McCuan Carrillo’s ccould ould survive survive if charges charges were were dr opped, if he he were were aacquitted cquitted d of a dropped, ffelony elony or even even if he he were were cconvicted onvicted v of a mi sdemeanor. “V oters lo ve to misdemeanor. “Voters love

Gabe Gab be Meline

WALKING AWAY Three Th hree and a half months months o off d delays elays ffor o or E Efren ffren C Carrillo arrillo sho should uld co come me to an end with this w week’s eek’s co court urt d date. atte.

Every town needs a conscience— a Jiminy Cricket to its Pinocchio tendencies. In the case of Sant ta Rosa, Santa surroundin ng county, county, and the surrounding conscientiousness manif ests manifests form of the North Bay in the form Organizing Pr ojectt, a coalition Organizing Project, for those who lack working for representation andd voice in representation Sin nce fforming orming the community community.. Since three years ago, members m of the three NBOP’s task fforces orcess have agitated for Restorative Restorative Justice Jusstice in Santa for Rosa city schools, hosted vigils in front of the contes sted site of a front contested for Youth Youth Dream Dream Social Advocates for Center, fought fought for for immigr ation Center, immigration reform and against against deportations, reform revived the spirit spirit of pr otest and revived protest democracy in a county that and democracy ratifications maintains deep str stratifications between the havess and have-nots. Novv. 3, the NBOP NBO OP holds its On Nov. meeeting at the annual public meeting Academy (only slightly Sonoma Academy ironic, considering tuition at this ironic, college-pr g p epp schoo ol runs to five college-prep school figures). The publicc is invited figures). promise of to attend, with thee promise galvanizing pr esenntations by presentations ration task the NBOP’s immig immigration force, education ta ask fforce orce and force, task formed transportation/ transportation/ a a newly formed elopment task neighborhood deve development force. Also pr esentted is an idea force. presented coome—the whose time has come—the rollout of a transit transit rider ’s union. rollout rider’s Last yyear ’s ppublic meetingg year’s featured a who’s who’s who w of featured community leaders s, activists leaders, and politicians, in addition to large contingent of rregular egular a large citizens looking to participate community change. in positive community This year ’s event pr ppromises omises to year’s car ry the same ene ergy. This is a carry energy. witth fr ee childcar e. bilingual event with free childcare. “Unite to Win,” The North Bay Organizing Pr ojectt’s third third annual Organizing Project’s meeting gets gets under way public meeting, underway on Sunday Sunday,, Nov Nov.. 3, at Sonoma A cademy. 2500 Fa rmers Lane, Academy. Farmers 4–5:30pm. Free. Free. Santa Rosa. 4–5:30pm. 7077..236.7501. For mor m e, see www 707.236.7501. more, www.. northbayop.org.—Leilani — Clark northbayop.org.

The Bohemian started as The Paper Paper in 1978. 1978.

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Paper Pa P ape perr T THE

A Just J ommu unity Community C

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Carrillo ( 8 forgive their politicians, but they don’t always reward them,” says McCuan, suggesting Carrillo’s aspirations for higher office may be dashed. “He has a long time to look at reelection, but he won’t move up.” Since his arrest, Carrillo’s sentencing hearing has been postponed three times; the current court date is set for Friday, Nov. 1, but that could be postponed yet again if prosecutor Cody Hunt of the Napa district attorney’s office— which has been characterized as notoriously aggressive—asks for more time to build his case. In the meantime, many have cast the ongoing delays as a plot by Carrillo’s side to buy time for solidifying a more bulletproof story. Rosanne Darling, the lawyer representing the unidentified woman who called 911 twice before Carrillo’s arrest, said at the Oct. 18 hearing that she felt the most recent postponement was politically motivated. Chris Andrian, Carrillo’s lawyer, says Darling, a former Sonoma County prosecutor herself, should know that court cases are often delayed multiple times, and that this isn’t a political move. Efren Carrillo, meanwhile, repeats the mantra of “No comment.” Carrillo is playing it safe in the wake of the scandal, a story that has legs internationally; McCuan says he’s fielded calls about the case nationally and from as far away as London and Singapore. With the public keeping a close eye on the story, a recall effort would have to be well orchestrated, including finding the right replacement candidate, says McCuan. “We don’t want to do it and not be successful,” says Alice Chan, leader of the Coalition for Grassroots Progress, the group organizing the recall effort. After initially announcing they would press forward with a recall on Sept. 15, the group has since backed off, waiting for more information and political strategies to play out. The North Bay Labor Council, a group representing 71 labor unions

in California, has come out in support of a recall effort and would be able to bankroll the potential $200,000 cost. There’s just one missing piece of the puzzle: a viable candidate to replace Carrillo. “We are identifying a candidate that, for the voters of the 5th District, will be preferable,” says Chan, a 5th District voter. “We would definitely want to elect someone to replace Efren who is progressive.”

‘He can weather this. Voters love to forgive their politicians.’ If he feared a recall effort might be successful, Carrillo could resign, and Gov. Jerry Brown would appoint a replacement to fill the seat until the next election cycle. Carrillo’s friend and close political ally, former U.S. Congressman and Press Democrat co-owner Doug Bosco, certainly has Gov. Brown’s ear as far as a replacement goes—Bosco has hosted fundraising parties, with Brown in attendance, in his McDonald Avenue home in Santa Rosa, and would be all too willing to suggest a replacement. Even though Carrillo’s environmental voting record is spotty, it could be worse for the progressive 5th District of west Sonoma County; Gov. Brown could simply appoint a former supervisor and friend of Bosco to fill the position. “There couldn’t be a bigger nightmare than [former supervisor] Eric Koenigshofer for the progressives,” says McCuan. Carrillo, who won reelection in 2012 by a landslide, could possibly even weather a recall effort, says McCuan. “There is a current of support that is deeper than Doug Bosco,” he says, “deeper than others in the community that he might be allied with.”

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

Belly Californian. $$. When he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian. $$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Bre0akfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

Dempsey’s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

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Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

LaSalette Portuguese. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic dishes include classic lusty Portuguese stews and seafood. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 452-H First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.1927.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A

887-3344 U corks116.com

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top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat.

7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Pub Republic Pub fare. $-$$. Pub grub from Petaluma’s southernmost tip, featuring Brussels sprout tacos and a hearty selection of brews. Lunch and dinner daily; weekend brunch. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090.

West Side Bar & Grill Sports Bar. $$. Home of the almost-famous bacon cheeseburger. Seventeen beers on tap (wine list available). Fourteen flat screen televisions to watch all of the hottest sports events. Two great pool tables. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd # B8, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9453.

Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner daily; dinner, Mon-Sat. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner daily. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Cafe Reyes Pizza. $$. At the end of the main drag in West Marin’s quintessential small town sits a wood-fired oven serving piping pizzas of perfection. Beer and oysters can be had as well. Lunch and dinner, Wed–Sun. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9493. Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia� cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

13

SMALL BITES

Cooking in Gaza In Gaza, where strife and violence are common, home cooking can create a feeling of normalcy, even as the outside world explodes to pieces. ‘The Gaza Kitchen’ by Laila ElHaddad and Maggie Schmitt captures this tenuous balance between pleasure, life, death and the hearth, but it’s not your typical cookbook. Yes, it contains 120 recipes for vegetable stews, seafood dishes, meats and rice. Yes, the book is laden with mouth-watering, full-color photos of luscious herby, peppery and lemony dishes created by talented Gazan home cooks. But it also allots as much page space to tales about cooking, farming and food economy from Gazan people, as well as the “daily drama of surviving and creating spaces for pleasure in an embattled place.� Laila El-Haddad appears for a book talk and recipe tasting on Thursday, Oct. 31, at the Epicurean Connection. 122 W. Napa St., Sonoma. 7pm. 707.935.7960. On Nov. 2, Sebastopol officially celebrates the opening of the Barlow, —the sleek food, retail and cultural center that’s become a destination spot for townies and tourists alike. The Barlow Street Fair will feature live music from Sol Horizon, the Louies and the Blane Lyon (of Zap Mama) Band. Food and libations will be available courtesy of local vendors and artisans. Check out the place Sunset magazine dubbed the “artisan amusement park� when the street fair kicks off on Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Barlow. Highway 12 and Morris Street, Sebastopol. 4–9pm. Free. 707.824.5600.—Leilani Clark

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788. Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic

dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

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and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

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14

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Clos du Bois With picnicking area, friendly staff and knickknacks galore, Clos Du Bois is a reliable treasure. 19410 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 800.222.3189. Frick Winery Tailwagging hospitality team greets visitors at this rustic little bodega that’s anything if not picturesque. Proprietorrun winery specializes in lively Rhône-style blends and varietally bottled Syrah, Viognier; rare Counoise is a special treat. Honest, handmade wines with a sense of place. 23072 Walling Road, Geyserville. Open Saturday– Sunday, noon–4:30pm. Tasting complimentary with purchase. 707.857.1980. Matrix Winery Taking over the former warren of Rabbit Ridge, Mazzocco Winery’s new spinoff promises (threatens?) “Wines to die for.” Pinot, Zin and Syrah are tragically good; bar stool seating and a relaxed vibe are pluses. 3291 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.1911.

River Road Vineyards Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

Selby Winery Regularly served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to

4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463.

Topel Winery Hailing from Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

Wilson Winery Scenic setting and rustic-modern tasting room makes for an atmospheric, recommended visit. Single-vineyard Zinfandels, Cabernet Sauvignons, Cabernet Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah win awards for good reason— namely, even curmudgeons take one sip and turn into believers. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am to 5pm. Tastings are $5; $10 for reserves. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction

building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Patz & Hall In a Napa business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Stony Hill Vineyard In the 1940s, advisers from UC Davis told them, “Under no circumstances plant Chardonnay.” So they planted Chardonnay. Intimate tastings in the flagstone-studded, Eisenhower-era McCrea living room; Chardonnay and White Riesling are legends. 3331 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment, Monday through Friday, weekends when available. $25. 707.963.2636.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Taste at Oxbow Stylish setting across from Oxbow Market offers a roster of popular flavors from Waterstone Wines. 708 First St., Napa. Generally, from noon to 6 or 7pm. Tasting fee $15. 707.265.9600.

Lasseter Family Winery The adventures of Merlot and Alicante B. BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

t should surprise no one that a movie mogul owns a vineyard in Glen Ellen. That’s what successful folks do around here. But mention John Lasseter, and you’ll generally widen some eyes. Yes, the very same creator of Toy Story, Finding Nemo, WALL-E and dozens of other hugely successful Pixar features that are all too well known to anyone who’s had kids in the past 20 years. And yes, befitting of one of the nation’s leading grownup kids, his home vineyard is ringed with its own narrow-gauge railroad, serviced by a charismatic little steam engine called the Marie E. If it all sounds like so much fun, there is one more surprise: the only carryover from Lasseter’s groundbreaking career in computer animation is a discreet “Wally B.” in the winery’s logo. The Lasseters want the experience here to be just about the wines, explains their winemaker, Julia Iantosca (pictured), which is why you’ll find no giant statues of Buzz Lightyear (or even the mere mention of the word “Pixar” on their website). The modest, compact winery and hospitality center was built from scratch on the site of the former Grand Cru Vineyard, by a babbling “brook” that recycles water from the vineyard pond. Visitors should not expect to drop in on John and Nancy Lasseter here, although their portly dachshund may come scuttling by in his never-ending search for Iantosca, who is obliged to give him a treat upon being found. The Marie E. makes an appearance on the label of Lasseter’s 2011 Chemin de Fer ($46), a juicy Rhône-style blend with a spice box more like Pinot Noir. The 2012 Enjoué Rosé ($24) also employs the triple threat of Syrah, Mourvèdre and Grenache. Fastidiously Francocentric, the Lasseters wanted to make a rosé like those they enjoy from the south of France, so they brought back three dozen bottles to survey before deciding on this wine’s style: classic salmon-pink, orange zest flavor, mouth-filling but crisp. “Because the Lasseters are very visual people,” Iantosca says, “it was important to get the color correct.” The vibrant, magenta-rimmed 2010 Paysage ($52), a Merlotbased blend, and the Malbec-based 2010 Amoureux ($54), with graphite and wild raspberries on the nose, are fine Bordeaux facsimiles. With engaging wines, paired with a plate of locally made cheeses and chocolates, this seated tasting should not disappoint adult fans of well-made wine. Children, on the other hand, may be bored out of their tiny minds—except on the day that the Lasseters invite classes from neighboring Dunbar School to release and learn about the “good bugs” that inhabit the insectary bordering their organically farmed vineyards, and it’s a bug’s life here, after all. Lasseter Family Winery, 1 Vintage Lane, Glen Ellen. Daily by appointment only, $25 per person. 707.933.2800.

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The Best of The North Bay 2014

Readers Poll You know the feeling. It’s that excited feeling you get walking into the lobby of your favorite theater, loading up produce from your favorite farmer’s market or finding just the right title at your favorite bookstore. It may come daily at the cafe, weekly at the nightclub or even just once a year at the framing shop. It can happen anywhere, from the bank to the feed store, from the yoga studio to the park. It’s a feeling that says you absolutely need to tell the entire world about how wonderful this one perfectly divine little thing is right now. We know. We get that same feeling pretty much constantly, and each week we get the chance to get the giddiness offour chest in print. But once a year, it’s your turn. Dear readers, it’s time to channel all those good feelings about

A few online voting rules: Complete at least 30 votes of the ballot or it won’t be counted Include your name and a daytime phone number

Vote online at bohemian.com (mailed ballots will not be counted)

everything you love and shout them from the mountaintop—or, as the case may be, our Best of the North Bay Readers Poll. The sample ballot below can be scribbled on however you see fit to prepare voting for the many places, businesses and people who make your world brighter. When you’re ready to pull the trigger, go online to www.bohemian.com between now and Tuesday, Dec. 10 at 5pm. Look for your picks to be printed in our annual Best Of issue, publishing on March 19, 2014. Keep in mind that any big-box corporate entities will be tossed out in favor of our prized independents; we’re all about supporting local businesses and people. Sit down with the ballot and vote for your favorites today!

Important! Check one of the following. My selections are for:

Sonoma County

Ballots are confidential, but you may be called to confirm your vote Only one entry per person is permitted Bohemian staff members, contributors, advertisers and their families may vote Dealine for online ballots is Tuesday, Dec. 10, at 5pm

Culture Best Art Gallery Best Ballet Company Best Band Best Charity Event Best Dance Studio Best Festival Best Film Festival Best Media Personality: TV, Radio, Print Best Movie Theater Best Museum Best Music Festival Best Music Venue Best Outdoor Art Event Best Performing Arts Center Best Performing Dance Company Best Place to Dance Best Theater Troupe

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Marin County Napa County Honorable mentions will be included in the Sonoma votes!

Best Snow/Skate/Board Shop Best Surf Shop Best Yoga Studio

Food & Drink Best Bakery Best Bar Best Bartender Best BBQ Best Breakfast Best Brew Pub Best Brunch Best Burger Best Cabernet Best Cafe/Coffeehouse Best Candy/Chocolate Shop (by location) Best Caterer Best Chardonnay Best Chef Best Chinese Best Chocolatier Best Cocktails Best Cupcakes Best Diner Best Dining After 10pm Best Dive Bar Best Farmers’ Market

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SOMBER MEMORIAL A visitor lights a candle on the spot where Andy Lopez was shot by a sheriff’s deputy last Wednesday.

Gun Crazy

On the struggle for answers in the killing of Andy Lopez BY GABE MELINE

T

en seconds.

Ten seconds is how long it takes to tie one’s shoes or to send a text. But for a sheriff’s deputy last week, 10 seconds was the time it took between calling in to report a suspect and calling again to report the boy had been shot. This is what we know about the shooting of 13-year-old Andy Lopez from the deputy’s perspective: that Lopez, wearing

shorts and a blue hoodie, was seen by two deputies walking along Moorland Avenue holding an Airsoft gun made to look like an AK-47. That the orange tip, signifying it as fake, had been removed. That the lights of the deputies’ car came on, that the boy, from behind, was told twice to “put the gun down.” That, upon moving to turn around and face the deputy, the barrel of his toy gun “was rising up and turning in his direction.”

We know all too well what happened next: that deputy Erick Gelhaus fired at Andy Lopez eight times, striking him seven times, killing him on the spot. What we know about the shooting of Andy Lopez from witnesses’ perspectives is that deputies kept firing after Andy Lopez hit the ground, according to a neighbor across the street. That deputies instructed Lopez to put the gun down from inside their vehicle, not outside, according to two women who were on the block. That after the deputies’ doors opened, it took only three to five seconds before shots were fired, according to another man in the neighborhood. What we know from visiting the site on Moorland Avenue is that the location of the deputies’ vehicle is still marked on the asphalt, very much behind where

Andy Lopez was walking. That deputies have not yet said they identified themselves as law enforcement when they called out to drop the gun. That by the SRPD’s own admission, Andy Lopez hadn’t fully turned around to see who might be calling to him before he was struck with bullets. That according to the autopsy, he was struck, among other places, in the right hip and buttock—from behind. In the week since the shooting of Andy Lopez, more questions than answers have arisen from a community still in shock and still struggling with how a 13-yearold carrying a toy can be killed in plain daylight. “The public expects that the investigation will be thorough and transparent,” says Sonoma County Sheriff Steve Frietas. “As sheriff, I will do all in

) 21

1 2013 Nonprofit Guide

Charting our climate NOW!

Rosemary Olson, Publisher *Resources: www.energy.gov | www.1.eere.energy.gov Published by the North Bay Bohemian

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act awarded the Office of Energy Efficiency billions of dollars to be invested towards programs and initiatives to reduce our carbon footprint. These grant directives are designed to increase energy efficiency by offering consumers and businesses cost-saving energyreduction choices, establishing new, natural energy resources, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and developing new scientific advances. In 2006, the Global Warming Solutions Act (AB 32) passed, which set the 2020 greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal into law. In this year’s Nonprofit Guide, we wanted to see where our dedicated regional nonprofits, government agencies and other resources are now with those initiatives. Let’s take a glance at how this collaborative effort is working to meet the original goals, and what goals they hope to achieve in the future. We all have the power to take action now and be a part of the working proposition for our beloved Mother Earth!

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

2013 NonproямБt Guide

2

3 take a serious and complicated issue and sum it up in a nutshell—our climate then and now. We attribute the noted positive directives to policy, heads of offices, the vast environmental nonproďŹ t sector, green businesses, and you! Everyone can be a part of this positive and massive movement to protect and save our environment. Start today, and reach out to make your mark, treading lightly!

The Climate Eco-Pillars Government Agency Q&A’s

Sonoma County Climate Protection Agency  Q: How much greenhouse gas is emitted in Sonoma County per year?

Q: What is the county’s plan for achieving the goal, and what progress has been made towards it?

Q: What new climate protection innovations and programs have been established in the county?

A: The most recent analysis done by the nonproďŹ t Climate Protection $BNQBJHO $1$ TIPXTUIBUPWFS 4.2 Million tons of carbon dioxide is emitted in Sonoma County each year. Of those emissions, roughly JTDBVTFECZUSBOTQPSUBUJPO  CZFOFSHZVTFEJOCVJMEJOHT BOE the remainder by solid waste, water treatment and delivery, agriculture, and other smaller sources. Q: What is the county’s goal for reducing the emissions?

A: The citizens, elected officials, business leaders, and nonproďŹ ts of Sonoma County have long been leaders in climate action. Here are just a few short examples of local government leadership: Ĺ” 5IF&OFSHZ*OEFQFOEFODF Program operates one of the only residential Property Assessed $MFBO&OFSHZ 1"$& ĹŁOBODJOH programs in the Country; it allows home and business owners to upgrade buildings to be more energy efficient and/or generate renewable power. Ĺ” 5IFUPXOPG8JOETPSPŢFSTBO on-bill repayment program called 1BZ"T:PV4BWF 1":4 UIBU allows water customers to pay for resource efficiency measures over time through a charge on their water bill. Ĺ” /FXMZGPSNFE4POPNB$MFBO Power is one of three Community Choice Aggregation programs in the state; it is a joint powers authority that will buy power on behalf of residents in participating communities and invest in a portfolio of resources in line with local climate and other goals. Ĺ” 5IF4POPNB$PVOUZ8BUFS Agency is committed to providing carbon-free water by 2015. Ĺ” 5IF4POPNB$PVOUZ Transportation Authority has piloted a real-time ridesharing program – Carma – using technology to link a person’s empty car seat with others looking for a ride in a safe and GHG reducing way. Ĺ” 5IFDPMMBCPSBUJWF&MFDUSJD7FIJDMF $IBSHJOH4UBUJPO &$74 1SPHSBN

VOEFSXBZ XJMMIBWFJOTUBMMFE public charging stations in Sonoma County. *OBEEJUJPOUPMPDBMHPWFSONFOU programs like these, there are numerous non-governmental organizations promoting climate protection including the Climate 1SPUFDUJPO$BNQBJHO UIF/PSUI#BZ $MJNBUF"EBQUBUJPO*OJUJBUJWF UIF4PMBS Action Alliance, and many more. The RCPA, which works with all of these government and nongovernment partners, is itself a testament to the innovation and commitment found in Sonoma $PVOUZ*UJTBOBUJPOBMMZVOJRVF entity that has in its ďŹ rst three years helped to bring millions of dollars into Sonoma County to implement climate protection programs such BTUIF#BZ"SFB3FHJPOBM&OFSHZ /FUXPSL &OFSHZ6QHSBEF$BMJGPSOJB  1BZ"T:PV4BWF 3FOFXBCMF&OFSHZ Secure Community project, and Climate Action 2020. More information about the RCPA or our Sonoma County partners can be found at www.SonomaRPCA.org or by contacting program manager Lauren Casey at lcasey@sctainfo. org, or 707.565.5379. 

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A: The Regional Climate Protection Authority adopted the same target as that adopted by all nine cities and the county in 2005: to reduce emissions CZGSPNMFWFMTCZ This is one of the most aggressive UBSHFUTJOUIFTUBUF*OBEPQUJOHJU  local leaders acknowledged not only the implications of inaction, but also the opportunities created by the climate challenge including the wiser use of resources and associated cost savings, investment in local infrastructure and the local economy, improved public health, protection of natural and working lands, among others.

A: Currently the plan for achieving the adopted targets is based on the Community Climate Action Plan developed by CPC in 2008. *UMBZTPVUTUSBUFHJFTBDSPTT energy efficiency, transportation and land use, renewable energy, conservation, and ďŹ nancing. Many FŢPSUTVOEFSXBZCZUIFDPVOUZ  county agencies, cities, and private partners were motivated by this plan. However, with the exception of Santa Rosa, the jurisdictions of Sonoma County lack a formally adopted plan, consistent with state expectations. The RCPA is now leading a planning FŢPSUUPESBGUBSFHJPOBMQMBOUIBUXJMM encompass all communities, identify XBZTUIBUDPOTJTUFOUSFHJPOBMFŢPSUT will make us more successful, and provide a framework for achieving targets within the legal framework for local planning and projects. This FŢPSUJTDBMMFE$MJNBUF"DUJPO *UXJMMJOWPMWFBOBOBMZTJTPGQSPHSFTT towards the 2015 target, and the identiďŹ cation of new targets and an implementation plan through 2020. There will be signiďŹ cant stakeholder engagement and public outreach to ensure that the adopted plans reect community values. The ďŹ rst series of public workshops will be held in December and January. For more information visit: www. SonomaRCPA.org

2013 NonproďŹ t Guide

In this guide, we invited regional government agencies and nonproďŹ ts to

2013 Nonprofit Guide

4

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www.fcbconnect.com

The Climate Eco-Pillars

Napa County Transportation and Planning Agency

(Inside Raley’s) 100 2nd St. Petaluma 707-636-9030

Q: How much greenhouse gas is emitted in Napa County per year? 

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A: According to NCTPA’s Climate Protection Framework (December 2009?), the sounty as a whole emitted approximately 1 million tons of GHG emissions in 1990 and approximately 1.2 million tons in 2005.     Q: What is the County’s goal for reducing the emissions? 

D e c i d e d l y D i ff e re n t .

Connecting People Connecting Peop ple and a nd L Land and ffor or the the Benefit B enefit of of Both Both “I learned “I learned how how we we affect affect the the Earth Earth and help and me.” a nd how how we we h elp iit, t, a nd tthat hat cchanged hanged m e.” —LandPaths’ — Land Paths ’ In In Our Our Own Own B BackYard ackY Yard S Student t u d e nt

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A: According to the same source, the County-wide goal is to reduce GHG emissions such that they are equivalent to 1990 levels in the year 2020, consistent with AB32.  Individual jurisdictions like Napa County, the city of Napa, the city of American Canyon, and the City of St. Helena have affirmed this goal or developed alternative goals in their general plans or via other planning efforts.   Q: What is the county’s plan for achieving the goal, and what progress has been made towards it?  A: In 2009-10, NCTPA developed a non-binding Climate Protection Framework in collaboration with all county jurisdictions (The cities of Napa, American Canyon, Calistoga, and St. Helena, the Town of Yountville, and Napa County).  The Framework outlined six goals and 53 actions that representatives of each jurisdiction believed were achievable to reach the emission reduction goal.  Since the framework was adopted in early 2010, individual jurisdictions have used it as the basis for more refined inventories and emission reduction plans.  Efforts have been made to improve

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Q: What new climate protection innovations and programs have been established in the county?  A: The county has a long history of protecting agriculture and directing growth to its incorporated jurisdictions and already urbanized areas.  These planning principles are not new, but they are recognized as the most important way to reduce emissions from new development and are on display in Napa County like nowhere else in the Bay Area.      Plan Bay Area also included a funding program to preserve open space and agriculture lands.  NCTPA is working with the county on a $1.25 million grant for the Suscol Headwaters Preserve project.   Contact: Kate Miller, Executive Director: Napa County Transportation and Planning Agency, Napa Valley Transportation Authority, Soscol Gateway Transit Center Phone:  707.259.8634

The Marin Climate and Energy Partnership

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coordination between land use and transportation in the region. As part of the region’s Sustainable Communities Strategy in Plan Bay Area, NCTPA will also be working with the Cities of Napa and American Canyon to implement their Priority Development Areas which will concentrate growth in already developed areas in the county.  Funding opportunities have been made available to encourage better development that will encourage the community to use alternative transportation options, in order to reduce sprawl, and vehicle miles traveled. 

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Q:  How much greenhouse gas is emitted in [Napa, Marin, Sonoma] County per year? A:  We’ve estimated Marin County emits about 2.2 million metric tons of greenhouse gasses each year, based on our latest 2010 inventory year. That number includes emissions from: energy used in the residential, commercial and industrial buildings; transportation fuels used on local roads, state highways and off-road vehicles and equipment; waste generated by the county as it decomposes it landfills; energy used to treat and convey water

and wastewater; and wastewater treatment. It doesn’t include agricultural emissions, air transportation, or lifecycle emissions from products made outside of the county. Q: What is the county’s goal for reducing the emissions? A: Most jurisdictions within Marin County have a goal of reducing emissions 15% below 2005 levels by the year 2020, which is in line with the State goal adopted with Assembly Bill 32.  A few cities and towns have adopted more aggressive

5 Q: What is the county’s plan for achieving the goal, and what progress has been made towards it? A: Most Marin cities and towns have adopted a Climate Action Plan, which outlines strategies the jurisdiction will take to reduce emissions related to energy use, transportation, water use, and waste.  The individual plans can be accessed through the Marin Climate & Energy Partnership’s website at www.marinclimate.org. Countywide, emissions dropped by about 116,000  metric tons CO2e between 2005 and 2010—a 5 percent reduction.  Emissions dropped in all cities and towns we inventoried, with reductions ranging between 3 percent and 8 percent. Q: What new climate protection innovations and programs have been established in the county? A: The Marin Energy Authority (MEA)

started supplying electricity to Marin cities and towns in 2010.  MEA provides 100% greenhouse gas-free electricity from renewable sources, as well as “regular” electricity that has been a little less carbon-intensive than PG&E electricity.  It’s one of the major reasons for the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in Marin County.  Marin cities and towns have also adopted many waste reduction programs geared to zero waste goals, including curbside food waste composting, and we’ve seen the quantity of waste produced by Marin drop by about one third since 2005.  Individually, the Marin cities and towns are implementing a wide range of greenhouse gas reduction actions, from installing electric vehicle chargers, LED streetlights, and solar panels, to encouraging residents to bike, walk, carpool or use transit instead of drive.  We’ve highlighted many of these programs on the Marin Climate & Energy Partnership’s website at www. marinclimate.org.

2013 Nonprofit Guide

goals for their community and/or for their government operations.

Nonprofit Sector Q&A’s

Daily Acts Q: How does your mission relate to reducing greenhouse gas emissions?

conserve energy, build community and more! This effort is being replicated regionally and nationally.

A: Daily Acts works to make our communities more healthy, just and resilient by inspiring action where people live and work. We do this through action and education programs that teach and support citizens, civic and business leaders to reduce water, waste, energy and resource use while growing more food, habitat, beauty and community. We teach people to harvest the rain, recycle their greywater, turn their lawn into lunch and just generally live in a way that uses far less resources and is healthier, more just and fun.

Through collaborations with local cities, we help inspire and create more climate friendly gardens through programs that promote sheetmulching turf and recycling greywater. A couple additional achievements include leading the largest greywater course in the U.S., helping transform city hall landscapes in Petaluma and Sebastopol and participating in the California State Greywater code update. 

A: The 350 Home and Garden Challenge is a community-wide initiative to take action on our climate crisis, calling attention to the need to reduce CO2 emissions to 350 parts per million. In four years we have registered over 7,000 local actions to grow food, save water,

A: Since all change begins with awareness, it’s important to get real about how critical it is to our families and our future to address climate disruption. While the challenges are large, know this, there has never been a time when your small choices have mattered more. Get skilled at using less, growing, sharing and 6

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Q: What are your top climate protection initiatives and achievements?

Q:What can every individual, homeowner and business owner in our region embrace daily to impact our goals, making this priority a reality?

6

Nonprofit Sector

2013 Nonprofit Guide

living more. Get connected to your neighbors and local groups doing incredible work. Get active in the civic policies and programs shaping our future. And most importantly, live your inspiration and as if every choice

Trathen Heckman, Director, Daily Acts, www.dailyacts.org | Board President, Transition US, www. transitionus.org

Post Carbon Institute Q: How does your mission relate to reducing greenhouse gas emissions? A: The core of all of Post Carbon Institute’s work is helping society understand how vulnerable we are as a result of our dependence on fossil fuels. Our view is that we must dramatically reduce fossil fuel consumption as fast as possible, for two reasons: (1) to keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius (the limit generally agreed upon by climate scientists and international governments); and (2) because while there are still vast, untapped hydrocarbons in the ground, the remaining reserves come with a far greater economic and environmental cost. We simply cannot afford to burn the same (let alone a growing) amount of oil, coal, and natural gas-which means that the world we’ve built upon cheap and easy fossil fuels is going to go through a dramatic shift in the coming decades.

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Q: What are your top climate protection initiatives and achievements? A: As a think tank, our role is to support the many organizations and activists in communities around the world who are developing and implementing strategies to get us off fossil fuels fast. For example, our Fellow Rob Hopkins founded the Transition movement, a network of over 1,400 initiatives in 44 countries around the world who are building climate, energy, and economic

resilience. In just the last year, we’ve distributed over 4,000 copies of a powerful image and essay book called ENERGY: Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth to energy activists around the world and published a hands-on guidebook for community-owned renewable energy called Power from the People. Q: What can every individual, homeowner and business owner in our region embrace daily to impact our goals, making this priority a reality? A: There’s so much! As individuals, there’s lots we can do to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels--from how we travel to what we buy and what we eat. As homeowners, the first step is conservation—weatherizing, insulating, energy efficient windows, lighting, etc. The next is solar hot water or solar pv. Thankfully we have great resources here in Sonoma County Energy Independence Program is a great place to start. To scale, however, we need to mobilize the entire community. That’s why Sonoma Clean Power is such a great start. But we also need to move our savings and retirement accounts from investing in Wall Street and fossil fuel companies and into local, community-owned enterprises that help us build resilience and generate much more of our own, renewable energy. For more information contact Tod Brilliant tod@postcarbon.org | www. postcarbon.org

Country

Climate Protection Campaign JOIN DONATE VISIT VOLUNTEER www.quarryhillbg.org 12841 Hwy 12, Glen Ellen 707.996.3166 info@quarryhillbg.org

Q: How does your mission relate to reducing greenhouse gas emissions? A: There is perfect alignment with the mission of the Climate Protection Campaign which is to inspire, align, and mobilize action in response to the climate crisis. We work with business, government, youth and the broader community to advance practical, science-based solutions for

significant greenhouse gas emission reductions. Q: What are your top climate protection initiatives and achievements? A: Our top aim is to create model programs for communities everywhere. Sonoma Clean Power is our top initiative because it is the most

7

For the transportation sector, the source of most of Sonoma County’s emissions, we’re incubating two important programs. Carma is a ridesharing program and ECO2school deals with emissions from high school students’ commutes.

Q: What can every individual, homeowner and business owner in our region embrace daily to impact our goals, making this priority a reality? A: While individual actions are essential, they are insufficient to tackle the underlying cause of the climate crisis. We’re all trapped in interlocking systems that consign us to burn fossil fuel. Therefore we must support policymakers who prioritize climate protection. For more information contact www. climateprotection.org

Educating Our Children Bay Area Green Tours Through our educational tours, students engage with innovators around the Bay Area who are working to create a greener future. Geared for high school and college students, these tours help prepare our future leaders for the rapidly emerging green workplace. These behind-the-scenes experiences are a great opportunity to see green collar jobs in action and learn about training and educational resources. Tour topics include: Sustainable Agriculture, Re-thinking Waste, Green Building, Sustainable Cities, Green Collar Jobs, Green Pioneers and more!

2013 Nonprofit Guide

powerful solution under local control that addresses two problems— economic and environmental. Now that Sonoma Clean Power’s creation has been achieved, our aim for it is to rapidly develop local renewable energy resources.

To learn more about our Educational Tours, contact us www.bayareagreentours.org

Climate Ride GENERAL INFORMATION MAY 17-20, 2014 - NEW ROUTE! Climate Ride California 2014 is an exciting four-day cycling adventure that begins in San Francisco, heads north up the coast and through Wine Country to California’s Capitol in Sacramento. Climate Ride California is more than a bike trip it’s an inspiring journey with like-minded people who are united by their passion for sustainability, renewable energy, and bicycles—the ultimate carbon-free form of transportation. On this year’s new California ride, you’ll experience epic biking, amazing scenery, and dynamic speakers that all combine to make this charitable event exciting, informative, and fun. There are four days of riding and each one is a new adventure. You’ll pedal from the city by the Bay, San Francisco, across the Golden Gate Bridge and along California’s scenic Marin coast. Then, turning east at Point Reyes Station, we’ll pedal past quaint dairy farms and through historic Petaluma to our first camp of the trip.

Do you walk, bike, carpool, or use another sustainable mode of transportation? Why or why not?

Each evening, our expert speaker series will provide information, opinion, and discussion on topics such as renewable energy, climate science, sustainability, and bicycle infrastructure. Our professional Climate Ride staff takes care of all the details, so you can focus on riding the 30-60 miles per day of carefully planned routes on scenic back roads. It’s challenging yet doable, and you have all day to make it to the next rest stop. Meals, snacks, bike support, luggage transport, and all of the logistics are included when you reach your fundraising minimum. On the road, the Climate Ride support team is always nearby to assist you, keep you happy and healthy, and make your ride worry-free and memorable. Climate Ride California is a camping trip, but there are hotel/indoor accommodations available at an extra cost. Detailed hotel/cabin information will be available in the travel planner. Click the tabs above for more about each day. If you’re ready to sign up and ride, go to website below to register! www.climateride.org/events/ california Register: http:// bike.climateride.org/index. cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive. eventlist

This November, join students from around the San Francisco Bay Area to discuss transportation issues in your communities. Share stories from events you’ve hosted at your school. Discuss what changes have to be made to encourage transportation alternatives at your school. Learn how to fix a flat tire on your bicycle. Whether you come to learn about innovative projects school groups have worked on, advocate your elected officials to promote sustainable modes of transportation, or to win raffle prizes; join us! Date: Saturday, November 2nd, 2013, 10am to 4pm. Location: Joseph P. Bort Metro Center, 101 Eighth St., Oakland (near Lake Merritt BART Station) Registration is free! Breakfast and lunch will be provided. A free shuttle bus is available from the North Bay. Pick-up/drop-off locations are at: Bus #1: Solano County – Fairfield Transportation Center at 2000 Cadenasso Drive in Fairfield (8:30am pick-up; 5pm drop-off) Bus #2: Stop #1 – Sonoma County – Trek Bicycle Parking Lot at 512 Mendocino Ave. in Santa Rosa (8am pick-up; 5:30pm drop-off) Stop #2 – Marin County – Bus Pad at Smith Ranch Road and Lucas Valley Road in San Rafael (8:45am pick-up; 4:45pm drop-off) Participate in discussions about global climate change and transportation and interactive presentations. Who should attend: Bay area youth leaders, green team members, safe routes to school participants, all students interested in transportation, climate change and a sustainable future! For more information and to register go to: www.sparetheairyouth.com/summit2013, www.sparetheair.org

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The next two days are spent pedaling through the verdant vineyards of California’s classic Wine Country growing regions of the Russian River Valley, Dry Creek Valley, Alexander Valley and eventually into the famed Napa Valley, where we’ll spend a whole day on the Silverado Trail. That night we’ll camp in the rolling hills above Napa at an out-of-the-way campground with panoramic views. Then, it’s up and over the final hill and across the flat Central Valley to Sacramento where we’ll make our voices heard at a speaking event in front of the iconic Capitol building.

Youth for the Environment and Sustainability (YES) Conference

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2013 Nonprofit Guide

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Peace in Medicine is a non-profit mutual benefit corporation with a unique business model firmly based in three overarching tenets: the importance of local support and supporting locally; the belief in patient access to alternative medicine, information and education; and an unwavering adherence to environmental integrity. Recognizing the importance of community, we reinvest a significant portion of any surplus income into local causes, community services, charities and social movements.

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Andy Lopez ( 21

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n marches, vigils and calls to action over the last week, the community has demanded— and deserves—a detailed explanation of what happened last week on Moorland Avenue. But in Sonoma County, detailed facts about officer-related shootings are often impossible to obtain. Per longstanding protocol after officer-related shootings, the Andy Lopez shooting is being investigated internally by the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office and also by the Santa Rosa Police Department, ostensibly an independent, outside agency. But as many are quick to note, the close relationship and shared duties between these two departments negates any possibility of complete impartiality. Currently, the SRPD is being investigated by the sheriff for an incident earlier this month. How, people are correct to ask, can the SRPD be impartial to the sheriff? And how can the district attorney, a sworn representative of law enforcement, also be impartial in its own analysis? Such questions have yet again brought up the need for a civilian review board, which could potentially have subpoena powers and could provide taxpayers with a mechanism to oversee the public servants whose salaries they pay. In fact, a civilian review board was recommended for Sonoma County by the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in 2000, after a oneyear probe into a spate of officer-

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my power to see that expectation is satisfied.” Likewise, the Santa Rosa Police Department and District Attorney Jill Ravitch have all promised thorough, transparent investigations into the incident. After the incident timeline and preliminary autopsy results were released last week, the FBI announced it will conduct its own independent investigation into the shooting, taking all perspectives into account. But the perspective that’s missing is the one of Andy Lopez—and, tragically, the one person who can offer his perspective is no longer alive.

related deaths and the conflicts of interest inherent in local protocol for investigations. It was criticized by law enforcement, then as now, as unnecessary. Even longtime activists like Mary Moore admit that civilian review boards aren’t perfect. “I am personally one of those that feels that civilian review boards have their downsides,” she says. But considering the current practice of local departments investigating each other, Moore adds, “I just don’t see that anybody would trust that process to be either transparent or accurate. We definitely need an outside eye on this.” Longtime police-accountability activist Robert Edmonds points out that in the 26 officer-related fatal shootings that have occurred since 2000—a number that includes deaths caused by Taser— no officer has been convicted of any wrongdoing. Edmonds says this underscores the need for outside investigations, even while predicting that civilian review boards can create extra levels of bureaucracy—and won’t always stop complaints. “Police say they’ll be stacked with liberals who are opposed to police at all times,” Edmonds notes, “and liberals will say it’s stacked with conservatives who side with police at all times.” Still, Edmonds says, something needs to be done to stop the cycle of citizens being shot. Looking at other models in San Francisco and beyond, a civilian review board could be set up in such a way to provide that opportunity. As Marty McReynolds of the ACLU stated last week, “Only such an independent investigation can supply the facts needed for corrective recommendations and give the public confidence in the actions of the agents pledged to protect our community.” Sheriff Frietas asserts that the existing grand jury serves as the impartial outside body that police accountability activists continue to demand. Comprised of 19 voluntary applicants, the grand jury delivers the final report on the district attorney’s findings into officer-related ) 23 shooting investigations.

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | O CTO B E R 3 0 - N OV E M B E R 5, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

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Andy Lopez ( 21

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A PARENTS’ LOSS Rodrigo and Sujey Lopez at a recent rally in Santa Rosa.

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But a community like that of Andy Lopez’s won’t see itself represented in the grand jury. The current grand jury, for example, is predominantly white and over 50 years old. “Typically, grand jury membership involves a time commitment of some portion of two to three days a week,â€? reads the county’s website, and who, living in the low-income neighborhood of Moorland Avenue, has that kind of time? The FBI will investigate the shooting, and has stated that Andy Lopez’s civil rights will be an issue in their investigation. This can hopefully address questions about the shooting’s racial implications and the marginalization of the Latino community at large in Sonoma County. Just this month, Santa Rosa police and SWAT members surrounded a house for 11 hours after reports of a man ďŹ ring a gun at his wife. Why would officers wait 11 hours when dealing with a man shooting a real gun and only wait 10 seconds when dealing with a teenager carrying a replica gun? Could it be that the man was a middle-aged business developer living in Fountaingrove, instead of a teenager in a hoodie walking in a largely Latino neighborhood?

C

hances are that amid the slow investigation process, more facts could come to light via a wrongful death lawsuit ďŹ led by Lopez’s family, who has reportedly hired an attorney. This could yield much more information than is available to the public or the press, says Santa Rosa attorney Patrick Emery, who represented the family of Jeremiah Chass, a 16-year-old shot and killed by county deputies in 2007. The wrongful death lawsuit ďŹ led by Emery on behalf of the Chass family resulted in a $1.75 million out-of-court settlement. But it also resulted in a collection of evidence that Emery says conicted with official reports at the time coming from the sheriff’s department, the SRPD and the Press Democrat. That evidence was never stied by a nondisclosure agreement; if the family wanted to, they could have released it, says Emery. “In the Chass case, my clients chose not to speak further once the case was settled. It was their choice simply to avoid further emotional upset, and that was a very emotional personal decision they made.â€? Rather than shield themselves from the public, Andy’s parents, Sujey and Rodrigo Lopez, have been active in marches and vigils

) 24

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for their son, and have demanded that justice be served. If a wrongful death lawsuit were to be ďŹ led and evidence collected, it’s likely they would push for its release. Currently, audio recordings from dispatch continue to be withheld by the sheriff’s department. With further details like post-incident interviews, witness accounts, depositions and the deputy’s personnel records that could come from the “discovery phaseâ€? of the process, “I think a wrongful death suit would be appropriate, unless there is a complete disclosure of all the facts, and those facts clearly justify what the officers did,â€? says Emery. “Frequently, the only way to obtain a thorough and detailed explanation of the facts is through a wrongful death suit.â€?

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hile select facts trickle out from the SRPD, the online background of deputy Erick Gelhaus is disappearing. Gelhaus, a 24-year veteran deputy who served in Iraq and led gangprevention and narcotics efforts for the department, had no prior civilian shooting record before last week. An avid hunter and gun enthusiast, he served as senior ďŹ rearms instructor for the sheriff’s department and posted regularly to online gun forums, using his real name. While many of those posts have now disappeared, easily accessible cached pages show that Gelhaus made comments pertinent to the events of last week. “Does anybody have or know of a location for an AK-47 nomenclature diagram?â€? he asked in April 2001. “I got interested in the shotgun as a result of what I couldn’t do with it—which back then was hitting much of anything,â€? he joked in 2000. But in 2006, Gelhaus replied to a discussion about being threatened by someone with a BB or pellet gun, and it’s indicative of his knowledge of the investigation process. “It’s going to come down to YOUR ability to articulate to law enforcement and very likely the Court that you were in fear of death or serious

bodily injury,â€? he wrote. “I think we keep coming back to this, articulation—your ability to explain why—will be quite signiďŹ cant.â€? In a news conference last week, Lt. Paul Henry of the SRPD stated as much about Gelhaus’ testimony after the shooting. “He was able, at least in interviews with us, to articulate that he was in fear of his life, the life of his partner, and the community members in the area. And that’s why he responded in the way that he did.â€?

E

than Oliver is the witness who ďŹ rst appeared in front of TV cameras to say that Erick Gelhaus continued to ďŹ re at Andy Lopez after the boy had fallen to the ground. Speaking in front of his house last week, he reiterates that from his front porch on Moorland Avenue, that’s what he saw last Wednesday. Though the autopsy eventually bore out his statements about how many shots were ďŹ red, Oliver says that in the days following his statements on TV, he’s been targeted by law enforcement. “I’ve been harassed real bad over this,â€? he says. “I’ve been arrested twice in one day, and then I just caught a bogus DUI for nothing because they said they had a report of a drunk driver, which wasn’t the case. They saw me, and then they had six cops follow me. Six cops for a traffic stop. And then twice, they got me. The other one, you know, I kind of understand where their standpoint was on that, because I got pretty extensively verbally violent with them. But to me, it’s still harassment.â€? Oliver also notes that the ďŹ eld where Lopez was shot is a common play area for kids with toy guns, where neighborhood children “play with their paintball guns all the time.â€? Oliver’s little brother often played with Lopez, a boy that Oliver describes as a “real good kid.â€? “He wanted to be a boxer, he wanted to do a lot of things. He was real friendly, real popular around the school,â€? Oliver says, as dozens of mourners gather nearby around a candlelit shrine where Andy Lopez was killed. “To me, I really don’t care [about being harassed]. Just as long as there’s justice for this little boy and his family.â€?

The week’s events: a selective guide

S A N TA R O S A

She Can’t Stop

Miley Cyrus came in like a wrecking ball, but the less-hyped Wrecking Ball is a far more tasteful album by Emmylou Harris. After the death of her singing partner, Gram Parsons, in 1975, Harris released Pieces of the Sky, which opened with a song by a virtually unknown artist, Rodney Crowell. Now, after almost 40 years of friendship and working together, they have released their first duo album, Old Yellow Moon, selections from which they’ll perform on Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $159–$591. 707.546.3600.

HEALDSBURG

Tales from Disney

The art of George Scribner is so enchanting that it hangs on the walls in “the happiest place on earth,” the Disneyland Gallery on Main Street. If you’ve ever seen The Lion King, Fantasia Continued, Dinosaur or Oliver and Company, which he directed, you’ve experienced the magic of Scribner’s works. This rare breed of Disney directors and animated artists will be illustrating his experiences in an appearance called “Working at Disney” on Friday, Nov. 1, at the Healdsburg Center for the Arts. 130 Plaza St., Healdsburg. 7:30pm. $5. 707.431.1970.

SA N R A FA E L

Djembi Djazz

Have you ever heard of the guembri, oud, djembe or balafon? Such exotic instruments are heard in the music of Omar Sosa; with explosive playing and adventurous writing, Sosa mixes the folkloric music of Esmeraldas, an Arican-rooted culture in Ecuador, with Cuban marimba roots to create a blend of music loosely labeled as Afro-Cuban. Sosa blends his eclectic roots with Miles Davis’ classic recordings to create Kind of Blue, a tribute performance with Sosa’s Afri-Lectric Sextet, on Sunday, Nov. 3, at the Osher Marin JCC. 200 North San Pedro Road, San Rafael. 6:30pm. $25–$35. 415.444.8000.

S E B A S TO P O L

PRIMAVERA Portuguese fado sensation Mariza gets you hot and bothered Nov. 2 at the Green Music Center. See Concerts, p31.

Blues Breaker

Coco Montoya, a lefty who plays his “icy hot” guitar style on an upside-down, right-handed instrument like Albert King, never took one lesson. A self-taught guitarist, Montoya learned by mirroring some of the best guitarists of his time, with artists like King who taught him, “Don’t think about it, just feel it.” His heartfelt musical style caught the ear of John Mayall at a bar gig, and Montoya was recruited to his band to follow in the footsteps of former Bluesbreaker guitarists like Eric Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor. Montoya plays solo on Friday, Nov. 1, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8:30pm. $17. 707.829.7300.

—Tara Kaveh

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Crush CULTURE

25

Arts Ideas Victoria Webb

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 23 – 29, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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THE FORCE BE WITH HIM Steve Sansweet shows a Day of the Dead knockoff of Han and Leia to a visiting school group.

Destination: Rancho Obi-Wan Guinness World Records names Petaluma collection the galaxy’s largest personal collection of ‘Star Wars’ memorabilia BY BOB CANNING You have taken your first step into a larger world.—Ben Kenobi

A

naheim has Disneyland. San Diego has Legoland. And Petaluma has “Lucasland.”

Well, sort of. To be more precise, it has Rancho Obi-Wan (ROW), Steve Sansweet’s huge collection of Star Wars memorabilia housed in a converted 9,000-square-foot barn on his two-acre ranch.

Where some 20,000 chickens once roosted, over 300,000 items are now on rotating display, making Sansweet’s Star Wars collection officially the largest in the world. With the creation of Rancho Obi-Wan, a 501c3 nonprofit museum, Sansweet’s famous collection is open for tours

to members and the occasional larger event, like this weekend’s “World Record Night.” For 26 years, Sansweet was a well-respected, award-winning journalist (nine of them as Los Angeles bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal). Months before seeing Star Wars in 1977, he caught the bug. “In early ’77, a fellow reporter at the Journal got a promotional brochure from 20th Century Fox touting the upcoming film,” Sansweet recalls. “He flipped through it and threw it away. I waited until he left for the day, then I fished it out of his wastebasket.” And Sansweet was hooked. “I didn’t plan on collecting over 300,000 items—it just sort of happened,” he says. “I always had the collecting gene when I was a kid—baseball cards, matchbook covers—and I always loved science-fiction and fantasy. But when I saw Star Wars at a screening on the Fox lot, it blew my mind. “Star Wars is the most significant worldwide pop-cultural phenomenon in the past 50 years,” he says. “George Lucas’ saga changed my life, and all for the better.” The original trilogy’s force was so strong, Sansweet decided to take mythologist Joseph Campbell’s advice, “Follow your bliss.” So in 1996, he packed it in at the Journal, gathered his collectibles from his three-level L.A. home and five rented storage units, and unpacked in Petaluma to become director of content management and head of fan relations for Lucasfilm. Since then, he has acted as a “Star Wars ambassador,” making public appearances at conventions around the world (the most recent this summer in Essen, Germany), written 16 Star Wars books and co-hosted no less than 27 themed

Arts Ideas Victoria Webb

N O RT H BAYNORTH B O H E MBAY I A N BOH | O CTO BE 0 - N OVBE EM E R– 29, 5, 220 0 1133 | | BBO O HHEEM N.COM E MI A NR |3OCTO R B23 MIIAAN.COM

26 ŴŸ

THE FORCE BE WITH HIM Steve Sansweet shows a Day of the Dead knockoff of Han and Leia to a visiting school group.

Destination: Rancho Obi-Wan Guinness World Records names Petaluma collection the galaxy’s largest personal collection of ‘Star Wars’ memorabilia BY BOB CANNING You have taken your first step into a larger world.—Ben Kenobi

A

naheim has Disneyland. San Diego has Legoland. And Petaluma has “Lucasland.”

Well, sort of. To be more precise, it has Rancho Obi-Wan (ROW), Steve Sansweet’s huge collection of Star Wars memorabilia housed in a converted 9,000-square-foot barn on his two-acre ranch.

Where some 20,000 chickens once roosted, over 300,000 items are now on rotating display, making Sansweet’s Star Wars collection officially the largest in the world. With the creation of Rancho Obi-Wan, a 501c3 nonprofit museum, Sansweet’s famous collection is open for tours

to members and the occasional larger event, like this weekend’s “World Record Night.” For 26 years, Sansweet was a well-respected, award-winning journalist (nine of them as Los Angeles bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal). Months before seeing Star Wars in 1977, he caught the bug. “In early ’77, a fellow reporter at the Journal got a promotional brochure from 20th Century Fox touting the upcoming film,” Sansweet recalls. “He flipped through it and threw it away. I waited until he left for the day, then I fished it out of his wastebasket.” And Sansweet was hooked. “I didn’t plan on collecting over 300,000 items—it just sort of happened,” he says. “I always had the collecting gene when I was a kid—baseball cards, matchbook covers—and I always loved science-fiction and fantasy. But when I saw Star Wars at a screening on the Fox lot, it blew my mind. “Star Wars is the most significant worldwide pop-cultural phenomenon in the past 50 years,” he says. “George Lucas’ saga changed my life, and all for the better.” The original trilogy’s force was so strong, Sansweet decided to take mythologist Joseph Campbell’s advice, “Follow your bliss.” So in 1996, he packed it in at the Journal, gathered his collectibles from his three-level L.A. home and five rented storage units, and unpacked in Petaluma to become director of content management and head of fan relations for Lucasfilm. Since then, he has acted as a “Star Wars ambassador,” making public appearances at conventions around the world (the most recent this summer in Essen, Germany), written 16 Star Wars books and co-hosted no less than 27 themed

Victoria Webb

ŴŹ 27 Wed, Oct 30 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Thur, Oct 31 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 1 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a NIGHTCLUB TWO STEP PARTY

Sat, Nov 2 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SINGLES & PAIRS HOEDOWN

Sun, Nov 3 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING TEARIN’ UP HIS HEART Joey Fatone from N’Sync visits Rancho Obi-Wan.

collection was Texan Anne Neumann. She offered her services to catalogue the collection, guesstimating the job would take six months to complete. “That was eight years ago,” Neumann says with a laugh, “and it’s far from done.” As vice-president and general manager of ROW, Neumann maintains its website, coordinates traveling exhibitions and schedules tours for schools and individuals as well as special onsite events. “Like weddings,” she adds. “People have been inquiring if it’s possible to get married at ROW. The answer is an unqualified yes!” Two major events take place in early November. Sansweet, who has married five couples throughout California, is looking forward to conducting his sixth wedding on Nov. 1. “It’ll be the first of what I hope will be many at Rancho Obi-Wan,” he says. Ross Cuddie and fiancé Charmaine Picot, both nurses, are from a distant-rim planet named Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. They say they “wanted a venue that was classy yet fun.” Picot, who has a penchant for Princess Leia art, explains, “We were engaged in San Francisco in July 2011 during our first visit to the city, and we found the surrounding area beautiful. Having the premier Star Wars

collection onsite is a unique and fitting location for us and our friends who are attending.” Adds Yoda collector Cuddie, “Plus, Steve Sansweet—friend, collecting guru, mentor and allaround swell guy—couldn’t be a better person to perform the ceremony.” Nov. 2 is the date for a major fundraiser (“World Record Night @ Rancho Obi-Wan”) commemorating the second anniversary of the museum as a nonprofit, and being included in the Guinness World Records 2014. Fans and collectors from all over the United States and overseas will descend on ROW like it’s party time on the forest moon of Endor. “To be included in the Guinness book has been a tremendous honor, and recognition for Rancho Obi-Wan is growing internationally,” says Sansweet. “And Star Wars fever is only going to increase as five more feature films are scheduled, starting in 2015. That will keep us on the map.” Sonoma County, the Force is with you. Tours at Rancho Obi-Wan are available in memberships starting at $100 each and must be booked in advance. Registration for ‘World Record Night @ Rancho Obi-Wan’ on Nov. 2 is now closed. For more information, visit www.ranchoobiwan.org.

Mon, Nov 4 8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Nov 5 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

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shows on QVC in the 1990s. “I’ve often been the only person from Lucasfilm who fans can personally meet and chat with on a fan-to-fan basis,” Sansweet explains. In 2011, Sansweet retired from Lucasfilm, although he remains a consultant for the company. In October 2012, staff from Guinness World Records visited ROW and confirmed what most insiders had already known: that Sansweet is owner of “the largest collection of Star Wars memorabilia.” The 2014 Guinness book was released in mid-September. “People assume that I’m a millionaire,” says Sansweet, “or that I get everything for free from licensees, but that’s not true. Most of my collection has been bought and paid for out of my own pocket, and I’m struggling to get my credit card debt down just like everybody else. Some of the items in my collection are made by fans that show their passion for the saga as well as their skill. And those are among my favorite items.” These include a large bantha piñata—the beast of burden ridden by fierce Tusken Raiders in Star Wars—and a full-sized wearable costume of the wampa creature that attacked Luke Skywalker in The Empire Strikes Back. Fans have even made and sent Sansweet a dozen figures of himself, usually as a Star Wars character. And how’s this for symmetry: the abandoned door from the Mos Eisley Cantina in Star Wars, which later was used on a chicken coop in Tunisia, is now a permanent fixture at ROW—in Petaluma, one-time chicken-andegg capital of the U.S. “I love to share my collection with other fans and collectors, who come from all over the world,” Sansweet says. “They really enjoy hearing little-known stories and anecdotes about many of the pieces. I try to never leave any question unanswered. That’s why the tours average three hours or longer.” ROW also donates tours to other charities for fundraising and does tours for school and community groups. One of those visitors who traveled from a galaxy far away to see Sansweet’s legendary

Victoria Webb

27 Wed, Oct 30 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Thur, Oct 31 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 1 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a NIGHTCLUB TWO STEP PARTY

Sat, Nov 2 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SINGLES & PAIRS HOEDOWN

Sun, Nov 3 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING TEARIN’ UP HIS HEART Joey Fatone from N’Sync visits Rancho Obi-Wan.

collection was Texan Anne Neumann. She offered her services to catalogue the collection, guesstimating the job would take six months to complete. “That was eight years ago,” Neumann says with a laugh, “and it’s far from done.” As vice-president and general manager of ROW, Neumann maintains its website, coordinates traveling exhibitions and schedules tours for schools and individuals as well as special onsite events. “Like weddings,” she adds. “People have been inquiring if it’s possible to get married at ROW. The answer is an unqualified yes!” Two major events take place in early November. Sansweet, who has married five couples throughout California, is looking forward to conducting his sixth wedding on Nov. 1. “It’ll be the first of what I hope will be many at Rancho Obi-Wan,” he says. Ross Cuddie and fiancé Charmaine Picot, both nurses, are from a distant-rim planet named Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. They say they “wanted a venue that was classy yet fun.” Picot, who has a penchant for Princess Leia art, explains, “We were engaged in San Francisco in July 2011 during our first visit to the city, and we found the surrounding area beautiful. Having the premier Star Wars

collection onsite is a unique and fitting location for us and our friends who are attending.” Adds Yoda collector Cuddie, “Plus, Steve Sansweet—friend, collecting guru, mentor and allaround swell guy—couldn’t be a better person to perform the ceremony.” Nov. 2 is the date for a major fundraiser (“World Record Night @ Rancho Obi-Wan”) commemorating the second anniversary of the museum as a nonprofit, and being included in the Guinness World Records 2014. Fans and collectors from all over the United States and overseas will descend on ROW like it’s party time on the forest moon of Endor. “To be included in the Guinness book has been a tremendous honor, and recognition for Rancho Obi-Wan is growing internationally,” says Sansweet. “And Star Wars fever is only going to increase as five more feature films are scheduled, starting in 2015. That will keep us on the map.” Sonoma County, the Force is with you. Tours at Rancho Obi-Wan are available in memberships starting at $100 each and must be booked in advance. Registration for ‘World Record Night @ Rancho Obi-Wan’ on Nov. 2 is now closed. For more information, visit www.ranchoobiwan.org.

Mon, Nov 4 8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Nov 5 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

PRO DJ RIG FOR i OS®

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$499

515 Ross Street, Brickyard Center Santa Rosa • (707) 542-5588

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1111 11 4 4th th S Street, t ree t , R Railroad a i l roa d S Square q ua re Santa S anta R Rosa osa 7 707.546.YARN 0 7. 5 4 6 .YA R N C a s t Awa yYa r n . com CastAwayYarn.com

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shows on QVC in the 1990s. “I’ve often been the only person from Lucasfilm who fans can personally meet and chat with on a fan-to-fan basis,” Sansweet explains. In 2011, Sansweet retired from Lucasfilm, although he remains a consultant for the company. In October 2012, staff from Guinness World Records visited ROW and confirmed what most insiders had already known: that Sansweet is owner of “the largest collection of Star Wars memorabilia.” The 2014 Guinness book was released in mid-September. “People assume that I’m a millionaire,” says Sansweet, “or that I get everything for free from licensees, but that’s not true. Most of my collection has been bought and paid for out of my own pocket, and I’m struggling to get my credit card debt down just like everybody else. Some of the items in my collection are made by fans that show their passion for the saga as well as their skill. And those are among my favorite items.” These include a large bantha piñata—the beast of burden ridden by fierce Tusken Raiders in Star Wars—and a full-sized wearable costume of the wampa creature that attacked Luke Skywalker in The Empire Strikes Back. Fans have even made and sent Sansweet a dozen figures of himself, usually as a Star Wars character. And how’s this for symmetry: the abandoned door from the Mos Eisley Cantina in Star Wars, which later was used on a chicken coop in Tunisia, is now a permanent fixture at ROW—in Petaluma, one-time chicken-andegg capital of the U.S. “I love to share my collection with other fans and collectors, who come from all over the world,” Sansweet says. “They really enjoy hearing little-known stories and anecdotes about many of the pieces. I try to never leave any question unanswered. That’s why the tours average three hours or longer.” ROW also donates tours to other charities for fundraising and does tours for school and community groups. One of those visitors who traveled from a galaxy far away to see Sansweet’s legendary

Stage Eric Chazankin

FREE

PRE-PARTY Raffle Giveaways!

I AM WHAT I AM Michael Van Why

and Stephan Walsh in ‘La Cage.’

for Warren Miller's North Bay film release

Not a Drag

Wed, Nov 13 6–8pm

Cinnabar’s ‘La Cage’ comes out strong BY DAVID TEMPLETON

Lagunitas Tap Room & Beer Sanctuary at the

A

ppearances can be deceiving. In Cinnabar Theater’s dramatically grounded yet joyous production of La Cage aux Folles, the opening anthem, “We Are What We Are,” is presented as a celebration of the art of female impersonation, a chorus of sexy, shimmying men in dresses singing the words, “We are what we are / And what we are is an illusion.”

ALL AGES

UÊSquaw Valley trip for 2 with

lift passes UÊ£äÊ«>ˆÀÃʜvÊvˆ“Ê̈VŽiÌÃÊvœÀÊ̅i œÛÊ£ÈÊvˆ“Ê«Ài“ˆiÀiÊ>ÌÊ>Àˆ˜Ê i˜ÌiÀ

Enter to Win Big Prizes!

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Partial proceeds to benefit SSU Snow Club 1280 N. McDowell Blvd, Petaluma 707.769.4495 info: 707.527.1200

© Peter Mathis

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As directed by Sheri Lee Miller, what is often staged as an overthe-top spectacle of genderbending farce and envelopepushing comedy is revealed to be the deeply moving, honest, detailed love story that always existed below the wigs, high heels, feathers and glitter. By anchoring the comedy in clear, recognizable believability, and by keeping the

motivations of the characters from straying into outsized caricature, Miller—who also serves as choreographer and costumer, with assistance in the latter from Clay David—establishes a rich, gradually escalating sense of emotional risk as these very real people bump, bruise, hurt, heal and ultimately love each other. La Cage aux Folles is a cabaret on the French Riviera, where the headliner, ZaZa—the stage name of Albin (played by Michael Van Why, who is spectacular, hilarious and moving)—is the most popular gay performer in town. For 20 years, Albin has raised a son with his longtime lover, Georges, the boy’s biological father (an equally splendid Stephan Walsh, spot-on and marvelous). When their son, Jean-Michel (Kyle Stoner) arrives with news that he is engaged to the daughter of a French politician committed to shutting down all the gay cabarets in the city, an escalating series of farcical plots is concocted to convince the in-laws that Albin and Georges are not what they really are. What begins as two gay men pretending to be straight quickly becomes . . . well, something else entirely, as Albin and Georges improvise their way through a very long dinner party. Ultimately, everyone in this affectionately eccentric family has a chance to rediscover and reaffirm themselves— simultaneously rediscovering the love that holds them together—all while dancing their way through eye-popping song and dance numbers that show off Miller’s facility for staging, from jazzy, tapdance tunes to a truly sultry tango. The tight six-piece band, under the musical direction of Mary Chun, handles the difficult score with feisty aplomb. La Cage aux Folles is what it is— one of the best, most life-affirming musicals to appear onstage this season. Rating (out of five): +++++ ‘La Cage Aux Folles’ runs Friday through Sunday through Nov. 10 at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 N. Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Fri.-Sat. at 8pm; Matinees Sunday at 2pm. $25-$35. 707.763.8920.

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OSCAR WORTHY Chiwetel Ejiofor brings the insanity of slavery to the fore.

Hard Truths

‘12 Years a Slave’ a masterful depiction BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

here’ll be two kinds of viewers of 12 Years a Slave: the many who didn’t realize American slavery was so terrible, and the few, like Henry Louis Gates, who’ll point out that what went on was far worse than what we see here.

Director Steve McQueen’s third and best film sources a real-life narrative, a bestseller of the 1850s. A free man of New York named Solomon Northrup was knocked out with a Mickey Finn and shanghaied to New Orleans, where he was sold. During his enslavement, Northrup was traded back and forth among cotton, pine and sugar planters. Some masters were relatively civilized (Benedict Cumberbatch plays one). Others were corroded utterly. As Master Epps, one of the latter, Michael Fassbender embodies a soul caught in a chasm of evil: sadistic yet silly with his selective religion. There are times when watching this monster

that it becomes clear why actors often end up with troubled lives: how could you give yourself up to be a soundingboard for these kind of figures and come back from it whole? The movie is alive with knockout character acting, including a psycho overseer (Paul Dano), Epps’ dead-eyed, vicious wife (Sarah Paulson) and Brad Pitt in a graceful, one-scene role as a self-amused Canadian carpenter. Star Chiwetel Ejiofor’s moral firmness, compassion and natural nobility are perfect for conveying what the institution did to the people it devoured. 12 Years a Slave is a timely movie— even today, revisionists are trying to rewrite these horrors. Such liars are accessories after the fact to our national shame, and they’re fools to deny that the stench of our forefathers’ atrocities doesn’t linger in the air of 2013 America. ‘12 Years a Slave’ opens Friday, Nov. 1, at Summerfield Cinemas in Santa Rosa.

12YEARSASLAVE.COM

EXCLUSIVE E XCLUSI V E ENGAGEMENT ENGAGEMENT

SSTARTS TARTS FFRIDAY, R IDAY, N NOVEMBER OV EMBER 1

Copyright ht © 20 2013 13 Twentieth Twentieth Century Century y Fox. Fox. All Rights Reserved. Reserv ve ed.

SANTA A ROSA ROSA Summerfie ld Cinemas Summerfield (707) 52 522-0330 22-0330

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Film

Peter Pe eter Travers,

Lit

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30

POP-CULTURE MARKER

Erica Jong comes to town this week.

Wings of Desire 11/1 11 /1 – 11 11/7 /7

On the 40th anniversary of ‘Fear of Flying’

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Summer field Summerfield 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road 3 ANTA2OSAs 707. 522 .0719 3ANTA2OSAs707.522.0719

BY LEILANI CLARK

A

s a feminist and avid reader, I’m familiar with most of the essential feminist writers of the past century, but Erica Jong, who appears Nov. 1 in Rohnert Park, is one that I’ve invariably passed up. Fear of Flying is one of those titles that pops up endlessly on the shelves of used bookstores; since publication in 1973, it’s sold 20 million copies. That’s a lot of Fear of Flying floating around. Most covers have semi-salacious, soft-lit photos of women’s torsos, belly buttons, high-heeled feet and half-covered breasts. It was too easy to write off Fear of Flying as cheesy, ’70s romantic schlock or, worse,

women’s liberation ridiculousness that would come off as dated and silly, especially in contrast to the sharp, feminist insight of the writers I adored. I assumed it to be the literary equivalent of calling a flight attendant a stewardess. I was wrong. Pulpy, paperback covers may have gotten Fear of Flying shelved among Jackie Collins and Danielle Steele, but this is a book that fits infinitely better with Henry Miller and J. D. Salinger (with “Fuck the Pain Away” by Peaches playing softly on the stereo). Years before Annie Hall, Jong wrote into being the character of a neurotic, psychoanalyzed-todeath, hypersexual New York Jew. Unlike Allen, Jong’s protagonist is a woman, Isadora Wing, a 29-yearold poet who flies to Vienna with her restrained Chinese-American analyst husband on the occasion of the Congress of Analysts. Freud be damned, the trip sets off a chain of events for the cerebral, quixotic Isadora, one that culminates with her running off on a beer-and-guilt soaked road trip through Europe with Adrian Goodlove, the impotent, swinging, Dionysian English analyst who, like Tyler Durden in Fight Club, represents Isadora’s own compulsion to be free of restraint, to be sexually and socially untethered to what’s “acceptable.” The trip ends in Paris, where Goodlove breaks the news to Isadora that he’s actually as bourgeois as they come, and is returning to his wife and children, leaving her alone in the City of Love. This great tragedy allows for some breathing room, finally void of male influence, that leads Isadora to real selfdiscovery. While some sentiments in the book are as dated as Goodlove’s plum-colored turtleneck and corduroys, others still hold weight, at a historical moment when feminism is written off as “been there, done that,” even as a Missouri town makes a teenage girl into a pariah for calling out and identifying the jocks who raped and left her to die in the snow; namely, Isadora Wing’s relentless interrogation of what it means, what it feels

like, to be female in a patriarchal, misogynistic social structure. I found it cathartic. And, yes, this book has sex, lots of it, imagined and otherwise. Sex in hotel rooms and parked cars. And masturbation—no wonder John Updike compared Fear of Flying to Portnoy’s Complaint. And, yes, there is the zipless fuck, Wing’s phrase for the “platonic ideal” of a brief and anonymous affair, a sexual dalliance that begets nothing more and nothing less. Ready-made for controversy, the phrase (and probably the fact that it was conceptualized by a woman) stirred up waves of controversy among America’s false puritans and lent the book the lingering scent of taboo.

And, yes, this book has sex, lots of it, imagined and otherwise.

I’ve always measured 1973, my birth year, in light of its connection to Watergate. I tell people that I was born in East Los Angeles the same month that Spiro Agnew resigned as vice-president of the United States. Starting now, I’m replacing Spiro Agnew with Fear of Flying as the flamingly bright pop-culture marker for the year that I entered the world. Copperfield’s Books presents ‘Women’s Night Out with Erica Jong’ on Friday, Nov. 1, at the Doubletree by Hilton. One Double Tree Drive, Rohnert Park. 7pm. $65 admits two (older women are encouraged to bring a younger woman who has yet to discover the book) and includes one book. $20 admits one without book. 707.776.7284.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY The Crux CD release party for “The Ratcatcher.� Hobo Gobbelins, Dixie Giants open. Oct 31. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Friction Quartet Concert aims to reinvent what a chamber music concert looks, feels and sounds like with this modern San Francisco group. Nov 3, 8pm. $25. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

MARIN COUNTY Castro & Click Tommy Castro & the Painkillers with Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Nov 2, 8pm. $30$40. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Charlie Musselwhite Harmonica master appears with blues slide guitarist HowellDivine. Nov 1, 8pm. $27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY

Finley Community Center Oct 30, Jess Petty. First Friday of every month, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Flamingo Lounge Nov 1, Jeff Edwins. Nov 2, Counterbalance. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Nov 1, Solid Air. Nov 2, Smilin’ Iguanas. Nov 3, Wake the Dead. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030. Nov 1, Legends of the Celtic Harp. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Grand Night for Singers

His pure tenor is a standout voice in country music. Oct 30, 8pm. $59-$79. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Green Music Center

Makana

Hopmonk Sebastopol

Internationally acclaimed slack-key guitarist. Nov 2, 8pm. $20-$25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Oct 30, Smasheltooth. Oct 31, Phutureprimative, El Radio Fantastique, Lafa Taylor. Nov 1, Coco Montoya. Nov 2, Diego’s Umbrella, Beso Negro, Dginn. Nov 6, Stylust Beats. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Songwriter appears with Rodney Crowell. Richard Thompson opens. Nov 2, 8pm. $49-$69. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Jazz Forum Popular concert series features informal sessions and concerts with masters and rising stars. Oct 30, SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble; Nov 20, Jim Snidero. Wednesdays, 1pm. through Oct 30. Free. Green Music Center 1029, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

JGB & Melvin Seals Also featuring live painting by Stanley Mouse and others. Stephanie Salva and the Ser La Muse Band open. Oct 31, 8:30pm. $25. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Mariza Portuguese fado singer with a sultry voice. Nov 2, 7:30pm. $30-$70. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Official Blues Brothers Revue Jake, Elwood and the band perform favorite Blues Brothers hits like “Soul Man� and “Gimme Some Lovin’.� Nov 5, 8pm. $35-$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings Great slide guitarist with a full band. Nov 1, 8pm. $20-$25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Oct 31, the Crux. Mon, Fire Spinning. Wed, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Belly Oct 31, Choppin’ Broccoli. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787.

Berger Center Nov 2, New Horizons. 6575 Oakmont Dr, Santa Rosa.

Coffee Catz Sat, 2pm, bluegrass jam. Mon, 6pm, open mic. Last and First Wednesday of every month, Inner Piano Listenings with

Lydia’s Organics

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Celebrating Our Ancestors %(E]SJXLI(IEH'SQQYRMX]6MXYEP Create a community ancestor shrine, learn multicultural ancestor reverence, and sing and dance with them 23:ĈĀTQĈ%HZ(SSV Diverse & Eclectic Jazz, Folk & World Music

Tribecastan

Glaser Center

Vince Gill

Emmylou Harris

Music / Events

Nov 1, Laxmi G Tewari. Nov 2, Mariza. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House Nov 2, Lee Koch & Company. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sonoma Nov 2, Dirty Cello. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Nov 2, Kevin Fitzsimmons Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Inn at the Tides Sat, Maple Profant. Bay View Restaurant. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 800.541.7788.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 30, the Easy Leaves. Oct 31, Dirty Cello. Nov 1, This Old Earthquake. Nov 2, Bermudagrass. Nov 3, Kelly Peterson Band. Nov 6, Vintage Grass. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Oct 30, Greg Hester. Oct 31, Susan Sutton. Nov 2, Yancie Taylor Trio. Nov 3, Michelle Jaques. Nov 4, Gypsy Cafe. Nov 6, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Sun, Kit Mariah’s ) Open Mic Night.

32

3R8SYVJVSQ2= 23:ĈTQĀEQĈ*VII A Homegrown Positive Hip-Hop Experience 6 DJs plus Live Music

OneWerd, BP & 4VEHYL 7MVEW&EGM(.*SWWMP &1EWXE7QEWL PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM /.$%08&--#-7%t1&5"-6."t$"

707.792 . 530 0

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

ORANGE is the New

BLACK

Monday, Nov 18, 7pm NY Times bestselling author Piper Kerman comes to SSU. In her memoir Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Woman's Prison, Piper Kerman recounts the 15 months that she spent in the Danbury Correctional Facility for a crime she had committed ten years earlier. The memoir was adapted into the hit original Netflix series.

Location: Student Center Ballroom Tickets for this very special event are free for SSU students, staff and faculty and $15 for the general public

Associated Students Productions / Sonoma State University 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, CA 94828 TICKETS: SSU BOX OFFICE 707.664.4246 OR ONLINE AT TICKETS.SONOMA.EDU

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Music

31

Jerry Green. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Music ( 31

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32 Monday ~ Open Mic Night 2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E WAY WAY N OVATO | 415.892.6200 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0 NOVATO

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VA VARIETY RIE T Y | GENERAL GENER AL

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS H HANEDA ANEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 6PM/ALL 6PM /ALL A AGES GES

FRI F RI N NOV OV 1

VAUDEVILLE V AUDE VILLE | RAG R AG TIME TIME SSWING WING | EEXP XP

ELL R E RADIO ADIO FANTASTIQUE FANTA ASTIQUE $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT N NOV OV 2 / AAFRO FRO | FUNK FUNK | SSOUL OUL

CHERRY CH ERRY ROYALE ROYALE $$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SUN SU N NOV NOV 3 / NNOVATO’S OVATO T ’S 1 YR YR ANNIVERSARY ANNIVERSARY

NINKASI N INKASI BE BEER ER D DINNER INNER $$58 58 INCL INCL TAX TA X + GRATUITY/6PM/21+ GR ATUIT Y/ 6PM /21+

TTICKETS: ICKETS: HOPMONK.COM/STORE/BEER-DINNER/ HOPMONK.COM/STORE/BEER-DINNER/

THUR T HUR N NOV OV 7 / IINDIE NDIE | FFOLK O LK | R ROCK O CK 33 3 3 1â „3 1 â „ 3 MILE MILE SHOWCASE SHOWCASE

MANZANITA M ANZANITA FALLS FALLS $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 77PM/21+ PM /21+

FRII NOV FR NOV 8 / GGLITCH LITCH | DUB DUB STEP STEP | BASS BA SS

EPROM E PROM

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI F RI N NOV OV 1 15 5 / FFUNK UNK | B BLUES LUES | R AND AN D B

ORGONE OR GONE

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our n next e x t event event with with us, us, up up to to 150 1 50 people, people, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

with Austin DeLone 7:30pm 7KXU2FWĂŁSP

New Monsoon with Emily Yates

Halloween Costume Party )UL1RYĂŁSP

Charlie Musselwhite with Howell Devine 6DW1RYĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch

FREE SHOW with Eric Kjorlien

Renaissance Lute

6DW1RYĂŁSP Closed for Private Event 6XQ1RYĂŁDP

Live Music Sunday Brunch

FREE SHOW with Dirty 6XQ1RYĂŁSP

Cello

The Sticky Fingers Project with Deep Bench 7KXU1RYĂŁSP

Patty Larkin )UL1RYĂŁSP 6 Time Grammy Winner

Ike Stubblefield

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with Austin DeLone Trio

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Reverend Horton Heat

Murphy’s Irish Pub Oct 30, Carrtunes. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Nov 2, Tainted Love. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater Nov 2, Project 86. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

River Theatre Oct 31, JGB & Melvin Seals. Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Russian River Brewing Co Nov 2, Motel Drive. Nov 3, Groovality. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

with Larry and His Flask

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

Nov 1, Hired Guns. Nov 2, Megan Mclaughlin. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

& Deke Dickerson

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Sally Tomatoes Nov 1, the Rotten Tomatoes, Hip Hug-Her. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN THUR T HUR OCT OC T 31 31 VAUDEVILLE V AUDEVILLE SWING SWING | ELECTRO ELEC TRO BASS BASSS | BURLESQUE BURLESQUE C CABARET A BA R E T

WHISKERS W HISKERS & WHISKEY WHISKEY WITH ITH HALLOWEEN H ALLOWEEN W

PHUTUREPRIMITIVE, E PHUTUREPRIMITIVE, ELL R RADIO ADIO F FANTASTIQUE, ANTASTIQUE, LAFA LAFA TAYLOR TAYLOR !! !!

$$10 10 G GARDEN ARDEN ONLY/ ONLY/ $20 $20 GARDEN GARDEN + ABBEY ABBEY DOORS DOO RS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI N NOV OV 1

BLUES B LUES | C CLASSIC L A SSIC | R ROCK O CK

COCO CO CO M MONTOYA ONTOYA $$17/DOORS 17/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT N NOV OV 2

MEXICALI M E XI C ALI | G GYPSY YPSY JJAZZ A Z Z | PI PIRATE R ATE P POLKA O LK A

DIA D IA DE DE LLOS OS MU MUERTOS ERTOS

WITH W ITH D DIEGOS IEGOS U UMBRELLA, MBRELLA,

B BESO ESO NEGRO NEGRO & DGIIN DG IIN $$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SUN SU N NOV NOV 3

POETRY P OE TRY | SSPOKEN POK EN WORD WORD | LYRICISM LYRICISM

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Nov 1, Dgiin. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

SHED Nov 3, Friction Quartet. 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Society: Culture House Sun, Church on Sundays. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Friction Point 21st century classical meets kombucha at SHED In the land of kinetic sculptures, accordion festivals and rubber duckie races, the competition for quirky niftiness is tight around these parts. Still, “we want to create something unique that you can’t find anywhere else in Sonoma County,� says Gary McLaughlin of this weekend’s concert by the Friction Quartet. McLaughlin is the founder of Brave New Music, whose aim is to present serious chamber music in a casual setting. For the Friction Quartet performance, that setting is SHED in Healdsburg, upstairs in the Grange Room. “It’s very informal—the musicians may be playing in jeans—but with a high level of playing,� says McLaughlin, adding that craft beer, wine, kombucha and food will be served. In keeping with Friction Quartet’s tendency to premiere new works, the program includes pieces by Noah Luna and Eric Deluca, the latter of which is an artist-inresidence with the national park system and whose composition accompanies a screened film. Beethoven and Debussy, round out the offerings, but in every other way, “we’re trying to re-create chamber music,� says McLaughlin. The Friction Quartet performs Sunday, Nov. 3, at SHED. 25 North St., Healdsburg. 8pm. $25. 707.431.7433.—Gabe Meline

Emmylou Harris. Nov 5, Official Blues Brothers Revue. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY

Wells Fargo Center

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Oct 30, Vince Gill. Nov 2,

Nov 2, Mostly Dylan. Mon, Open

Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Fenix Nov 1, Zoo Station. Nov 2, Aja Vu. Nov 3, Amber Snider. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Finnegan’s Marin

George’s Nightclub Oct 31, Pride and Joy. Nov 2, “Thriller” Halloween Costume Ball. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Nov 1, EL Radio Fantastique. Nov 2, Cherry Royale, Saffell. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts Nov 2, Castro & Click. Nov 3, Omar Sosa Afri-Lectric Sextet. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre Nov 3, Barbershop Harmony Concert. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Nov 2, A Song for All Beings. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

19 Broadway Club Oct 30, Damn Legall Band, Nothing to Lose. Oct 31, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time, Sol Doc & the Optimystics. Nov 1, B-Side Players. Nov 2, Old School Marin Reunion. Nov 3, 19 Broadway Good Time Band, Crow Crash Radio, the Zins. Nov 6, Ken Khristian Memorial Benefit. Nov 6, Ken Khristian Memorial Benefit. First Sunday of every month, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino Oct 31, Passion Habanera. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Oct 30, Clifford Lamb Trio. Oct 31, Robin DuBois Trio. Nov 3, Machiavelvets. Nov 5, Swing Fever. Nov 6, Haute Flash Quartet. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Oct 30, (W+T)J2. Oct 31, Sabbath Lives, Hustler. Nov 1, the Grain. Nov 2, the

Soul Satellites. First Sunday of every month, Blues Jam. Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. First Wednesday of every month, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Band. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. Fri, Brian Lesh & Ross James. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY

Nov 1, Keith Crossan Band. Nov 2, El Radio Fantastique. Nov 3, Ted & Kaye Rodden. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Cameo Cinema

Sleeping Lady

Hydro Grill

Oct 30, Rattlebox. Nov 1, the Sol Doc Project. Nov 2, Rhythm Addicts. Nov 3, Mario Guarneri. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Station House Cafe Nov 3, Rhythmtown Jive. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 31, New Monsoon. Nov 1, Charlie Musselwhite with HowellDivine. Nov 3, Sticky Fingers Project. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Nov 1, Alo. Sun, Terrapin Family

ROY ROGERS

& THE DELTA RHYTHM KINGS THIS FRIDAY! NOV 1

Nov 2, Mitch Woods & the Rocket 88s. 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946. Sun, 7pm, Swing Seven. First Saturday of every month, AlwaysElvis. Fri, Sat, blues. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Napa Valley Opera House Nov 1, Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings. Nov 2, Makana. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Pica Pica Maize Kitchen

Nov 1, Bay Area Blues Society Caravan of All Stars. Nov 2, Lucas Ohio. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Death “A Band Called Death” has rightfully pulled this essential early ’70s Detroit punk band out of obscurity. Oct. 31 at the New Parish.

Deerhoof Bay Area noise pop group has no fear of strange and unexpected time signatures. Nov. 1 at Bottom of the Hill.

Charli XCX Songstress behind Icona Pop’s radio hit “I Love It” busts out with her own debut album “True Romance.” Nov. 1 at Slim’s.

Johnny Marr Ex-Smiths, Modest Mouse and Cribs guitarist goes solo with “The Messenger.” Nov. 1 at The Fillmore.

Television Tom Verlaine and the gang (sans Richard Lloyd) bring their scissory songs to the stage. Nov. 5 at the Independent.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

NVOH.ORG

in downtown Napa

707.226.7372

HOLIDAY SHOWS AT NVOH! A ROCKAPELLA CHRISTMAS THU, DEC 5

TERRY BRADFORD’S COMMUNITY CHORUS HAWAIIAN SLACK-KEY GUITARIST

MAKANA SAT, NOV 2

SINGER–SONGWRITER CELEBRATING NEW ALBUM ‘STILL GREEN’

PATTY LARKIN FRI, NOV 8

TUESDAY NIGHT FLICKS:

MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS TUE, NOV 26

THU, DEC 12

A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS WITH DAVID BENOIT FRI, DEC 13

WINDHAM HILL WINTER SOLSTICE SAT, DEC 14

NV BALLET: A VISIT TO SANTA’S WORKSHOP & RHAPSODY IN BLUE SUN, DEC 15

First Friday of every month, salsa dance party. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Silo’s

1030 Main Street

HOT CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO - A COOL YULE THU, DEC 19

PAULA POUNDSTONE

COMEDIAN FROM NPR’S WAIT, WAIT...DON’T TELL ME

FRI, NOV 29

VOENA: VOICES OF THE SEASON - STARRY NIGHT SAT, DEC 21

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Oct 31, Matt Bolton Band. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Nov 1 Sonoma County Museum, “Day of the Dead Altars,� pieces made to honor lost ones who have passed. 6pm. Family day, Nov 2, noon. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Nov 2 di Rosa, “Beatnik Meteors,� collaborative sculptures by regional artists. 6pm. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Nov 5 O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Big and Small,� abstract and expressionistic mixed media art works. 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

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Keep your money local this holiday season!

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Yountville Community Center ĂˆxÂŁĂˆĂŠ7>ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŒÂœÂ˜ĂŠ-ĂŒÂ° All items are handmade by local artisans. Handmade gifts are a special way to show someone how much you care. Town of Yountville Parks and Recreation i˜˜ˆviÀÊ >ÀÛ>Â?Â…ÂœĂŠUÊÇäÇ°™{{°nÇ£Ó www.townofyountville.com

Through Dec 28, “What Are You Looking At?� works by Ken Berman and William C Cutler. 958 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Beerntsen and Suki Diamond. Free. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2424.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Through Nov 12, Paintings by Barbara Kelley. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am–4:30pm 707.827.3600.

Finley Community Center Through Dec 19, “Drawing Towards Design,� works by architect Obie G Bowman. Through Dec 3, “Senior Show,� artwork by Sonoma County seniors. Through Dec 19, “Student Show,� art by SRJC students. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery One Through Nov 10, “25th Anniversary Exhibit,� multimedia works by Judith Klausenstock and Birgit O’Connor. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Dec 1, “New Work,� paintings by James Fred and Sandra Rubin. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Nov 23, “Uncanny... Something to Chew On,� sculptures by Art Moura. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Nov 2-Apr 27, “Starry, Starry Night,� feautring Peanuts characters under the night sky. Through Feb 3, “Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,� a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, “School Projects,� follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Corrick’s

Through Oct 31, “50 Series,� paintings by Lori Mole. 423 Hudson St, Healdsburg.

First Friday of every month. through Dec 6, Meet artists featured in ARTrails and watch them work. Sep 6, ARTrails preview show; Oct 4, ARTrails kickoff; Nov 1, Abby Bard, Jane Garabaldi and Susan Greer; Dec 6, Tony Speirs, Lisa

Through Nov 17, “A Measure of Light,� photography exhibit. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Healdsburg Museum Nov 1-10, “El DĂ­a de los Muertos,â€? special exhibit by students of Healdsburg High School. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Hudson Street Wineries

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Oct 31, “Great Blue and Beyond,� art by Marge Mount. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Nov 3, “Earth, Wind and Fire,� gallery exhibit. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Nov 2, “Victorian Mourning Customs,� see how our predecessors honored their deceased. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 3, “Inspired in France,� paintings and photos by Karen Spratt. Through Nov 3, “Just Need a Little Love,� paintings by Christine Kierstead. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Nov 30, “Fiber Art VI,� large, international, juried fiber art exhibition. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Dec 1, “Day of the Dead Altars,� pieces made to honor lost ones who have passed. Family day, Nov 2, noon. Through Jan 12, “Photography in Mexico,� from the collection of the SF MOMA. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 1, “Delicious Images: Art About Food,� paintings and works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Through Dec 1, “Kitchen Memories,� culinary art and equipment collection of Kathleen Thompson Hill. Gadget demonstration, Nov 9, Nov 22, 5:30pm, $12. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio Blomster Nov 1-13, art by Jessica Martin. 14045 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Oct 30-Nov 22, “Dialogues with

35 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | O CTO B E R 3 0 – N OV E M B E R 5, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

‘BEATNIK METEORS’ A new multimedia exhibit at the di Rosa, opening Nov. 2,

explores artistic collaboration. See Receptions, adjacent.

Nature,� works by Bob Nugent. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum Through Nov 17, “The Architecture of the Invisible,� sculptures by Ned Kahn. Through Nov 17, “Land of a Thousand Birds,� photos by Tim Burns. Through Nov 17, “The Secret Life of Seaweed,� photos by Josie Iselin. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

COM Art Gallery Through Nov 14, “The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper 1949–1992,� pieces by Richard Diebenkorn. College of Marin, Fine Arts Building, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Community Congregational Church Through Nov 26, “Spirit of Place,� works by members of Golden Gate Marin Artists. 145 Rock Hill Dr, Tiburon.

Gallery Bergelli Through Nov 7, “Duet,� paintings by Jennifer Li and Nicholas Oberling. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Dec 1, “Edges and Flows,� paintings by Mary Mountcastle Eubank. Through Dec 1, “For the Birds,� sitespecific installation by Jane Ingram Allen. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

“Transmissions,� work by 30 artists from around the country. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Meteors,� collaborative sculptures by regional artists. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm. 707.226.5991.

Marin MOCA

Downtown Napa

Through Nov 17, “Legends of the Bay Area,� works by Robert Hudson. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Through Nov 30, 6pm, “Art on First,� the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Through Jan 1, 2015, “Metamorphosis,� outdoor sculpture exhibit with self-guided tour. Main and Third streets, Napa.

MINE Art Gallery Through Dec 1, “BreathingLight,� sculptures by Sandra Cohn. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Oct 31, “Unfamiliar Landscapes,� abstract and expressionistic mixedmedia works. Nov 5-23, “Big and Small,� abstract and expressionistic mixed media art works. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Oct 30, “Pressing Matters IV,� annual printmakers group show. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Nov 10, “Form and Place,� sculptures by Jane Rosen and Ann Hollingsworth. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Nov 30, “Found in Translation,� mixed-media by Thomas Morphis and ceramics by Hiroko Ishida. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa

Through Jan 24,

Nov 2-Feb 2, “Beatnik

Thur Nov 7

Dave Mason Sun Nov 10

SOJA Fri Nov 15

Reverend Horton Heat

Napa Valley Museum

Sat Nov 16

Through Nov 24, “Napa Valley: A to Z,� works from the museum’s collection featuring cultural, historical and artistic heritage of the Valley. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Sylvia Browne Fri Nov 22 Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Eddie Money Fri Nov 23 An evening with Pride & Joy

Sat Nov 30

,Ä‚Ç Ä‚Ĺ?Ĺ?Ä‚Ĺś,ŽůĹ?ĚĂLJĞůĞÄ?ĆŒÄ‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ featuring Faith Ako, Patrick Landeza and Steven Espaniola

Sat Dec 7

Merle Haggard

Comedy

Special Guest The Malpass Brothers

Sun Dec 8 An evening with The Wailin’ Jennys

Wed Dec 11

Clean Hit Comedy Featuring Nick Hoffman, hosted by “Uncle� Charlie Adams. Nov 2, 7pm. $5. Johnny’s Java, 3080 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1332.

Mark Pitta

Marin Community Foundation

ÂĄPuro Alma Apachicano! by Emmanuel Catarino Montoya, 2010

Headliner has appeared on Carson and Leno. Larry “Bubbles� Brown ) opens.

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"Come Together Tour" 'ĆŒĹ˝ĆľĹśÄšÄ‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ

Fri Dec 13

Craig Ferguson—Hot and Grumpy Sat Dec 14

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

The Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show Sun Jan 12

Jonny Lang Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

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Nov 1, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Events Blind Scream Haunted House Interactive haunted house will literally scare you to death. Literally. Through Nov 2, 7pm. $5-$20. Blind Scream Haunted House, 1400 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park.

$25. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Grand Opening Street Fair Featuring live music from Sol Horizon, the Louies and the Blane Lyon Band. Nov 2, 4pm. Free. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley Ave, Sebastopol.

Heirloom Craft Hub Each evening includes instruction for a specific craft. Last Thurs of every month. $5. Marin History Museum, Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538.

Day of the Dead

Master Magician Robert Strong

Drum procession leads to celebration with art and dance performance. Nov 1, 5:45pm. Free. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Children’s show. Nov 3, 11:30am. $8. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Dia de los Muertos

First Tues monthly, 6 to 8, downtown area galleries and businesses showcase local artists. First Tues of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Downtown Mill Valley, Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley. 415.721.1856.

Dancing late into the night hosted by MC RadioActive. Nov 2, 6pm. $10. Move 2 Change Studio, 6780 Depot Street, Sebastopol, 823-1074.

El Día de los Muertos Procession Culminates with celebration on Lakeville Street. Nov 2, 6pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

El Dia de los Muertos Storytime Presented in Spanish and English. Nov 2, 11am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Mill Valley Art Walk

Field Trips Creepy Crawlies & Slimy Suspects Hike explores the habitat of amphibians. Nov 2, 1pm. Rancho Mark West Farm, 7125 St. Helena Rd, Santa Rosa.

Entrepreneurs’ Happy Hour

Five Senses Hike

Enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while socializing with local innovators, service providers and investors. First Tues of every month, 5pm. Free. Sonoma Mountain Business Cluster, 1300 Valley House Dr, Ste 100, Rohnert Park. 707.794.1240.

French Garden Farm Tour

Game Tournaments Various card and role-playing games including Yu-Gi-Oh, Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering. Mon-Thurs-Sun. Outer Planes Comics and Games, 526 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2000.

Giving Animals the Gift of Tomorrow Fundraiser for BrightHaven Healing Arts Center for Animals featuring music by Jay Shaner and Salt Wizard. Nov 4, 5:30pm.

Docent-led hike uses all senses. Nov 3, 9:30am. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Join Dan Smith for practical tips on growing your own garden. First Sat of every month. Free. French Garden Farm, 11031 Cherry Ridge Rd, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Film Italian Film Festival Nov 2, “1,000 Meters to Paradise.” Sat, 5:30 and 7:45pm. through Nov 9. $14-$91. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Jewish Film Festival Oct 31, “Orchestra of Exiles”; Nov 7, “Dressing America.” 1 and 7:30pm. through Nov 21. $10. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Brian Martinelli

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National Theatre: 50 Years on Stage Live performances and glimpses from the archive of the National Theater, London, simulcast around the world. Sat, Nov 2, 1:45pm and Wed, Nov 6, 7pm. $16-$23. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

National Theatre London Live in HD Oct 31, “Frankenstein” directed by Danny Boyl. 7:30pm. $24-$30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

The Nose Shostakovich’s opera performed at the Met. Oct 30, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Nosferatu Classic 1922 adaptation of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula.” Oct 30-31, 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Sonoma Film Institute

DANCE OF THE DEAD Petaluma’s annual Dia de los Muertos processional closes a month-long celebration of arts and culture on Nov. 2. Visit www.petalumaartscenter.org for more information.

David Scheumann

Nov 1, “André Gregory: Before and After Dinner.” 4 and 7pm. through Nov 24. $7. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Author or “99 Bottles of Wine: The Making of the Contemporary Wine Label” lectures. Winetasting included. Nov 1, 7pm. Free. Whole Foods Market, 3682 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6300.

Young Frankenstein

Seed Exchange

Mel Brooks’ parody of 1930s Universal horror movies starring Gene Wilder, Cloris Leachman and Peter Boyle. Oct 30, 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Food & Drink Suzanne Gorin Chef and author of “The AOC Cookbook” prepares recipes from and talks about her book. Nov 5, 6:30pm. $120. Left Bank Restaurant, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Mary Karlin Author of “Mastering Fermentation” demonstrates recipes from her book. Nov 2, 11am. $35. Whole Foods Market, 3682 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6300.

Even the seedless are invited to attend. Nov 2, noon. Free. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Lectures Annie Standard Artist talks about her paintings. Nov 5, 7:30pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Art of Relaxation Navigate through the holidays with more ease. Nov 3, 2:30pm. Donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Ask a Historian Research Advisory Council tackles tough questions posed by moderator, first Sun monthly at 2:30. First Sun of every

month. Free. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa, www.napahistory.org.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Drop-In Meditation Classes for all levels include guided meditation and brief commentary. Kids welcome. Ongoing. $10. Mahakaruna Buddhist Center, 304 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7720.

Fall Lecture Series

First Sun of every month, 10:30am. Donation.

Pet Clinic Learn about alternative healing services to support the health of your pet. First Tues of every month, 7:30pm. through Nov 5. Sliding Scale. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Pleasures of the Heart First Monday, women’s salon. Second Monday, coed discussion group. First Mon of every month, 7pm. Pleasures of the Heart, 1310 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.9899.

Nov 1, “Working at Disney” with director George Scribner; “Stop-Motion Animation Festival: Pupf-Phew!” with Sarah Klein and David Kwan. 7:30pm. $5-$10. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Public Discussion

Meditation Group for Mothers

Author of “Transition to Peace” talks about his 10,000-mile motorcycle trip across the US. Nov 3, 12:30pm. $10. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mindful meditation and sharing experiences for benefit of mothers and their children. Wed, 8:30am. $10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

Peace in Process Relax with morning meditation.

Institute for the Fulfillment of Human Society invites all for public chat on current issues. First Tues of every month, 7pm. $5. Subud Hall, 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol. 707.793.2188.

Russ Faure-Brac

Science Buzz Cafe Nov 5, “Cellular Science & the Imagination” with Sondra Barrett, PhD; Dec 3, “Quantum

Sebastopol Buddhist Meditation Beginning-level Tibetan Buddhist meditation group. Sun, 1pm. Donations. Kagyu Takten Puntsokling, 5594 Volkerts Rd, Sebastopol. 707.824.4637, ext 2.

Spirit & Revolution Rudolph Steiner’s teachings on social transformation with Abraham Entin. Thurs, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

To Walk in Harmony “Native American Lifeways in Sonoma County” with Dr Ben Benson. Nov 6, 7pm. Free. Darwin 102, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Tomorrow’s Healing Technology ZeroPoint Global presents technology based on quantum physics & frequency-based healing modalities. Nov 1, 7:30pm. Donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Readings

“Japantown” with Barry Lancet. Nov 5, 7pm, “An Atomic Love Story: The Extraordinary Women in Robert Oppenheimer’s Life” with Patricia Klaus & Shirley Streshinsky. Nov 6, 7pm, “Paris Was the Place” with Susan Conley. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Oct 30, 3pm, “Battle Bunny” with Mac Barnett & Jon Scieszka. Nov 5, 4pm, “A Very Fuddles Christmas” with Frans Vischer. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Doubletree Hotel Nov 1, 7pm, “Fear of Flying” with Erica Jong. $20-$65. 1 Double Tree Dr, Rohnert Park.

Hopmonk Sebastopol First Sunday of every month, 9pm, North Bay Poetry Slam, Monthly poetry performance and competition. Nov 4, Leo Bryant and Jaz Sufi. $5-$10. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Rebound Bookstore Nov 2, 10am, “A Southern Sampler” with authors. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.482.0550.

SoCo Coffee First Saturday of every month, Poetry Azul. Free. 707.527.6434. 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

West End Cafe Barking Dog Roasters First Sat, 5:30 to 7, First Sat monthly at 5:30, UniverSoul poetry and music open mic, hosted by Juanita J Martin. 707.435.1807. 18133 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma.

Book Passage Oct 30, 7pm, “Quiet Dells” with Jayne Anne Phillips. Nov 1, 12pm, “Survival Lessons” with Alice Hoffman, includes book and lunch $55. Nov 1, 7pm, “Critical Mass” with Sara Paretsky. Nov 2, 1pm, “The Art of Procrastination: A Guide to Effective Dawdling, Lollygagging and Postponing” with John Perry. Nov 2, 4pm, “At Night We Walk in Circles” with Daniel Alarcón. Nov 2, 7pm, Poetry with Barry Kraft. Nov 3, 1pm, “Wounded Prey” with Sean Lynch. Nov 3, 4pm, “Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation” with Estelle Freedman. Nov 3, 7pm, “Grateful Table: Blessings, Prayers and Graces” with Brenda Knight & Nina Lesowitz. Nov 4, 7pm, “The Circle of Thirteen” with William Petrocelli. Nov 4, 7pm,

First Wednesday of every month, 7pm, First Wed at 7, open mic poetry evening. 1131 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Theater Bram Stoker’s Dracula Classic vampire story. Times vary. Thurs-Sun. $10-$12. Montgomery High School, 1250 Hahman Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.5191.

Elephant & Piggie Show Local actors present shows based on books by Mo Willems in this children’s program. Nov 6, 4pm. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Ghost Sonata Burton-esque Halloween tinge to this 1907 modernist play. Times vary. Wed-Sun through Nov 9. $10-$17. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

I & You Two teens learn how to work together in this world premiere

performance. Times vary. Tues-Sun through Nov 3. $37$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

La Cage aux Folles

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A young man is afraid to tell his fianceé’s parents that he was raised by two men, but his fathers have a plan to help him break the news in this musical comedic romp. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Nov 3. $25$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

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Monique A combination of mystery and terrifying suspense, with just a touch of the supernatural. FriSat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Nov 3. $20-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest A charming rogue contrives to serve a short sentence in an airy mental institution rather than prison in this play made famous by the 1975 movie starring Jack Nicholson. ThursSat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Nov 10. $20-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Rapunzel Will the fair maiden let down her hair for the charming prince to save her? Presented by Marin Theatre Company. Sat-Sun, 10:30am and 12:30pm. through Nov 10. $15-$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Suddenly Last Summer Tennessee Williams’ play about the predatory nature of people. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Nov 23. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

This Is Our Youth Kenneth Lonergan’s dark comedy about 1980s morality, youth and counterculture in America. Times Vary. Thurs-Sun through Nov 11. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Biology & Consciousness” with Charles Ostman. First Tues of every month. through Dec 3. $5. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

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Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

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For the week of October 30

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Once when I was hiking through Mauiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rain forest, I spied a majestic purple honohono ďŹ&#x201A;ower sprouting from a rotting log. As I bent down close, I inhaled the merged aromas of moldering wood and sweet ďŹ&#x201A;oral fragrance. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make this scene your metaphor of the week, Aries. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why: a part of your life that is in the throes of decay can serve as host for a magniďŹ cent bloom. What has been lost to you may become the source of fertility. Halloween costume suggestion: a garbage man or cleaning maid wearing a crown of roses. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

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MEDITATION CENTER OPEN HOUSE Free talk & guided meditation. If you have wondered if meditation is for you, please join us 6:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:00pm, Nov. 5. The evening includes a guided meditation, a short talk on meditation & Buddhism and a brief introduction to the Center's programs. Compassion Kadampa Buddhist Center 436 Larkfield Ctr, SR www.meditateinsantarosa.org

What donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you like? Get clear about that. What donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you want to do? Make deďŹ nitive decisions. What kind of person do you not want to become and what life do you never want to live? Resolve those questions with as much certainty as possible. Write it all down, preferably in the form of a contract with yourself. Sign the contract. This document will be your sacred promise, a declaration of the boundaries you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cross and the activities you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t waste your time on and the desires that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worthy of you. It will feed your freedom to know exactly what you like and what you want to accomplish and who you want to become. Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who you really are.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Are you up for an experiment? Not just on Halloween, but for a week afterwards, be scarier than your fears. If an anxious thought pops into your mind, bare your teeth and growl, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get out of here or I will rip you to shreds!â&#x20AC;? If a demon visits you in a nightly dream, chase after it with a torch and sword, screaming â&#x20AC;&#x153;Begone, foul spirit, or I will burn your mangy ass!â&#x20AC;? Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tolerate bullying in any form, whether it comes from a critical little voice in your head or from supposedly nice people who are trying to guilt-trip you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am a brave conqueror who cannot be intimidated!â&#x20AC;? is what you could say, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am a monster of love and goodness who will defeat all threats to my integrity!â&#x20AC;? CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Are you ready to be amazed? Now would be an excellent time to shed your soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infantile illusions . . . to play wildly with the greatest mystery you know . . . to accept gifts that enhance your freedom and refuse gifts that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t . . . to seek out a supernatural encounter that heals your chronic sadness . . . to consort and converse with sexy magical spirits from the future . . . to make love with the lights on and cry when you come. Halloween costume suggestion: the archetypal LOVER.

LEO (July 23-August 22) Some people in your vicinity are smoldering and fuming. The air is heavy with emotional ferment. Conspiracy theories are ripening and rotting at the same time. Hidden agendas are seeping into conversations, and gossip is swirling like ghostly dust devils. Yet in the midst of this mayhem, an eerie calm possesses you. As everyone else struggles, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re poised and full of grace. To what do we owe this stability? I suspect it has to do with the fact that life is showing you how to feel at home in the world no matter whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening around you. Keep making yourself receptive to these teachings. Halloween costume suggestion: King or Queen of Relaxation. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) UniďŹ cation should be a key theme for you in the coming weeks. Anything you do that promotes splicing and blending and harmonizing will get extra help, sometimes from mysterious forces working behind the scenes. The more you work to ďŹ nd common ground between opposing sides, the stronger youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel and the better youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll look. If you can manage to mend schisms and heal wounds, unexpected luck will ďŹ&#x201A;ow into your life. To encourage these developments, consider these Halloween disguises: a roll of tape, a stick of Krazy Glue, a wound thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s healing, a bridge. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

What do you think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be like if you were among the 1 percent wealthiest people on Earth? Would you demand that your government raise your taxes so you could contribute more to our collective well-being? Would you live simply and cheaply so youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have more money

to donate to charities and other worthy causes? This Halloween season, I suggest you play around with fantasies like thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe even masquerade as an incredibly rich philanthropist who doles out cash and gifts everywhere you go. At the very least, imagine what it would be like if you had everything you needed and felt so grateful you shared your abundance freely.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

What if you had the power to enchant and even bewitch people with your charisma? Would you wield your allure without mercy? Would you feel wicked delight in their attraction to you, even if you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t plan to give them what they want? I suspect these questions arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t entirely rhetorical right now. You may have more mojo at your disposal than you realize. Speaking for your conscience, I will ask you not to desecrate your privilege. If you must manipulate people, do it for their beneďŹ t as well as yours. Use your raw magic responsibly. Halloween costume suggestion: a mesmerizing guru; an irresistible diva; a stage magician.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) I had a dream that you were in the ďŹ lm O Brother, Where Art Thou? You were like the character played by George Clooney after he escaped from a prison chain gang. Can you picture it? You were wearing a striped jailbird suit, and a ball and chain were still cuffed around your ankle. But you were sort of free, too. You were on the lam, making your way from adventure to adventure as you eluded those who would throw you back in the slammer. You were not yet in the clear, but you seemed to be en route to total emancipation. I think this dream is an apt metaphorical depiction of your actual life right now. Could you somehow use it in designing your Halloween costume? CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) I invite you to try the following exercise. Imagine the most powerful role you could realistically attain in the future. This is a position or niche or job that will authorize you to wield your inďŹ&#x201A;uence to the max. It will give you the clout to shape the environments you share with other people. It will allow you to freely express your important ideas and have them be treated seriously. Let your imagination run a little wild as you visualize the possibilities. Incorporate your visions into your Halloween costume. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

In the course of earning a living, I have worked four different jobs as a janitor and six as a dishwasher. On the brighter side, I have performed as a songwriter and lead singer for six rock bands and currently write a syndicated astrology column. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Aquarians are primed to cultivate a relationship with your work life that is more like my latter choices than the former. The next eight months will be a favorable time to ensure that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be doing your own personal equivalent of rock singer or astrology columnist well into the future. Halloween costume suggestion: your dream job.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Author Robert Louis Stevenson loved the work of poet Walt Whitman, recommending it with the same enthusiasm as he did Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Stevenson also regarded Whitman as an unruly force of nature, and in one famous passage, called him â&#x20AC;&#x153;a large shaggy dog, just unchained, scouring the beaches of the world and baying at the moon.â&#x20AC;? Your assignment is to do your best imitation of a primal creature like Whitman. In fact, consider being him for Halloween. Maybe you could memorize passages from Whitmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leaves of Grass and recite them at random moments. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, / I sound my barbaric YAWP over the roofs of the world.â&#x20AC;?

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Halloween Ball Extravaganza at Jerry Knight`s Historic River Theater â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Don`t Miss It! JGB Featuring Melvin Seals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Live Music, Live Dance, Live Painting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all on Halloween Night www. brownpapertickets.com

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