Issuu on Google+

Win tickets to Yo-Yo Ma’s Goat Rodeo Sessions at the Green Music Center bohemian.com

Roseland Choices p8 NitroKarma Ice Cream p12 ‘The Spanish Tragedy’ p24

Thirsty for Change How small towns stick it to the water company by taking over their own service p18

WEILL W E I LL H HALL ALL at

presents pr esents the

Sonoma State University

SUUMMER MMER 2 2013 013 San Francisco Symphony

“Music fr from om the Movi Movies� es� with special guest Mark Hamill

SSunday, unday, August 4, 4pm m IInside nside $55-$100 | Outsidee $25-$45

pianoSonom ma

Saturday,, Augustt 10, 7:30pm Saturday

The ticket price does include a drink ticket

Community We Week kend: All Tickets $5

BLUES & SOUL SATURDAY, SEPT. 28TH

TOM RHODES TAYLOR BROWN RIVER SHIVER

El Gusto

Documentaryy an nd Concert Sunday, August 11, 1 4pm

FOR TICKETS OR INFO WWW.VMLWINE.COM/EVENTS

ÂŽ

GREEN G GR EEN MUSIC MUSIC CENTE CENTER R gmc gmc.sonoma.edu c.sonoma a.edu

MasterCard Ma asterCa ard and a the Master MasterCard Card brand mark ar aree rregistered eg gistered trademarks of Master MasterCard Card IInternational nternational IIncorporated. ncorpo orated. Š2013 Master MasterCard. asterCard ard.

Summer Concert Series

2013

Community We Week kend: All Tickets $5

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! TICKETS: T ICK KET ETS: 1-866-955-6040

VML Winery is proud to announce its 2013 Summer Concert Series

sponsored by



 >  >—>ALL TICKETS $5

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Ĺ´

ŵ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

@kËjc`b\EGI¿ @kËjc`b\EGI¿ fe8Z`[ f e 8Z`[ ) G GFC@K@:J) FC@K@:J) C C@M<DLJ@: @M<D < DLJ@: ) : :FD<;P) FD<;P) GFG:LCKLI< GFG:LCKLI< < ) N NFIC;=8DFLJ>L<JKJ FIC;=8DFLJ>L<JKJ

KfY\Zfd\X; i`m\jgfejfi KfY\Zfd\X;i`m\jgfejfi ZfekXZk:Xk_pIXkkfXk Z fekXZ k :Xk_pIXkkf Xk ZXk_p%iXkkf7pX_ff%Zfd Z Xk_p% iXkkf7pX_ff%Zfd

OM

CO U

A

SO

N

& Property Management, Inc.

Y

&&A8OFE;I@M< A8O 8 OFE;I@M< F E; I@M<

D E D E’S R ENTALS

NT

*K *KF-#N<<B;8P * KFF -#N<<B; # N<<B;8 8P P 8=K<IEFFEJ 8 =K<IEFFE =K<I EFFEJ FE(*,'8DBJIF F E (*, *,' 8D BJI BJIF

CALIFORN

IA

REPUBLIC

A G R I C U LT U R E INDUSTRY R E C R E AT I O N

Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Interns Anna Hecht, Nadav Soroker

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Dani Burlison, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, Gretchen Giles, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Mike Koftinow. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

nb LAST CALL

RIP to Ken Melendy, whose bar on Cleveland Avenue served many a thirsty Oakland Raider.

Submit your photos to photos@bohemian.com, and follow us on Instagram at @nbaybohemian.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;On one side of the street your water bill is $150 and on the other side itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $650.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

COVE R STORY P18

Providing Better Food Choices P8 Overcoming Social Anxiety P22 The One-Man Didgeridoo Band P26 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p12 Wineries p16 Swirl p17

Cover Feature p18 Culture Crush p21 Arts & Ideas p22 Stage p24 Film p25

Music p26 Concerts & Clubs p27 A&E p30 ClassiďŹ ed p35 Astrology p35

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST This issueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cover art is by Mike Koftinow, whose motivation is to investigate the accountability and legitimacy of global policy barons. He combines a variety of mediaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;drawing, painting, print and sculptureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to create imagery with a topical narrative. Topics his art has addressed include water, the environment, the economy and abuses of power. He lives in Santa Rosa.

%URRNZRRG$YH6DQWD5RVD 0RQ¤6DWDP¤SP6XQDP¤SPÂ&#x2020;ZZZZEXFRPVDQWDURVD

%LUGVHHGÂ&#x2020;)HHGHUVÂ&#x2020;%LUGEDWKVÂ&#x2020;2SWLFVÂ&#x2020;1DWXUH*LIWVÂ&#x2020;%RRNV

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Burning Urgency Even in Sonoma County, we must get more involved in battling big oil BY GARY PACE

L

et’s face it, climate change is here. Hurricanes and heat waves appear with frightening regularity on the news, and most analysts now acknowledge that burning carbon-based fuels is the root cause. Yet we are a bit protected here in Sonoma County. With our temperate climate and distance from the dirty work of mining, we don’t feel the same immediacy as elsewhere.

Unfortunately, that doesn’t let us off the hook. Fracking, an environmental nightmare with minimal regulation, uses deep drilling and toxic chemicals to unlock the oil and natural gas deep within the earth. Recent developments in this technology have allowed access to an estimated 15 billion barrels of shale oil under Monterey County. These huge potential profits have spurred energy companies and local governments to plan a massive expansion of its use just south of San Francisco. Processing of the Alberta Tar Sands, oil sludge from Northern Canada which is the impetus for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, already occurs in the Bay Area at Chevron in Richmond. This plant poses significant risks to local residents, as the fire on Aug. 6, 2012, demonstrated. In addition, the explosion of an oil transport train in Quebec didn’t deter Valero from requesting to bring in 100 rail cars a day of the stuff for processing in Benicia. Can we lower our local carbon footprint? Sonoma County boasts a rising tide of electric vehicles; the SMART rail project is making mass transit a viable option; Sonoma Clean Power opens the door to greener energy production. These advances are the result of good leadership and an informed public. We must get more deeply involved. Most climate scientists agree that extracting and burning carbon-based fuels may help local economies, but it will send our weather patterns into further turmoil. For our long-term survival, coal, petroleum and natural gas need to stay in the ground. Come to the rally and march to the Chevron refinery in Richmond on Aug. 3, marking the one-year anniversary of last year’s Chevron fire, which aims to mobilize for a sustainable energy future. For more info, see www.350bayarea.org. Gary Pace is a Sebastopol-based physician. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Hooray for Porn!

predominantly, the burning of fossil fuels.

In his letter in the July 17 Bohemian, Nick Stewart cites pornography as a source of violence against women. The last I knew, this popular belief was not supported by the research—quite the contrary.

We are clear about the solutions we must adopt to address the problem and secure a good future. We must rapidly transition from fossil fuels to clean, renewable energy. We must leave the dirtiest of fossil fuels in the ground. This is an effort we can make in our personal, political and economic lives.

A subject like pornography attracts lots of crappy, biased research that gets publicized, but when scientists separate out the bogus studies and review the properly designed ones, they find no support for any link between pornography and sex crimes. See the “Report of the Commission on Obscenity and Pornography” (1970) and Dr. Edna Einsiedel’s overview of the research (1986). The National Research Council’s Panel on Understanding and Preventing Violence (1993) wrote: “Studies of individual sex offenders have found no link between their offenses and their use of pornography; if anything, they do not appear to use pornography as much as the average male.” UCLA’s Larry Baron (1990) found a positive correlation between sales of sexually explicit material in a community and gender equality. Worldwide, when pornography is legalized or becomes more available or more explicit, sexual assaults don’t increase—in fact, they usually decrease. For instance, Denmark’s legalization of hardcore pornography in 1965 was followed by large decreases in all types of sexual assault. So, ironically, restrictions on pornography likely result in more sexual violence, not less.

DIXON WRAGG Santa Rosa

Marching on Chevron All across America, people are getting very serious about addressing climate chaos, a disastrous problem we have brought upon ourselves. We are clear about what has caused the problem:

Next week, there is something you can do to help. On Aug. 3, people will march to the Chevron Refinery in Richmond, demanding the changes we need. This event has incredible potential to bring together thousands on the doorstep of the largest climate polluter in the state, and to build the movement to stop climate chaos. Please join in to help create the biggest rally on the West Coast this year and to make a large impact on our public discourse. Contact joinsummerheat.org for more information on how to join in.

HENRY DENICOLA Sebastopol

Where Is Carrillo? On a day when his fellow supervisors spent 10 minutes chastising his behavior in a public meeting, Efren Carrillo was somewhere, anywhere, we-don’t-knowwhere, in “rehab.” Meanwhile, no further facts have come to light that make his attempt to break into a woman’s bedroom at 3 in the morning any more explainable, other than the actions of a disturbed individual who is unfit to serve. Why has he issued no further statement about what happened that night? It’s time for Carrillo to either speak up or step down.

TRISHA CAMPBELL Santa Rosa

Screams for Help I have a few more questions I’d like to ask George Zimmerman, his supporters and the jury that acquitted him. First, why would a man carrying a gun

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

The first step toward a rewarding career is making the decision to get the right education. Empire College students are enrolled in comprehensive programs designed to develop marketable skills and entrepreneurial thinking. need to scream “Help! Help! Somebody please help me!” when being attacked by an unarmed person? Wouldn’t the man with a gun just shoot the attacker? Doesn’t it make more sense that an unarmed person confronted by a man with a gun would be the one screaming “Help!”? Second, why is an unarmed person confronted by a man with a gun not allowed to protect himself by any means necessary, while a man with a gun is allowed to shoot and kill an unarmed person whose only crime is trying to protect himself? Think about it, Zimmerman supporters. Think long and hard.

CHRIS WENMOTH Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Fellow supervisors condemn Efren Carrillo’s actions in Tuesday meeting

2 Zazu closes up on

Guerneville Road, set to open in the Barlow

3

Brian Wilson to be a Dodger; hopefully everyone in SF will shave their beards

· Day and evening classes, with Fridays off. · Excellent on-time completion rates. · Financial aid is available for those who qualify. · Full-time career placement professionals assisting in your job search.

Start August 5. Call today or visit us on the Web.

800-705-0567 www.empcol.edu

4

Napa PorchFest serenades thousands from front porches in Napa

5 You can now buy a

glazed-doughnut hamburger at the Sonoma County Fair 3035 Cleveland Ave. , Santa Rosa

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

Quality • Value • Proven Results

7

Paper THE

Be Right Back Nadav Soroker

Nadav Soroker

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Santa Rosa’s Community Media Center may see a second life yet. In March, Santa Rosa’s city council reversed a threat to shut down the community resource, which produces such television programming as Women’s Spaces, Eat the Fish and Galactic Messenger, and gave the center a six-month stay with a stern directive to become more relevant, sustaining and innovative. Enter Daedalus Howell, who as new executive director has rebranded the center as CMedia and introduced drastic changes expected to satisfy the city. “My first mandate was to figure out a way to create revenue,” Howell explains, “so that we could be a little more autonomous from the city and proceed operating with or without them.”

IMPULSE BUY A new initiative encourages stores in low-income areas to stock healthier items on more prominent shelves.

Daily Intake In poorer areas of Santa Rosa, a push for better nutrition choices BY LEILANI CLARK

S

taying fit is easy, right? Just eat healthier and exercise more. Yet current research shows that the built environment in which people live heavily influences the choices they make regarding food and physical activity. Place Matters, a multicity, ongoing study by

the Joint Center for Political and Economic Study, has found that the “social, economic, and environmental conditions in low-income and non-white neighborhoods make it more difficult for people in these neighborhoods to live healthy lives.” Danielle Moreno, HEAL Zone coordinator with the Sonoma

County Department of Health, agrees. “A person’s neighborhood can greatly influence their health outcomes,” he says. At the local level, the Healthy Eating, Active Living Community Health Initiative (HEAL), implemented through the Community Activity and Nutrition Coalition of Sonoma County, aims to transform the built environment of Roseland and Kawana ) 10 Springs, two Santa Rosa

To that end, CMedia will solicit sponsorships from local businesses, not unlike sponsorships seen on KQED or KRCB, Howell says. Video content for the businesses will be created in-house and broadcast on one of the four CMedia channels— likely Channel 30, being reimagined as a Sonoma County arts and lifestyle channel. Howell calls it a “Trappist monk” model, referencing the monks who make beer and other goods and sell it to support their spiritual practice: “We’re in our brewing-the-beer phase, creating a more obvious commercial endeavor.” Howell has also reorganized the staff, reached out to area schools and met with the city to check the center’s plans with city staff’s expectations. As for interest from the Sonoma County Museum, KRCB, the Community Foundation and the Sonoma County Arts Council to run the center? “They’ve all retracted,” says Howell. Howell has written for the Sonoma Index-Tribune, Sonoma magazine and the San Francisco Chronicle—and, in the North Bay Bohemian, helmed a column on the changes in digital media. The city council plans to discuss the center’s contract at its Aug. 27 meeting.—Gabe Meline

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

Ż NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

A FRESH ST START TART TART FOR 2013!!

50% LESS THAN THE COST C OF CIGARETTES! NO TAR, NO SMOKE, NO N ASHES! TIRED OF THE SMELL OF O ASHTRAYS? THEN THE ELECTRONIC C CIGARETTE IS THE ANSWER! FOR YOU OR THAT SPECIAL SOMEO ONE YOU SOMEONE KNOW WHO SMOKES.. COME DOWN AND SEE SEE US! .

WWW.DIGITALCIGGZ.COM 1560 156 60 4TH ST, STE C 450 COLLEGE AVE SAN N RAFAEL SANTA ROSA 415.747.8239 415 5.747.8239 707.637.2457 DISCLAIMER – THIS PRODUCT IS NOT AN AID FOR SMOKING G CESSATION. CESSATIO N . THIS THIS PRODUCT PRO DUC T IN IN NO NO WAY WAY INTENDS INTEN DS TO TO DIAGNOSE, DI AGNOSE , TREAT, TRE AT, CURE OR MITIGATE ANY DISEASE OR CONDITION. THIS PRODUCT ODUC T H HAS AS N NOT OT Y YET ET B BEEN EEN A APPROVED P P R OV E D B BY Y TTHE HE U UNITED NITED STATES STATES FOOD FOO D AND AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IN NO WAY CLAIMS L A IMS TO TO ASSIST A SSIST USER USER IN IN QUITTING QU IT TING OR O R LESSENING LESSENING FREQUENCY FREQU ENC Y OR OR SMOKING TRADITIONAL TOBACCO CIGARETTES. KEEP THISS PRODUCT PRO DUC T AND A N D ITS IT S COMPONENT CO M P O NENT PARTS PA RT S OUT OUT OF OF REACH RE ACH OF OF CHILDREN. CHILDREN. REFRAIN FROM USING THIS PRODUCT OF YOU ARE UNDER THE THE LEGAL LEG A L SMOKING SM OK ING AGE AGE IN IN YOUR YOU R STATE. STATE .

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

Nutrition ( 8 neighborhoods with a relatively high number of low-income residents, by promoting access to healthier foods and physical activity. Both neighborhoods have a high concentration of Latino residents, and the statistics are staggering; countywide data from the 2009 California Healthy Interview Survey shows that 79.3 percent of Latino adults in Sonoma County are considered overweight or obese. “Kawana Springs has nine times as many unhealthy food sources as healthy,” explains Moreno. “Roseland has seven times as many unhealthy food sources in comparison to healthy.” For this reason, HEAL participants have been working with smaller stores to help stock local produce and healthier snack items. They’ve addressed the epidemic on a marketing level, by encouraging local stores to reconsider how snacks are merchandised. This is just one aspect of a “sphere of influence” that moves from home to school and back into the community. Up until recently, only about 10 percent of the students at Roseland and Sheppard elementary schools were eating breakfast at school, even though 86 percent of the students qualify for the free and reduced meal program. Now, 68 percent of the students are eating a healthy breakfast at school, says Moreno. Sonoma County may be the 12th healthiest county in California, but in Southwest Santa Rosa, where 41 percent of the streets lack sidewalks and where parks are scarce, the childhood obesity rate (as of 2006) was 22–25 percent (in Santa Rosa’s general population, the rate is closer to 18–20 percent). “Obesity is a socio-economic issue,” says Dr. Ari Hauptman, a pediatrician at Kaiser Santa Rosa and a physician advocacy volunteer with HEAL. “Do you have a park that’s close by? Are you living in a home that doesn’t allow for play in the evening—with

a busy street versus a cul-de-sac? If parents are working two jobs, they might not have time to be around the table at night, and that makes it easier for the kids to grab unhealthy things to eat.” Bayer Farm, in the heart of Roseland, is one of the HEAL successes mentioned by Moreno. On a sunny Friday afternoon, Dominga Gonzalez, a farm volunteer, cleans up after her afternoon children’s art class lets out. Gonzalez has worked at the hybrid farm and park—established in collaboration between Santa Rosa Parks and Recreation and LandPaths— for three years. The 30-year-old Santa Rosa resident lights up as she talks about her work as a nutrition teacher, facilitating classes on how to prepare food in season, using the organic vegetables grown on the six-acre piece of land. “We try to teach the mothers that they can harvest and then cook with the vegetables,” says Gonzalez. She estimates that between 30 and 40 women attend the summer classes along with their children. Gonzalez says she’s seen changes in neighborhood since she first began volunteering. More families are walking or riding bikes instead of driving. But there’s still work to be done. “We need more security for people who are walking,” says Gonzalez, who used to bicycle to the farm but stopped after she was hit and injured while riding from her home on West Ninth Street. “We need more bike lanes, ‘Go Slow’ signs, ‘Be Careful for Children’ signs.” Meanwhile, low-income and Latino children in Sonoma County are disproportionately overweight or obese, according to a 2011 Community Health Needs Assessment, a reality that cannot be separated from crumbling infrastructure, ineffective policy and the environment in which the children live and grow. As Moreno reiterates, “What we do know is that the choices that people make are shaped by the choices that they have.”

ųų

#' Âą%' 

]_R`R[a`

Hot August Nights:

An Erotic Literary Soiree

Join us for an evening of erotic poems and stories by local authors.

SRNab_V[T 7\N[ =_VPR Â&#x2018; 7R[[VR <_cV[\ Â&#x2018; /VYY ;\OYR ?baU 5\]]R Â&#x2018; 7b`aV[R :VPUNRY` Â&#x2018; =V[X 9NQf ?Nf 5\Rf Â&#x2018; :VPUNRY 9N__NV[

Kindred

'BJSTrade Handcrafts

$10 cash at the door, includes ticket for fabulous raďŹ&#x201E;e prizes ~ This is an over 18 event. CoďŹ&#x20AC;ee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Suite 300, Sebastopol Info: steamysonomacounty@gmail.com or facebook.com/SteamySonomaCounty

'BJS5SBEF'SJEBZ 5IF%J%J+FXFMSZ1SPKFDU August 16, 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7:30pm JFXFMSZNBEFCZBSUJTBOTJO*OEJBXIP BSF)*7QPTJUJWF XJEPXFEPSWJDUJNT of sex trafďŹ cking 707-579-1459 www.kindredhandcrafts.com .POo4BUo 4VOot'PVSUI4Ut4BOUB3PTB

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Get ready to be teased, titillated and tempted.

@Nab_QNf .bTb`a

Dining Sara Sanger

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

12

WHOOOOSH! Strange things are afoot at Dave’s Market, where ice-cream nirvana is achieved by Chase Berry-Travis.

Chilled Out Liquid nitrogen makes NitroKarma’s ice cream smooth and velvety—and dazzling to order BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

I

t was a Wednesday in late May when Renee and Madeline Berry-Travis found out they’d have to leave the house they’d lived in for four years. Their landlords were reclaiming the abode after their own home had been foreclosed on. “We were totally broke,” Renee recalls.

So the next day, on Thursday, Renee walked into Dave’s Market,

a place she’d been frequenting for years, and asked Dave if she could make him some ice cream—not just any ice cream, mind you, but liquid nitrogen ice cream, an enterprise she and Madeline had been experimenting with since March. Dave acquiesced. “At first he looked at me very oddly,” Renee tells me over the phone recently, “but after eating his scoop, he asked if we could start tomorrow.” They couldn’t; they needed a week to get the appropriate licenses together. By

the following Friday, however, they were up and running. NitroKarma was born. Despite their quick launch, Renee and Madeline are not your typical entrepreneurs. For most of their adult lives, they’ve devoted their time to helping young people. Madeline, who is currently a full-time caregiver for a child with disabilities, ran sexualassault-prevention programs for youth, while Renee ran group homes for youth in recovery. They were foster parents for 10 years,

and wound up adopting eight kids, all but one of whom have special needs (they have a dozen children total, ranging in age from eight to 36). Quips Renee: “We’re like the circus family of the neighborhood.” Their efforts to feed such a large brood are what first sparked their idea to make ice cream. “It’s kind of silly how it all came about,” Madeline admits. When her kids wouldn’t eat the fruit smoothies she made for them, she’d put them in the freezer, unwilling to let good food go to waste. “They didn’t want all-natural smoothies,” she laughs, “until they became allnatural ice cream.” Madeline had remembered a college science class she took in which her professor made ice cream with liquid nitrogen. No stranger to adventure (years ago she and Renee relocated to the jungles of Mexico), she called up the gas company and started tinkering. “All the kids went nuts over it,” Madeline recalls. “And we thought this might be a good way to make some money.” Eight weeks later, they were in business. On a recent Friday, I head down to Dave’s to watch the magic happen. Tucked between the fruit display and the deli counter, Renee and her 18-year-old daughter Chase concoct made-to-order scoops ($4 each) as customers admire the spooky, cauldron-like effects of the liquid nitrogen. Renee’s 15-year-old son Adian offers free samples of the brittle ice cream they just invented that morning. (The other children are discerning taste-testers). Though a more expensive way to make ice cream, liquid nitrogen is also more efficient. No freezer necessary. Other than the giant 260-liter metal tank hunkering in the corner of the market’s storage space, the set-up is simple: a couple of mixers, Strauss organic dairy base and the ingredients du jour—currently things like chocolate ganache, pineapples, cucumbers, limes, marshmallows, espresso and caramel.

NitroKarma, inside Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, 320-A W. Third St., Santa Rosa. 707.542.8333.

13

Savory Lunch Menu Aromatic Loose Teas

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

When a new customer orders the butter pecan, Renee offers a brief science lesson as she pours the frigid liquid into the mixing bowl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The liquid nitrogen is only used as a freezing agent,â&#x20AC;? she explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not actually an ingredient in the ice cream.â&#x20AC;? With a temperature of 321 degrees below zero, Renee continues, liquid nitrogen can freeze something so instantly that the ice crystals are miniscule, rendering ice cream impossibly dense and velvety. The whole process takes less than ďŹ ve minutes. Like snowďŹ&#x201A;akes, no two scoops are alike. They can be harder or softer, depending on preference, and some customers even buy or bring their own ingredientsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; recent picks include avocado and a Ziploc bag full of Oreosâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to throw into the mix. When I ask for a cone of caramel and coffee, Renee stops in the middle of mixing so that I can evaluate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What do you think? Does it need more espresso?â&#x20AC;? Open for only two months, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already got a few regulars, like Tami, who discovered them on day one and has been â&#x20AC;&#x153;addictedâ&#x20AC;? to the coconut ice cream ever since. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be freezing up scoops at Graton Winery next month (a special apple wine/bleu cheese/candied pecan ďŹ&#x201A;avor is in the works) and are about 10 grand shy of getting their trailer on the road. If their goals are lofty, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also admirable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to generate seed money to invest in other peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enterprises,â&#x20AC;? Renee says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and help them be sustainable. Obviously, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to make some money ourselves, but we also want to be socially responsible.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gifts come from very strange places,â&#x20AC;? she continues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been forced to move, we might not have started NitroKarma so soon. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the whole point: we want to give out the good stuff in life. And then, hopefully, get some of it back.â&#x20AC;?

Tudor Rose English Tea Room Traditional English Tea Room with a Slice of Silliness Reservations Recommended Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6

Pinkies Up! &OURTH3TREETs3ANTA2OSA sTUDORROSETEAROOMCOM

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage â&#x20AC;˘ improves mobility in

neck and shoulders â&#x20AC;˘ relief from tension headaches,

eyestrain, and sinusitis

ON SITE MASSAGE AVAILABLE

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

Tune into

Art, Food & Wine Experience at Kenwood Vineyards

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swingin' with Sinatraâ&#x20AC;?

Sundays 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3pm

Disc over the Discover t he art ar t and and savor savor the t he exceptional exc ep t ional wwines ine s iincluding ncluding tthe he AArtist r t is t SSeries er ies CCabernet aber ne t SSauvignons. au v ignon s . V i s i t o r s wwill Visitors i l l hhave a v e aann oopportunity p p o r t u n i t y ttoo ssee e e ooriginal r i g i n a l aartr t ppieces iec e s ffrom r o m tthe h e ccollection o l l e c t i o n tthat h a t bbegan e g a n wwith i t h tthe h e ccontroversial o n t r o v e r s i a l 11975 975 â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naked N a k e d LLadyâ&#x20AC;? a d y â&#x20AC;? bbyy DDavid a v i d LLance a n c e GGoines. oines . SSavory a v o r y aappetizers p p e t i z e r s wwill i l l bbee ppaired a i r e d ttoo bbring r i n g oout u t tthe h e bbest est ccharacteristics h a r a c t e r i s t i c s ooff tthe h e wwine. ine.

Reser vat ions ((required Reservations requir ed 7722 hhrs r s iinn aadv): dv) : 7707.282.4228 07.282. 4228 $$30 30 per per pperson er son / $25 $ 25 Club Club Members Member s

KENWOOD K ENWOOD VINEYARDS VINEYARDS

99592 592 Sonoma Sonoma Highway, Highway, KKenwood enwood EEnjoy njoy responsibly. responsibly. WWW.KENWOODVINEYARDS.COM W W W. KE NWOODVINE YA AR DS .COM

?fjk\[Yp1 ?fjk\[Yp1 J k\m\AXofe$M`ZXi`f Jk\m\AXofe$M`ZXi`f JXkli[Xpe`^_kj J Xkli[Xpe`^_kj -gdkf/gd gd kf /gd

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Blu American Eatery American. $-$$. Perfect when looking for a great spot between cafe and restaurant. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Fri-Sun; lunch and dinner, TuesThurs. 140 Second St, Ste 100, Petaluma. 707.778.6965.

Casino Bar & Grill California. $. Chef Mark Malicki is a true Sonoma County star, serving up a changing menu of locally sourced, inspired creations. Unpretentious, creative and affordable, Casino is a whispered-about landmark among locals in the know. Dinner nightly. 17000 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.3185.

Central Market California cuisine. $$$. Fish is the thing at this airy spot that features local and sustainable foods. Lots of pork dishes, too–and they’re insanely good. Dinner daily. 42 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.9900.

Dempsey’s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

Forchetta / Bastoni Asian-Italian. $$. Southeast Asian street food served alongside rustic Italian in unique two-in-one restaurant. Heart-warming Italian from Forchetta, while Bastoni’s focuses on Vietnamese and Thai. Lunch and dinner daily. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

French Garden French.

$$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600.

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

$$$-$$$$. The French Garden serves classic French and California cuisine focusing on seasonal and sustainable foods, much of it grown on its own farm; also, a casual bar with small plates. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Pamposh Indian. $-$$. Clean, fresh, exciting traditional Indian food. Chicken tikka masala is indescribably good. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 52 Mission Circle, Ste 110, Santa Rosa. 707.538.3367.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian.

Simply Vietnam

$. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner daily. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Garden Court Cafe & Bakery American. $-$$.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian.

Traditional diner food treated with utter respect; the quality ingredients make for sublime eating. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 13647 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.1565.

Haku Sushi. $-$$. Cleverly named rolls like “Jedi Mind Trick” and “Roll me a Fatty” are as flavorful as they are fun. Lunch and dinner daily. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.541.6359. La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355. Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat-Sun. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza.

$-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

Spoonbar Regional cuisine. $$. Chef Louis Maldonado’s market-driven menu includes such creative dishes as chickpea-crusted avocado, slow-cooked beef petite tender, and Spanish octopus with bonito brioche, daikon radish, snap peas, and charred japapeno vinigrette. Lunch, Thursday-Monday; dinner daily. 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Tolay Californian. $$-$$$. Sonoma County cuisine is the specialty, with entrees focusing on local wild and farmed foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. In the Sheraton Sonoma County, 745 Baywood Drive, Petaluma. 707.283.2900.

Water Street Bistro Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Breakfast and lunch daily. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

West Side Bar & Grill Sports Bar. $$. Home of the almost-famous bacon cheeseburger. Seventeen beers

on tap (wine list available). Fourteen flat screen televisions to watch all of the hottest sports events. Two great pool tables. Lunch and dinner daily. 3082 Marlow Rd # B8, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9453.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$. California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121. Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona St, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 & 903 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Mill Valley location: 401 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Fri-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.

Hilltop 1892 American.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

$$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun; closed Tues. 3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. All Seasons Californian. $$-$$$. A Calistoga institution specializing in fresh, seasonal wine country cuisine. 1400 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.9111. Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger,

Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

SMALL BITES Growing up, taco night was one of the best nights of the week. It was like eating Legos; Mom simply put the components on the table and we went at it, making our own hard-shelled, handheld delights. She used frozen ground beef, taco seasoning packets, pre-formed hard shells from a box, shredded iceberg lettuce, brand-name salsa, sour cream and some fresh produce. They were more akin to a Taco Hell menu item than anything authentically Mexican. But by using local ingredients, taco night still remains a favorite, albeit vastly different in execution. Carnitas simmered all day in a crock pot, salsa made by hand with Parsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tomatoes and onions from Ortiz farms and tortillas made fresh by La Tortilla Factory make taco night Slow Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;approved. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite easy to consume 10 of these tacos and not even loosen the belt. At home, tortillas can be steamed over the shredded carnitas crisping up in a hot pan. As if carnitas werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to on its own to induce a flavorgasm, wrap it with fresh tortillas steamed with pork juice and top it with fresh salsa with the best tomatoes this side of Jupiter, just now starting to ripen on backyard plants. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truly an otherworldy experience.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily.

1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Kellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center,

SQUARES

CAFĂŠ

BSFUVSOUPXIPMFTPNF DPNGPSUGPPE 707.545.4300

ĂąGUITUSFFUrTBOUBSPTB thethreesquarescafe.com

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

The Courtyard Spa

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

JgXN\cZfd\ Jg\Z`Xcj

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

$50

OďŹ&#x20AC; couples massage $20 OďŹ&#x20AC; any individual massage or treatment

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$-

the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

15

includes a Mediterranean foot bath 16702 Coast Hwy One, Bodega 888.404.2255 www.scvilla.com

$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Fyqfsjfodf!gjof!cffs!boe!gsfti!Tpopnb!gppe 6IWXEYVERX +VERH3TIRMRK %YKYWX

(ITSX1G/MRPI]7X7IFEWXSTSP  [[[[SSHJSYVFVI[MRKGSQ JEGIFSSOGSQ[SSHJSYVFVI[MRK

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Macho Taco, Man

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Copain Wine Cellars Barn-style tasting room provides panoramic view of the Russian River Valley and a peek into the cellar from whence emanate low-alcohol, food-friendly, continentalstyle Syrah and Pinot Noir crafted with subtle oak, forest-floor notes and cool dark fruit flavors on a smooth finish. 7800 Eastside Road, Healdsburg. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11am–5pm; Tuesday– Wednesday, by appointment. 707.836.8822.

Cotati Corner Fine Wines What a funky college town like Cotati needs in a wine shop is friendly, unpretentious, with a small but unique selection of under $20 wines. And that they have. Thursday tastings. 1818 La Plaza, Ste. 106, Cotati. Open Tuesday–Saturda; tastings, Thursday–Friday, 5–8pm. 707.793.9357.

D’Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Frick Winery Tailwagging hospitality team greets visitors at this rustic little bodega that’s anything if not picturesque. Proprietorrun winery specializes in lively Rhône-style blends and varietally bottled Syrah, Viognier; rare Counoise is a special treat. Honest, handmade wines with a sense of place. 23072 Walling Road, Geyserville. Open Saturday– Sunday, noon–4:30pm. Tasting complimentary with purchase. 707.857.1980. John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers

offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115.

Ledson Winery & Vineyards What warlock, many high-way travelers wondered, within those stone walls broods? Happily, Ledson’s wine-wizard is a Zinfandel zealot, making 10 from the zaftig grape. 7335 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.537.3810.

Medlock Ames Tasting Room Low-key urban aesthetic meets selfconscious sustainable land stewardship, with home-grown food pairings–plus a dark and stylish, full bar in the back. Make this your last stop of the day. 6487 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily 10am–5pm. $12.50 fee. Alexander Valley Bar opens at 5pm. 707.431.8845.

Old World Winery Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, familyowned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Paradise Ridge Winery A gorgeous, provocative sculpture garden with annually changing exhibits set amid a pygmy forest. Stay for sunset Wednesday evenings April–October. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.528.9463. Paradise also offers its food-friendly wines at an accessible little shack in the heart of Sonoma Valley. Try structured clarets from the estate’s high-elevation Rockpile vineyards; do some time with “the Convict” Zinfandel. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 8860 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.282.9020.

Robert Rue Vineyard A new wave of Zin specialists

helped keep small, old vineyards like this in production. Now, they’re making their own; refreshing Sauvignon Blanc, too. 1406 Wood Road, Fulton. Friday to Sunday, 10am–5pm, or by appointment. Tastings $5. 707.578.1601.

Stonestreet Late wine magnate Jess Jackson took to the hills in a big way. Eight hundred acres, 400 blocks, at elevations up to 2,000 feet. Tasting room is a fewfrills affair, while “mountain excursions” offer views plus Cab and Chardonnay, plus lunch. 7111 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm. $12, $15 and $25; Mountain excursion, $75. 707.433.9463. Timber Crest Farms Animal labels abound at Peterson Winery’s expanded tasting room adjacent the cellar. Is that a Jackalope, or is that just the Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel? Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, it’s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 11am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. 707.431.7568.

VML Winery Acronym of Virginia Marie Lambrix, who practices organic and biodynamic winegrowing— the artist who created VML’s wacky new labels said, “Ah, so you’re a witch!” Bewitching Russian River Valley Chard and Pinot, to be sure. 4035 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. $10 fee. 707.431.4404.

Westwood Winery Wonky wine scientist crafts soil-driven wines of beguiling complexity from the promising Annadel Estate vineyard, on the western frontier of Sonoma Valley. Tucked away in historic downtown Sonoma, the handsomely furnished tasting

salon is a casual setting for a serious sit-down tasting of food-friendly Pinot Noir and some of the most savory Rhône west of the Rhône. 11 E. Napa St., #3, Sonoma. Hours by appointment; tasting fee $10. 707.935.3246.

MARIN CO U N TY

far more defensible than any other winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Eagle & Rose Estate Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

N A PA CO U N TY Brown Estate Vineyards (WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500-square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Castello di Amorosa Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,” but authentically

(WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Grgich Hills Mike Grgich’s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30am–4:30pm. 707.963.2784. Hagafen Cellars There shall be no wine before it’s certified kosher. Wide variety of varietal wines, the go-to choice for many a White House state dinner. 4160 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am to 5pm (yes, they’re open Christmas). $5–$15. 707.252.0781.

PlumpJack Winery Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10am– 4pm. 707.945.1220.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for

ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Somerston Wine Co. Ambitious ranch and winery inclues utility-vehicle “buggy” rides by appointment. The cheese shop and grocery opens in April. All that and wine, too. 6488 Washington St., Yountville. Tasting room open noon-8pm Monday–Thursday; to 9pm, Friday–Saturday; to 10pm, summer. Tastings $15– $40. Ranch tours by appointment, $50. 707.944.8200.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: “This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.” But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.

Uncorked at Oxbow Across from the Public Market, this remodeled house in Napa’s historic “Little Italy” is a casual and unaffected joint. Ahnfeldt and Carducci wines include estate Merlot, Syrah, Cab, vinted by Paul Hobbs. Don’t ask about the horse. 605 First St., Napa. Open daily, noon–8pm; winter hours vary. Tasting fee, $10–$20. 707.927.5864.

V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9am–6pm. 707.963.7774.

17

The comeback Cabernet kids BY JAMES KNIGHT

J

udging from its limited range along the California coast, you might conclude that Sequoia sempervirens is as finicky about terroir as Pinot Noir. But redwoods seem to grow well enough in the flat, warm middle of Napa Valley, where a healthy looking group of trees shades the very barn where Jim Allen started barreling down Cabernet wine in 1979. In the 1980s, Sequoia Grove was the place to go for hot new Napa Cabs. It was a golden age. And then there was a fall. Well, not a fall, exactly—but, says Michael Trujillo, present and director of winemaking since 2001, “It’s kind of been surpassed by the [air quote] ‘hero brands.’” His challenge, to take Sequoia Grove into a new golden age, is one he clearly enjoys. Trujillo took a semester off from college to work in Napa, and he’s been here since. It was an amazing time, he says, to be taking classes at UC Davis and then coming back to do his homework with the help of André Tchelistcheff, who consulted at Sequoia Grove. In 2001, the Kopf family (Kobrand) stepped in to play fairy godmother to the faltering brand. After “a candid conversation” about the brand’s prospects, Trujillo says, he got the tools he needed to step up quality, and hired promising UC Davis grad Molly Hill as winemaker. “In other words, that diamond in the rough is polished and ready to kick some booty,” says Trujillo. Not that they’re competitive—Trujillo says they could make 300 cases of “point-chasing wine,” just to get attention. But that isn’t the point. Except when it is: Trujillo introduces the 2008 Cambium ($140), a Bordeaux-styled blend, as their “throwing-it-into-the-ring wine” at a recent tasting. “Our running-with-the-big-dogs wine,” affirms Hill. It has nice, toasted-Graham-cracker and allspice detail, with grilled blackberry savor, although the complex Cambium is less “dusty” in the Rutherford way than the 2010 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($38), a chimera with tarry, molasses aromatics, sticky, prune fruit and fine, lifted tannins, reminding me of the last BV Georges de Latour that I tasted—but wouldn’t they like to hear that. For his 2011 Napa Valley Chardonnay ($28), Trujillo convinced one of his growers to get over his embarrassment at growing ragged-looking clusters of Wente clone Chardonnay. But the reds are the strong suit in this tasting room, which is housed in the original, remodeled barn. Light-filled and rustic like a cabin in the woods, it’s simply laid out and clutter-free. One of the few keepsakes for sale is a tiny peat-potted live sequoia seedling. Expect big things from it. Sequoia Grove Winery, 8338 St. Helena Hwy., Napa. Daily, 10:30am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15–$30. 707.944.2945.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sequoia Grove

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Water Wars P How small communities overthrow their private water companies BY RACHEL DOVEY

at McPherson rattles off facts about his town water system as easily as some people cite baseball stats. He knows that two companies—one public, one private—maintain pipes and treat water in his inland Southern California community. He knows where the border lies.

“You could live in the city of Ojai, and on one side of the street your water bill is $150 and on the other side it’s $650,” he says. The private company issuing the higher bill is called Golden State Water, and it’s structured and regulated much like Cal Water, which serves remote parts of Sonoma and Marin and was the focus of a recent Bohemian cover story (“Wrung Dry,” May 29). It’s similar in another way, too: ratepayers complain of costs so steep they’re killing the town. “We saw that the city could actually disappear,” McPherson says. After all, shops, restaurants and other players in the town’s tourist industry depend on water, and sky-high utility rates threaten their very existence. According to McPherson, even the school district is currently shelling out as much as $65,000 a year on what has come to be a precious and costly resource. In May, we examined how rates often skyrocket in small towns served by investor-owned water utilities—many of them remote areas with high poverty rates. Marysville in Yuba County, for example, has a poverty rate of almost 26 percent; residents pay between $80 and $350 a month for water, according to resident Connie Walczak, and the town faces a possible rate hike of nearly 50 percent. Unlike energy utilities, those providing water can’t spread the cost of service across a vast, statewide base. Per California’s regulating Public

Utilities Commission (PUC), each community pays for its own cost of treatment and service, which means that a town of roughly 200, like Dillon Beach in Marin, can get strapped with exponentially more dollars per household than a district with thousands—or hundreds of thousands—of hookups. Dillon Beach residents compensate any way they can: showering once a week, abandoning gardens and buying only dark clothing, so they can wash it less. But with fees leaving small districts for Cal Water’s headquarters—where the CEO drove an $85,000 car, board members were paid thousands per meeting and rate increases were requested to pay the salasries of employees who then weren’t even hired—some ratepayers we met in May felt their steep fees were unjust. In Lake County’s Lucerne, especially, a group was pushing to oust the private company entirely. A group of citizens in Marysville have filed a formal complaint with the PUC, and the town may be heading toward localization as well. But is it possible to overthrow your water company? McPherson is part of Ojai FLOW (Friends of Locally Owned Water), an organization also trying to reclaim its city water infrastructure. This would require eminent domain and 66 percent of the town vote, and it sounds like an underdog story too optimistic to exist off-screen: a city of just over 7,000 vs. a water company serving roughly 250,000. You do the math. But it has been done. What’s more, according to a man whose town actually did declare independence from the company running its pipes, the smaller the community, the better.

F

elton is a town of roughly 4,000 that sits along winding, redwood-lined Highway 9

19

a majority of the town voted to do something extraordinary—give themselves a $600-a-year property tax hike to buy their pipes. But the water company fought back.

N

early 10 years later, Evan Jacobs with California American Water says Felton’s water infrastructure, though locally owned, will continue to have costly maintenance issues. The reason: many of the pipes serving the mountain town were laid in the late 1800s. “They are not saving money,” he says, referring to a rate hike of 53 percent proposed by San Lorenzo Valley Water District, the local company that took over Felton’s water, earlier this year. “Now they’re paying the acquisition cost and facing another cost because of infrastructure,” he says. According to Graham—and confirmed by current SLVWD manager James Mueller—the water-treatment facility was in need of major upgrades when the local company seized it. “Specifically, there were leaks that had been reported as leaks by consumers for years and were not identified,” Mueller says. Jacobs doesn’t contest this, but points to the age of the infrastructure, coupled with Felton’s remote wooded terrain. “There are a lot of steep hillsides and redwood trees, which love to wrap their roots around water pipes and crack them,” he says. Cal American’s rate increase was partially proposed to fix one of the two main water lines feeding the treatment plant, he explains. Aging infrastructure is a common problem facing small rural towns served by private water companies, Jacobs says. Without public subsidies, private companies are forced to charge the actual cost of maintaining these crumbling systems. So, according to Jacobs, Cal American tried to inform the Felton group that their local bid wouldn’t really save any money in the long run. But according to Graham, it was more than that—an aggressive PR strategy that included deceptive

KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORS The small town of Felton broke free from Cal American Water thanks to a door-to-door effort prevailing over shady tactics.

websites, astroturf groups and push polls. Graham paints it as a costly example of the company ignoring what its ratepayers obviously wanted—to break free.

I

n a confidential PR plan, shared with the Bohemian by Felton FLOW, Cal American states: “Our strategy is to make the road a rocky one for proponents.” The document reads like a political campaign, outlining intentions of “making this an unpleasant experience” for the incumbent county supervisor and convincing at least one-third of the voters that localization “is a bad idea for them.” Jacobs confirmed that the document, sent to him via email, was real. “We wanted to show that local takeover would result in an additional tax burden for customers,” he says. The packet contains a letter drafted for Felton homeowners. The San Lorenzo Valley Chamber of Commerce is cited, in large bold letters at the top. “Outside organizers want to put another tax on Felton residents,” it reads, adding further down that “[t]his tax won’t pay for better schools, fire protection or police. This tax doesn’t improve anything.” At the bottom of the letter, in miniscule font, is printed: “This letter was made possible through a grant

from California American Water.” “The water companies play dirty,” Graham says, adding later that the worst part was the push polling. Jacobs denies that the poll, attached to the document, is in fact a push poll. A subtle form of smear campaigning, push polls begin with open-ended questions and then proceed to questions designed to slur. Negative statements that aren’t necessarily true—e.g., “If you knew so-and-so was engaged in money laundering, would you be more or less likely to vote for him/her?”—are masked as simple information gathering. “You can decide if you think it’s a push poll,” Jacobs says. Performed by Voter Consumer Research—which, according to the Los Angeles Times, conducted polls for the 2000 Bush campaign—it starts out with a bland question: “Do you believe things in Felton are going in the right direction, or have they gotten off on the wrong track?” It then, subtly, gets into water, asking speakers to rate California American Water as one of many “people or organizations in the news,” along with state senators and local politicians. Quickly it becomes more specific, asking about rates and local water control. While the questions do represent both sides, questions about local takeover certainly don’t have the rosiest ) 20

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

east of Santa Cruz. It resembles Guerneville. Rustic cabins sit atop long bumpy driveways and line the San Lorenzo River on stilts. It’s not the kind of place you’d expect a door-to-door petition to succeed. But it did, and according to Jim Graham, spokesperson for Felton FLOW, the reason was both simple and surprising: people knew their neighbors. Graham says that the effort to oust California American Water, another investor-owned utility regulated by the PUC, began when the company requested a 78 percent rate increase in 2003. He estimates that bills were already twice the amount paid to the nearby public utility, San Lorenzo Valley Water District (SLVWD). So a group of ratepayers gathered at the small downtown fire district, discussing how they could take back their water—which runs cold and free through the misty state parks surrounding the town. They decided to go door-to-door. “We walked the community three different times,” he says. First they rang doorbells and told homeowners about the rate increase. After that, they calculated what it would cost to fund a bond measure with local property taxes and sue for eminent domain. They estimated $11 million, which worked out to about $60 a month per homeowner. Then the group printed their calculations on a flier and took it door-to-door. Once everyone was aware of the tax increase, Graham put his background in PR to work. Walkers climbed porches again, this time collecting only the names of those who were in favor of the bond measure. “We looked for anyone who was influential—business families, prominent families,” he recalls. “We asked them if they’d be willing to put their names on another flier.” Because it’s such a small town, and so many people know each other, that strategy worked well. Graham recalls that when activists broadcast the third flier with 300 family names on it, homeowners scanned the list for names they knew. After the third walkthrough,

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20

movement studio ZPHBrEBODF QJMBUFTrBSU

Unlimited Classes

New Client Special $ 20 per week

6780 Depot St Sebastopol 707.823.1074

One Week, One Time Only

MOVE2CHANGESTUDIO.COM

WE BUY GOLD

Sell Local in Old Downtown Windsor 707.836.1840

Sebastopol California

GOLD MEMBERSHIP 35% DISCOUNT

WHEN YOU PRE-PAY FOR 5 CAMPS HURRY, 5 SPOTS LEFT!*

Fast results for busy women

30% DISCOUNT

ON 5 CAMPS PAID BY EFT!* NEXT CAMP:

METABOLIC MELTDOWN AUG 12–SEPT 6

*Camps begin July 8–Dec 20

707.217.3795

www.SebastopolBootCamp.com

The School of Shiatsu and Massage Recognized as one of the world’s premier learning institutes for aquatic and land-based healing arts. We offer: ∑ Certified Training Programs ∑ Individual Classes ∑ Personal Growth ∑ CE hours 800.693.3296 707.987.3801 bodyworkcareerinstitute.com registration@bodyworkcareerinstitute.com

Water Wars ( 19 tone. “Still other people believe . . . [l]ocal water should be under public control even at a cost of thousands of dollars in new taxes per household,” it reads. Important to Graham at the time was how much ratepayer money funded Cal American’s campaign. “I don’t know how much it cost, but it was not ratepayer money,” Jacobs says. He adds that the campaign was funded by shareholder money, which doesn’t come from rate increases and isn’t overseen by the public PUC.

Archives from a Tennessee newspaper in 1999 report that similar PR battles—between Cal American’s sister Tennessee American and local takeover efforts in Chattanooga and Peoria, Ill.— cost the company $4.9 million, with the majority spent on Chattanooga. “We didn’t even spend $300,000 in the last mayoral campaign,” a woman is quoted as saying about the fight. During that campaign, local takeover efforts failed.

M

eanwhile, back in Lake County’s Lucerne, policemen patrol water

Areas of Service

Mike Koftinow

SILVER MEMBERSHIP

HIGH BILLS An effort in Ojai to break free from Golden State Water will need two-thirds of the vote.

Is your water utility privately owned? In some remote areas, water service is supplied by privately owned companies. If your water company is on this list, chances are your bill is higher than households on municipal utilities. CALIFORNIA WATER SERVICE (CAL WATER)

Dillon Beach Parts of Guerneville Parts of Santa Rosa Parts of Duncans Mills Lucerne

CALIFORNIA AMERICAN WATER SERVICE (CAL AMERICAN WATER)

Larkfield/Wikiup GOLDEN STATE WATER

Clearlake

meetings for crowd control, business owners talk about paying $800 a month and picketers line streets with signs that read: “Bring our water down or get out of town!!” Craig Bach, the president of Lucerne FLOW, says there are some unique challenges facing the town—where almost 40 percent of the population lives below the federal poverty rate. “People who have trouble putting food on the table don’t have time to organize,” he says, adding, “There are a lot of seniors here living on $800 a month or less.” The 66-year-old, who still works as an electrical contractor, says the person doing PR for Lucerne FLOW has passed away, and that it’s simply hard to amass the support needed to fuel a local movement with so few people in town. But he’s not hopeless. He has an appointment to speak at the local Democratic meeting, and he continues to reach out to politicians. “I don’t have any immediate answers,” he says. Still, according to Jim Graham, ratepayers—even in small districts— can take control of their water. “The towns that are most successful are the small towns,” he says. “If you’re in a big town, the water company can print newspaper ads and buy time on NPR, they can send you slick fliers, but they can’t go door-to-door. We had so few people that everyone knew everyone else. Small communities can create a united front.”

The week’s events: a selective guide

R O H N E R T PA R K

NICASIO

Skywalker Sound

Texas Gold

What do Luke Skywalker and the San Francisco Symphony have in common? Not much, until now! Mark Hamill, who played the famous Star Wars hero that got with his sister, hosts the symphony in a concert featuring music from the movies. Get excited to hear the themes from such popular movies as Titanic, Batman and Jurassic Park, as well as scores from classics including Psycho, Superman and Star Trek. With conductor Sarah Hicks leading and Mark Hamill slaying the rebel forces with his light saber (just kidding, he won’t be doing that), the experience is sure to be more fun than flying an X-wing fighter on Sunday, Aug. 4, at Green Music Center. 1801 East Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. $25–$100. 4pm. 866.955.6040.

Though not a great motto for driving responsibly, nine-time Grammy winning Asleep at the Wheel still hold strong as a good-time-bringin’, country-swingin’and-don’t-forget-the-singin’ fan favorite. During their 40-year span, the “Kings of Texas Swing” have toured with the Dixie Chicks, Tim McGraw, Lee Ann Womack and Dwight Yoakam—to name a few—in tribute to the country-swing musician Bob Wills. Now, Asleep at the Wheel bring their liveliness to the little ol’ town of Nicasio on Saturday, Aug. 3, and Sunday, Aug. 4 (with a barbecue on the lawn), at Rancho Nicasio. Town Square, Nicasio. $37–$40. Saturday at 8:30pm; Sunday at 4pm. 415.662.2219.

S A N TA R O S A

Homespun Fun

FA I R FA X

Super Bass The party gets started this week when the Turn Up the Bass Tour 2013 comes to town, and it’s giving its all with a crew ready to tear the roof off: Z-Man, Zyme and Luck & Lana featuring DJ Nykon, with special guests Big Green and Cisum Tomorrow featuring Wes Nyle. Showcasing the ultimate partnership of EDM and hip-hop, this crew of Bay Area rappers, artists and dubstep producers create a mixture of energetic, loud, crazy music. Wear comfortable shoes, as you’ll surely dance until your feet hurt at this tour-closing performance on Thursday, Aug. 1, at 19 Broadway Club. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. $10–$15. 9pm. 415.459.1091.

THE FORCE Mark Hamill hosts ‘Music From the Movies’ at the Green Music Center on Aug. 4.

With the No. 5 album in the country, it’s no surprise that Florida Georgia Line’s show at the Sonoma County Fair is sold-out. “Wanted” singer Hunter Hayes? Yeah, his show’s sold-out too. While the diehards scour Craigslist, Disney Channel star-turnedsinger Bridgit Mendler appears on Aug. 8, and Tejano-Norteño musical group Intocable get jumpin’ on Aug. 9. Besides concerts, the fair offers the annual rides, games and exhibits aimed to keep both kids and adults entertained, including XTreme AirDogs sports, a live butterfly exhibit and the ever-popular horse racing. The fun runs through Sunday, Aug. 11, at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. $5–$20. 707.545.4200.

—Anna Hecht

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

CULTURE

21

ArtsIdeas Nadav Soroker

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

FACING THE DAY Rose Shannon, left, had such problems at school that her mother, Jennifer, was inspired to write a workbook.

Fear Factor

In an age of online isolation, a new book by Santa Rosa therapist helps teens overcome social anxiety BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

W

hen Rose Shannon was in sixth grade, she spent recess hiding in the bathroom. Getting sweaty in PE and eating lunch in front of her peers were enough to make her panic, and she was sure her friends were gossiping behind her back. She once broke the strap of her training bra just so sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have an excuse to go home.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t face all those kids on the blacktop,â&#x20AC;? Rose tells me recently. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The black top became the focus of all my fears.â&#x20AC;? Her bright smile and casual demeanor belie the tale sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s telling meâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a tale all too common among prepubescent and teenaged kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; about feeling painfully awkward and shy in social situations. Her mother, Jennifer, a therapist with 15 years of experience, had been counseling patients with social anxiety disorder for two years. By the time Rose hit seventh grade, she told her mother, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d

rather die than go to school today.â&#x20AC;? As Jennifer searched for books about social anxiety that would appeal to her daughter, she was shocked to ďŹ nd that there were none, despite the fact that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the most common anxiety disorder and the age of onset is adolescence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I started writing a book proposal immediately,â&#x20AC;? Jennifer tells me on a recent morning, as we sit in her cheery office on College Avenue. A slim woman with short cropped hair, Jennifer has quick-to-light eyes and a calming presence. Her book, The Shyness

and Social Anxiety Workbook for Teens, was published last June and is currently No. 2 on Amazon for Teens. The culmination of nearly a decade of work, the workbook is based on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), an action-oriented, evidence-based collaborative therapy. Instead of talk therapy, in which client and therapist often spend hours (sometimes months, years or even decades) hashing out the particulars of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past, CBT is focused on the now. This is not the lie-on-the-couch-and-whineto-your-analyst-like-Woody-Allen kind of therapy; CBT is more like walking over hot coals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While your past may have fed and contributed to your anxiety, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maintaining it are the distorted beliefs that you have,â&#x20AC;? explains Jennifer. Rose, for example, thought other kids didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really like her, which led to feelings of nervousness and depression, which in turn led to wanting to avoid school altogether. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like vampires, these thoughts will live forever unless they are exposed to sunlight,â&#x20AC;? writes Jennifer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To really change the way we think, we need to purposely experience what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been avoiding. We need exposure.â&#x20AC;? Exposure means doing exactly the things that make you feel anxious. Even though Rose switched schools to have a fresh start, it was performing small, daily exposures that eventually lessened her anxiety. She started by asking friends for their email addresses. After ďŹ nding that they were more than happy to comply, she slowly climbed her â&#x20AC;&#x153;exposure ladderâ&#x20AC;? by doing things that made her even more anxious: calling friends on the phone or sending texts without rewriting them to perfection. By her junior year of high school, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d made friends with â&#x20AC;&#x153;the cool, interesting kidsâ&#x20AC;? sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d always been afraid to talk to. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This kind of therapy is more

1030 Main Street S in downtown Napa N TTickets ickets & Information Information m

NVOH.ORG NVOH.O ORG

707.226.7372 707.226.73 372

A NON-PROFIT EVENT BENEFITTING LOCAL YOUTH GROUPS

23

$%

SUMMER SALE! LIKE US ON F FACEBOOK ACEBOO OK

FOR SPECIAL O OFFERS FFERS visit NVOH.org/SUMM NVOH NVOH.org/SUMMER /SUMM MER

GARAGE G ARAGE BAND BAND 101 Saturday, S aturday, 8 8/3, /3, 7 P PM M

DE D E CORDA CORDA EM CORDA CORDA TThursday, hursday, 8 8/8, /8, 7 P PM M

28 Acts 4 stages

A Non-Stop, Multicultural Extravaganza at La Plaza Park ~ Cotati

L

KIDS 15 AND UNDER

FREE

 #) L#*  



9:30 AM TO 8:00 PM - BOTH DAYS

MADELEINE MADELEINE PEYROUX PEYROUX Friday, Friday y, 8/9, 8 PM With a music career that started started on the streets of Paris, this performer performer quickly quickly gained mainstream recognition with her one-of-a-kind voice.

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Best in Napa

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com

707.321.7901

ECHO GALLERY

Yo Y oe ell R Rey ey A Arthouse r t h o us e P Presents r es e n t s

Eat Localâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Eat Localâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Save S ave a Barn Barn Opening Saturday, Opening Saturday, August Au gust 3, 3, 8pm 8p m

Visit E Visit ECHO CH O G GALLERY ALLERY a att 1348 1 348 Lincoln Lincoln Ave, Ave, Calistoga Calistoga

Viva Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Italia! World-Class Italian Accordionists Renzo Ruggieri, Frank Petrilli, Vincenzo Abbracciante Cory Pesaturo, Gail Campanella and a host of multi-cultural acts:

Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic MotorDude Zydeco, Jazz Great Those Darn Accordions, Andre Thierry Renzo Ruggeri & Zydeco Magic The Wild Catahoulas, The Mad Maggies, Polkacide, The Golden State Accordion Club Band, The Steve Balich Sr. Polka Band, The Hot Frittatas, Simka, The Internationals, Chuck Berger, Jim Gilman, Sweet Moments of Confusion, Jet Black Pearl, Tango No. 9, Youkali, Future Accordion Stars, Bella Ciao, Cajun / Zydeco Duckmandu, Les Amis Zydeco, Dance Parties La Familia PĂŠna-Govea, 12:00 to 5:00 pm The Great Morgani and Friar Tuckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub 5:05 to 6:30 in the park Sat. SO MUCH MORE!

(707) 664-0444

www.cotatifest.com

$15 ONE-DAY IN ADVANCE, $17 AT GATE OR $25 TWO-DAYS PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE ONLINE OR AT: CALL 888-559-2576 Ä?Ć&#x2039;((Ć&#x2039;$.!!Ć&#x2039;(%2!.Ä&#x161;/Ć&#x2039;.'!0Ć&#x2039; +0%+*/ Ä?Ć&#x2039;$!Ć&#x2039; /0Ć&#x2039;!+. Ć&#x2039;0+.!Ć&#x2039;%*Ć&#x2039;*0Ć&#x2039;+/Ć&#x2039;Ä?Ć&#x2039;!+,(!Ä&#x161;/Ć&#x2039;1/%Ć&#x2039;%*Ć&#x2039;!/0+,+( Volker Financial  6 6   & Insurance Services

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

fun,â&#x20AC;? says Jennifer, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because I get to see change. CBT is about what you can do now to change patterns so that you can lead a more fulďŹ lling life.â&#x20AC;? In 2009, Jennifer cofounded the Santa Rosa Center for CognitiveBehavioral Therapy, where, in addition to social anxiety, she and her colleagues treat people with obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, phobias and insomnia. Because of its potential to put clients in distress (exposures are no picnic), many therapists are afraid of practicing CBT, which may help explain why it is still so underutilized. Its effectiveness may also dissuade therapists who would prefer to have long-term clients (although insurance companies love the lower-cost treatment). Illustrated with funny, whimsical drawings (courtesy of Jenniferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, Doug, a freelance cartoonist), The Shyness and Social Anxiety Workbook for Teens is less a tome and more a call to action. Using realistic characters and scenarios, each chapter introduces a new concept (disastrous distortions, avoidance behavior, exposure ladders) and provides interactive worksheets to help readers understand their own thoughts and behaviors. By the end of the book, Jennifer encourages us to do the unthinkable: purposefully embarrass ourselves. Why? Because only by â&#x20AC;&#x153;leaning into our fears and putting ourselves at riskâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;not popping a Xanax or downing a beerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;will we overcome our social anxiety. Nearly a decade after hiding from social situations, Rose now embraces them. After going to a small Midwestern college for a year (â&#x20AC;&#x153;I made the best friends Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had!â&#x20AC;?), she decided to pursue a more hands-on education, WOOF-ing her way around Washington and Hawaii before returning to Santa Rosa a few months ago. These days, she tells me, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the one who almost always initiates friendships, practicing Jenniferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three strikes ruleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;reach out to someone at least three times before giving up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have conďŹ dence now,â&#x20AC;? Rose admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Learning CBT was easily the best thing Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever done for myself. Without that gift from my mom, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be a mess.â&#x20AC;?

Stage Eric Chazankin

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

KNIVES OUT Julian Lopze-Morillas

as Hieronimo, with Elena Wright as Bellimperia.

Blueprint for a Bard Seldom-staged ‘Tragedy’ in Marin 88/2 / 2 – 88/8 /8

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

HHonorable onor able

I

Blackfish B lackfish PPG13 G13 (10:15-12:30-2:45-5:00)-7:15-9:15 (10 :15-12: 30-2: 45-5 : 00 ) -7:15-9 :15

Dirty D irty W Wars ars

NNRR

(4:00)-6:30-8:35 (4 : 0 0 ) - 6 : 30 - 8 : 35

Fruitvale F ruitvale S Station tation

R

((10:45-1:00-3:30)-7:00-9:00 10 : 4 5-1: 00-3 : 30 ) -7: 00 - 9 : 00

The W The Way, ay, W Way ay G13 (1 (11:00-1:30-4:15)-6:45-9:05 1: 0 0 -1: 30 - 4 :15 ) -6 : 4 5- 9 : 05 Back B ack PPG13 Unfinished U nfinished S Song ong PPG13 G13 (1 (10:45-1:15) 0 : 4 5-1:15 )

20 Feet 20 Feet From From G13 Stardom S tardom PPG13 (10:30-1:00-3:45)-7:00-9:10 (10 : 30-1: 00-3 : 45 ) -7: 00-9 :10

Summer field C Summerfield Cinema in e ma 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719

t’s one of the most influential plays in the English language, yet no one ever produces it. It clearly inspired the styles of Marlowe, Jonson and Shakespeare. Still, few audiences have heard of it.

What do people have against Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy? Is it dense, archaic, stilted, boring? Not a bit. Known to the Elizabethans by its awesome subtitle, Hieronomo Is Mad Again, Kyd’s action-packed blockbuster—all the rage of London when young Shakespeare first arrived in town—includes a vengeful ghost, two different Iagolike characters, a mad woman tossing flowers on the stage, a central character who might be a lunatic but who is probably just pretending, a plot-advancing play within a play and a last-minute bloodbath in which many, many people die in quick succession.

Clearly, a certain beloved playwright was paying attention. The Spanish Tragedy, presented through Aug. 11 by the Marin Shakespeare Company, is so over-the-top, so frequently moving and stirring, we not only see why Shakespeare wanted to steal as much as he could from it but we have to wonder why theaters stopped producing a play that is such an obvious, crowd-pleasing hoot. At the outdoor Forest Meadows Amphitheater on the Dominican University campus in San Rafael, director Lesley Currier has staged a highly entertaining, if somewhat tonally uneven, production of Kyd’s neglected masterpiece. Actor Julian Lopez-Morillas is stunning as Hieronomo, the fairminded Spanish judge whose grief over the murder of his son turns to bloody vengeance when he teams up with the spirited Bellimperia (an excellent Elena Wright), the woman his dead son had planned to marry. Together, the gruesome twosome cook up a dramatic plot that’s brutal to the point of absurdity—and, in this, almost postmodern. The whole story is packed with action, comedy, twists and turns and touching moments of real beauty, not to mention all the hangings, shootings, stabbings, impalings and throat-cuttings, which Currier stages with wit, grace and a sharp attention to detail. The cast is all over the map. Some, like Wright, Lopez-Morillas, and Scott Coopwood as Bellimperia’s watchful yet oblivious father, the Duke of Castille, all give grounded performances. Others—primarily a rabid Dashiell Hillman as the villainous Lorenzo—are distracting, adopting the amped-up overacting and shameless mugging that has often marred Marin Shakespeare’s productions in the past. Still, Currier keeps it all from going off the rails, blending Kyd’s thrills, shocks, laughter and pathos into one amazing must-see show. Rating (out of 5): ++++ ‘The Spanish Tragedy’ runs Friday– Sunday through Aug. 11 at Forest Meadows Amphitheater at Dominican University. 890 Belle Ave., San Rafael. Showtimes vary. $20–$35. 415.499.4488.

/2

1

THIS SUMMER’S ‘LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE’.” -Claudia Puig,

WAY, WAY WONDERFUL.

A JOYOUS MOVIE , THE BEST ONE I’VE SEEN IN A VERY LONG TIME.” -Joe Morgenstern,

TYPE CAST Barbara Sukowa as Hannah Arendt, who coined the term ‘the banality of evil.’

History Writ Large ‘Hannah Arendt’ retells the writing of ‘Eichmann in Jerusalem’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

M

argarethe von Trotta’s Hannah Arendt is the only film you’ll see this summer with the noted philosopher-historian playing “truth or dare” billiards, in a story representing a rare revisiting—in the movies, anyway—of the Eichmann trial. This, even though the war criminal’s glass booth haunts our epics: Dr. Lecter, Magneto, Loki, Silva and the rest.

The film follows a turning point in the career of Arendt (Barbara Sukowa), who traveled at The New Yorker’s behest to observe the trial of Adolph Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961. Arendt was a German who fled her native country with her husband in 1933. She claimed she had never even seen a Nazi in the flesh, which is not quite true, since she was taught by one: her mentor, and perhaps lover, Martin Heidegger (played by Klaus Pohl). Not to steal the thunder of her book Eichmann in Jerusalem, but Arendt’s breakthrough was deducing that even if

the SS lieutenant-colonel was the living representative of a nightmare, he was also a consummate bureaucrat. As with today’s war criminals, Eichmann used passive sentences: the slippery “one” when describing how he conducted his obscene duties. The mirror of this bland monster is a humane, lovable brave woman of middle age, facing the pressure from middlebrow New Yorkers to cast Eichmann’s life as a study of evil in the realm of good—and also to turn her back on the shame of Jewish collaboration with the Nazis. Sukowa’s inner strength as an actress mostly conquers the problem of a biopic about a person who vegetates on sofas, smokes cigarettes and stares at the ceiling. The script may have carved up too much history to chew, though; there are numerous “As you know, Bob”–isms to keep the viewer up to speed in ’60s politics, as well as unfortunate scene-changing lines: “Israel has aged faster than you, my little Hannah.” ‘Hannah Arendt’ opens Friday, Aug. 2, at the Rafael Film Center.

NOW NO W PLAYING PL AY IN NG AT AT SELECT SEL EC T THEATRES T HE AT RES CHECK C H E C K LOCAL L O C A L LISTINGS L I S T I N G S FOR F O R THEATRES T H E AT R E S AND A N D SHOW S H O W TIMES T IMES

Win Free Stuff! ƌɄRestaurants ƌɄEvents ƌɄClubs ƌɄMuseums ƌɄShopping

bohemian.com/northbay/freeStuff

It just clicks.

Bohemian.com

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

++++

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

IGGYAND THE STOOGES 70+ Acts 12+ Venues 4 days 1 wristband

ALL HANDS Xavier Rudd, center, plays a contraption that looks like an ancient spaceship.

sat, Sept 28 Didging the Gap

ST. JAMES PARK, DOWNTOWN SAN JOSE

The Bay Area’s Biggest Technology conference + Music Festival Topics Include: Gi\cf_ŸMi]c[fŸ;oag_hn_^L_[fcns Q_[l[\f_=igjon_lmŸNl[hmg_^c[Ÿ;C;jjm Mb[lcha?]ihigsŸ>cmlojncih Mi]c[fNl[hmjiln[ncihŸ Gil_ Speakers Include: Li\_lnM]i\f_ŸD_``Mnc\_fŸHif[h<ombh_ff =blcm;h^_lmihŸMn_p_Eclm]bŸ[h^g[hsinb_lm San Jose McEnery Convention Center

Early Purchase Tickets Now on Sale @ c2sv.com/tickets

TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE + MUSIC FESTIVAL SEPT 26-29, 2013

Music

Nqcnn_l4 :=,MP:=,MPn_]b:=,MPgomc] @[]_\iie4 =,MP`_mnv=,MPn_]b

Xavier Rudd headlines Petaluma Music Fest for area schools BY ANNA HECHT

T

he sixth annual Petaluma Music Festival soars to new heights this year—or should I say to a new continent.

The fest, running Aug. 3, brings as its headliner Xavier Rudd, an Australian singer and one-man band. Since debuting in 2002, Rudd has become a mainstay in the folk, blues and reggae scenes while making his mark in the industry with his talent. How did this acclaimed one-man band—who plays an array of guitars, stomp boxes, didgeridoos and percussion instruments— become the festival’s headliner? It’s all about the connections. “Ken O’Donnell was booking for the Mystic Theatre,” explains festival director Cliff Eveland, “and decided he would put a hold on Xavier Rudd because he knew he was coming this direction as part of his tour, and he offered Xavier to me as part of the festival.” Rudd leads the remaining lineup of artists set to perform at the festival, including the Pimps of Joytime, Sean Hayes, Stroke 9, the Stone Foxes, Nahko and Medicine for the People, the Brothers Comatose, the Easy Leaves, David Luning, Dgiin, the Incubators, Victoria George, the Grain and Soup Sandwich. While kicking back to the soothing sounds or dancing like a maniac to livelier tunes, attendees can enjoy the many other options present throughout the day, including wine, food, a silent auction and raffle, a kids’ area and more. The annual festival raises funds for music education programs in Petaluma public schools. “We hope to make another $30,000 this year like we did the last two years,” says Eveland. “The last three years we’ve donated over $75,000 to various public schools in Petaluma.” The Petaluma Music Festival is Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds. 100 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. $30–$75. Noon. 415.519.6949.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Aenimus Technical deathcore band from the Bay Area plays an album release show. Arrythmia, Walk the Atmosphere, the Know Nothings, Aethere and Strength in Numbers open. Aug 2, 7pm. $10-$12. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

BWB Rick Braun, Krik Whalum & Nora Brown, finally together and performing smoooooth jazzzzz covers of Michael Jackson songs. Aug 3, 5pm. $60-$90. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Friday Night Live Weekly music series in conjunction with farmers market. Aug 2, Frobeck. 5:30pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale.

Funky Fridays Live music in the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outdoor amphitheater. Proceeds support Team Sugarloaf. Aug 2, Jami Jamison Band. 6:30pm. $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

J Boog Reggae with Pacific Island flavor. Aaradhna & Hot Rain, WBLK Dancehall Massive & Kimie open. Jul 31, 9pm. $27-$30. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Mickey Hart Band Global drum master says this about his new show: â&#x20AC;&#x153;My brain wave signals are reimagined in sound using a cap with electrodes that can read the throbs and signals of the brain.â&#x20AC;? Aug 1, 8pm. $30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Music from the Movies Actor Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker) hosts the San Francisco Symphony in a pops concert featuring film music. Aug 4, 4pm. $25-$100. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Peacetown Summer Concert Series Jul 31, Bill Kirchen. 5pm.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Petaluma Music Festival Featuring Xavier Rudd, Sean Hayes, the Pimps of Joytime, the Soul Rebels, Stroke 9, the Brothers Comatose, the Easy Leaves, David Luning, Dgiin, the Incubators, Victoria George, the Grain and others. Aug 3, 12pm. $30-$75. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Concerts Series Aug 3, Sun Kings. Noon. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Santa Rosa.

Tall Toad 25th Anniversary David Luning, John Courage and Teresa Tudury help celebrate the Petaluma music store. Aug 2, 8:30pm. Free. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Dwight Yoakam One of the few triple threats in country music; he can act, dance and, of course, sing. Aug 4, 5pm. $75-$115. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Ftubuf!Kfxfmmfsz

NAPA COUNTY Jeff Bridges & the Abiders

XF!CV Z!ZPVS!HPME!'!EJBNPOET

The Lebowski Dude picked up his love of music after an Oscar-winning role in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crazy Heartâ&#x20AC;? and has been touring ever since. Aug 2, 7pm. $70. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good night, the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s pop star might get â&#x20AC;&#x153;Footlooseâ&#x20AC;? in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Danger Zoneâ&#x20AC;? with this new county-tinged group. Aug 3, 8pm. $65-$80. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Aug 2, Machiavelvets. Aug 3, Mark Growden. Aug 4, Vanilla Kiss. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Dead Meadow

Aubergine

Darlings of both the stoner rock and modern psychedelia worlds. The Tambo Rays open. Jul 31, 8pm. $17. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Aug 2, Rachel Bockover. Aug 3, One Drop. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

The Meditations Reggae group formed in 1974 recorded the hit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Woman is Like a Shadow.â&#x20AC;? Aug 2, 9pm. $15. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Summer Music Series Aug 4, Firewheel. 1pm. $8. Elks Lodge, 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.721.7661.

Z-Man, Zyme, Luck & Lana San Francisco-based rapper on Heiroglyphics label. Big Green Cisum, and Tomorrow featuring

YPsjhjobm!Boujrvf!up!Npefso!Eftjhot YXfeejoh!'!Boojwfstbsz!Cboet YMpdbmmz!Pxofe

498!Ifbmetcvsh!Bwfovf 2!cmpdl!Opsui!pg!uif!Ifbmetcvsh!Qmb{b 818/4:6/1966 xxx/tipqEFK/dpn ! Tbo!Gsbodjtdp! Ifbmetcvsh!

Arlene Francis Center

Multiple Grammy-winners bring their Texas-swing sound. Aug 3-4, 4pm. $40. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Asleep at the Wheel

From I Do to I Still Do

Kenny Loggins with Blue Sky Riders

Aug 2, Aenimus, Arrythmia, Walk the Atmosphere, the Know Nothings, Aethere, Strength in Numbers. Aug 3, Ant Dog, Shlump Criminal, the Prodkt, JG, Chippy C, Masta Smash, DJ Kudjo, Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ugliest Dog, Nasty Nate. Mon, Fire Spinning. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

MARIN COUNTY

27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

Wes Nyle open. Aug 1, 9pm. $10-$15. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER &2)s0-$//23s COUNTRY ROCK

RECKLESS KELLY

"Mountain and Air" by John Langley Howard

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Center for Spiritual Living

FRI 8/23s7PM DOORSs SMOOTH JAZZ

KEIKO MATSUI

ROY ROGERS & THE DELTA RHYTHM KINGS PLUS THE INCUBATORS 3!4s0-$//23s COUNTRY

Epicurean Connection Aug 1, Brooke & the Caterpillar. Aug 4, Sebastian Nau. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

DAN HICKS LICKS

AND THE HOT

3!4s0-$//23s MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE BAND

Flamingo Lounge

28

& THE MOTORCARS AND WADE BOWEN

3!4s0-$//23s COUNTRY

Aug 3, Ron Atchison Benefit with Christy McWilson. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

Aug 2, B-4 Dawn. Aug 3, Sick Tones. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. ) 707.545.8530.

LIVERS OF STEEL III TOUR PLUS MIKEY

AN EVENING WITH

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

FOREVERLAND .O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

WWWMCNEARSCOM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28 707.829.7300 7 0 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 2 3 0 PETALUMA P E TA L U M A AVE AV E | S SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY TUES EVERY TUES AT AT 7PM 7PM WITH WITH EVAN EVAN FRI F RI A AUG UG 2 ROOTS R O OTS | ROCK RO CK | REGGAE R EG G AE

ROOTZ R OOTZ UN UNDERGROUND DERGROUN ND $$15 15 A ADV/$18 DV/$18 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+

Wed, Jul 31 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

Thur, Aug 1 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club

SAT S AT A AUG UG 3

BURLESQUE B U R LE SQ U E | C CABARET A BA R E T | V VARIETY ARIE T Y SSHOW H OW

CABARET C ABARET D DE E CALIENTE'S CALIENTE'S

BLACK B LACK LLIGHT IGHT & B BURLESQUE URLESQUE A ALL LL O OVER VE R $$55 DANCE DANCE PARTY/$15 PART Y/$15 GA GA ADV/ ADV/ $20 GA GA DOS/$25 DOS/$25 VIP/DOORS VIP/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+ $20

SAT S AT A AUG UG 3

IINDEPENDENT NDEPENDENT FILM FILM

THE T HE B BLOOM— LOOM—

A JOURNEY JOURNEY T THROUGH HROUGH TRANSFORMATIONAL TR ANSFORMATI T ONAL FESTIVALS FESTIVALS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 66PM/ALL PM /ALL A AGES GES

MON M ON A AUG UG 5

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP HOP HOP

REGGAE R EGGAE ON ON THE THE RIVER RIVER AFTER AFTER PARTY PARTY WITH WITH S SPECIAL PECIAL G GUESTS UESTS

$$10/ 10/ LADIES LADIES FFREE REE BB44 111/DOORS 1/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WED W ED A AUG UG 7

DUBSTEP D U BS T EP | W WEST EST C COAST OA S T | G GLITCH L I TC H

BRAINSTORM B RAINSTORM F FREDDY REDDY T TODD ODD $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 10 10PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 9

FFUNK UNK | SSOUL OUL | R AND AN D B

JJELLY ELLY B BREAD READ

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W W W. H O PM ONK .CO M BBook ook yyour our

ne x t eevent ve n t w ith u s, u p tto o2 50, kkim@hopmonk.com. i m @ h o p m o n k . co m . next with us, up 250,

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Fri, Aug 2 7:15–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Aug 3

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise

Sun, Aug 4 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

CRUSHING IT! Rapper Z-Man, who apparently has a thing for the timeless pairing of gold chains and melons, performs Aug. 1 at 19 Broadway. See Clubs, adjacent page.

Mon, Aug 5 8:45–9:45am;5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Aug 6 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Music ( 27 Gaia’s Garden Jul 31, Songwriters’ Circle. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Green Music Center Aug 4, Music from the Movies with Mark Hamill. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Heritage Public House

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0 NOVATO N OVA ATO | 415.892.6200

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VA VARIETY R IE T Y | G GENERAL ENER AL

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS HA HANEDA NEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7:30PM/ALL 7: 30PM /ALL AGES AGES

FRI F RI A AUG UG 2 / CCOUNTRY OUNTRY | R ROCK O CK

RUSTY R USTY E EVANS VAN A S

((TRIBUTE T R I BU T E T TO O JJOHNNY OHNNY CASH) CASH) $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 7:30PM/21+ 7: 30PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 3 / AALT LT | IINDIE ND IE | R ROCK O CK

HONEYDUST H ONEYDUST $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 9 / ROOTS ROOTS | ROCK ROCK | REGGAE R EG G AE

SOL S OL HORIZON HORIZON $$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 10 10 / RROCK OCK | POP POP | COVERS COVERS ROCK R OCK C CANDY ANDY W WITH ITH

THE TH ER RECEDERS ECEDERS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 1 16 6 / IINDIE NDIE | P POP OP | R ROCK O CK

NOVA N OVA ALB ALBION ION ((ALBUM ALBU M R RELEASE E LE A S E E EVENT) VE NT)

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 1 17 7 / IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK OCK | BLUES BLUES

BLUESHIFT BL UESHIFT

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM Book yyour Book our next ne x t eevent vent with with us, us, up up to to 150 1 50 people, people, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

Fri Aug 2

:ĞīƌŝĚŐĞƐ & dŚĞďŝĚĞƌƐ  Sat Aug 3 <ĞŶŶLJ>ŽŐŐŝŶƐƉůƵƐůƵĞ^ŬLJZŝĚĞƌƐ Fri Aug 9

^K>K  h

d͊ ŶũĞůĂŚ:ŽŚŶƐŽŶ

Wed Aug 14

>ŽƐ>ŽŶĞůLJŽLJƐĐŽƵƐƟĐ Thur Aug 15 DŝĚƐƵŵŵĞƌΖƐEŝŐŚƚǁŝƚŚdŚĞDŽŶŬĞĞƐ

Sat Aug 17

:ĞƌƌLJ:ĞītĂůŬĞƌĂŶĚĂŶĚ ^ƉĞĐŝĂů'ƵĞƐƚ͗ũĂŶŐŽtĂůŬĞƌ   

Wed Aug 21

ŚƌŝƐ/ƐĂĂŬ Fri Aug 30

>ŝƐĂDĂƌŝĞWƌĞƐůĞLJ

^ƉĞĐŝĂů'ƵĞƐƚ͗dŚĞĞĂĚůŝĞƐ

Sun Sept 1

WƐLJĐŚĞĚĞůŝĐ&ƵƌƐ 

^ƉĞĐŝĂů'ƵĞƐƚ͗dŚĞƵƌŶŝŶŐŽĨZŽŵĞ

Fri Sept 6 dŚĞŽŵďŝĞƐ  ƉůƵƐdƵƌƵĐĞ Wed Sept 11

:ŽŚŶ,ŝĂƩ and the Combo ^ƉĞĐŝĂů'ƵĞƐƚ͗ƌĞǁ,ŽůĐŽŵď

Fri Sept 13

tĂŶĚĂ^LJŬĞƐ Sun Sept 15

'ĞŽƌŐĞdŚŽƌŽŐŽŽĚ  and the ĞƐƚƌŽLJĞƌƐ ^ƉĞĐŝĂů'ƵĞƐƚ͗dŚĞ/ƌŽŶŚĞĂƌƚ

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Aug 3, Greenlight Silhouette. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jul 31, Ill Gates. Aug 2, Rootz Underground. Aug 3, Black Light & Burlesque All Over. Aug 5, Reggae on the River Afterparty. Aug 7, Freddy Todd. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Aug 5, Yellowbirds. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Aug 3, Robb Fisher Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jack London State Park Aug 1, Sutton Foster. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Jackson Theater Aug 2, Piano Sonoma Music Festival Young Artists Concert. Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Phoenix Theater

Aug 2, Monstaville Music. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Aug 2, Shadow & Substance, Heroes at Gunpoint, Kiddo, Legal Disaster, Moldy Poop, Care Eh Boo, Show Pony. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

La Follette Wines at the Barlow Aug 2, Bill Stratton. 180 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.827.4933.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 31, Whisky Pills Fiasco. Aug 4, Fairfax Social Club. Aug 7, Nate Lopez. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Jul 31, Brulee. Aug 2, Frankye Kelly. Aug 3, Yancie Taylor. Aug 4, Vernelle Anders. Aug 5, Gypsy Cafe. Aug 7, Maple Profant. Aug 1, Susan Sutton. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Aug 4, Nothing to Lose. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Aug 2, Liz Brown and Adam Traum. Aug 3, Andrew Freeman. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Jul 31, J Boog, Aaradhna & Hot Rain. Aug 2, Tall Toad 25th Anniversary with David Luning, John Courage, Teresa Tudury. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Raven Theater Aug 1, Mickey Hart Band. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Redwood Cafe Aug 3, Yo! Pizza Face. Aug 7, Jason Bodlovich. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Rodney Strong Vineyards Aug 3, BWB. Aug 4, Dwight Yoakam. 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Russian River Brewing Co Aug 3, Kingsborough. Aug 4, Sorentinos. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Petaluma Fairgrounds

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Aug 3, Petaluma Music Festival. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Aug 3, Mark McDonald. Sun, Evening Jazz with

Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610. Jul 31, the Honey Dippers. Aug 2, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Aug 7, Vickie Guillory. Sun, Church on Sundays. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jul 31, (W+T) J2. First Thursday of every month, Burnsy’s Sugar Shack. Aug 2, Shotgun Harlot. Aug 7, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Sunflower Center

Rancho Nicasio

Jul 31, Murray Kyle. Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Aug 3-4, Asleep at the Wheel. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Toad in the Hole Pub Aug 2, Baba Fats. Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix Aug 1, Twice as Good. Aug 2, Darryl Anders AgapeSoul. Aug 3, Lavay Smith & her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Aug 4, Jenny Kerr. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Aug 2, Pride & Joy. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Sausalito Seahorse Aug 1, W Allen Taylor & the Judy Hall Quartet. Aug 2, Key Lime Pie. Aug 3, Donna D’Acuti. Aug 4, La Fuerza Gigante. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Aug 1, Darren Nelson & friends. Aug 2, Danny Click’s Texas Blues Night. Aug 3, Playground. Aug 4, Tracy Blackman. Aug 7, Dirty Cello. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Fishtrap. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Aug 1, Jerry’s Birthday House Party with Phil Lesh and the Terrapin All Stars. Aug 3, North Mississippi All Stars. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live music. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

DIN N E R & A SHOW “Asleep at the Wheel Weekend Part I” Aug 3 AS LEEP AT THE WHEEL 8:30 Fri Nicasio’s Favorite Mikes— Aug 9 LIPSKIN AND DUKE 8:00 / No Cover Sat

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Sun, DJ Night. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Aug 3, Garage Band. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Aug 2, Jeff Bridges & the Abiders. Aug 3, Kenny Loggins with Blue Sky Riders. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

TENDER MERCIES

DAN AND JIM FROM M COU NTIN G CROW S

FEATU RI NG

Rancho Debut!

Americana/Roots Rock 8:30

ANNIE SAMPSON BAND Aug 17 Rockin’ Soulful Blues Sat

8:30

 Sun

BBQs On The Lawn! 

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL Aug 11 BLUES & BBQ FEATU RI NG RON THOMPSON & THE Aug 4 Sun

RESISTORS, DANNY CLICK & THE HURRICANES AND VOLKER STRIFLER

Silo’s Aug 3, Mitch Woods & his Rocket 88s. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Sat

Aug 10

Uptown Theatre

Jul 31, Dead Meadow. Aug 1, ALO. Aug 2, Rockamovya with Blue King Brown. Aug 3, the Deadly Gentlemen. Aug 4, Hobo Paradise. Aug 7, Mingo

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

ZULU SPEAR PLUS FREDDY CLARKE Aug 18 World Music BBQ Sun Sun

Another Beatle Q with Aug 25 THE SU N KIN GS Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Hopmonk Novato Aug 2, Rusty Evans. Aug 3, Honeydust. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts Aug 3, LoCura, Los Pinguos. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

19 Broadway Club

San Francisco’s City Guide

Sebadoh Amidst a sea of ’90s reunions comes Lou Barlow & Co., hair hanging in front of their eyes. Jul 31 at Cafe du Nord.

El-P & Killer Mike

Aug 1, Z-Man, Zyme and Luck & Lana featuring DJ Nykon. Aug 2, the Meditations. Aug 6, Junior Kelly & Natural Black, Prestige, Mi Gaan. Aug 7, the Ring. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Both released hot albums last year, now touring on new collaboration, “Run the Jewels.” Jul 31 at the Independent.

No Name Bar

Mac Miller

Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino Jul 31, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jul 31, Rockit Science. Aug 1, C-

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Rancid The world’s favorite sneering East Bay punks headline a two-night stand. Aug 2-3 at the Warfield.

A new album winning critics, performing with the expert rhymesmith Chance the Rapper. Aug 4 at the Warfield.

Panteón Rococó Mexico City’s biggest ska band blends punk, salsa and mestizo for energetic live sets. Aug 6 at the Fillmore.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Society: Culture House

JAM with Connie Ducey. Aug 6, Swing Fever. Aug 7, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Aug 1 From 6 to 7:30pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Monoprints,” pieces by Harry Frank; also, “Not Just Landscapes,” scenery in any style, from cityscapes to nature views. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Aug 3 From 6 to 9pm. Gallery 300, “GolemDrone Project,” a Todd Barricklow installation of ceramic figures, graffito tiles and woodblock prints. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

Aug 6 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

SONOMA COUNTY Backstreet Gallery Through Jul 31, “Color Fuse,” fused glass and abstract paintings by Kate E Black and Suzanne Edminster. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa.

Calabi Gallery Through Aug 31, “Summer Selection,” new selection of works by gallery artists as well as vintage art. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, “Barking Up the Family Tree,” featuring comic strips with Snoopy’s siblings. Through Oct 27, “Mid-Century Modern,” works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane,

Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Sep 18, “Printmaking,” pieces by Catherine Atkinson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Aug 10, “Hodge Podge,” mixed-media exhibit by artists from Becoming Independent and the Barracks Studio. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Aug 31, “Scapes, Scapes & Scapes,” handcolored photos by Laura Culver and oil scapes by Robin Burgert. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Aug 3, 6pm, “GolemDrone Project,” a Todd Barricklow installation of ceramic figures, graffito tiles and woodblock prints. Reception, Aug 3, 69pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 11, “Summer Songs,” works by Mylette Welsh and Maria-Esther Sund. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Aug 11, “The Summer of 2013,” featuring pieces by Harley, Bill Shelley, Brian Wilson and Hugh Livingston. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Local Color Gallery Through Aug 11, “Horizons,” paintings and drawings by Pamela Wallace and Linda Gamble. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Sep 1, “Light and Shadow,” original art. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Sep 15, “Undercover Genius: The Creative Lives of Artists with Disabilities,” curated by Janet Moore and

Geri Olson. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Aug 25, “Changing Courses,” the history and future of the Petaluma river. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Sep 8, “Juried Fine Art Show,” works from North Bay residents. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Aug 1-Sep 7, “Monoprints,” pieces by Harry Frank. Aug 1Sep 7, “Not Just Landscapes,” scenery in any style, from cityscapes to nature views. Reception, Aug 1. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 18, “Margins to Mainstream,” seven contemporary artists with disabilities. Panel discussion, Jul 28, 2pm. Through Aug 18, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25-year hiatus from art. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Aug 25, “Akin,” pieces by photographer Nicole Katano and painter Marc Katano. Artist talk, Aug 15, 5:30pm. Through Aug 25, “Stand by Me,” photographs by Nicole Katano of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Aug 15, “Fantasy in Oils,” paintings by Marcia Chastain. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Oct 6, “Hidden Treasures,” variety of styles from local artists. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

TRIP OUT It’s Black Light Burlesque at Hopmonk on Aug. 3. See Dance, adjacent page.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Aug 25, “Birds of the Sierra Nevada,” paintings by Keith Hansen. Through Aug 25, “Celebrating 30 years,” featuring historical pieces from the museum’s past. Through Aug 25, “Constructed Surfaces,” color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Through Aug 25, “Consuelo Kanaga,” pieces by the American photographer from the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 17, “Splendid Objects,” new works by 19 contemporary artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Sep 15, “Summer Group Show,” art by Bryn Craig, Phoebe Brunner and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Sep 8, “Box Show,” 150 artists choose from three boxes and create a work of art. Closing party and live auction, Sep 8, 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 25, “Out of Order,” a MarinMOCA member exhibition. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Aug 6-26, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. Reception, Aug 6, 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Through Sep 2, “Nurture,” photos and stories midlife mothers with their families, written and created by Cyma Shapiro with photos by Shana Sureck and Tracy Cianflone. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

NAPA COUNTY Blackbird of Calistoga Through Aug 31, “Vegetable

Portraits,” photography by Lynn Karlin. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

di Rosa Through Sep 22, “External Combustion,” pieces by Sacramento sculptors Nathan Cordero, Julia Couzens, Chris Daubert and Dave Lane. Artist panel discussion, Aug 14, 7pm, $10. Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Aug 31, “Sum Sum Summer,” art by John Casey, Shawn Wisenhunt, Emma Higgens and Kim Ford Kitz. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Grand Hand Gallery Aug 1-Sep 29, “Presence,” paintings by Michele de la Menardiere and sculptures by John Petrey. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Comedy Alex Ramon Magic Show Illusion Fusion Former Ringling Bros ringmaster has made Whoopi Goldberg levitate. Jul 31, 7pm. $25. Marin Center

1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Tuesday Evening Comedy

Thurs, 3:30-6pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Teen Health Clinic

Uke-a-Palooza Celebrate Polynesian culture with food, drinks and music by the Maikai Gents. Aug 2, 6pm. Free. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Walk for Animals

Dance Black Light & Burlesque All Over Featuring the UltraViolets Black Light Burlesque troupe from Hawaii, and local performers. Presented by Cabaret de Caliente. Aug 3, 9pm. $15-$25. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Summerfest Marin Dance theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer show. Aug 3, 1 and 5pm. $22$28. Spreckels Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Stroll through downtown with a four-legged friend on a morning full of music, doggie contests, raffles and more. Aug 4, 7:30am. $25-$35. Veterans Memorial Park, Third and Main, Napa.

Field Trips Campfire in the Woods Spanish-language walk and campfire. Jul 31, 6pm. Free. Riverfront Regional Park, 7821 Eastside Rd, Healdsburg.

Peace in Nature Hike

Events Bayer Farm Tending All ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Wed, 4-8pm. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.9318.

Low-Cost Physicals Family physicals for adults and children by appointment. Ongoing. $20-$65. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Sebastopol Art Walk First Thurs monthly, 6 to 8, downtown area galleries and businesses showcase local artists. First Thurs of every month. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.874.9462.

Sonoma County Fair â&#x20AC;&#x153;Home Spun Funâ&#x20AC;? theme includes horse racing, dog shows, butterflies, tiny houses and more. Music lineup (separate tickets required) includes: Aug 6, Hunter Hayes (sodl out); Aug 7, Florida Georgia Line (sold out); Aug 8, Bridgit Mendler; Aug 9, Intocable. Tues-Sun, 11am11pm. through Aug 11. $5-$20. Sonoma County Fairgrounds,

Meditative hike through the preserve. Aug 3, 1:30pm. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Local 101â&#x20AC;? provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Corte Madera Farmers Market Wed, noon-5pm. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.382.7846.

Fairfax Community Farmers Market Offering artisanal foods and locally grown and raised agricultural products. Wed, 4pm. through Sep 24. Free. Bolinas Park, 124 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Wed, 4-7pm. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. Wed-Sat, 9amnoon. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Lobster Luau Wine Fest

Film The Bloom Documentary about the emerging culture of transformational festivals. Aug 3, 6pm. $10. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Everyday Sunshine Documentary about the band Fishbone. Directors Lev Anderson and Chris Metzler in person. Aug 6, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Genetic Roulette Documentary explores the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involvement in genetically modified crops. Aug 6, 7pm. $10. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Live at the Met Opera Series Aug 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Il Barbiere de Siviglia.â&#x20AC;? 10am. $10-$14. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Forget Klondike bars, what would you do for a lobster roll? Aug 3, 5pm. $135. Juddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.255.2332.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am-1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sonoma Valley Certified Farmers Market Fri, 9am-12:30pm. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Valley of the Moon Farmers Market Tues, 5:30-8:30pm. through Oct 29.

) 32

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-XO\ĂŁSP

Dead Meadow with

The Tambo Rays, The Electric Magpie, & DJ Joel Gion (Brian Jonestown Massacre) )UL$XJĂŁSP

Rockamovya featuring

members of Groundation & Will Bernard with Blue King Brown 6DW$XJĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch FREE SHOW with

Antonette Goroch

6XSHU1DWXUDO/LVHO V:HW'UHVV $PD]RQ0ROOLHV

6DW$XJĂŁSP

The Deadly Gentlemen 6XQ$XJĂŁDP

Live Music Sunday Brunch

FREE SHOW with Hobo Paradise :HG$XJĂŁSP

Mingo Fishtrap 7KXU$XJĂŁSP

Victoria George

with Midnight

North

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

A E

P E TA L U M A

( 31

Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma.

Wednesday Night Market Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm-8pm, through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

West End Farmers Market Rediscover the historic heart of Sonoma agriculture. Sun through Oct 27. Free. West End Farmers Market, 817 Donahue St, Santa Rosa.

West of West Festival Taste, appreciate and understand the wines from west Sonoma County. Event times vary, see www. westsonomacoast.com for details. Aug 2-4. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley Ave, Sebastopol.

each month, 4 to 6. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Pleasures of the Heart First Monday, women’s salon. Second Monday, coed discussion group. First Mon of every month, 7pm. Pleasures of the Heart, 1310 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.9899.

Public Discussion Institute for the Fulfillment of Human Society invites all for public chat on current issues. First Tues of every month, 7pm. $5. Subud Hall, 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol. 707.793.2188.

Science Buzz Cafe Aug 6, Gobekli Tepe-Anatolia: 10th to Sixth Century BCE with Joan Marler, archaeomythologist; Sep 3, conversations with bacteria with Dr Philip Harriman. Tues, Aug 6, 7pm. $5. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Tesia Blackburn

Lectures Dyana Foldvary

petersonsfarm.com

Rockin’ Dentistry

636 Gossage Ave., Petaluma, CA

Rick Lane, DDS

NAMI art facilitator shows how art programs are utilized within the prison system’s mental health unit. Aug 1, 7pm. $9. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Free Legal Consultation Half-hour consultations with elder law attorney Janice Sternfeld. First Thurs of every month, 10am-noon. Jewish Family and Children’s Services, 600 Fifth Ave, San Rafael.

Here for Good

73

m % AT ore th Ms Bo an fA !

Meditation Group for Mothers

FREE checking without a huge (or any) balance

Mindful meditation and sharing experiences for benefit of mothers and their children. Wed, 8:30am. $10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

7.07% (APY) youth account

Money, Magic & Manifesting

$776,192,759 in local home & car loans in past 52 years!

Three keys to generating more money and magnifying your value with Mary O’Connor. Aug 6, 7pm. $10-$15. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

FREE debit card gets you discounts & money back

O’Hanlon Roundtable 707/ 546-6000 ☎ www.comfirstcu.org Guerneville Healdsburg Napa Sebastopol Santa Rosa x2

Continuing parade of experienced artists share thoughts on creative process. All artists welcome. First Tues

Painter gives an overview of Golden Digital Grounds. Aug 6, 7:30pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Cuba. Aug 5, 7pm, “Buddha or Bust: In Search of Truth, Meaning, Happiness, and the Man Who Found Them All” with Perry Garfinkel. Aug 6, 7pm, Chick Lit & Wine with Meg Donohue, Gretchen Berg, Libby Mercer and Sere Prince Halverson. Aug 7, 7pm, “The Best Travel Writing, Volume 9: True Stories from Around the World” with authors. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Coffee Catz Aug 3, 6:30pm, Hot August Nights: Erotic Poetry with Justine Michaels. $10. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jul 31, 7pm, Redwood Writers Young Adult & Children’s Panel. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jul 31, 6pm, “The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells” with Andrew Sean Greer. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Petaluma Library

Writing Is So Delicious

Aug 3, 2pm, “Shedding Light on Murder” with Patricia Driscoll. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Creative writing workshop for teens. Aug 5, 4pm. Free. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Theater All in the Timing

Readings Aqus Cafe Aug 5, 6:30pm, Rivertown Poets with Sherri Rose-Walker and Iris Jamahl Dunkle. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Book Passage Jul 31, 7pm, “Nine Gradations of Light” with Joesph Zaccardi. Aug 2, 7pm, “The Vintage Years: Finding Your Inner Artist (Writer, Musician, Visual Artist) After 60” with Francine Toder. Aug 3, 4pm, “The Barefoot Spirit: How Hardship, Hustle and Heart Built America’s No 1 Wine Brand” with Bonnie Harvey and Michael Houlihan. Aug 3, 7pm, “Killer Dads: The Twisted Drives That Compel Fathers to Murder Their Own Kids” with Mary Papenfuss. Aug 4, 4pm, “The Years the Giants Won the Series” with Joseph Sutton. Aug 5, 7pm, “Body and Bread” with Nan

Collection of short plays by David Ives performed by Dance Palace Summer Stock Players. Fri, Aug 2, 7:30pm and Sun, Aug 4, 4pm. $5-$10. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

A Comedy of Errors Marin Shakespeare Company’s presentation of the Bard’s classic with a Texas twist. Fri-Sun, 8pm, through Sep 29. $20-$37.50. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

The Dixie Swim Club Sassy comedy about friendships between women that last a lifetime. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm, through Aug 18. $22$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Fiona: The Mother Goose Musical

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Shrek: The Musical Everyone’s favorite ogre has his life turned upside-down when a talking donkey and beautiful princess come calling. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sat, 2pm, through Aug 10. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Spamalot The legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table–Monty Python style. Fri, 7:30pm and Sun, 2pm, through Aug 4. $14-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The Spanish Tragedy Marin Shakespeare Company opens summer season with the play credited as the inspiration for “Hamlet.” Sun, 4pm and FriSun, 8pm, through Aug 11. $20$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Tapas Short Play Festival New short plays from Northern California playwrights. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 4pm, through Aug 4. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

The Pirates of Penzance Gilbert & Sullivan’s classic tale of swashbuckling and singing on the high seas. Sun, Aug 4, 2pm, Tues, Aug 6, 7:30pm and Wed, Aug 7, 7:30pm. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Here They Come Todd Barricklow’s droneinspired sculptures In Jewish mythology, the golem is an unstoppable creature made from inanimate materials, brought to life to protect its creator from certain targets. In American warfare, a drone is an unstoppable plane controlled remotely to protect its creator from certain targets. The parallels between the two intrigued Sonoma County artist Todd Barricklow so much that he started making what he calls GolemDrones, 37-inch clay sculptures that resemble marionettes. “The myth concludes with the golem vanquishing the enemy,” he says, “but he also falls in love with a woman, becomes jealous, kills some of his own people, and eventually has to be stopped.” Barricklow has been working for two years on the little beasties, which look like something from the Saw movie franchise rather than the Department of Defense. So far, 30 of the 100 planned GolemDrones have been completed. Barricklow had the idea in part to deter crime on his street, and “we have not had any recent bike thefts or auto break-ins since I made the GolemDrone of thieves,” he says. When the United States “lost” a drone and the Iranian government claimed to have stolen it, Barricklow thought immediately of the Jewish myth. “I began rethinking the promise of the drones,” he says ominously. “They are unstoppable, they are defense-only and could never be used against us.” See the GolemDrones Aug. 3–31 at Gallery 300. 300 South A St., Santa Rosa. Opening reception, Aug. 3, 6–9pm. 707.332.1212. —Nicolas Grizzle

33 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 31–AUGUST 6, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sing along with Fiona and her friends on a musical journey of self-discovery along her path to fame. Aug 3, 2pm and Aug 4, 7:30pm. $10. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ŵŶ

0GG 0GG BBOZQVSDIBTF OZQVSDIBTF XJUIUIJTDPVQPO

XJUIUIJTDPVQPO

> Pers Personal ersonal Service ers Se > Everyday E day low prices p > Widest st selection selectio tion of edib tio edibles dibless dib >B Bonus for or new members me s & referra referrals rrals > Disc Discounts scounts for sc fo senior seniors ors and ve veteran veteranss M, T, F 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; 0â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; W, Th 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7,, Sat S 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 Highw ghway 101 ghw 01 at Stee eele Lane ee ne Highway Steele 2425 Cle nd Ave, Su Suite 1755 Cleveland

4PNFFYDMVTJPOTBQQMZ&YQ

4 PNF FYDMVTJPOT B QQM Z & Y Q

11"91-00. " 9 1- 0 0.

$95

77"1&1&/4 " 1& 1& / 4

New Patients

''30. 30. 



$75



Renewals

  vvaap po

or We h We have ave a H HUGE U sselection UGE election of of glass glass pipes, p ipes , pens w waterpipes, aterpipes, wood wood pipes pipes and and all all the the smoking s m ok in g a accessories ccessories you you want! w an t ! FFOUR OUR LOCATIONS: LOCATIONS: NEW N EW HOURS for SR: 9 9AM-10PM AM-10PM FRI & SAT SA AT

porriizzeerrss v po va

9 AM-9PM SUN-THUR S 9AM-9PM SUN-THURS

3372 SANTA 3372 SANTA ROSA ROSA AVE AVE SANTA ROSA, ROSA , 707-545-4975 7 0 7- 5 4 5 - 4 9 7 5 SANTA

707.526.2800 70 7.526.2 6.2800 6.2

OPEN OPE N 11AM-8PM MON MON-SAT -SA AT / 11A 11AM-7PM AM-7PM SUN SUNDAYS DA AYS Y

1099 44TH 1099 TH S ST, T, SAN S A N RAFAEL R A FA EL , 415-457-2 415- 4 57-24 420 20 116 6W WESTERN E S T E RN A AVE, VE, P PETALUMA, E TA LUM A , 7707.762.9 07.762.9 4 420 20 110 NAPA, 110 SOSCOL SOSCOL AAVE, VE, N A PA , 7707-226-7 07-226-74 420 20

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

E^][r=k'AZgrZ;Zkma K^Ze<Zk^K^Ze=h\mhkl +-(0LZ_^O^kb_b\Zmbhg MhmZeer<hg_b]^gmbZe

O]ddEYl[` Any Local Price

JnZebmr B=<Zk]l

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

=hpgmhpgLZgmZKhlZ30-*.maLm9>Lm

BOHEMIAN

PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

?8E;PA@D

g Home Services

Â&#x2019;QO`^S\b`g^OW\bW\U Â&#x2019;aSWa[WQ`Sb`]TWb Â&#x2019;ab`cQbc`OZe]`Y Â&#x2019;abcQQ]Q]\Q`SbS Â&#x2019;UcbbS`QZSO\W\U Â&#x2019;`]]TW\U

Electrical

Horti-Tech LLC, Specializing in Master Light Control, Ballast and Fluorescent Repair

4/@E3AB@3AB=@/B7=< 1=<AB@C1B7=<

Josh Guttig, email â&#x20AC;&#x201C; jgutt7@yahoo.com or call 707.364.1540

Employment Share your love of music. Piano/voice teacher wanted. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 days. $30/hr. Email resume to jobs@ napaschoolofmusic.com

g Adult Services Adult Massage

A Wild Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

%% &"&' 4O`ESab1]\ab`Q][ 8W[9S\\SRg1 /:WQS\aS%&$&'

&g

Alternative Health Well-Being

g Chiropractic

Relax!

Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 13 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856.

Massage & Relaxation

Pleasure Pleasing

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your pleasure, my business.â&#x20AC;? Women, men, couples,..by a Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. and pool available. Will do 707.799.4467(C) or outcalls. 707.228.6883. 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy.

Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of July 31

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) To add zest to mealtime, you might choose food that has been seasoned with red chili peppers, cumin, or other piquant ďŹ&#x201A;avors. Some chimpanzees have a similar inclination, which is why they like to snack on red ďŹ re ants. Judging from the astrological omens, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing you are currently in a phase when your attraction to spicy things is at a peakâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just for dinner but in other areas of your life, as well. I have a suggestion: pursue rowdy fun with adventures that have metaphorical resemblances to red chili peppers, but stay away from those that are like red ďŹ re ants. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) The 19th-century English artist John Constable specialized in painting landscapes. The countryside near his home especially excited him. He said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sound of water escaping from mill dams, willows, old rotten planks, slimy posts, and brickwork, I love such things. They made me a painter, and I am grateful.â&#x20AC;? Take a cue from Constable, Taurus. Spend quality time appreciating the simple scenes and earthy pleasures that nourish your creative spirit. Give your senses the joy of getting ďŹ lled up with vivid impressions. Immerse yourself in experiences that thrill your animal intelligence. GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) This is Grand UniďŹ cation Week for you Geminis. If your left hand has been at war with your right hand, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect moment to declare a truce. If your head and heart have not been seeing eye to eye, they are ready to ďŹ nd common ground and start conspiring together for your greater glory. Are there any rips or rifts in your life? You will generate good fortune for yourself if you get to work on healing them. Have you been alienated from an ally or at odds with a beloved dream or separated from a valuable resource? You have a lot of power to ďŹ x glitches like those. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) In an episode of the

Body Work for Men & Women

g

Strong, Thorough, Intuitive Dependable, Safe. 30+ years experience. Colin CMT 707.823.2990 www.colingodwin@blogspot.com

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

A Finer Touch Swedish massage, body electric experience. Petaluma. Jack CMT. 707.888.8266. In/Outcall.

Healing & Bodywork

Relax, Release, Rejuvenate Massage for men. Muscular, professional, mature. Clean, warm studio in the country, shower available. 707.696.1578.

A Safe Place To Be Real

Bearhands4u

Massage for men, Sebastopol. Mature, strong, Holistic tantric masseuse/sur- Russian River Massage professional. 707.799.0637. rogate. Unhurried, private, Full body massage, Body Elec- Days, evenings, weekends heartfelt. Women â&#x20AC;&#x201D; first time tric experience. In /Out. $60/hr. Outcalls available. visit, 50% discount. Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. Body shaving/trimming availPlease call after 10:30am. able. Bob 707.865.2093. 707.793.2232.

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

TV show Twin Peaks, special agent Dale Cooper gives the following advice to his colleague Harry: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to let you in on a little secret. Every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t plan it, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for it, just let it happen.â&#x20AC;? Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m passing on this advice to you, Cancerian. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect time for you to try out this fun game. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be wise to intensify your commitment to self-care . . . and deepen your devotion to making yourself feel good . . . and increase your artistry at providing yourself with everything you need to thrive.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Sergei Diaghilev was a Russian ballet impresario who founded Ballets Russes, one of the 20th centuryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great ballet companies. At one point in his career he met French playwright Jean Cocteau. Diaghilev dared Cocteau to write a piece for a future Ballets Russes production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Astonish me!â&#x20AC;? he said. It took seven years, but Cocteau met the challenge. He created Parade, a ballet that also featured music by Eric Satie and sets by Pablo Picasso. Now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretend Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Diaghilev and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Cocteau. Imagine that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just told you, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Astonish me!â&#x20AC;? How will you respond? What surprising beauty will you come up with? What marvels will you unleash?

than your head and your gut and your genitals put together.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) The holy grail of skateboarding tricks is called the 1080. To pull it off, a skateboarder has to do three complete 360degree revolutions in mid-air and land cleanly. No one had ever pulled it off until 12-year-old Tom Schaar did it in 2012. Since then, two other teenage boys have managed the same feat. But I predict that a Scorpio skateboarder will break the record sometime soon, managing a 1260, or three and a half full revolutions. Why? First, because your tribe is unusually geared to accomplish peak performances right now. And second, you have a knack for doing complex maneuvers that require a lot of concentration.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Can you think of ways that you have been colonized? Have any powerful institutions ďŹ lled up your brain with ideas and desires that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in alignment with your highest values? For instance, has your imagination gotten imprinted with conditioning that makes you worry that your bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not beautiful enough or your bank accountâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not big enough or your style isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cool enough? If so, Sagittarius, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to get uncolonized. There has rarely been a better time than now to purge any brainwashing that puts you at odds with your deepest self. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) An old Chinese poem tells us that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the true measure of a mountainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatness is not its height but whether it is charming enough to attract dragons.â&#x20AC;? You and I know there are no such things as dragons, so we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take this literally. But what if we treat it as we might a fairy tale? I suggest we draw a metaphorical meaning from it and apply it to your life. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say that you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be impressed with how big and strong anything is; you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give your mojo to people or institutions simply because they have worldly power. Rather, you will be best served by aligning yourself with whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mysterious and fabulous. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more likely to have fun and generate good fortune for yourself by seeking out stories that appeal to your soul instead of your ego. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) The questions you have been asking arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t terrible. But they could be formulated better. They might be framed in such a way as to encourage life to give you crisp insights you can really use rather than what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been getting lately, which are fuzzy conjectures that are only partially relevant. Would you like some inspiration? See if any of these inquiries help hone your spirit of inquiry. 1. What kind of teacher or teaching do you need the most right now? 2. What part of you is too tame, and what can you do about it? 3. What could you do to make yourself even more attractive and interesting to people than you already are? 4. What is the pain that potentially has the most power to awaken your dormant intelligence?

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) Since 1948, the chemical known as warfarin has been used as a pesticide to poison rats. Beginning in 1954, it also became a medicine prescribed to treat thrombosis and other blood ailments in humans. Is there anything in your own life that resembles warfarin? A person or an asset or an activity that can either be destructive or constructive, depending on the situation? The time will soon be right for you to employ that metaphorical version of warfarin in both capacities. Make sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very clear about which is which.

some enterprises in which a careful disorderliness is the true method.â&#x20AC;? So says Ishmael, the hero of Herman Melvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 19th-century novel Moby Dick. He is ostensibly referring to whale hunting, which is his job, but some modern critics suggest heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also talking about the art of storytelling. I suspect his statement applies to a certain enterprise you are currently engaged in, as well. Can you wrap your mind and heart around the phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;careful disorderliness,â&#x20AC;? Pisces? I hope so, because I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the true method. Here are some other terms to describe it: benevolent chaos; strategic messiness; purposeful improvisation; playful experiments.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;My heart was a hysterical, unreliable organ,â&#x20AC;? wrote Vladimir Nabokov in his novel Lolita. We have all gone through phases when we could have uttered a similar statement. But I doubt that this is one of those times for you, Libra. On the contrary. I suspect your heart is very smart right nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;poised and lucid and gracious. In fact, I suggest you regard the messages coming from your heart as more trustworthy than any other part of youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wiser

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žš NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 1-AUGUST 6, 201 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We’re here to help you help yourself. SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

Starts in Oct. YA approved school. www.anandaseva.org/yoga/yoga-teacher-training OR 707.239.3650

Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

• Subutex/Suboxone available • Providing Treatment since 1984 • Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

BECOME A YOGA TEACHER or simply deepen your yoga practice at Ananda Seva Yoga Teacher Training.

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone.

• MediCal accepted

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

2013 Healdsburg Guitar Festival August 9–11, Santa Rosa, CA – 800.477.4437 — www.festivalofguitars.com

Move In Specials 5 X 10…

Tall Toad’s 25th Anniversary Party

starting as low as $ 30 per month

Friday August 2 at the Mystic – Free Admission with Ticket – David Luning - John Courage - Teresa Tudury – Guitar Raffle

10 X 10…

starting as low as $ 75 per month

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

NEW Shop - My Chic Boutique In the Windsor Town Green! New & Consignment — affordable women`s clothing & accessories. Plus sizes available with plenty to choose from. — 9121 Windsor Road 707.480.2269

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

707-546-0000 707-578-3299 B-12 Shots Happy Hour! – Thursdays 4–6 PM Only – $18 (30% off) WALK-INS ONLY. For energy, immune, fatigue, anxiety @ the Naturopathic Wellness Center @ the Integrative Medical Clinic of SR - Dr. Dana Michaels ND and Dr. Moses Goldberg ND — 175 Concourse Blvd. 707.284.9200

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at - www.PeaceinMedicine.org

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE

Rodney Strong Summer Concert Series

707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

Live on the Green. Sat Aug 3 BWB: Rick Braun, Kirk Whalum & Norman Brown. Sun Aug 4 Dwight Yoakam. Box Office: 707.869.1595 rodneystrong.com

DONATE A CAR

Sonoma-Cutrer Jazzy Summer Nights

Free towing. Running or not. Tax deductible. Help the Polly Klaas Foundation 800.322.4234.

August 17, Bill Champlin with Special Friends. 707.237.348 shop.sonomacutrer.com

Award Winning Dog Training ~ Dog Boarding Doggie Day Care 707.542.2066

Win Free Stuff bohemian.com/northbay/freeStuff

2404 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa

www.olivetkennel.com

PRESENTED BY

LABOR DAY WEEKEND

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!*

Celebrate Sonoma County’s finest wine and food while supporting our kids and our community. *Visa Signature ® account holders receive special savings and perks.

SonomaWineCountryWeekend.com


NBB1331