Issuu on Google+

Pick Pick’s Pick’ k s Dri Drive-In ve-In e In n p13 Marin M arin Ba Ballet llet att 50 p23 p23 Unconventional U ncon nventional Wisdom Wisdom p28

A Picture of Tragedy A brutal bru utal Santa Santa Rosa Rosa mur murder der h has as a grieving grieviing family family ple p pleading ading ffor or ccompassion o passion instead om i stead of revenge in revenge RACH RACHEL HEL DOVEY REPORTS REPO ORTS P P8 8

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Ĺ´

EExperience xperience a O nce iinn a Lifetime Lf L etime Li Once O pera EExtravaganza xtravaganza Opera

WEILL HALL AT SONOMA SONOMA O S STATE TAT TE UNI UNIVERSITY VERSITY

BVS 0]VS[WO\ O\R ESWZZ 6OZZ Q]`RWOZZg BVS0]VS[WO\O\RESWZZ6OZZQ]`RWOZZg WW\dWbSg]cb]Oa^SQWOZ^S`T]`[O\QS \dWbSg]c b] O a^SQWOZ^S`T]`[O\QS ObbVS`S\]e\SR5`SS\;caWQ1S\bS` O b VS`S\]e\SR5`SS\;caWQ1 bb Q S\bS` /\W\bS`\ObW]\OZZgOQQZOW[SRd]QOZWab / \ W\bS`\ObW]\OZZgOQQZOW[SR d]QOZWab eWZZbOYSg]c]\O`WQVX]c`\SgPSg]\R e WZZ bOYSg]c ]\ O `WQVX]c`\SgPSg]\R g]c`Sf^SQbObW]\a g ] `Sf^SQbObW]\a ]c BO`O3``OcUVbAc\ROg/^`WZ B O`O3``OcUVbAc\ROg/^`WZ ab.!^[ ab.!^[

‘‘A feat of visual and acoustic wonder‌’’ Architectural Digest

UPCOMING CONCERTS

BO`O3``OcUVb B O O`O3``OcUVb

3\bS` bVS^`][] Q]RS 3\bS`bVS^`][]Q]RS 0]VS[WO\ObQVSQY]cb 0 ]VS[WO\ Ob QVSQY]cb O\RUSbO\SfQZcaWdS# O \RUSbO\SfQZcaWdS# RWaQ]c\b]TT]TabO\RO`R R WaQ]c\b]T T]TabO\RO`R bbWQYSb^`WQSa WQYSb^`WQSa  BWQYSbaO`SZW[WbSR B WQYSba O`S ZW[WbSR  USbg]c`ab]ROg U Sbg]c`ab]ROg

Lila Downs Thu, Apr 18, 8pm This theatrical Mexican singer-songwriter mixes indigenous Mexican roots music with blues, jazz and soul. Her most recent recording, “Pecados y Milagros� won a 2013 Grammy.

Tara Erraught* Sun, Apr 21, 3pm The brilliant Irish mezzo-soprano became an overnight sensation when she replaced an ailing colleague at the Bavarian State Opera. Don’t miss “the new Queen of Bel Canto� in her North American recital debut tour. *PART OF THE JAN SHREM AND MARIA MANETTI SHREM VOCAL ARTS SERIES.

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra Sat, Apr 27, 8pm Hailed as Ĺ“$PHULFDĹ‘VĹľQHVWFKDPEHURUFKHVWUDĹ” by Public Radio International, they are led by +FĂ´SFZ,BIBOF, who critics call Ĺ“DFRQGXFWRU RIXQFRPPRQLQWHOOHFWLQVLJKWDQGPXVLFDO LQWHJULW\Ĺ” with Ĺ“XQGHQLDEOHFKDULVPDĹ”

ON C CAMPUS AMPUS PRODUCTIONS PRODUCTIONS PRESENT PRESENTS, S, IN CONJUNCTION CONJUNCTIION WITH T THE HE H H.. A ANDRÉA NDRÉA N NEVES EVES & B BARTON AR RTON E EVANS VA ANS S SOCIAL OCIAL JUSTICE JUSTICE LECTURE LECTURE SERIES SERIES

An evening with Professor Cornel West Thu, Apr 11, 7pm A Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice at Union Theological Seminary and Professor Emeritus at Princeton University, his greatest passion is to keep alive the powerful legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. TICKETS TICKET S: 11-866-955-6040 866-955-6040 GREEN G MUSIC MUSIC CENTER gmc.sonoma.edu gmc.sonoma.edu

U[Q  a]\][O SRc U[Qa]\][OSRc &$$'##$"  & $ $  '##  $ "

V]\]`OPZS V]\]`OPZS [S\bW]\ [S\bW]\

Ĺľ N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

4

GEM FAIRE April 26, 266, 27, 28

May 3, 4, 5

SSonoma CCounty t FFairgrounds i d

Marin M i Center C

{ Grace Pavilion, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa }

{ Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael }

Gems

FRI. 12-6 | SAT. 10-6 | SUN. 10-5 - General admission $7 weekend pass Ăź Huge selection from around the world! Ăź Buy direct from importers & wholesalers Ăź Jewelry repair while you shop

Beads

Ăź Free hourly door prize drawings

*Br

ing this ad for

one

FREE admission GemFaire.com

Crystals Minerals Findings

503.252.8300 info@gemfaire.com

*Not valid with other offer. One coupon per customer.

Bohemian 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Did you see this

?

Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor

On Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 10:00am, an elderly woman fell in Sebastopol on the sidewalk of Healdsburg Avenue between Florence Avenue and Murphy Avenue. If you have any information about this accident, please call Private Investigator Scott Wilmore at: 707.484.0688

Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Interns Estefany Gonzalez, Taylor May

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Jasmine Rios, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205 TH UAL

18 ANN

shes, Bagels, Tasting, BBQ Hot Dogs, Kni Challah Baking Contest & Plates ean ran iter Med les, p, Pick Challah, Matzah Ball Sou kie Corner’ Coo & gel ‘Ku le’s Circ hip The Friends

& DO! LOTS TO SEE ncing Da ish Live Music $ Jew Art & Gifts aic Jud $ ces our Res Community

Simcha Sim mccha Sunday Sun day Sonoma County’S $Jewish Cultural Festival $ $ CCelebrating All Things Jewish!

April 21, 2013 12 ~ 4 pm Free Admission Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Building 1351 Maple Avenue across from the fairgrounds

Advertising Account Managers

H FOOD! LOTS OF JEWIS

ts Activities th Art & Craf inting Kids’ Area wiEn inment, Face Pa ta ter e, us Ho Bouncy ÀÊ*Ă€ÂˆĂ˘iĂƒ >Ă•ĂƒĂŠ>“ˆÂ?ÞÊ Ă€i>“iĂ€ ÞÊUĂŠ œœ Ă€iiĂŠ-VÂœÂœÂŤĂŠÂœvĂŠViĂŠ Ă€i>“Ê-ĂŒĂ€ 28-4222 : www.jccsoco.org or

For more information

707/5

NEW THIS FREE Shuttle Bus YEAR

for Seniors To the fest ival

Pick up .................... .. Windsor .......... ..........11 Am (Senior Center: 92 31 Foxwood Drive) Pick up .................... . Oakmont .......... .........11:30 Am (First Community Ban k: Corner of White Oa k & Oakmont) Arrive Festival ..... .............................. ............12 pm Pick up ................. Rohnert Park ..... ..........12:30 pm (Burlington Coat Fac tory - Park on Redw ood Dr.) Pick up ................... Sebastopol .......... .......12:45 pm (Community Center , 390 Morris St.) Arrive Festival ..... .............................. ............1 pm Home from the fes tival Depart .................... ... Festival .......... ..........3 pm Drop off .................... Oakmont ............... ....3:15 pm Drop off .................... . Windsor .......... ..........3:45 pm Depart .................... ... Festival .......... ..........4 pm Drop off .................. Sebastopol .......... .......4:15 pm Drop off ................ Rohnert Park ..... ..........4:45 pm

Lynda Rael, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Pampered Feet Reflexology Center

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager

BVhhV\ZI]ZgVen

DcZ=djg;ddi IgZVibZci includes arms, shoulders, neck, & back and herbal foot soak

'*

dcan

L]dadkZh?Zhh^Z?^c\4 LdbZc!BZc! ;Vb^a^Zh;g^ZcYh <gdjehd[+dgbdgZeaZVhZXVaaV]ZVY#

<^[i8VgYh6kV^aVWaZ 9dlcidlcHVciVGdhV *'&)i]HigZZi!HVciVGdhV ,%,#*'+#&,-9dlcidlcEZiVajbV &+&@ZcijX`nHigZZi!EZiVajbV ,%,#,,-#,--lll#_Zhh^Z_^c\hbVhhV\Z#Xdb

Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Mark and Houston Herczog courtesy of Annette Keys. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

20% OFF All Glass (except Mobius)

nb THE MAGIC BUS Thing is, she could really just pack up and leave at any time. I mean, I gave her the keys. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a trust thing. And she loves driving a stick.

This photo was submitted by Chase Ottney of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

FFREE 420 t-shirt to 1st 50 t0 customers at 9am in SR & at 10am 0a Napa p

FFREE GIFT for every ccustomer

FREE 420 t t-shirt to 1st 50 customers at p in SR 3pm

llilive glass l blowing by 2 local * r t artists

1 random customer will win big!!

rolling contests withh great prizess

Events in Santa Rosa & Napa Only, Sale applies to all stores. SANTA ROSA ONLY: 9AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9PM ALL OTHER STORES: 11AM-8PM

3372 SANTA ROSA AVE, SANTA ROSA, 707-545-4975 1099 4TH ST, SAN RAFAEL , 415-457-2420 16 WESTERN AVE, PETALUMA, 707.762.9420 110 SOSCOL AVE, NAPA, 707-226-7420

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;According to the family, Mark refused to call police, fearing that officers would shoot his son.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; THE PAPER P8 The Best Little Burger Stand in Cloverdale D I N ING P 13

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Whipping Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at MTC STAGE P 2 5

Film Festivals in Sonoma, Tiburon FI LM P 2 6 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p13 Restaurants p15 Wineries p17

Swirl p17 Culture Crush p22 Arts & Ideas p23 Stage p25 Film p26

Music p28 Concerts & Clubs p29 A&E p33 Astrology p38 ClassiďŹ ed p39

 %URRNZRRG $YH 6DQWD 5RVD  0RQ¤6DWDP¤SP6XQDP¤SPÂ&#x2020;ZZZZEXFRPVDQWDURVD

%LUGVHHG  )HHGHUV  %LUGEDWKV  2SWLFV  1DWXUH *LIWV  %RRNV

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Santa Rosa & Napa

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Butting out In support of local smoking bans BY NINA TEPEDINO

T

he list of toxic substances in the air around us can be daunting to consider, but one of the most important yet preventable of them all is secondhand smoke, which is a lethal, unseen, almost phantom-like toxin that permeates the air in which we live and breathe. A recent joint study from British and Chinese researchers published in the January 2013 issue of the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine strongly links secondhand smoke with both severe and mild dementia, damaging parts of the brain responsible for reason. My sense of reason tells me that our acute sense of smell and our capacity for compassion has become immune to the dangers and that we cannot escape the “silent spring” that infringes on our lives during every season of the year.

Secondhand smoke from cigarettes is still allowed to continue in many cities and towns here in Sonoma County. Fortunately, Rohnert Park, Petaluma, Sebastopol and the county do have smoking bans in place for multi-unit housing and bus stops, but we need to urge the City Council of Santa Rosa and other cities to enforce smoking bans in multi-unit housing, bus stops and other public areas. Without such enforcement, elders, children and medically sensitive residents are subjected to the hazards of secondhand smoke on a daily basis. During the last couple of years, I have devoted volunteer time with the Northern California Center for Well Being, where I have joined their expert and passionate advocacy staff for workshops, presentations to the City Council of Santa Rosa and have unofficially designated myself as a representative for my fellow elders who suffer the effects and health hazards from secondhand smoke every day and every night. My heart tells me it is right to want change, and that it is right to not be quiet or to not give up. I keep waiting for my city of Santa Rosa to listen. Nina Tepedino lives in downtown Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Stop the Pipeline

I Like the Ads

I am asking for help to stop the Keystone-XL pipeline. For me, it is a moral obligation I have to my children and to future generations. The pipeline will enable a substantial escalation of the development and burning of the Alberta Tar Sands, one of our dirtiest carbon polluting energy sources.

I agree with Mr. Rick Call in his response to the comment made by a reader about doing away with capitalism (Letters, April 3). If it weren’t for the privately owned businesses in this community, spending their hard-earned dollars in hopes of attracting new customers, the Bohemian could not exist as the advertisement vehicle it is. I always enjoy the advertisements of local businesses in the Bohemian, and that’s why I look at it. However, I usually don’t agree with many of the ideas expressed in the articles and cartoons.

Climate change is real and dangerous. It is now understood that Earth’s massive ecosystem can be affected by human activities. Our centuries-old habit of burning fossil fuels has affected the planet’s atmosphere in a harmful way. Continuing to develop and burn our known fossil-fuel reserves will create catastrophic climate chaos with deadly consequences for our planet. Instead, we should direct our efforts to more rapidly deploying clean, renewable energy sources. It is possible. Germany’s “Energiewende” made a strong commitment to do this 12 years ago, and they have made great progress. I believe we can, too. Please write the president and ask him to stop the Keystone-XL, pipeline, and go to 350.org to become active and learn more.

JOELLEN DENICOLA Nutrition Director, Ceres Community Project

Kudos for Angelo Wonderful article on Angelo Chambrone (“Fresh Blood,” March 27)! I’ve known this kid (man? Ha-ha) since he was 11. I worked with him and his parents at Sweet Lou’s, and all I can say is that his passion for food ran as deep as it does now. I’ve had the pleasure of enjoying his amazing menu at Barolo. They definitely scored with him in the kitchen. Congrats, Angelo!

NATALIA JARAMILLO Via online

BILL COBB Via online

The End of War “The war that will end all wars.” Yes, this is what we were told in middle school during the ’40s—that, yes indeed, World War I was the last war for the world. Maybe it was because of the mustard gas that did its evil thing before the gas masks could be made en masse. Maybe the slaughter of teenaged men and those in their early 20s was so terrible, twisted bodies lying in the mud or light snow. Maybe this was sobering. What about now? World War I didn’t end war. World War II followed, Korea came and went, and now, what of this in our immediate here and now? No one knows what Korea will do next. The premier war to protest, Vietnam, came and went, and the lesson of war’s negative effects was not yet a hit at home. The early ’80s saw a lot of war in Latin America and elsewhere. And of course the wars in the Middle East. What will it take to end war? And so World War I did not end war. We can only hope that if World War III ever comes, it will end the idea that might makes right in order to survive. Here’s hoping.

MICHELLE ROBIN Santa Rosa

THIS MODERN WORLD

No More Meat The new link between meat consumption and heart disease, discovered by Dr. Stanley Hazen of the Cleveland Clinic, is just the latest evidence linking meat consumption to killer diseases that cripple, then kill, 1.3 million Americans annually. We have sacrificed the lives of 10,000 American personnel and trillions of dollars in waging two wars to avenge the deaths of 2,600 Americans in the 9-11 attacks. When will we wage a bloodless, low-cost war on the killer meat-based diet, potentially responsible for as many as 1.3 million American deaths annually?

LARRY ROGAWITZ Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 Farewell to Roger Ebert,

famed screenwriter of ‘Beyond the Valley of the Dolls’

2 PG&E to pay $390,000

fine for spying on critics of SmartMeters in Sebastopol

3 Bret Michaels and his

hair extensions will perform at Lake Sonoma on June 8

4 Spiffy new Behrens

Street bridge installed over Napa River

5 Win tickets to see Travis

Tritt at the Lincon Theater in Yountville at bohemian.com

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Rants

7

Paper THE

Rachel Dovey

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

8

A BROKEN HEART Houston Herczog’s mother, Marilyn, holds a photo of Mark and Houston Herczog at Houston’s 2009 graduation.

Crying for Mercy The family of Mark Herczog, a father killed by his son, pleads for compassion as a court trial looms BY RACHEL DOVEY

I

n November of 2011, Mark Herczog wrote a short, desperate note on his calendar for the week of the 21st. It was about his son.

“It said, ‘Get help for Houston,’” his sister Annette Keys recalls. It had been an increasingly difficult year for the Herczog

family, during which 21-year-old Houston seemed to have been replaced by a different person. He had always been shy, but according to his aunt, he now shunned social interaction, waiting until after 11pm to go to the gym so he could work out alone. He stole his mom’s Adderall. He said strange things with an empty, vacant gaze that

his family now refers to as “the look.” In early November, when he crashed his dad’s green Caravan and smashed his head into the windshield, he didn’t check to make sure his passengers were OK. Instead, his aunt, who was in the vehicle at the time, says he asked her about the sandwich he’d placed between them, in the center console of the car.

Houston’s family knew something was very wrong, but they didn’t know what it was. They didn’t know that three psychiatrists would eventually diagnose him with schizophrenia. They didn’t know that two of them would be appointed by Sonoma County Superior Court. Around 1am on Nov. 21, Houston Herczog stabbed his father in the kitchen of his Rincon Valley home, using at least four knives to gash and puncture his body 60 times. He tried to cut off his head. He would later tell a court-appointed psychiatrist that he’d thought he was performing an exorcism with a cardboard version of his dad. When police arrived, he told them flatly, “I killed him.” Mark was declared dead at 2:52am by Memorial Hospital, his face so tattered that, according to the coroner’s report, his right ear was barely attached. He was never able to help his son. Houston’s defense has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity, a verdict that would likely allow him to be sent to a maximum-security facility for the criminally insane, such as Napa State Hospital. Three psychiatrists have backed up this claim. On the eve of Houston’s juried trial, however, the district attorney called for a rarely requested additional opinion, which contradicts the others’ assertions of insanity. Herczog faces a possible murder charge that could land him in prison, where his family worries he won’t have access to the treatment they believe he needs. Tragically, the Herczog family has landed in the criminal justice system partly because of their initial reluctance to use it. In 2007, Sonoma County police shot and killed 16-year-old Jeremiah Chass and 30-year-old Richard Desantis during psychotic episodes. Mark Herczog’s daughter, sister and exwife all say Mark refused to call police despite signs of Houston’s escalating violence for fear that officers would shoot his son. As a judge prepares to sentence Houston in a Sonoma County courtroom, Mark’s surviving family is not crying for blood.

‘He had that look in his eye, and he said, “I feel really violent.”’ ‘I’m Scared’ Cameron McDowell, Mark’s oldest daughter, remembers a chilling moment of foresight soon before her dad was killed. At her home in North Carolina, she’d just gotten off the phone with her aunt, who’d described the vacant look that would slip over her half-brother sometimes, saying it almost seemed like he left his body and someone else came in and took his place. “I told my husband, ‘I’m scared Houston is that kid who’s going to walk into a supermarket and open fire,’” she recalls. This was in mid-November, but she’d suspected something was off for roughly a year and a half. The brother that she describes as shy, creative and gentle as a child had become quieter and more distant. He’d quit his band and instead spent hours playing guitar alone. McDowell’s dad once told her jokingly on the phone that her brother was such a loner, he wished Houston go out drinking if it meant he’d be with friends. On her son’s third birthday, McDowell received a card from the family that Houston had signed, “I hope you have a shitty birthday.” McDowell wasn’t alone in her concern. Her aunt, Annette Keys, noticed him changing in 2010, after he graduated from Santa Rosa High School’s ArtQuest program and began taking

classes at SRJC. He read Kant and Nietzsche obsessively. He would begin a movie with the family and then get up 30 minutes later to go sit by himself at the computer without explaining why. Keys lives in Ohio, but she came to Santa Rosa to visit her brother Mark in early November, when she was in the car accident with Houston. On Nov. 11, the day before she flew back to Ohio, she asked Houston about the change she noticed in him. “I said, ‘Honey, I feel like something happened to you. Did something happen that you’re not telling us about?’ And he gave me this sideways glance and said, ‘Maybe I’ll tell you about it sometime.’ It was the creepiest thing.” In March of 2011, Houston’s mother and Mark’s ex-wife Marilyn Meschalk-Herczog began taking her son to see a private psychiatrist, Dr. Dennis Glick. Like other family members, Marilyn was increasingly concerned about her son. He was argumentative. He couldn’t keep a job. He would act out in bizarre ways, like refusing to follow his employers’ dress code. The three psychiatrists who assessed Houston in jail reviewed Glick’s notes, which suggest several possible diagnoses for the then-20-year-old Houston—major depression, developmental issues and schizoaffective disorder. According to Dr. Alan Abrams’ review of Glick’s notes, the initial psychiatrist did not recognize that Houston was suffering symptoms of schizophrenia, despite his early note on schizoaffective disorder, and focused instead on his depression, prescribing him an antidepressant. Glick also noted Houston’s substance-abuse history, which he writes included Adderall that Houston stole from his mom, along with alcohol, LSD, marijuana and other prescription medications. In his interview with Dr. Abrams, Houston said that he only took LSD once, in the ninth grade, and in his interview with Dr. Donald Apostle, he said he smoked pot in high school but stopped in the summer of 2009 because it made him feel

psychotic. According to the review of Glick’s notes, Houston stopped taking Adderall—after being prescribed an antidepressant— until June, with sporadic use through September. Because Houston continued to steal his mother’s Adderall, Marilyn eventually told him he needed to leave her Forestville home and live with his dad. But on Nov. 19, she says, two days before he killed Mark, Houston came back to her house. “He had that look in his eye, and he said, ‘I feel really violent,’” she recalls. “I said, ‘Are you afraid you’re going to hurt me?’” Marilyn says that she followed Houston through her home, out to the attached garage. As she descended the steps leading into the garage, her son grabbed her by the arm and threw her. Then he locked her in, asking her through the door if she was afraid of him. “I said, ‘No. You’re my child. I love you and I trust you, and I don’t think you’re going to hurt me,” she recalls, crying. “I had told him, ‘If you’re feeling violent, go out and run. Run around. It’s dark out and nobody will see you. Just run as fast as you can. Go up the hill. Just run.’” He unlocked the door and ran outside the house. In an interview with Dr. Abrams recounting the same night, Marilyn says that when checked her purse, more Adderall was gone.

‘Don’t Call the Police’ After he threw her across the garage that night, Marilyn says that she called her therapist, who told her to call the police. In California, officers can take mentally ill people who are a danger to themselves or others into temporary custody in what’s known as a 5150, or involuntary psychiatric hold. She called her ex-husband and told him what her therapist had said. “He said, ‘No, no, please don’t call the police,’” she recalls. “I said, ‘Why not?’ And he said, ‘They shoot those kids. Please don’t call them. That’s my son.’” Mark’s sister and

) 10

Radio Days KSRO 1350AM and its radio-dial siblings (97.7 the River, Hot 101.7, Froggy 92.9 and Mix 104.9) have been sold to local owners by Connecticut-based parent company Maverick Media. The assemblage of new investors is led by former KSRO owner and Sonoma County resident Lawrence Amaturo. The sale was announced to employees on Monday, says KSRO news producer Tony Landucci. “I’m definitely optimistic with the ownership being local,” he says. “I’m excited to see how it will be different having local ownership rather than someone on the other side of country.” Amaturo, who is a co-owner of Nissan and Kia of Santa Rosa, sold KSRO and three other stations in 2000 for $30 million, reportedly paying $4.5 million for the radio properties in this deal. Maverick Media was not exactly popular with local listeners. When afternoon host Steve Jaxon of The Drive was cut in 2010, listeners protested and he was back on the air within weeks. In 2011, the company killed popular hard-rock station 101.7 the Fox and replaced it with a Top 40 format, prompting a protest outside the station. And when the Good Food Hour with John Ash was axed from KSRO last year, the response was a mix of anger and confusion. “Everybody’s very happy, because no one liked being owned by a company in Connecticut that didn’t know anything about Sonoma County,” says Jaxon of the sale. On Amaturo’s ownership, Jaxon has nothing but enthusiasm. “I was there in 1996 when he bought the stations,” he says. “He was new to the market then, but now he’s been here 25 years, and he knows the market inside out. It’s gonna be a great day for radio.”—Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Instead, they want treatment for Houston and changes in a system that too often criminalizes—and even kills—the mentally ill.

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

daughter report similar conversations. Both say that when the idea of a 5150 was brought up, Mark insisted that the family refrain from calling the police. McDowell says that in October, her dad told her he’d looked into an involuntary psychiatric hold. “He said that there had been some cases where parents had done a 5150, and the police have shot and killed their kids,” she says. In Sonoma County, two mentally ill individuals died after their families made distress calls to local law enforcement. During a 2007 psychotic break in which he sat on his little brother clutching a two-inch Leatherman knife, 16-year-old Sebastopol resident Jeremiah Chass was shot 11 times by the sheriff’s deputies who answered his mother’s distress call. He died in their driveway. A month later, bipolar 30-yearold Richard Desantis was also shot as he ran out of his house toward the sergeant and two Santa Rosa officers who responded to his wife’s call. According to the Desantis family’s attorney, he was unarmed when he was shot. He also died in front of his home. Not long afterward in January 2008, 24-year-old Jesse Hamilton, suffering from schizophrenia and holding a butcher knife, was shot and killed by a Santa Rosa police officer after a staffer at his group home called 911. While few national statistics on the subject exist, the nonprofit Treatment Advocacy Center reports that police kill mentally ill people in so-called justifiable homicides four times as often as they kill people who are not mentally ill. According to McDowell, her father told her in October that he was too unsure about what Houston might do if he called the police, and that he didn’t want to lose his son.

Walls of Blood Several hours before Mark died, Marilyn says that her youngest daughter, 17-year-old Savannah Herczog, called to warn her that

Courtesy Annette Keys

10 Herczog ( 9

CAUTIOUSLY PROTECTIVE Mark Herczog knew about instances of police shooting and killing those with mental illness,

and resisted calling the police during Houston’s episodes for fear of what they might do to his son.

the strange, vacant look was coming over Houston again. She recalls thinking that he might come over to her house, safe in the knowledge that she had changed the locks. The next phone call Marilyn received was after midnight. It was her daughter again, saying that Houston had stabbed their father. Marilyn says she raced to Rincon Valley, still unaware of the magnitude of the crime. She remembers thinking the attack had probably resulted in some kind of minor injury, like scissor wounds in her ex-husband’s arm. But as she approached Mark’s Parkhurst Drive home, she saw police cars and paramedics surrounding the yellow house with brown trim. She says that her daughter ran into her arms, crying. She told her that Mark had been taken away, and that he hadn’t been moving at all. The two women were taken into police custody for questioning. Several hours later, still in custody, they learned that Mark was dead. After she was let out of police custody, Marilyn says that she went back to the house and went inside. The kitchen walls were covered in blood. She saw a denim jacket sitting on the back of a chair

that was also covered in splatters of blood. She picked it up and put it on. According to Mark Herczog’s autopsy report, a chop wound on his scalp exposed his skull. His left eyelid was punctured. Most of his right ear dangled from his face. Ten horizontal, overlapping stab wounds surrounded his neck just above his thyroid, where Houston tried to remove his head. His entire body down to the soles of his feet was covered in blood. McDowell says the condition of Mark’s remains meant she wasn’t able to say goodbye to her father’s body; although she flew to Santa Rosa from North Carolina, she had to say goodbye to his hand. She remembers entering the funeral home, where her dad had been laid out in a body bag with one scratched-up hand poking out. A flesh-colored blanket had been draped over the body bag. She remembers thinking that it looked oddly like a Muppet, and that because her dad had a twisted sense of humor, she felt like he was with her as she had this thought.

‘Oh, dear. Oh, God.’ Three psychiatrists have diagnosed Houston Herczog with paranoid schizophrenia, arguing

that he killed his father in the midst of a psychotic break. As Dr. Robbin Broadman writes: “There is no non-psychotic motive that I can see for the violence that occurred. He and his father may have had a disagreement, but the extent of violence goes beyond what one would expect from a stabbing in anger. There were 60 stab wounds.” The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) defines schizophrenia as a chronic brain disorder that afflicts roughly 1 percent of the American population. It stems from a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and is often characterized by paranoia, hallucinations and a lack of interest in socialization. It typically exhibits between the ages of 16 and 30. Although NIMH cautions that most people with schizophrenia are not violent, certain tendencies, like delusions of persecution, can lead to violence. “If a person with schizophrenia becomes violent, the violence is usually directed at family members and tends to take place at home,” NIMH’s website states. Considering the match-up between Houston’s behaviors the year before he killed Mark and

three psychiatrists, based on her contact with Houston beginning in December of 2011, soon after he was jailed. She asked that the Bohemian clarify that she was simply speaking from her own experience and not as an official spokesperson for NAMI. Coleman recalls that Houston’s symptoms in prison were indicative of paranoid schizophrenia. She describes him as shy, depressed and traumatized, and speaking in disjointed sentences. “I really believe, from my gut, from my background, from my experience, from my expertise, that Houston is mentally ill,” she says. “I believe that he does not belong in a prison. He really needs help and belongs in a hospital where he can get help with his mental illness.”

‘Evil was frantic, squeezing my mind. I had to stop it. It wasn’t my dad.’ Trial Awaits Despite the opinions of three psychiatrists, an insanity defense can be a tough sell. A 1991 study commissioned by the National Institute of Mental Health and published by the Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry found that less than 1 percent of county court cases involved the insanity defense, and, of those, only around one in four was successful. The nation’s jail cells now contain up to 400,000 mentally ill, according to NAMI, which estimates the cost of housing nearly half a million mentally ill to be $9 billion a year. In California, defendants cannot

have committed their crime under the influence of drugs or alcohol when pleading not guilty by reason of insanity, a detail that is being debated in the Herczog case. In his blood sample at the time of arrest, Houston tested positive for amphetamine and dextromethorphan, two common ingredients in cough syrup. He also reported that he’d continued to take Adderall. Shortly before press time, the deputy district attorney prosecuting the Herczog case, Robert Waner, received a fourth doctor’s report from Dr. James Misset. While district attorney spokesperson Terry Menshek declined to discuss the document with the Bohemian, the Press Democrat’s Paul Payne reports that Misset’s evaluation concludes that Houston was acting under a drug-induced psychosis and not a mental illness. The two court-appointed reports do discuss Houston’s drug use when he killed Mark. “He did use Adderall, but his drug level was insignificant, and the duration of his psychosis both preceded and continued after his relative cessation of Adderall use,” Dr. Apostle writes. Dr. Broadman writes that although Houston’s drug use may have exacerbated his psychotic symptoms, “it is clear that he was having hallucinations and delusions before the drug use began. His symptoms were chronic and escalated over a period of time, beginning in his late teens. This is the course of schizophrenic illness.” The district attorney’s office declined comment for this story, citing the open case. Silver, Houston’s defense lawyer, says that she’s never seen a district attorney deviate from California’s standard practice of calling in two court-appointed physicians and seeking the additional evaluation of a third. “I question whether he [Waner] believes in the insanity defense,” she says. “Some people don’t, even though it’s law.” Ironically, the greatest doubt in the three doctors’ reports prior to Dr. Misset’s arises over

whether Herczog’s symptoms are actually too perfect—in other words, whether he could be faking schizophrenia. Dr. Broadman examined this most critically, quoting a jail psychiatrist who believed Houston might exaggerate and amplify his symptoms. “He speaks in sophisticated language and seems to be logical much of the time,” she writes. “In my opinion, [he] has schizophrenia and experiences genuine delusions and hallucinations. However, he is intelligent and understands the hospital will offer him a better chance of treatment and relative comfort compared with prison. This would be a motive to exaggerate his symptoms. Even if he is exaggerating his symptoms, that does not mean he was not psychotic at the time of the offense. I believe he was.” In the middle of her evaluation of Houston, hearing his explanation of why he’d killed his father, Broadman asked him if he felt an insanity plea was to his advantage. According to her report, Houston’s reply was simple and brief: “I’m fucked either way.”

‘Not Crying for Blood’ Rallying behind Houston, the Herczog family feels misrepresented by a legal system acting on behalf of Mark. In a court case surrounding a brutal killing like Mark’s, his family might normally be the loudest voices demanding justice for the loved one. “But we’re not crying for blood,” says Keys. “We’re crying for mercy.” Mark’s sister adds that she believes if her brother had survived his attack, he wouldn’t have pressed charges. Her portrait of him is of a man lost, desperate— unsure what to do as he watched his son change. As he wrote on his calendar in November two years ago, he knew his son needed something. He just didn’t know what. “All he wanted was to help his kid,” she says.

11 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

his ongoing paranoid delusions in prison—of everything from TVs speaking directly to him to the prison being a concentration camp—Dr. Abrams writes in a report dated Nov. 1, 2012: “With a very high degree of medical certainty, I believe that Mr. Herczog was insane at the time of the killing.” Dr. Abrams was retained by Houston’s defense, public defender Karen Silver, and the two psychiatrists brought in by the impartial court agreed. Dr. Donald Apostle and Dr. Broadman examined Houston in reports dated Dec. 3, 2012, and Feb. 18, 2013, and both concluded that a not guilty by reason of insanity verdict is applicable. Along with Houston’s behavioral patterns and the sudden and gruesome nature of his crime, the psychiatrists also interviewed him about what he believed was happening while he was stabbing his dad. The two accounts match up: he thought his father was trying to speak metaphorically to him about incest. He says he thought his dad was speaking symbolically and “in code.” “Evil was frantic, squeezing my mind. I had to stop it. It wasn’t my dad,” he told Dr. Broadman. Houston told Dr. Apostle that was when he grabbed a knife and began stabbing his father, who seemed to him to be plastic and unreal. Both psychiatrists note that Houston was shaking while he talked. Dr. Apostle writes that after recounting the stabbing, he stopped, sighed and said, “Oh, dear. Oh, God.” Silver declined the Bohemian’s request to interview Houston in jail. At a court appearance on March 29, he stared at the ground, his shoulders hunched, and rocked slowly back and forth. His hair was short and unkempt and he wore glasses that he kept pushing up as they slid down his nose. He was unrecognizable from the thin, smiling boy with high cheekbones and wavy, blonde hair who hugged his smiling dad in graduation photos from 2010. The National Alliance on Mental Illness’ (NAMI) jail liaison Carol Coleman agrees with the

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

ųŴ

Support local parks!

BECOME A PARKS MEMBER Sonoma County

Regional Parks

Member

Annual Membership Includes: D12-month day-use parking pass DFree night of camping DMap to all county parks DProgram & merchandise discounts DLocal merchant discounts DAdmission to Tolay Fall Festival

Individual/Family Golden Years (60yrs+) Access

$69 $39 $23

(SHUPDQHQWO\GLVDEOHGDYDLODEOHDW3DUNV2I¿FHRQO\

Get your Parks Membership: On-line at sonomacountyparks.org,or at Sonoma Outfitters, REI Santa Rosa, Oliver’s Markets, Sebastopol Hardware, Frizelle Enos Feeds, or staffed park entry stations

sonomacountyparks.org

707/565-2041

The School of Shiatsu and Massage Recognized as one of the world’s premier learning institutes for aquatic and land-based healing arts. We offer: ∑ Certified Training Programs ∑ Individual Classes ∑ Personal Growth ∑ CE hours 800.693.3296 707.987.3801 bodyworkcareerinstitute.com registration@bodyworkcareerinstitute.com

Sebastopol California

WE BUY GOLD

Sell Local in Old Downtown Windsor 707.836.1840

Fast results for busy women

ABSOLUTELY APRIL CAMP APR 22 – MAY 17

707.217.3795

www.SebastopolBootCamp.com

SMALLTOWN, U.S.A. Pick’s, now owned by Claudio Clow, above, has scarcely changed since it opened in 1923.

Meet Me at Pick’s After 90 years, Pick’s Drive-In is still the heart of Cloverdale BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

I

n 1984, Claudio Clow went to Pick’s Drive-In, biking there with her teenage son, Todd, who had his eye on one of the cute counter girls. Though she’d lived in Cloverdale for several years, the Boonville native hadn’t yet visited the iconic burger

joint. As she and Todd enjoyed their milkshakes, Clow had no idea that in six years she’d become the next in a line of longtime owners wanting to keep Pick’s alive. Apparently, she’s not alone. “I keep a file folder of people who want to buy it,” Clow tells me on a recent afternoon, as we sit at a picnic table in the spring

sunshine. It’s easy to see why. At 3pm on a Monday, not exactly peak eating time, a steady stream of customers come and go, lingering over ice cream cones and baskets of onion rings at the outdoor bar. Relics from long ago accent the classic scene at Pick’s, now in its 90th year, like the coin-only cash register, built in 1917, and the original (though now defunct and

no longer up to code) root beer mixer. Thin footrails run beneath the half of the bar without stools. There’s even a sign advertising a frosty mug of 5 cent root beer, which Clow has amended with black ink that reads “Sold out as of 1928.” “I was tired of people asking for it,” Clow says, laughing. “It just wasn’t funny anymore.” Opened in 1923 as a “refreshery,” the small white and green roadside stand served up the popular (and legal) Reed & Bell root beer during Prohibition. In 1950, Mayo and Johnnie Pickard, who had run the cafe at Santa Rosa’s Greyhound bus station, bought the place and renamed it Pick’s. After Reed & Bell went out of business, the Pickards painted over the original round orange and black sign, which hung outside until five years ago. “I never thought much about it,” Clow tells me, “until one of my delivery guys who collects old signs took it home, removed all the layers of green paint and brought it back to me.” (The restored sign now hangs behind the counter beneath the littlechanged menu). The fourth owner in the drivein’s 90-year history, Clow bought the property from Bernie and Barbara Day in 1990. At the time, she was working “lots of swings and graves” as a police dispatcher for the Cloverdale Police Department. For three years, she pulled double shifts, working the grill at Pick’s until 3pm, and then answering phones at the station from 5:30 until 9pm. “Once, I answered the PD phone, ‘Hello, Pick’s,’” she admits, though the detective in the tight-knit town didn’t mind. While she loved dispatch work, Clow—who fielded calls about choking children, suicides, cars crashed into live wires—ultimately realized she needed to choose one profession. “In police work, lots of people get labeled as bad,” she tells me, “but the truth is, not everybody’s a bad guy.” A Cloverdale resident for almost 30 years, Clow ) 14 is a repository of local

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Jessica Dur Taylor

Dining

13

Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ( 13

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

14

GRAND REOPENING

California Thai Restaurant

201% OFF

Entire Bill, hr Free Parking Must show ad. Exp. 4/30/13

Open Daily

707.573.4777

OWN JO NT E W

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Voted Best Bakery of the North Bay Since 2008

DO

522 Seventh St, Santa Rosa Brickyard Center

4"/5"304"t 5PXO$PVOUSZ%SJWF 4&#"45010-t )FBMETCVSH"WFOVF $"-*450("t -JODPMO"WFOVF

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

photo: Marilee Koll

Artisan Hearth Breads & Fine Pastry

legend and habits. She chats about everything from the time Art Linkletter showed up (her young employee asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who?â&#x20AC;?) to the Humboldt marching band that plays on the bar at Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s after the annual Citrus Fair parade every year. From her perch behind the counter, Clow has watched the changing tides ripple through the town, for better and for worse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember when that was the ďŹ rst stoplight youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d hit after leaving San Francisco,â&#x20AC;? she says, pointing to Cloverdale Boulevard. This was back when Old Redwood Highway meandered through all towns north but Highway 101 zipped through all towns southâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;before the Cloverdale freeway bypass was completed in 1994, threatening to suffocate downtown, and before the Golden Arches appeared on the horizon and Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown could still support local bookstores and shoe stores. Though Clow admits that Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown has faded (thanks, Starbucks and Subway), she also celebrates the addition of the farmers market and Cloverdale Arts Alliance, which hosts free Friday night concerts from May until August. And even though frozen yogurt and consignment shops have dragged the little town into the 21st century, Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, along with the Owl Cafe, Papaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza, the Eagles Nest and the Hamburger Ranch, keeps it anchored in its historical past. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is not any different today,â&#x20AC;? says 94-year-old Al Furber, whose ancestors moved to Cloverdale in 1879, â&#x20AC;&#x153;than it was back in 1936â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the year he graduated from high school and went to work at the Standard gas station next door (now Chase bank). At that time, car-hops brought trays of food to peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s windows, and Furber couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for his break to get a root beer. Indeed, Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still looks much like it did 90 years ago. Though the menu has remained remarkably consistent over the decades, Clow has made a few changes, mostly to appease the health-conscious. In addition to

replacing the deep fried chicken burger with a grilled chicken sandwich, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s added veggie patties, black-bean burgers, turkey burgers and the larger quarterpounder to the repertoire. She also buys antibiotic and hormone-free beef from Niman Ranch. Like many, Clow loves the classic deluxe burger. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m tempted to eat one every day,â&#x20AC;? she laughs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have to roll me home at night.â&#x20AC;? One thing that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed in 65 years is the famous red relish, which the Pickards bought from a local Santa Rosan who made the stuff in his garage with chow-chow and pickles. After he died, they procured the recipe from his widow. When I ask Clow if anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever asked her for the recipe, she shakes her head. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No. Everyone knows itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top secret.â&#x20AC;? Clow and her employees still make six gallons of the relish at a time, which lasts longer in the winter but goes quickly during peak summer and fall seasons. Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closes during December and January, and reopens a week before the annual Citrus Fair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the winter, people say itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a light has gone out downtown,â&#x20AC;? Clow says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is so happy when it reopens.â&#x20AC;? And by â&#x20AC;&#x153;everyone,â&#x20AC;? Clow is talking about a wide swath, from diehard locals, like Jeremy from the post office who always gets a double bacon cheeseburger, and Andy who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do without his french fries, to the farther-ďŹ&#x201A;ung regulars who stop by on their way to and from the coast. The ďŹ rst time I ever ate there, I shared the bar with a group of Germans who were touring the country by motorcycle. More than one coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;including two people whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d met and courted thereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; has celebrated their wedding anniversary at Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. But Clowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true prized customers are the newest generation, like her own grandchildren, who can still hop on their bikes and enjoy an ice cream cone for a buck ďŹ fty. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really try to keep it affordable,â&#x20AC;? she tells me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;for the kids.â&#x20AC;? Pickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drive-In, 117 S. Cloverdale Blvd., Cloverdale. 707.894.2962.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Caffe Portofino Italian. $$-$$$. Great flavors and some eclectic dishes at this Santa Rosa institution. 535 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.1171.

Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Chloe’s French Cafe French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

East West Restaurant California cuisine. $$. Comfortable and casual, Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 557 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.6142.

Hallie’s Diner American and more. $-$$. Classic diner food with a gourmet touch, plus Latin American items and homemade pizzas. Great for breakfast. Breakfast and lunch daily. 125 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.773.1143. Khoom Lanna Thai. $$.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty

Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

$-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Outstanding Thai dishes and seasonal specialties with an authentic cooking style. Fresh ingredients, serene dining room, convenient Railroad Square location. Lunch and dinner daily. 107 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8424.

Boca South American. $$$-

Kirin Chinese. $$.

Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

Maguire’s Pub Irish pub.

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub

Sizzling Tandoor Indian.

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Citrus & Spice Thai/

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is

IRS

Drake’s Beach Cafe

$-$$. Pub food–burgers, fish and chips, hearty salads. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch, Fri-Sun; dinner, Tues-Sun. 145 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.9800.

family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat-Sun. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

15

BLUES Event

Saturday & Sunday April 13 & 14 ~ 11–4pm

fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Sing away your tax blues while enjoying award-winning wines and gourmet pairings at Kenwood Vineyard’s IRS Blues event. Great wine sales, savory delicacies and visiting vendors will make you forget all about Uncle Sam! Sonoma County KZST’s morning host, Brent Farris, will be spinning the blues.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$.

KENWOOD VINEYARDS 9592 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood For Info/Tickets: 707.282.4228 $ 20 per person / $10 Club Members

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Enjoy responsibly.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

Wine Club

member and guest

Save 20% on Dining

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Shucking & Barbecue Service Oyster Nursery Tours

887-3344 U corks116.com

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

2 for 1 Entreès (Dine-in only. Valid with purchases of 2 beverages. Not valid on holidays. Cannot combine offers.) Exp. 3-31-13

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian

) 16

707.829.8889 707.575.9296 In Downtown 2478 W Third St Sebastopol Santa Rosa thaipotrestaurant.com

SSanta a nta Rosa Rosa

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Dining

beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840.

Dining ( 15

Here for Good

73

%

m AT ore th Ms Bo an fA !

food. Kid-friendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.

FREE debit card gets you discounts & money back

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Thurs-Mon. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

FREE checking without a huge (or any) balance 7.07% (APY) youth account $776,192,759 in local home & car loans in past 52 years!

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Fri-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.

707/ 546-6000 ☎ www.comfirstcu.org Guerneville Healdsburg Napa Sebastopol Santa Rosa x2

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870. Buster’s Barbecue

GIVING YOU THE P POWER TO MAKE A DIFFE ERENCE DIFFERENCE

Since 19866

T THE BEST IN SO SOLAR OLAR License 878231

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

16

!

www.SolarWorksCA.com www.SolarWo orksCA.com

70 707.829.8282 7.829.82282

We W e a appreciate ppre ci a te y your ou r co confidence on f i d en nce iin n u us! s!

SMALL BITES

Bury Me in Bacon Waffle Batter I’ve given it much thought, and when I die, I hope to be encased in carbonite like Han Solo in Star Wars. But I hope to have carbonite replaced with bacon-in-the-batter waffle mix. On Saturday, April 13, Santa Rosa’s Zazu hosts a brunch to benefit the Ceres Community Project. What’s special about this, other than being hosted by two of the hottest chefs in the area (Duskie Estes and John Stewart), is that 100 percent of the proceeds go to the nonprofit—all of it. Teens from the project will help cook and serve. The menu includes three types of breads (some with bacon), four sides (some with bacon, some with Meyer lemon) and six entrées (including bacon-in-the-batter waffles). It makes sense that each course includes an option for bacon, since that’s what the pioneering restaurant is largely known for; the chefs raise their own pigs, and therefore know exactly what goes in them, which, needless to say, does not include chemical additives like those found in most grocery-store pork. This isn’t the first time Zazu’s partnered with Ceres, and hopefully it won’t be the last. Tickets are $39 per person for three courses with coffee. Zazu Restaurant and Farm, 3535 Guerneville Road, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.—Nicolas Grizzle

Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. . Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Checkers California. $$.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$.

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs

Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Wineries

17

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Charles Creek Vineyards The wines dazzle. Chardonnays and Merlot, those old workhorses, shine. 483 First St. W., Sonoma. Open daily, 11am–6pm. 707.935.3848.

Hawley Winery Barrelfermented Viognier, kiwistyle Sauvignon Blanc, plus toothsome reds. Winemaker John Hawley helped to grow some of the big-name brands; now his sons have joined him in this small, Dry Creek Valley family business. 36 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500.

111 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, noon–6pm. Tasting fee. 707.933.8343.

noon–10pm; free salsa class starts at 7:30pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.226.6445.

MA R I N CO U N T Y

Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land

Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Hall Winery (WC) Craig and Kathryn Hall specialize in “beefy” wines favored by Robert Parker. Intensely modern art and all things Austrian. New tasting room will be by Frank Gehry. 401 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5:30pm. 866.667.HALL.

Moondance Cellars

Tam Cellars Spacious

Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

Monticello Vineyards

Portalupi Wine Husbandand-wife team went the distance, selecting Barbera cuttings from the Italian alps: their Barbera was named best in the world. You’ll also find Vermentino, Pinot, and rusticchic two-liter milk jugs of “vino di tavola” in comfortable downtown lounge; wine education classes for groups. 107 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–7pm. Tasting fee, $5–$12. 707.395.0960.

River Road Vineyards Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Monday–Friday. 707.887.8130.

Spann Vineyards Ninety percent of Spann wines are distributed out of state, leaving a little aside for this off-thePlaza tasting room. Malbec, Mourvedre and Mayacamas Cab; the take-home bargain is a $20 blend. Photography gallery adds visual interest.

Point Reyes Vineyards

N A PA CO U N T Y

Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Ceja Vineyards To Ceja

Schramsberg (WC)

Vineyards’ motto, “Vinum, Cantus, Amor,” and when there’s wine, song and love, there’s dance. Founded by one-time field workers, the Mexican-American-owned winery celebrates culture and wine at this sleek downtown lounge. Wine flights, light bites and one of the few full-bodied rosés “con huevos” in the county. On Saturdays, free salsa lessons and dance party spice up the night. Bailamos! 1248 First St., Napa. Sunday– Friday, noon–6pm, Saturday,

Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283.

Adastra Wines

To the Stars, Through Napa BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

here’s something about the name that suggests something else. Adastra! It almost demands an exclamation mark, a pyramid with black tinted glass, that sort of thing. Adastra’s hospitality center in Napa, however, located down a narrow little drive lined with poplars, within a tidy but antique farmstead, is anything but wine country moderne. It’s a big, old horse barn.

Inside, owner Chris Thorpe explains that “ad astra per aspera” means “to the stars through striving.” It’s the motto also of many a school, and, among other things, of the Martian Imperial Commandos in Kurt Vonnegut’s Sirens of Titan. The giant painting of a mammoth inside the barn? That’s another story, but it’s already clear that Adastra is a quirky mom-and-pop outfit with a sense of humor. Thorpe grew up on a farm in Michigan, so his first idea was to get rural, not get into the wine business. He tried raising cattle first, but it turned out that grapes were less likely to bust out of the fencing. The vineyard has been certified organic since 2005. Thorpe may have led this tour hundreds of times, but he’s in no hurry, passing leaves from the garden over for inspection: there’s wormwood, camphor, sorrel. Once a surgeon, his manner is more reminiscent of a tangent-spinning professor emeritus, his voice pitching into a mischievous lilt when he’s kidding around. He’s quick to drop the names to restaurants that serve his wine, but he’s also proud of their prize-winning tomatoes. “The Adastra tomatoes are the best I’ve ever tasted,” said one chef. “The wine is pretty good, too.” For small groups, tasting is conducted on the kitchen table, “the way it used to be,” according to Thorpe. The 2011 N’Oak Chardonnay ($20) spent no time in barrels, but it’s got aromas of apples and cream, with a rich, lingering finish. The 2009 Proximus Pinot Noir ($60) has more spice, texture and cranberry fruit than the 2005 Pinot Noir library sample, which has an enticing bouquet of orange rind and chocolate liqueur. The 2009 Merlot ($40) should appeal to Right Bank fans, with inky fruit, graphite and tobacco notes; fine herbs accent the 2009 Proximus Merlot’s ($60) plush red fruit and baking chocolate flavors. Ed’s Red 2009 A.D. ($15) is nicely priced, with a silly theme and an artistic label depicting an imposing but quite extinct wooly mammoth. A pleasing, perfumy blend of Dolcetto, Zin and Syrah, it’s been a real hit for them. Ed’s Red is the brainchild of Thorpe’s son-inlaw, who explains the theme thus: it goes great with mammoth. You either get it, or add “non sequitur” to this week’s Latin lesson. Adastra Wines, 2545 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Tour and tasting by appointment, $25. 707.255.4818. Taste at Adastra and 20 other Carneros wineries during “April in Carneros,” April 20–21, 10am– 4pm. Admission, $45; $39 online at www.carneroswineries.org.

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

A Look Inside… North Bay Business Profiles

photo: Jon Lohne

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

ųź

What do you do at Farmacopia? It’s a question we get a lot. We listen. We hear your story and it might sound something like this: I'm incredibly frustrated because (fill in the blank) I have no energy, my stress levels are off the charts, my hormones are all over the map, I blow up like a balloon no matter what I eat, I can't sleep, and wow, on top of it, I've had this cold for 3 weeks. Or maybe your doctor sent you in because you asked for an alternative to the medication she's prescribing. Maybe you feel terrible and the doctor

Monday–Friday 10–6 95 Montgomery Drive Ste 90 Santa Rosa

707.528.4372

keeps telling you nothing's wrong. Maybe you just want to know if you're taking the right supplements, or if you can optimize your health. Or maybe your kid is sick for the 7th time this year. Here's where we come in: We hear you. And help you to find a starting point—recommend some of our superb supplements and really effective dietary tweaks, or we have you talk to our on-staff herbalist for a custom-blended tincture (our most popular offering!). If your issues are more complex, we might direct you to a private consultation, an acupuncturist or body worker. Less complicated: we send you off with remedies on the spot. A little bit more about us: We're warm, knowledgeable, and non-dogmatic. We've been here for 14 years but manage to stay on the cutting edge. We've been voted Best Herbal Clinic in the Bohemian 2 years running, and this year, our Clinical Herbalist/ Nutritionist Lily Mazzarella was voted Best Holistic Practitioner. In short, we help you feel good. Come in and see us, Monday–Friday 10–6.

Rebecca was born in 1978 and grew up in Sebastopol, California. She graduated from Sonoma State University with a degree in Kinesiology and Psychology. Her passion is fitness, nutrition, and health.

Peace in Medicine provides safe access to quality medicine for qualified patients in a professional and friendly environment. Peace in Medicine has successfully established itself as a role model for medical cannabis dispensaries and healing centers nationally.

Rebecca enjoys swimming, mountain biking, skiing, snowboarding, rock climbing, kiteboarding, etc…sports of all kinds.

We at Peace in Medicine advocate and support a proactive and holistic approach to health management. In this spirit, we offer numerous services including therapeutic massage, acupuncture, guest speakers, peer counselors and empowering educational materials.

After destroying her left knee joint from overuse, a friend introduced her to Bikram Yoga. She was amazed at what practicing Bikram Yoga did for her body. Her knee joint slowly became stronger and stopped throbbing with pain. Her body's alignment, posture, balance, and strength improved incredibly. Her athletic abilities greatly increased in all of the sports she plays. As long as she does Bikram Yoga three or more times per week, her knee stays strong and can take the impact of running, mountain biking, etc… With regular Bikram Yoga practice, Rebecca also noticed that her stress level began to decrease and she was able to sleep better at night.

Peace in Medicine is a non-profit mutual benefit corporation with a unique business model firmly based in three overarching tenets: the importance of local support and supporting locally; the belief in patient access to alternative medicine, information and education; and an unwavering adherence to environmental integrity. Recognizing the importance of community, we reinvest a significant portion of any surplus income into local causes, community services, charities and social movements. With two locations in Sonoma County, it is easy to “Find Peace in Medicine.” Downtown Santa Rosa 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College M, T, F, Sat 10am–5pm W, Th 12pm–7pm, Closed Sun

Downtown Sebastopol 6771 Sebastopol Ave @ Hwy12 M–Sat 11am–7pm Sun 12pm–7pm

522 Wilson St, Santa Rosa

707.843.3227

707.823.4206

www.bikramyogaofsantarosa.com

707.545.9642

Rebecca has practiced Bikram Yoga for eight years. She has seen how much Bikram Yoga has helped not only herself, but everyone who practices around her. She has seen those of all ages, sizes, and abilities benefit greatly from a regular Bikram Yoga practice. She has seen so many students transform their bodies, and reduce aches and pains. Rebecca went to teacher training in April 2010. She absolutely loves teaching Bikram Yoga and motivating students to stay healthy and strong.

Le Carre is the hidden gem of Santa Rosa!! My girlfriends and I enjoyed a lovely day at Le Carre! We were met with incredible service and impressive treatments for this group of tired mommies. They easily accommodated our challenging scheduling requests, provided us with complimentary mimosas, truffles, fruits, nuts etc., and were consistently addressing our every need. As locals, we have historically traveled to Calistoga, Sonoma, or Napa for a spa day. But, now since we've found Le Carre, there is no need to travel for great treatments and professional service.” —Cher J, Santa Rosa. Maria Shahi is one of the country’s top stylists. She was nominated by Vidal Sassoon as one of America’s 10 best in the U.S. Maria has worked as lead artistic director for a well known Sonoma County salon where she created a salon training program. Maria has also trained other young stylists who have gone on to win Vidal Sassoon’s New Talent Awards.

Lorna specializes in behavioral problem solving. She is an avid Doberman lover who successfully shows and breeds European imports. She is the puppy program manager for Canine Companions for Independence and manages the training and socialization of 300 puppies. Incredible Canine services include puppy consultations, private training, and doggie boot camps. All training programs include behavioral problem solving, and focus on strong social skills. The O'Connors believe all dogs are born social. They specialize in returning fearful or aggressive dogs to their naturally social state. Visit Incredible Canine and be a responsible pet owner. Your new relationship with your dog will be based on love and mutual respect. They offer free evaluations and guaranteed results. Mention the Bohemian for $50 off Doggie Boot Camp.

Doggie Daycare now available!

photo: Jon Lohne

www.incrediblecanine.com 3163 Juniper Ave, Santa Rosa

Jean Charles Castellisi is a native of Provence, France and brings an international appeal with many years of industry experience. Jean Charles has opened and managed salons under his ownership as well as for corporate clients in both Europe and the U.S. and has been the artistic director at well known salons around the world. Jean Charles has won numerous awards including Hairdresser of the Year in France, World Cup Finalist in Europe and Haircolorist of the Year at Haircolor U.S.A.

Creating Healthy, Beautiful Smiles There is a reason why Dr. Sean Wilson DDS has been voted the Best Dentist in Sonoma County the past Three years in a row. Dr. Wilson is dedicated to providing each patient with a personal and positive dental experience. This requires a caring staff in which only the best people will do in every area.

We are excited about what we do, are motivated to take care of our patient’s needs, have high standards at quality and integrity, and know that a smile makes everyone feel better than a frown. We strive to make our patients feel comfortable and at ease while providing them clinical excellence. We personalize our dental treatment to address the specific dental needs and aesthetic desires of our patients and are devoted to providing the utmost in treatment in a technically advanced setting.

at the Hyatt Vineyard Creek Hotel 170 Railroad Street, Santa Rosa

Four F our Paws Paws w Pet Pet Ranch Ranch

707.636.7300

www.lecarresalonspa.com

B oa oardin ng g - Day ycca a rre e G r oom i n g - Tr a i n i n g

Four P Four Paws aws P Pet et Ranc Ranch h is a ffamily amily owned owned pe pett ccare are ffacility. acility. W Wee kno know w tha thatt yyour our pets pets ar aree family family members. members. That's That's why why choosing the righ rightt ccare are for for them them is iimportant. mpo ortant. Wee pr W provide ovide a ccaring aring aatmosphere tmospheere of soci social cial ĨĨƵŶĂŶĚĂĐƟǀŝƚLJŽŶŽǀĞƌϱĂĐƌĞƐĂůŽŶŐǁŝƚŚƚƌĂŝŶŝŶŐĂŶĚĂǁĂƌĚǁŝŶŶŝŶŐ ĨƵŶĂŶĚĂĐƟǀŝƚLJŽŶŽ Ě Ɵ ŝƚ ǀĞƌϱĂĐƌ ϱ ĞƐĂůŽŶŐǁ ů ǁŝƚŚ ŝŝƚŚ Ś grooming gr ooming i services. services. i It’s IIt ’s like like a da d dayy at at the th he spa! a! Wee iinvite W nvite you you to to stop stop by by and ttake ake a tour. tou ur.

www.fourpawspetranch.com w w w.fou urpawsp petranch.com m 707-542-3766 7 07-542 -3766

Sean Wilson DS 98 Montgomery Drive, Santa Rosa

707.578.7424

www.seanwilsondds.com

Visit our website we ebsite for valuable v coupons. coupons. 3410 Guerneville Guernee vi lle Road R oad Santa Saan t a R Rosa, osa, CA 95401

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Ultimate Spa Retreat

Patrick is recognized internationally as an expert in his field and appears on radio and television programs including "K9 Cops" on Discovery Channel. He truly enjoys bringing out the best in every dog he trains, whether a police dog, a competitive sport dog, or your family pet. Recently Patrick became the contract trainer for Canine Companions for Independence. He holds classes for all the volunteer puppy raisers in the area weekly. The puppy raisers attend classes for 14 months until the dogs are turned in for advanced service dog training.

707 322 3272

ųŻ

Sonoma County’s

Incredible Canine is the vision of Patrick and Lorna O'Connor. Together, they have 65 years of experience training dogs.

ŴŲ N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

hip, trendy fashion Liv Fashion Boutique was established in 2006. Olivia and Jillian Walton are sisters and co-owners in the business. The initial store was opened in Ukiah. Two years later the Santa Rosa store was created, and in February 2011 the San Francisco location opened! Olivia and Jillian’s mission is to provide hip, trendy fashion forward style and accessories with a boutique atmosphere at an affordable price, while providing the ultimate customer service experience. Olivia has a degree in Fashion, Business and Marketing and 4 years experience as a buyer at bebe Inc. Jillian has several years of experience in small business management and interior design. They are dedicated to helping the community by participating in local fashion shows, supporting benefits, schools and sponsoring sport teams. The stores encourage and educate people interested in the fashion industry by offering work study programs, internships and informational interviews. Their love and passion has influenced their success and supports their opportunity for growth in the business.

3030 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 415.567.4730 620 4th Street, Santa Rosa 707.528.6198 107 S School Street, Ukiah 707.462.4730

Lydia’s Organic Foods It is the fulfillment of Lydia’s vision to create a gathering space to share food, knowledge and creativity. Stop in or visit us on the web. Enjoy a delicious, affordable, healthy meal. We serve pizzas, burgers, crepes and a variety of raw and cooked entrees. Join us at our restaurant for a meal or grab a quick snack on the go. We look forward to seeing your smiles!

Spring Detox

• Vegan, Gluten-Free & Organic

7-Day Juice Cleanse • April 15–21

• Restaurant & Café

• Pre Order now through Sun, 4/14

• Parties & Private Events

• On Going Support • Monthly Juice Cleanse • Morning Yoga Bemer Sessions & Massage • Healthy Lifestyle

• Family Friendly • Catering • Healthy Cakes & Baked Goods • Live Music Venue • Community Center

• Conscious Living • Ongoing Workshops & Classes

1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma

707.792.5300

www.LydiasOrganics.com

Ŵų

Good news! Windsor Community Acupuncture is an effective and affordable business model offering just $15– $35 per treatment. The sliding scale allows you to decide exactly what is the right amount for you to pay and you will NEVER be asked to show proof of your income. Windsor community acupuncture is in a quiet community setting, located on the town green in Windsor, California.

Windsor Community Acupuncture 432 Emily Rose Circle, Windsor Just a couple of minutes from highway 101 in central Windsor and a stone's throw from Patterson's Pub. Plenty of parking!

510.326.4209

BOHEMIAN’S ANNUAL

Resident Tourist Issue ISSUE:

April 17 DEADLINE:

April 11 INFO STOR is a Sonoma County “Home Grown Success Story” that initially started in 1993 as Security Vault & Storage, Inc., a company that offered private safe deposit boxes and secure storage room rentals Over the next ten years, INFO STOR departed these initial offerings in order to pursue the higher demand for full service record storage and management services. In doing so, the company became the North Bays’ largest commercial

CALL TODAY TO RESERVE YOUR SAFE DEPOSIT BOX

records center storing in excess of 1 Million Cubic Feet of Confidential Business Information. Currently, INFO STOR is reaching back to resurrect the safe depository services and offering sizes larger than banks in our high security fullscale vault.

A Service of Info Stor, Information Storage Centers, Inc.

707.568.2900

It's part of a growing movement around the nation, offering affordable and effective relief to those in need. This is perhaps one of the best deals in healthcare today. Acupuncture is renowned for pain management, neurological issues such as anxiety and depression, women's issues such as fertility and pms, chronic and acute conditions of all kind—and a whole lot more! Most importantly, community acupuncture WORKS. It yields the same effective relief by that of a conventional acupuncture business all the while keeping the price 5–10 times lower.

BOOK ONLINE at WINDSORACUPUNCTURE.COM

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

WINDSOR COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE $ 15– $35 Sliding Scale

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

22

The week’s events: a selective guide

u r C sh C U LT U R E

TRAPPER KEEPERS Portugal the Man play April 11 at the Mystic Theatre. See Concerts, p29.

S A N TA R O S A

D-List Diva Kathy Griffin has gone from life on the D-list—including starring as a naughty nurse in Eminem’s “The Real Slim Shady” video—to the top of the A-list as a dish-all standup comic. Griffin is fearless when delivering a punch line and doesn’t care whose toes she steps on, even if they’re her own (hello, cameltoe workout pants). Her reality show ran for six seasons, she’s recorded numerous comedy albums, currently has her own late night TV show and returns this week to the North Bay for a live taping of her next Bravo TV special on Friday, April 12, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm and 10pm. $45–$65. 707.546.3600.

SEBASTOPOL

Drinking Feelings Forget water, it’s all about turning songs into wine. Jack Tempchin is responsible for writing songs that many artists have turned into hits, including the Eagles; he wrote “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” which a popular wine was named after. To celebrate the 40th anniversary of “Peaceful Easy Feeling,” Tempchin performs his original versions of songs made famous by others. To hear his top hits—and possibly his new jams “Crazy Little Thing” or “Light a Joint”—see him on Saturday, April 13, at the Sebastopol Community Center Youth Annex. 425 Morris St, Sebastopol. 8pm. $22–$25. 707.874.3571.

S A N TA R O S A

Red Cheeks “From makeup remover to soothing balm for a spanked ass, who would have thought it was such a versatile liquid?” Quotes like this, about baby oil, can be found (where else?) in Fifty Shades of Grey. For those who would rather their ass cheeks hurt from laughing instead of spanking, there is good news: ‘Spank! The 50 Shades Parody.’ Sending up the Fifty Shades phenomenon for fans and naysayers alike in an unconventional way, Spank! follows the “author” E. B. Janet on a weekend away. Get spanked on Wednesday, April 10, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. $35– $45. 7:30pm. 707.546.3600.

SONOMA

N A PA

Flintstone Rock

Haunted

Dinosaur Jr. like to be described as fun, loud and fast as fuck, and, folks, that they are. For over 20 years, the trio has toured, recorded 10 albums and created hilarious music videos—like the one for “Feel the Pain,” in which the gang beat the crap out of each other with golf clubs. Still making music just as vital as in their classic ’90s heyday, Dinosaur Jr. play in a giant red barn this week before going off to play Coachella. See them on Friday, April 12, at Gundlach Bundschu Winery. 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. 7:15pm. $40. 707.939.3021.

As one of the planet’s premier world-music groups, Dead Can Dance hit Napa this week in a rare stateside appearance. Based in London, the band produces dark, beautiful sonic fusions. Recent set lists include favorites from classic mid-’90s albums, and if their previous schedule is any indication of when their next Bay Area show might be, fans won’t want to miss it when Dead Can Dance play on Wednesday, April 17, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $60–$70. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

—Estefany Gonzalez

AT THE BARRE Dancers Rachael Louie, Carly Wheaton, Galen Bolard, Julia Biber and Sidney Dimova (Lâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;R) at Marin Ballet.

A Golden Affair Marin Ballet turns 50

M

arin Ballet is half a century young this year, and its golden anniversary marks a signiďŹ cant milestone. To honor founder Leona Norman, and students past and present, the company hosts a public performance on April 13 featuring alumni whose aspirations and hard work led to careers as professional dancers. Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humble

BY JASMINE RIOS

beginning dates back to the 1950s, when Leona Norman, an accomplished dancer, began teaching lessons in a small studio above the old Tamalpais Theatre in San Anselmo. An ambitious woman herself, having danced throughout the world and trained with notable ďŹ gures in the industry, Norman was determined to bring the standards she knew to her own community in Marin. In the 1950s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s, Norman was a driving force in the regional dance movement, which promoted high-quality dance education and the further development of

performing companies across the country. Norman also taught private lessons from a studio in her home until 1963, when Marin Ballet was established as a nonproďŹ t. In 1971, Marin Ballet received a generous grant from the S.H. Cowell Foundation. These funds enabled the organization to acquire its current facility located at 100 Elm St., now equipped with six large studios, including a 120-seat studio theater, dressing rooms, administrative offices, a kitchen and a library. But it was at the Tamalpais Theatre where Norman met her

youngest pupil, Ms. Cynthia Lucas, an ambitious three-year-old who would become Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current artistic director. Initially too young to take Normanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pre-ballet class, Lucas was determined nonetheless; she even watched her older sister take class through a tiny hole in the wall. With further persistence, Lucas earned herself a spot in Normanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pre-ballet class for ďŹ veyear-olds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just really wanted to dance,â&#x20AC;? says Lucas today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when the love affair started.â&#x20AC;? By 1972, Lucas completed her training at Marin Ballet and joined the National Ballet of Canada, where she enjoyed a fulďŹ lling career as a dancer and, later on, ballet mistress. Some years after the birth of her daughter, Lucas accepted Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offer in 1998 as school director and, two years later, artistic director. Norman passed away in 1975, yet her vision survives. Lucas instills her students with Normanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s philosophy of maintaining a sense of life-balance when training to become a dancer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She had work that required a serious commitment and a certain amount of respect,â&#x20AC;? Lucas explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;which meant working our hardest every day while staying within our own individual limits.â&#x20AC;? Marin Ballet alumna Olivia Ramsay graduated from the program in 2002 under the direction of Lucas. Ramsay represents a modern-day example of Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My training not only gave me the technical base that I needed to survive as a dancer,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but Marin Ballet also gave me exceptional coaching and performance opportunities.â&#x20AC;? Ramsay began dancing professionally the same year she graduated, joining Santa Barbaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s State Street Ballet and touring throughout the United States, China and Taiwan. ) 24

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Oliver Wecxsteen

ArtsIdeas

23

Marin Ballet ( 23

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

24 Ftubuf!Kfxfmmfsz XF!CV Z!ZPVS!HPME!'!EJBNPOET

From I Do to I Still Do

YPsjhjobm!Boujrvf!up!Npefso!Eftjhot YXfeejoh!'!Boojwfstbsz!Cboet YMpdbmmz!Pxofe

498!Ifbmetcvsh!Bwfovf 2!cmpdl!Opsui!pg!uif!Ifbmetcvsh!Qmb{b 818/4:6/1966 xxx/tipqEFK/dpn ! Tbo!Gsbodjtdp! Ifbmetcvsh!

"Miserere et Guerre" by Georges Rouault, 1927-48

TTravis r av i s Tritt T ri t t SSaturday, aturday, AApril pril 220 0

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

99pm pm TTwo-time wo - tim e G Grammy r ammy aaward-winning, w ard - w innin g , multi-platinum m ulti - p latinum sselling e llin g ccountry o untr y m music usi c sstar tar presents p res e nt s aan n evening eve nin g of o f great g re at music. musi c . One One off tthe o h e lleading ea din g ccountry o untr y ssingers in g e r s from f ro m the the early e arly 1 1990s, 990s, w with i th hits hi t s such su ch as as "Can "C an I Trust Tr us t You Y ou W With i th My My Heart" H ear t " and an d "Foolish " Fo o lis h P Pride", r i d e", distinctive TTravis' r av i s' d is tin c ti ve ccountry o untr y and an d Southern Southern rrock o ck ssound o un d continues co ntinu e s to to thrill thr ill fans f ans while while his onstage performances h is o ns t age p e r f o r man ce s remain re main a rock ro ck pleaser ssolid o li d crowd crowd p leaser

For tickets:

707.994.9900 www.lincolntheater.org

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Two years later, she joined Ballet PaciďŹ ca in Irvine, followed by San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smuin Ballet, where she danced for six seasons. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;I loved working with Michael Smuin,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and feel honored to have had the chance to dance for him before he passed away.â&#x20AC;?) Recalling the inďŹ&#x201A;uence Lucas had on her while she was a student, Ramsay says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is an incredible teacher and has clearly dedicated herself towards preserving classical ballet. She was a tough but loving teacher as a student. Now, I see how this gives her the foundation to be such a successful director.â&#x20AC;? Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alumni performance on April 13 features a series of solo performances by Boston Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Lam; Smuin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Robin Cornwell; and Josie Garthwaite Sadan of the Robert Mosesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kin dance company. One work from years past is Ronn Guidiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trois Gymnopedies,â&#x20AC;? ďŹ rst performed in 1967 by Cynthia Lucas; in her place, Lucasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter Mila Lavoie, an apprentice with the Sacramento Ballet, will perform, along with Dawson/Wallace Dance Projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jessica Wagner and Memphis Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Travis Bradley. Current students of Marin Ballet will also have a turn in the spotlight, to perform works by Robert Dekkers, Casey Thorne, Amy London and the legendary George Balanchine. Closing the program, students will perform Julia Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Midsummer Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream,â&#x20AC;? alongside San Francisco Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pierre-François Vilanoba, and Smuin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Speed Orr and Jonathan Mangosing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;April 13th is going to be an exceptional showcase of our current students, alumni and guest artists,â&#x20AC;? says Ramsay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope to see many members of the Marin arts community in the audience.â&#x20AC;? Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary alumni reunion performance is on Saturday, April 13, at the College of Marin Theater. 835 College Ave., Kentfield. 7:30pm. $50. 415.453.6705.

Kevin Berne

NEW ERA L. Peter Callender plays Simon, a freed slave, in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whipping Man.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Free at Last MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whipping Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; packed with power BY DAVID TEMPLETON

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;W

ere we Jews . . . or were we slaves?â&#x20AC;?

That question is asked by John, a young black man raised as a Jew by the observant Southern slave owners to whom he recently belonged. In Matthew Lopezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful, intense drama The Whipping Man at Mill Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marin Theatre Company, faith, family and the scars of slavery are just some of the many ties that bind three men together at a singular time in Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. It is Passover, April of 1865, in Richmond, Va., just days after the Emancipation Proclamation. John (a ďŹ rst-rate Tobie Windham), seeking shelter in the ruins of the looted and abandoned home he once served in, is a mix of fear and resentment, the opposite of the older Simon (L. Peter Callender, astonishing), who also served in the house. Kinder and wiser, now

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Whipping Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday through April 28 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $36â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$57. 415.388.5208.

1 $ 3 $ 9$//(< 2 3 ( 5 $ +286(

25

0DLQ6WUHHW LQGRZQWRZQ1DSD 7LFNHWV ,QIRUPDWLRQ

1 92 +  2 5 *

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Stage

 cautiously optimistic about his future as a free man, Simon awaits the return of his former master, who escaped the sacking of Richmond (by Union soldiers), taking Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife and teenage daughter with him. With mixed motivations, John and Simon are caring for Caleb (Nicholas Pelczar), the masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Confederate soldier son, grievously wounded with a gangrenous leg, his faith in the Torah shattered after years on the battleďŹ eld and the defeat of the Confederacy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a setup ripe with dramatic and philosophical possibilities. Playwright Lopez takes advantage of every one of them, never letting up on the intensity and emotion of the situation. There is an artfully graphic onstage amputation, made more powerful following Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gorgeously crafted description of the procedure to come. John, understandably angry and confused about his identity as a Jewish slave, delivers a riveting, percussive description of being sent as a boy to the whipping man, and the lessons he learned there about the divisions between him and his white owners. Most potently, there is a movingly improvised Passover Seder, cobbled together from scraps and stolen provisions, two freed slaves and their former master uncomfortably (and powerfully) recalling their ancestorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; freedom from bondage in Egypt. Directed by Jasson Minadakis with tremendous heart and impressive attention to detail, the play was co-produced with the Virginia Stage Company, where it ran last month. Secrets, large and small, are revealed over the course of the two-hour play, and while some moments stray toward the predictable and the melodramatic, Lopezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boldly told tale is easily one of the best shows of the season, packed with challenging ideas and questions that just might reverberate in your mind for days. Rating (out of 5): +++++

      

.$7+<0$77($6$7$3530 0('(6.,0$57,1 :22' )5,$3530

$5/2*87+5,(+(5(&20(67+(.,' 6$7$3530

7+()$%8/2867+81'(5%,5'6 )5,$3530

&2:%2<-81.,(6 :('0$<30 /8&.<3(11<35(6(176 )811<*,5/ 6,;6+2:60$<  :((./<),/06192+25*),/0

0('(6.,0$57,1 :22'

&2:%2<-81.,(6

TM

0F.LQOH\6WÂ&#x2021;6HEDVWRSROÂ&#x2021; Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;}>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;°xäĂ&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;i`Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;ÂŁn Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x153;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;V]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i]Ă&#x160;>VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb LA 26th Schedule for Fri, April â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thu, April 22nd Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;>VĂ&#x160;LÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;tĂ&#x160;-ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>VĂ&#x152;tÂşĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160; Times Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th Academy Award â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Best Foreign Language Film! Years!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Box OfďŹ ce Stone ­£\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\ääŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, â&#x20AC;&#x153;RawIn and Riveting!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ -Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>iÂ?Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;>Â? A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 ÂşĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;wVĂ&#x160;wÂ?Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>LÂ&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>`Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}]Ă&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; (12:30)THE 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:20 9:15 9:45 RR Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;`iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;i°°°Ă&#x160; Ă?Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x201C;iÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;ÂŤĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; (12:30) 2:40 Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor! Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;ÂŤÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;i`tÂşĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Chicago Tribune â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Triumph!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE ­£Ă&#x201C;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\ÂŁxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;âÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;7>Â?`iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;`itÂşĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Variety (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE â&#x20AC;&#x153;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x; â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Really, Truly, Deeply â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ă&#x160;9 ,Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;/ Ă&#x160;/ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best!â&#x20AC;?9:40 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Newsday ­£Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\xäŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; , If It Were Fiction!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; San Francisco Chronicle

" Ă&#x160;/ Ă&#x160;,"

"

**9Ă&#x160;* "* \Ă&#x160;

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including / Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160;,"  -" Ă&#x160;-/",9

{Ă&#x201C;

PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;>`Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC; (2:20) 9:10 NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK ­£\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\£äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\xäĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haunting and Hypnotic!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling Stone â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wise, Humble and Effortlessly Funny!â&#x20AC;? (1:30) 4:10 6:45 9:30 R â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Newsweek THE GIRL THE TATTOO PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No 6:45IN Show Thu 1,-- Ă&#x160;*,Ă&#x160; Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR Ă&#x17D; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­£Ă&#x201C;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŤŰşŰşŰşâ&#x20AC;Ź1/2! AnFROST/NIXON Unexpected Gem!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; USA Today

/ Ă&#x160;, 6"1/" ,9Ă&#x160;"*/-/(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG ­£\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\ääŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; ,Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Slant Magazine REVOLUTIONARY ROAD â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deliciously Unsettling!â&#x20AC;? PARIS, JEAND Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R Ă&#x201C; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­£Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x17D;\ÂŁxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; THE Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13 Wed: 5 and 9pm Shows ONLY No 7Ror 9pm Shows (12:00) 5:00 Thu: 9:50

OZ: THE GREAT

Ă&#x160;*"7 ,1

PURE:/ Ă&#x160; ,"" A BOULDERING FLICK Michael Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 ­£Ă&#x201C;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\Ă&#x17D;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x160; THE MOST DANGEROUS SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING MAN IN AMERICA  --" Starts Fri, June 29th!

Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS ­£Ă&#x201C;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 NR No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 5:00 10:00 8 /" \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;"Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-VĂ&#x20AC;iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING 7i`]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;ÂŁÂŤÂ&#x201C; Venessa Redgrave Meryl CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH AND 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED ,Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Â?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 7i`]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;ÂŁĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;-i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;fnĂ&#x160; 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

 /Ă&#x160;*",/,9 Ă&#x160; ,* tĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;

/ Ă&#x160; 6Ă&#x160;  /Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;9 Ă&#x160; iÂ&#x2DC;iwĂ&#x152; iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x2C6;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;iÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;+EĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁnĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;

44/12 /12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 44/18 /18

HHonorable onor able

The Place The Place Beyond B eyond the the Pines Pines R (11:00-2:00-3:15-5:00)-6:15-8:00-9:15 (11: 00-2: 00-3 :15-5 : 00 ) -6 :15-8 : 00-9 :15

Trance T rance

R ((10:30-1:30-4:00)-6:45-9:05 10 : 30-1: 30- 4 : 00 ) -6 : 45- 9 : 05

Emperor E mperor PPG13 G13 (10:30-1:00-3:30)-7:00-9:15 (10 : 30-1: 00-3 : 30 ) -7: 00- 9 :15 Sunday Sunday 4/14 4 /14 oonly: nl y : (1 (10:30)-7:00-9:15 0 : 30 ) -7: 00- 9 :15 Tuesday Tuesday 4/16 4 /16 oonly: nl y : (10:30-1:00-3:30)-9:15 (10 : 30-1: 00-3 : 30 ) - 9 :15

On the the Road Road R (1:15)-8:45 (1:15 ) -8 : 45

No R ((10:15-12:45) N 10 :15-12: 45 ) Quartet Q uartet PPG13 G13 (1 (11:00-4:00)-6:30 1: 0 0 - 4 : 0 0 ) - 6 : 3 0 Join uuss oonn SSunday Join unda y 44/14 /14 aatt 11pm pm aand nd TTuesday uesda y 4/16 4 /16 aatt 6:30pm 6 : 30pm for f or special special performances per f or manc es ooff LLaa Fille F ille Mal M al Gardee! Ga r dee !

Summer field C Summerfield Cinema in e ma 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 07 719

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

26

FROM THE ACADEMY AWARD -WINNING DIRECTOR OF ®

“SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE” AND “127 HOURS”

++++

Film

SEXY, SUSPENSEFUL,

AND A DAZZLING BRAIN-SCRAMBLING MYSTERY.” EMPIRE

JAMES

McAVOY

VINCENT

CASSEL

ROSARIO

DAWSON

TRANCE A DANNY BOYLE FILM

© 2013 Twentieth Century Fox

STARTS FRIDAY, APRIL 12

NAPA SANTA ROSA Century Napa Valley & XD Summerfield Cinemas (800) FANDANGO #2521 (707) 522-0330

FIT TO PRINT A documentary on Project Censored screens in Sonoma.

Beyond Popcorn

Sonoma, Tiburon film fest highlights BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

n certain parts of the world, film aficionados have to wait months in between film festivals, often driving hundreds of miles over bridges and into major cities to get their cinematic fix. Such people, obviously, do not live in the North Bay, where every town worth its weight in cocktail napkins now has its own film fest. This weekend, two different festivals—each known for a sense of elegance and eccentric charm—will lure film fans, and filmmakers, to their respective towns.

Now in its 12th year, the Tiburon International Film Festival (running April 11–19), as its title implies, focuses on films from around the globe, with a crystal clear motto: “Understanding the world through film.” Meanwhile, the 16-

year-old Sonoma International Film Festival (April 10–14) has for years emphasized an appreciation for food and wine along with a love of fine independent cinema. In Sonoma, highlights include Project Censored: The Movie (April 12, 6:30pm; April 14, 3pm), a short and sweet documentary inspired by Sonoma County’s legendary alternative newsgathering project. The entertaining film features interviews with Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn and Oliver Stone. Iceland’s The Deep (April 10, 7pm; April 13, 9pm) recreates the true-life adventure of a man who survived in the freezing waters of Iceland after his boat capsized in 1984. The Sinners (April 12, 8:30pm; April 13, 6:30pm), from Iran, is a Hitchcockian thriller set on the streets of Tehran. And for those who really like their cinema to be violent, consider The Best of Looney Tunes (April 13, 9:30am), a montage of ingenious Chuck Jones cartoons spanning the years. For a bit of star-power, actor Ray Liotta will be present, introducing his hit-man thriller Iceman (April 10, 6:30 and 9:30pm), and Mary Louise Parker (star of Weeds and Fried Green Tomatoes) will be treated to a splashy tribute (April 13, 6pm). Meanwhile, in Tiburon, fans of comedies will want to check out The President (April 12, 8pm), a farcical Dutch film about a lovestruck goat herder who finds himself running for president of Holland. In Road to the Open (April 17, 8:15pm), Eric Roberts stars in a quirky love story about a depressed tennis player’s unlikely second-chance at love . . . and a tennis championship. And the festival’s local Marin Filmmakers series includes Past Their Prime, about the oldest living gorilla in captivity, and Running for Jim (April 16 and 18, 8pm) a thrilling documentary about high school track coach Jim Tracy and the length his team goes to help him once he’s diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease. For more, see www.sonomafilmfest.org and www.tiburonfilmfestival.com.

WELL ALL RIGHT Blind Faithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst album has a key role in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Cover Story.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Hip Squares New doc uncovers the stories behind classic album art

BY BRUCE ROBINSON

D

espite the old maxim about books, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re expected to judge a record album by its cover. By careful design, these 12inch squares meld art and marketing in iconic images and photographs that often make the LP a work of visual, as well as musical, creativity. Many have come with unknown but fascinating backstories, nuggets of cultural history that Marin ďŹ lmmaker Eric Christensen mines in his new documentary The Cover Story. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of the stories behind the albums I knewâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re legendaryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but with many, I uncovered stories of what it took to take the photograph or do the artwork,â&#x20AC;? he explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the really interesting ones is the Doors album cover that Henry Diltz did for Morrison Hotel, how they had to sneak into the hotel and take one shot and that was it.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Cover Storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; screens April 13 at the Sonoma International Film Festival and April 15 at the Rafael Film Center.

27 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Film

Along with photographers, graphic artists are the stars of The Cover Story, including several who are â&#x20AC;&#x153;intrinsically linkedâ&#x20AC;? with speciďŹ c performers, among them Roger Dean (Yes), Storm Thorgerson (Pink Floyd) and Stanley Mouse and Alton Kelley (the Grateful Dead). They naturally welcomed the chance to discuss their work, Christensen says, but musicians, too, were happy to contribute. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They sort of lit up when asked about how the artwork links with the music, and what went into the decisionsâ&#x20AC;? about their covers, Christensen says. The stories behind other album art, like Nirvanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nevermind, took considerable digging. The swimming baby seen underwater is now a young adult, who seems rather bemused by the whole thing. More intensive detective work was required to identify and locate the then-11-year-old girl seen topless and holding a model spaceship on the original cover of the lone album by 1970s supergroup Blind Faith. Even though the photographer refused to help, Christensen found herâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and persuaded her to tell her story on camera. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was a young girl and had no compunction about posing for it,â&#x20AC;? he recounts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way she feels now is sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s glad that people talk about it and are interested in it.â&#x20AC;? Blind Faith was quickly repackaged with a standard bandphoto cover in the United States, making it the second high-visibility case of what Christensen calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;banned covers.â&#x20AC;? (The ďŹ rst was the Beatlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hastily recalled â&#x20AC;&#x153;butcherâ&#x20AC;? cover for Yesterday and Today.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a funny one where the Mamas and Papas, fully clothed, are in a bathtub, but Dunhill records put a sticker over the toilet, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;cause the toilet was dirty and they thought that was too gross,â&#x20AC;? the ďŹ lmmaker notes. Several others are also featured in the ďŹ lm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of these have become collectibles,â&#x20AC;? he notes, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;have a certain place in the history.â&#x20AC;?

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 7:30pm

7KXU$SUĂŁSP

Ben Sidran )UL$SUĂŁSP

Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings 6DW$SUĂŁSP

House of Floyd 6XQ$SUĂŁDPĂŁ)5((

Live Music Sunday Brunch with Steep

Ravine

7XH$SUĂŁSP Irish Pub Tuesday Night

SESSIONS

(live reggae hip hop band) with featured Mcâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Singers and rude boysâ&#x20AC;Ś Is whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Up in ǧ

BRIAN JORDAN BAND Guitarist for Karl Denson, Lauryn Hill and

The Ray Charles Project

featuring Tony Lindsay & Dave MathewsIURP6DQWDQD :HG$SUĂŁSP

Jim Campilongo Trio

LAST CALLÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;Č&#x2C6; 

7KXU$SUĂŁSP

Farewell supports to our beloved Family members â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Chaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;z Morison, Brian & Daniel

Roadkill Ghost Choir

APPLE BLOSSOM FESTIVAL Č&#x2C6;   

Í&#x161;Í?Í&#x2122;Í&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;

707.829.2062

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

28

Music

ALL SEEING EYES Nahko Bear blends rhythm with a deep message.

Manifesto Wisdom, Nahko Bear play benefit

˜ BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

‘W

hen you are doing something that is not about you,” says Joey Damico, “it shifts the paradigm.” One afternoon last year, the new board members of Little Tribe Children’s Foundation heard the lyrics to Nahko Bear’s song “Manifesto.” The message went straight to their hearts, and they sought out Nahko and his band, Medicine for the People, to headline the nonprofit’s first benefit concert in support of arts and music therapy for kids. Oregon’s Nahko Bear is a folk revivalist who, along with his tribe of spirited troubadours, makes community-healing music. Nahko’s weighty vocals drift in and out of ballads about cultural cohesion, environmental consciousness and social transcendence. The message is heavy, but the rhythms are energizing. It’s a combination that resonates with the vision of the Little Tribe organization. The budding nonprofit is based in Sebastopol. Founder Joey Damico is an Oakland

native and Rhode Island–raised West Countian whose corporate technology career propelled him to the top—until his personal life suddenly came crashing down. Damico found himself searching for something to heal a broken spirit: “I started thinking about my kids and the gratitude for how healthy they were. There are a lot of people who are not blessed with healthy children.” Bay Area children’s hospitals offer lots of creative arts therapy programs, and doctors believe they have a tremendous impact on healing, even for terminally ill kids. Generally, however, they’re sparsely funded and lack the resources to expand. That’s where Little Tribe comes in, donating 90 percent of funds raised at major events to like-minded institutions. It’s an ambitious goal, and “it’s not easy to do but it’s our mantra,” assures Damico. “We are an allvolunteer army and our core principle is to run lean and mean.” Damico is in good company with the foundation, enlisting successful local artists to head up the board of directors. “In any business relationship, you want to surround yourself with talented and inspired people,” he says. “But more importantly they need a skill set that augments your own.” Graphic designer Zack Darling, photographer Jade Turgel and hip-hop artist Tevya “Wisdom” Jones each lend a creative dose of professional artistry to attract community enthusiasm. Also performing on Friday is Wisdom, whose third studio album, Full Spectrum, was released in March. Wisdom’s new bout of lyricism is rooted in conscious hiphop, enriched with world rhythms and classic dancehall beats. Featured in the seminal film The Indigo Evolution, Jones believes children must develop themselves spiritual and musically. “If I could just reach one person and help uplift their life,” says Jones, “I mean, how many artists have done that for me? That’s what inspires and drives me in my music.” Nahko and Medicine for the People play with Wisdom, Zack Darling and Beli3ver on Friday, April 12, at Hopmonk. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 9pm. $15. 707.829.7300.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Lou Barlow Towering musical figure from Sebadoh, Folk Implosion and Dinosaur Jr plays free solo show. Apr 12 at 6pm. Free. Last Record Store, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Bluetech Gifted electronic visionary Evan Bartholomew brings reverberations for the mind. Apr 13, 9pm. $15. Hopmonk, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Dinosaur Jr. The walls of the old barn may very well crumble as famously loud 90s icons turn it up. Apr 12 at 8pm. $40. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Harvey Mandel & the Snake Historic blues and rock group appears with Ron Thompson & the Resistors. Apr 12, 8pm. $20. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Hot Victory Drum-synth duo from Portland plays with Starskate, the Happening and Secret Cat. Apr 13 at 8. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa.

Jack Tempchin Songwriter for the Eagles and many others in solo show. Ray

Bierl opens. Apr 13, 8pm. $22$25. Youth Annex, 425 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.874.3571.

Leftover Crack Formerly known as Choking Victim, political New York City punk/ska band plays poignant, ass-kicking, unapologetic anthems. Appearing with Rats in the Wall, Slandyr and M Section. Apr 14, 6pm. $15. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Max Raabe & Palast Orchester Recapture the style and wit of German cabaret culture from the 1920s and ‘30s. Apr 14, 3pm. $35-$50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Portugal. The Man Indie rockers from Portland fond of making disturbing music videos. Wildcat Wildcat opens. Apr 11, 9pm. $26. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

The Skatalites Legendary Jamaican ska/ rocksteady band. Our Vinyl Vows opens. Apr 14, 8pm. $20$23. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Taikoza Japanese taiko drumming group has been featured on television and movies, and has toured the world. Apr 11, 7pm. Free. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Tune into

Alternative rockers broke through in 1991 with “All I Want.” Jessie Payo opens. Apr 14. $36-$41. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Swingin' with

Turf Talk & Benni Boom

Sinatra

Hyphy madness hip-hop show. Apr 12, 9pm. Forestville Club, 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

YG Compton rapper appearing with D-Lo, Willie Joe, NHT Boyz, Lefty and Facta Boyz. Apr 13, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

MARIN COUNTY Ben Sidran He wrote Steve Miller’s “Space Cowboy,” but also hosts NPR’s Jazz Alive and has 25 solo albums to his credit. Apr 11, 8pm. $17-$22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

?fjk\[ Yp1 ?fjk\[Yp1 Jk\m\AXofe$M`ZXi`f J k\m\AXofe$M`ZXi`f J Xkli[Xpe`^_kj JXkli[Xpe`^_kj gdkf/gd -gdkf/gd f e0*%.BAQP fe0*%.BAQP

Dark Star Orchestra Acoustic Grateful Dead tribute band plays a set list from the Dead’s 30 years of touring. Apr 10, 8pm. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Hot Buttered Rum Defining band in the California acoustic music genre. Apr 1213, 9pm. $21. Hopmonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415892-6200.

Marin Symphony Program includes Brahms’ German Requiem and Clyne’s )

Fri April 12

Del The Funky Homosapien plus 'ŝŌŽĨ'Ăď

Wed April 17

Dead Can Dance

30

Sat April 20 An evening with Helen Reddy

Fri April 26

Wed, Apr 10 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, Apr 11 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club

Music Meets Movies

ĨĞĂƚƵƌŝŶŐhϮ͗ZĂƩůĞΘ,Ƶŵ

Sat April 27

Foghat

Fri, Apr 12 8–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise SWING LESSON AND DANCE with California Ballroom

Sat, Apr 13 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise Circle ‘n Squares HOEDOWN

Fri May 3 An evening with Tainted Love

Sat May 18

Adam Carolla Θ Dr Drew’’s Reunion Tour Fri May 24

Naughty By Nature Sat May 25

dƌŝƐƚĂŶWƌĞƩLJŵĂŶplus Ben Taylor

Sun, Apr 14 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

Fri May 31 THIRD ANNIVERSARY PARTYĨĞĂƚƵƌŝŶŐ 

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy plus The Deadlies Sat June 8

&Ăď&ŽƵƌʹdŚĞhůƟŵĂƚĞdƌŝďƵƚĞ Wed June 12

Cheap Trick Sat June 15 Jerry DouglasΘPeter Rowan’’s Big Twang Theory Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

SECOND HELPING Leftover Crack raise hell at the Phoenix Theater on April 14.

See Concerts, above.

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

Mon, Apr 15 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Apr 16 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

29 N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Music

Toad the Wet Sprocket

Music ( 29

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

30 BEST MUSIC BEST MUSIC VENUE VE NUE B EST PLACE PLACE TO DANCE DANCE BEST B E ST O UTD O O R D INING BEST OUTDOOR DINING HONOR ABLE BEST BREWPUB B EST BR EWPUB HONORABLE BEST B EST PL PLACE ACE FFOR OR S SINGLES INGLES TO M MEET E ET

FRI F RI – APR APR 1 12 2

LLITTLE ITTLE TRIBE TR I B E C CHILDREN’S HILDREN’S FOUNDATION FOUNDATION PRESENTS PRESENTS WORLD W ORLD | SO SOUL UL | R REGGAE EG G A E

NAHKO N AHKO & M MEDICINE EDICIN NE FOR FO$$15/DOORS R T THE HE P PEOPLE E O P L E 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+ SAT S AT – APR APR 1 13 3

JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

DOWNTEMPO D OWNTEMPO | ELECTRONICA ELEC TRONIC A | CHILL CH I L L

BLUETECH BL UETECH

+ TOR TOR & M MEDIUM EDIUM TROY TROY + LIVE LI V E FLOWER A RT B YA NTHONY WARD WARD FLOWER ART BY ANTHONY

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+ MON M ON – APR APR 1 15 5 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK D DANCEHALL A N C E H ALL M MASSIVE ASSIVE & JJUNIORS UNIORS BIG BIG PLATE PLATE PRESENT PRESENT REGGAE R EGGAE | ISLAND ISL AND SOUL SOUL

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT MNE M NE SINGERS SINGERS SERIES SERIES W WITH IT TH

Two-Day Tribute to Living Legend CHARLIE HADEN CHARLES LLOYD & JASON MORAN duo SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK® FRED HERSCH Trio AZAR LAWRENCE Quartet MARCUS SHELBY Orchestra w/HJF Freedom Jazz Choir AND MANY, MANY MORE!

SEE FULL SCHEDULE ONLINE OFFICIAL SPONSORS

THE FOLEY FOOD & WINE SOCIETY H7D9>-9H;7J?L;šHE:D;OIJHED=L?D;O7H:I THE COUNTY OF SONOMA J>;>;7B:I8KH=JH?8KD; BUSINESS SPONSORS

8?=@E>DÊIC7HA;Jš8E>;C?7Dš9EIJ;7KN ;C;B;9JH?9š<;HH7H?#97H7DE >;7B:I8KH=9>7C8;HE<9ECC;H9; >;7BI8KH=9;DJ;H<EHJ>;7HJI >;7B:I8KH=I>;:š>EJ;B>;7B:I8KH= A;D:7BB#@79AIEDšCEDHEL?7DKHI;HO IFEED87HšIO7H<EKD:7J?EDšJ>;FH;II:;CE9H7J A9IC%/'$'šAF<7%/*$'šAH98%/'

THE T HE PAULA PAULA F FUGA UGA A AND ND MIKE M IKE LOVE LOVE TRIO TRIO

$3 $ 3R RED ED S STRIPES TRIPES & $ $4 4 JJAMESON AMESON A ALL LL N NIGHT IGHT $$10 10 PRE/$12 PRE/$12 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+ T TUES UES – APR APR 16 16 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R E SE NT S OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT HOSTED HOSTED BY BY E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

WED W ED – APR APR 17 17

DOUBLE D OUBLE D & WOBBLE WOBBLE FACTORY FACTORY PRESENT PRESENT GLITCH G LITCH | DUB DUB STEP STEP | ELECTRONICA ELEC TRONIC A

BRAINSTORM B RAINSTORM WITH W ITH MINNESOTA MINNESOTA

Rap star nicknamed the “Prince of the Bay” appears with Thrive, Rain, IrieFuse, Rain and MND. Apr 13, 9pm. $15-$20. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Paula West Jazz singer performs a wide variety of favorites from Cole Porter to Bob Dylan. Apr 13, 8pm. $30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Oakland–East Bay Gay Men’s Chorus A tapestry of Medieval chant, Renaissance polyphony, romantic part-song, spirituals, campy show tunes and a world premiere in the program titled, “Man, Oh Man.” Apr 14, 5pm. $15-$25. First United Methodist Church, 625 Randolph St, Napa.

Quartet San Francisco Virtuostic string quartet plays a tribute to Dave Brubeck. Apr 14, 4pm. $22-$25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

NAPA COUNTY Dead Can Dance Australian world-fusion group. David Kuckhermann opens. Apr 17, 8pm. $60-$70. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Del tha Funky Homosapien Oakland rapper can, in fact, rhyme a word like rhinoceros. Appearing with Gift of Gab, Serendipity Project and Bukue One. Apr 12, 8pm. $25. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues Aqus Cafe Apr 11, Brittany Haas. Apr 12, Euro Café Music. Apr 13, Down with May. Apr 14, Ken Roy Barry. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Apr 13, Hot Victory, Starskate,

FRI F RI – A APR PR 1 19 9

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY P PRESENTS R ESE NT S CLASSIC C L ASSIC | R ROCK O CK | C COVERS OVERS

PEPPERLAND PE PPER8LPMA/2N1+D $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+

Apr 11, DysphunctionalSpecies, the Antiquators. Apr 12, Dedicated Maniacs, Jimmy Allison. Apr 13, Come to the Beats for Katie Mae. Apr 14, the Moonbeams. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Belly Apr 13, Choppin’ Broccolli. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787.

Dhyana Center Lofts Apr 13, Shimshai, Elyihu Sills & Jason Parmar. 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Flamingo Lounge Apr 12, Koncept Party Band. Apr 13, Aqua Nett. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530. Apr 12, Turf Talk, Benni Boom. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

French Garden Apr 12, Out of the Blue. Apr 13, Honey B & the Bollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Green Music Center Apr 12, Faculty Composers Concert. Apr 13, USAF Commanders Jazz Ensemble. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Apr 10, Shawn Baltazor with Kermit Driscoll. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

S SAT– AT– A APR PR 20

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

6TH 6 TH A ANNUAL NNUAL

BEER B EER BLOSSOM BLOSSOM FESTIVAL FESTIVAL

Hopmonk Sebastopol

WITH W ITH D DAVID AVID LLUNING, UNING , M MR RD DECEMBER E CE M B E R

Apr 12, Nahko & Medicine for the People. Apr 13, Bluetech. Apr 15, the Paula Fuga & Mike Love Trio. Apr 17, Minesota, Dr Dylon, Mose. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

JJON ON GONZALES G O N Z ALE S S STRINGBAND T R I N G BA N D FFREE/12–7PM/ALL REE/12–7PM /ALL AGES AGES

SAT S AT – APR APR 20

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY P PRESENTS R ESE NT S ROOTS R OOTS | R ROCK O CK | R REGGAE EG G A E

NORRIS N ORRIS MAN MAN

+A ANCIENT NCIENT MY MYSTIC, STIC, CHRISTAFARI, CHRISTAFARI, SIZZLAK S I Z Z L AK A AND ND DINGER DING E R

healdsburgjazz.org

Aubergine

Green Music Center 1029

AN A NE EVENING VE NING W WITH ITH

MONDAY N MONDAY NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT D JACQUES & DJ DJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE DJJ JACQUES

the Happening, Secret Cat. Apr 17, Manzanita Falls, Highway Poets, Loves It!, Girls in Suede. Every other Wednesday, Open Mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Forestville Club

SONOMA COUNTY

$$10 10 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 99:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

PURCHASE TICKETS AT:

Levin & Cº., Healdsburg Last Record Store, Santa Rosa

Mistah Fab

Grammy-winning American country music and bluegrass performer. Apr 13, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

+ DR DR D DYLON YLON - M MOSE OS E

$$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+ WEEKLY W EEK EKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

800.838.3006

“Within Her Arms.” Apr 14, 3pm and Apr 16, 7:30pm. $10-$70. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Kathy Mattea

Hopmonk Sonoma

MON M ON – APR APR 22 22

Apr 12, Tony Gibson. Apr 13, Keystone Crossing. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP HOP HOP

Lagunitas Tap Room

$3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 77PM/21+ PM/21+

BRAND NEW LOVE Before his Dinosaur Jr. show at

Gundlach Bundschu, Lou Barlow plays a free in-store April 12 at the Last Record Store. See Concerts, p29.

Apr 10, Katie Garibaldi. Apr 11, Travelin’ Soul. Apr 12, Brothers of Siren. Apr 13, Todos Santos. Apr 14, Sean Carscadden & Marty O’Reilly. Apr 17, Stony

397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

31

Apr 13, Day on the Green with Sarah Baker (also see Events). Free. Village Court, Santa Rosa. DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House "REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(52s8PM DOORSs$26 s ALTERNATIVE/INDIE/ROCK

Apr 12, DaveEdJohn Quartet. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Mystic Theatre Apr 11, Portugal. The Man, Wildcat Wildcat. Apr 14, Toad the Wet Sprocket, Jessie Payo. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

PORTUGAL. THE MAN

PLUS WILDCAT! WILDCAT! 35.s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s ALTERNATIVE ROCK

TOAD THE WET SPROCKET

PLUS JESSIE PAYO 3!4s0-$//23ss BLUES

Occidental Center for the Arts

Dark Unknown Holcombe Waller to play Occidental While visiting Occidental a couple years ago, Holcombe Waller played at West County Herb Company and quickly dubbed it his â&#x20AC;&#x153;favorite tiny venue west of the Mississippi.â&#x20AC;? Even though Wallerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s haircut is hipper than all the single speeds and plaid shirts in the land, the Portland-based theatrical troubadour defies easy stereotypes. He creates elaborately staged shows incorporating video projections and costumes (what he once called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;metatheatrical singspiel-style pop operaâ&#x20AC;?), and yet he can also goose-bump a crowd with nothing more than his sweet tenor and acoustic guitar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holcombe has an aura of magic,â&#x20AC;? West County Herb Company owner Lisa Kurtz says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His voice is angelic.â&#x20AC;? When Waller returns to the West County Herb Company this week, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll draw heavily from his most recent album, Into the Dark Unknown, which one critic described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a contender for least macho album of the year.â&#x20AC;? Indeed, whether heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s singing about breakups or unicorns, Waller suffuses both the mundane and the magical with an arresting emotional honesty. See him on Friday, April 12, at West County Herb Company. 3641 Main St., Occidental. 8pm. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20. 707.874.9567.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jessica Dur Taylor

Apr 13, Lisa Ferraro & Erika Luckett. Apr 14, Gradina Balkan Singing Group. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Last Day Saloon Apr 12, Road Crew, Bad Boy Eddie, Jaded. Apr 13, Fusion Nights, DJ Crisp. Apr 14, the

PLUS GIRLS AND BOYS 7%$s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3 s POP/ROCK/FOLK

Apr 14, Les Amis Zydeco. 10005 Main St, Penngrove. 707.664.8018.

BOB SCHNEIDER ACOUSTIC

Phoenix Theater Apr 13, YG, D-Lo, Willie Joe, NHT Boyz, Lefty, Facta Boyz. Apr 14, Leftover Crack, Rats in the Wall, Slandyr, M Section. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7

WWWMCNEARSCOM

Redwood Cafe Apr 10, Buzzy Martin, Nate Lopez, Linda Ferro Band. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

River Theatre Apr 12, Harvey Mandel & the Snake, Ron Thompson & the Resistors. Apr 13, Lester Chambers. Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Russian River Brewing Co Apr 14, Gentry Bronson. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub Apr 12, Mark McDonald. Apr 13, the Hired Guns. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Skatalites, Our Vinyl Vows. T120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Shone Farm

Mavericks

Society: Culture House

Apr 12, Stephanie Teel Band. Apr 14, Dedicated Maniacs.

JOAN OSBORNE

Penngrove Pub

Apr 12, Ambuya Marimba Band. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797. Point. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

TAJ MAHAL TRIO

7%$s0-$//23s!$6$/3 s SINGER/SONGWRITER

Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs,

DIN N E R & A SHOW

JUSTIN FARREN Apr 12 West Coast Songwriters Fri

) 32

Rancho Debut!

2012 Song of the Year 8:15 / No Cover

SHANA MORRISON Apr 13 Sassy Songwriter/Singer 8:30 Sat

Apr 14 JEREMY Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ANTONIO AND FRIENDS 5:00 / No Cover Sun Fri

Apr 19

WHISKEY & WOMEN Ranchut!o

WITH ACCORDIONIST

Deb

RENEE DE LA PRADE 8:15 / No Cover

JOHNNY ALLAIRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Apr 20 Birthday Dance Party 8:30 Sat

HOUSTON JONES Apr 21 High Octane Americana 5:00 Sun

LONE STAR RETROBATES Apr 27 Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:30 Sat

### MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND ### Sun

May 26

THE BLUES BROADS

FEATURING DOROTHY MORRISON,

TRACY NELSON, ANGELA STREHLI

Mon

Apr 13, Dginn. 6225 Eastside Rd, Forestville.

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

AND ANNIE SAMPSON

MARCIA BALL #####################

May 27

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Alicia J. Rose

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

32

Music ( 31

Ken Cook Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Spancky’s Apr 12, Roadhouse. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

A FRESH ST START TART TART FOR 2013!!

50% LESS THAN THE COST C OF CIGARETTES! NO TAR, NO SMOKE, NO N ASHES! TIRED OF THE SMELL OF O ASHTRAYS? THEN THE ELECTRONIC C CIGARETTE IS THE ANSWER! FOR YOU OR THAT SPECIAL SOMEO SOMEONE ONE YOU KNOW WHO SMOKES.. COME DOWN AND SEE SEE US! .

WWW.DIGITALCIGGZ.COM 1560 156 60 4TH ST, STE C 450 COLLEGE AVE SAN N RAFAEL SANTA ROSA 415.747.8239 415 5.747.8239 707.637.2457 DISCLAIMER – THIS PRODUCT IS NOT AN AID FOR SMOKING G CESSATION. CESSATION . THIS THIS PRODUCT PRO DUC T IN IN NO NO WAY WAY INTENDS INTEN DS TO TO DIAGNOSE, DI AGNOSE , TREAT, TRE AT, CURE OR MITIGATE ANY DISEASE OR CONDITION. THIS PRODUCT ODUC T H HAS AS N NOT OT Y YET ET B BEEN EEN A APPROVED P P R OV E D B BY Y TTHE HE U UNITED NITED SSTATES TATES FFOOD OOD A AND ND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IN NO WAY CLAIMS L A IMS TO TO ASSIST A SSIST USER USER IN IN QUITTING QU IT TING OR O R LESSENING LESSENING FREQUENCY FREQU ENC Y OR OR SMOKING TRADITIONAL TOBACCO CIGARETTES. KEEP THISS PRODUCT PRO DUC T AND A N D ITS IT S COMPONENT COM PONENT PARTS PA RT S OUT OUT OF OF REACH RE ACH OF OF CHILDREN. CHILDREN. REFRAIN FROM USING THIS PRODUCT OF YOU ARE UNDER THE TH E LEGAL LEG A L SMOKING SM OK ING AGE AGE IN IN YOUR YOU R STATE. STATE .

Toad in the Hole Pub

Apr 12, Swamp Thang. Apr 17, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. Apr 13 and 16, Tommy Odetto. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Apr 13, RadioActive. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Apr 12, Justin Farrin. Apr 13, Shana Morrison. Apr 14, Jeremy D’antonio. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Tradewinds

Sausalito Seahorse

Apr 17, Down With May. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Apr 11, Equinox Jazz Trio. Apr 12, Tip of the Top. Apr 13, Rolando Morales And Carlos Reyes. Apr 14, Orquesta Borinquen. Apr 17, Curtis Woodman Trio. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Wells Fargo Center Apr 14, Max Raabe & Palast Orchester. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Youth Annex Apr 13, Jack Tempchin, Ray Bierl. 425 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.874.3571.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Apr 12, Craig Jessup. Apr 13, James Henry Celebration of Multi Cultural Music. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sleeping Lady

Terrapin Crossroads Apr 11-13, Spring Rambles. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

The Trident Apr 11, Andoni. 558 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.3232.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Apr 10, Wayne Scroggins & the Waterhole Band. Apr 11, Brian Cline. Apr 12, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Apr 13, Jinx Jones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House

Apr 17, Kelly Peterson. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Apr 13, Kathy Mattea. Apr 14, Quartet San Francisco. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Station House Cafe

Silo’s

Apr 14, Paul Knight and friends. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Apr 13, Mixed Signals. Apr 14, Original Juliane Band, Larry Otis, John Ruch & Michael Beck. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Sweetwater Music Hall Apr 10, Dark Star Orchestra Acoustic. Apr 11, Ben Sidran. Apr 12, Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings. Apr 13, House of Floyd. Apr 16, the Ray Charles Project. Apr 17, Jim Campilongo Trio. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Uptown Theatre Apr 12, Del tha Funky Homosapien, Gift of Gab, Serendipity Project, Bukue One. Apr 17, Dead Can Dance. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Fenix Apr 12, Mitch Woods & his Rocket 88s. Apr 13, Agape Soul. Apr 14, Elaine Lucia. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Apr 12, Pop Fiction. Apr 13, Ray Obiedo Group. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato

Sprouts For our new soon in ing Store Open a! lu a Pet m

Apr 12-13, Hot Buttered Rum. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415892-6200.

Lark Theater

Friday, April 12th & Saturday, April 13th

Apr 13, Paula West. 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Times:

19 Broadway Club

Upcoming Hiring Event:

Friday April 12, 2013 @ 8am-6pm • Saturday, April 13, 2013 @ 8am-4pm

Location: Sheraton Sonoma County- Petaluma 745 Baywood Drive • Petaluma, CA 94954 Sprouts offers the following benefits to many of our employees 401k, Medical, Dental and Vision, Paid Holidays, Long and Short-Term Disability, Paid Sick Leave & Vacation, Life Insurance, Team Member Discount Store Location: SWC Washington & Highway 101- Petaluma, CA Please complete your online application at prior to attending the Hiring Event! http://sproutsjobfair.com

Apr 12, ADD/C, Grey Coats. Apr 13, Mistah Fab, Thrive, IrieFuse, Rain, MND. Apr 14, Natural Gas Jazz Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon Apr 12, Steve Sutherby Band. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osteria Divino Apr 10, Jonathan Poretz. Apr 11, Nicholas Culp Trio. Apr 13, Suzanna Smith . Apr 14, Liza Silva & Voz do Brazil. Apr 17, Dick Fregulia Trio. Apr 12, Passion Habanera. Apr 16,

San Francisco’s City Guide

Jessie Ware If you missed out on tickets to Ware’s sold-out show, see her for free at all-ages in-store. Apr 11 at Amoeba SF.

Johnny Marr One of the world’s most inimitable and visionary guitarists tours for new solo album. Apr 13 at the Fillmore.

Bat for Lashes Mystical and variegated in talent, Natasha Khan plays from new album, “The Haunted Man.” Apr 14 at Regency Ballroom.

Aaron Carter Former squeaky-clean child pop star who now overuses the phrase “holy shitballs” on Twitter. Apr 14 at Cafe du Nord.

Purity Ring Edmonton duo whose excellent album “Shrines” continues to find a wider audience. Apr 15-16 at the Independent.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

33

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Artlife Gallery Apr 13-May 30, “Silver & Oil,” silver prints and oil paintings by Rogers and Thomas Wood. Reception, Apr 13, 6pm. 958 Gravenstein Highway S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Apr 29, “Small but Grand,” high school students given small canvas for use with any media. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and SunMon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery Through May 11, “The Human

Presence in Art,” group show. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 28, “Usable, Loveable Peanuts,” highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products plus the licensing and manufacturing stories behind them. Through Sep 1, “Art of the Line,” describing Schulz’s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Through May 2, “Earthbound,” ceramics from Eileen Jungwirth’s Pegasi series. Reception, Apr 11, 5pm.

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Arts Events Through May 2, “Spring Art Exhibitions,” featuring works by Lynnie Rabinowitsh and Eileen Jungwirth. Reception, Apr 11, 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery 300 Through Apr 27, “Light/Wave 450nm,” Collaborative Sculptures By Virginia Harrison and Patrick Scott. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Apr 13-Jun 8, “Atmosphere,” works of art creating a space of being. Reception, Apr 13, 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery

RECEPTIONS Apr 11 At 5pm. Finley Community Center, “Earthbound,” ceramics from Eileen Jungwirth; “Spring Art Exhibitions,”works by Lynnie Rabinowitsh and Eileen Jungwirth. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Apr 12 At 5:30pm. Napa Valley Museum, “Angels of the Valley,” photographer Mars Lasar’s collection on display. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Apr 13 At 11am. Markham Vineyards, “The Groupies,” work by Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman. 2812 St Helena Hwy N, St Helena. At 2pm. Graton Gallery, “A Look Back,” paintings, block prints and wood engravings by Rik Olson. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.829.8912. At 3pm. Art By the Bay Weekend Gallery, “Spring Show,” variety of media from West Marin artists. 18856 Highway One, Marshall. 415.663.1006. At 3pm. Upstairs Art Gallery, “Ballerinas,” paintings by Jim Richard.

306 Center Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.4214. At 5pm. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “Scissors... Wax... Glue,” collages of found, painted or collected materials. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970. At 5pm. Gallery of Sea & Heaven, “Atmosphere,” works of art creating a space of being. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123. At 6pm. Artlife Gallery, “Silver & Oil,” silver prints and oil paintings by Rogers and Thomas Wood. 958 Gravenstein Highway S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Apr 14

Through May 19, “A Look Back,” paintings, block prints and wood engravings by Rik Olson. Reception, Apr 13, 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Apr 10-May 5, “Scissors... Wax... Glue,” collages of found, painted or collected materials. Reception, Apr 13, 5pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

From Austin, Alt-Country Sweethearts

Kelly Willis & Bruce Robison Friday, April 19, 8:00 pm

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Apr 15, “The Diversity of Cuba: Images of Today,” photos, paintings and video by artists who have traveled and lived in Cuba. SRJC, 680 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974.

At 4pm. San Geronimo Community Center, paintings and collages by Anne Hillsley, photography by Dan McKenna. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Apr 16

Through May 12, “Out Come the Divs,” paintings by Laine Justice. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville.

At 4pm. Petaluma Arts Center, “Cosmic Terrain,” individual and collaborative works by Mars-1, Damon Soule, Oliver Vernon and Ricky Watts. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center and Cumulus Presents proudly present

Through May 5, “M for Mystique,” exploring the theme of intrigue. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Perdita Productions

Petaluma Arts Center Through Jun 2, “Cosmic Terrain,” individual and collaborative works by Mars1, Damon Soule, Oliver Vernon and )

34

(Apple Blossom Festival eve) Sebastopol

Also Coming Soon Ruthie Foster (solo) – May 11 in the Annex Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Community

Cultural Center

FRIDAY, JUNE 28 – SUNDAY, JUNE 30

John Prine Angelique Kidjo Taj Mahal Marianne Faithfull Greg Brown Iris Dement Irma Thomas Madeleine Peyroux Dave Alvin Rebirth Brass Band Paul Thorn Band Brothers Comatose Perla Batalla Red Molly Poor Man’s Whiskey Elephant Revival Sherry Austin w/Henhouse  Achilles Wheel Rani Arbo & Daisy Mayhem  Alice Di Micele Alice Stuart & The Formerlys  The Sam Chase Tiny Television  & many more…

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE

Tickets & Info. www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

34 A E

( 33

Ricky Watts. Reception, Apr 16, 4pm. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 5, “Juried Photography Show,” featuring local artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through May 10, “Flower Power,” using flowers as a central theme. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Apr 21, “Harry Dixon: The Metalsmith’s Workshop,” well-known metalsmith was the brother of painter Maynard Dixon. Through Apr 21, “Mail Call,” story of military mail and communication from the American Revolution to current wars. Through Jun 2, “Tools as Art,” collection of witty and light-hearted works based on familiar forms. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jun 16, “Minidoka on My Mind,” paintings by Roger Shimomura. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Jun 30, “Bright Summer Lights,” multi-media by Janet McBeen and oil paintings by Adele Pruitt. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

University Art Gallery Apr 15-May 11, “BFA Exhibition 2013,” featuring work from 15 art students graduating this spring. Reception, Apr 18, 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

variety of media from West Marin artists. Reception, Apr 13, 3pm. 18856 Highway One, Marshall. 415.663.1006.

Elsewhere Gallery Through Apr 10, “Thresholds,” a mother-son collaboration between Nadine Gay and Adrian Curtet. Through May 21, “Its Worser Than Louie Armstrong,” paintings, poetry and aphorism by Jack Carter. Reception, Apr 21. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Route One Through Apr 28, Eric Engstrom’s digital photography of the American landscape. Artist talk, Apr 28, 4pm. Through Apr 28, “Mars’ Book: Confessions of My Inner Dog,” paintings by Dorothy Nissen. Artist talk, Apr 28, 4pm. Through Apr 28, “The True Cost of Plastic,” mixed-media installation by Judith Selby Lang and Richard Lang. Artist talk Apr 28, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Apr 14, “AB/Normal,” works by Dan Herrera, Aron Meynell and Paula Moran that skew the idea of normalcy through surreal and nostalgic narratives. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Apr 29, Paintings and collages by Anne Hillsley. Reception, Apr 14, 4pm. Through Apr 29, Photography by Dan McKenna. Reception, Apr 14, 4pm. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Apr 30, “Postcards,” paintings by Chris Gwaltney. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY

Upstairs Art Gallery

ECHO Gallery

Apr 13-May 31, “Ballerinas,” paintings by Jim Richard. Reception, Apr 13, 3pm. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. SunThurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

Through Apr 30, “Radiant Ruins,” local artists focus on dimension, reflection and process. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

MARIN COUNTY Art by the Bay Weekend Gallery Apr 13-Jun 30, “Spring Show,”

Markham Vineyards Through Jun 30, “The Groupies,” work by Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman. Reception, Apr 13, 11am. 2812 St Helena Hwy N, St Helena.

Napa Valley Museum Through Apr 30, “Angels of the Valley,” photographer Mars Lasar’s unique collection on display. Reception, Apr 12, 5:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Ngaio Bealum SF comedian promises “a high time will be had by all.” Apr 17, 8pm. $15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Clean Comedy with Punch Starring Danny Dechi, Rob McCulloch, Steve Ausburne, Tyler V and Heidi Bartlett. Apr 13, 7pm. $5. Johnny’s Java, 3080 Marlow Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1332.

Kathy Griffin TV star and outrageous comedian taping for Bravo TV special. Apr 12, 7 and 10pm. $45-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Helen Pachynski Bay Area comics. Mature content. Apr 17, 9pm. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

‘LAGUNA REFLECTIONS’ Art by Linda Caldwell joins that of Cat Kaufman, Kathleen

McCallum and others at Montgomery Village’s Day on the Green on April 13. See Events.

Concert, “Water Works” theme by guest choreographers Christine Cali, Nancy Lyons, Scott Wells and Cassie Meador and Matthew Cumbie from Dance Exchange. Times vary. $10-$17. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

displaying and selling unique items from antique to vintage and repurposed. Apr 13-14, 10am. $6. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

free of charge. Mon, Apr 15, 7pm. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

The Magic of Olive Culture

Spreckels Performing Arts Center

Chef Marvin Martin and Carol Drinkwater describe olive oil, with a film showing and book signing. Apr 14, 2pm. $40-$45. VJB Vineyards & Cellars, 60 Shaw Ave, Kenwood. 707.833.2300.

Field Trips

Apr 13, 8pm and Apr 14, 2pm, “Fausto,” presented by Napoles ballet with Carlos Molina. $25-$30. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Brian Regan Family-friendly comedian. Apr 13, 7pm. $43-$50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Events

Johnny Steele

It’s like a mini “Antiques Road Show”–see what your family heirlooms are really worth. Apr 12, 10am. $30. Marin History Museum, Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538.

San Francisco comedian appears with Brendan Lynch and Samson Koletkar. Presented by Holy City Zoo. Apr 13, 8pm. $15-$18. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Dance Dance Palace Apr 13, 8pm, Gamelan Sekar Jaya, Balinese music and dance with three distinct gamelan ensembles. $10-$20. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Marin Ballet at 50

Antique Appraisal Day

April in Paris A Parisian evening hosted by Salvador Elementary School. Apr 13, 6pm. $45-$55. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Day on the Green with Sarah Baker Unplugged blues as well as art and other attractions on hand. Apr 13, 11am. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Extreme Midget Wrestling Federation

Mardell Mardeau Memorial Gathering Celebration of beloved violinist with music from friends and local musicians. Apr 21, 1-3pm. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.583.6386.

Mini Maker Faire DIY event promoting young people’s interests in science, technology, engineering, art and math. Apr 13, 10am-3pm. Free. Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa.

Fourth annual race to raise money for the park. Apr 13, 8am. Spring Lake Park, 391 Violetti Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Bill & Dave Hikes This 10 mile, six-hour strenuous hike requires climbing a total of 2,100 feet in elevation. Apr 13, 9:45am. Hood Mountain Regional Park, Los Alamos Road, Santa Rosa.

Bird Walk How many can you spot? Apr 11, 8:30am. Free. Riverfront Regional Park, 7821 Eastside Rd, Healdsburg.

Spring Book Faire

Nature Hike

Thousands of donated books on sale to benefit Friends of Santa Rosa Libraries. Apr 12-15. $5. Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Hall, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.565.7176.

Led by naturalist and retired biology professor Peter Leveque. Apr 13, 9am. Free. Mayacamas Sanctuary, Pine Flat Road, off Highway 128, Healdsburg.

Tomatomania

Led by Petaluma Wetlands Alliance. Sat, Apr 13, 9am. Free. Shollenberger Park, Parking lot, Petaluma.

Exactly what it sounds like. Apr 17, 8pm. $15-$20. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

World’s largest traveling tomato seedling sale features over 200 varieties. Apr 1314, 10am-4pm. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Person Theater

Indoor Antique Market

World Book Night

Apr 12-20, Spring Dance

Over 75 distinctive vendors

Thirty book titles given out

50th anniversary alumni reunion performance. April 13, 7:30pm. $50. College of Marin Theater, 835 College Ave., Kentfield. 415.453.6705.

Annadel Half Marathon

Nature Walk

Spring Wildflower Walks Preserve known for one of the most incredible wildflower displays in Sonoma County.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

beautiful girl. Apr 13, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

WELCOMING. WE LCOMING. E ENTERTAINING. NTERTAI A NING. INS INSPIRING SPIRING An intimate celebration of unforgettable cinema, world-class food and wine on Sonomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic plaza

Feature documentary on the iconic beat poet. Fri, Apr 12, 7pm and Sun, Apr 14, 4pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Film Classics Apr 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Airplane.â&#x20AC;? 7pm. $8. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

5 Broken Cameras

Dr. Motivation

Cornel West to give powerful message at SSU Dr. Cornel Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice is so motivational that hearing him read a grocery list could make heads nod in unison and inspire one to cry out, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right! We have to do something about the lack of peanut butter in this house!â&#x20AC;? But Cornel West doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read grocery lists. Born in 1953, he became a lecturer at Harvard at age 25. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now a professor at Princeton whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s written 20 books, several of which are required reading at Sonoma State University, where he lectures this week. Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expertise lies in politics and religion, but race, poverty and the inequality of wealth are all fair gameâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and nobody is above reproach. On a C-SPAN panel, he famously lambasted President Obama for taking the oath of office on Martin Luther King Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bible while approving drone strikes in Pakistan and leaving 62 percent of prisoners in jail for soft-drug crimesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; while not a single Wall Street executive is incarcerated. Cornel West speaks Thursday, April 11, at SSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7pm. $20. 866.955.6040. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Documentary aabout a Palestinian farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chronicle of his nonviolent resistance to the actions of the Israeli army. Apr 17, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

G-Dog

?fefiXYc\D\ek`fe

Documentary about Greg Boyle and Homeboy Industries. Discussion follows. Apr 17, 5:30pm. $5. NVUSD District Auditorium, 2425 Jefferson St, Napa.

activist and artist. Apr 16, 7pm. Free. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Film

Beauty and the Beast

Ai WeiWei: Never Sorry Documentary on Chinese

Jean Cocteauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1946 adaptation of the fairy tale in which a beast with a gentle heart falls in love with a

t th

th

Dfm`\GXjj18ZZ\jjgXjj]fiXccĂ&#x201D;cdjXe[gXe\cj 8ZZ\j \ jgXjj ]fiXccĂ&#x201D;cdjXe[gXe\cj $17 $175 75 Dfm`\GXjj1 Gi\d`\iGXjj1@eZcl[\jFg\e`e^E`^_kI\Z\gk`fe# Gi\d`\i GXjj1 @eZcl[\jFg\e`e^E`^_k I\Z\gk`fe# k`Zb\kkfXKi`Ylk\#CXk`efGXikpXe[8nXi[jGXikp% k`Z b\kkfXKi`Ylk\\#CXk`ef GXikpXe[8nXi[j GXikp% JkXiGXjj1K_\kfkXc]\jk`mXc\og\i`\eZ\%=`ijk _\kfkXc ]\jk`mXc\og\i`\eZ\%=`ijk $400 $4 00 JkXiGXjj1K \ekipkfXccĂ&#x201D;cdjXe[gXe\cj2Xcci\Z\gk`fejXe[ \ek ipkfXccĂ&#x201D;cdjXXe[gXe\cj2Xcc i\Z\gk`fejXe[ ]k\igXik`\j#=`cddXb\iD`o\i#M@G?fjg`kXc`kp $900 $9 00 XX]k\igXik`\j#=`cddXb\iD`o\i#M@G?fjg`kXc`kp 88i\X#Ki`Ylk\;`ee\i>XcXGXikp% i\X#Ki`Ylk\;`eee\i>XcX GXikp%

Great Expectations Filmed staging from the Vaudeville Theatre, West End, London, of Charles Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; classic novel adapted by Jo Clifford. Apr 16, 7pm. $8-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

For passes & membership info: -CBCA5 -

Documentary reveals the blood, sweat and tears that go into every bottle of Sonoma County wine. Filmmaker John Beck in discussion afterward. Apr 10, 7:15pm. $10. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ä&#x17E;ĨĆ&#x152;Žž^Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĆŠĹŻÄ&#x17E; singer/songwriter, Jill CohnÍ&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;Ä?ŽůůÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ć&#x;ŽŜ of lush, ambient, hopeful, love songs. The traveling songstress is best known for her hit song, Rescue Dog as heard on KRSH radio. Her melodious tunes about love, forĹ?Ĺ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ć?Í&#x2022;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;ƾžÄ&#x201A;ĹśĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜships over the years have elicited favorable Ä?ŽžĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?ŽŜĆ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ć?ĹŻĹ?ĹŹÄ&#x17E;:ŽŜĹ?DĹ?Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; ^Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ&#x161;DÄ?>Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;ĹśÍ&#x2DC;Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;ĹśÍ&#x203A;Ć?ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152; Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;ĹŻĹ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ć?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹ˝Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ&#x161;Ĺ˝^ŽŜŽžÄ&#x201A;ŽƾŜĆ&#x161;Ç&#x2021; and musical partnership with Dave Sampson whose guitar soundscapes create a perfect Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;ĹśÍ&#x203A;Ć?Ç Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹľÍ&#x2022;Ĺ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ć?Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ć&#x;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E; messages of hope.

The Loving Story Documentary about the 1967 US Supreme Court decision that struck down laws prohibiting interracial marriage. Panel discussion with Abby Bogomolny and Anne Marie Insull afterward. Apr 10, 6pm. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372. Director Lisa Gossels in attendance of this documentary following Palestinian & Israeli teen girls after a leadership program. Apr 10, 7pm. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Our City Dreams Documentary visits the creative spaces

) 36

=@A 9GHCF;Â&#x2021;VOV 9GHCF;Â&#x2021;VOVXRRQUOO VXRRQUOO

Beautiful I Love You

Harvest

My So-Called Enemy Thurs, Apr 11, 10am and Sat, Apr 13, 10am. Free. Van Hoosear Preserve, Grove Street, El Verano.

APRIL P Purchase urchase y your our Passes Passes ttoday! oday!

>Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ĺ˝:Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻŽŜÍ&#x2014;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä?Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ&#x2030;Í&#x2022;ĆľdĆľÄ?Ä&#x17E; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?dƾŜÄ&#x17E;Ć?Íť&Ĺ˝ĹŻĹŻĹ˝Ç :Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻŽŜdÇ Ĺ?ĆŠÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;& :Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻÍ&#x203A;Ć?&ĨÄ&#x201A;ĹśĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;

To hear Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĆľĆ&#x;Ĩƾů/>Ĺ˝Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;zŽƾ (with the single ,Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;Ç&#x2021;WÄ&#x17E;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;zŽƾ) please visit:

www.jillcohn.com

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Ferlinghetti

35

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

( 35

of five women artists. Apr 11, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

A Place at the Table Documentary starring Jeff Bridges, Tom Colicchio, and Ken Cook investigates incidents of hunger experienced by millions of Americans. Apr 15, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Sonoma International Film Festival Screenings in nine locations over five days. For info, see www.sonomafilmfest.org. Apr 10-14. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Tiburon International Film Festival Top-quality films from around the world. Apr 11-18. Price varies. For info, see www.tiburonfilmfestival.com. Playhouse Theater, 40 Main Street, Tiburon. 415.381.4123.

Wasteland Artist Vic Muniz creates garbage-inspired art at the world’s largest landfill in Rio de Janeiro. Apr 10, 6:30pm. $5-$8. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.393.1431.

A Year in Burgundy Intimate access into the lives of seven winemaking families in France. Wine and appetizers served. Apr 15, 6:30pm. $25. Raven Film Center. 415 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.823.4410.

Food & Drink Ceres Brunch Three-course meal to benefit Ceres Community Project featuring, among other dishes, bacon-in-the-batter waffles with espresso gelato. Apr 13, 9am. $39. Zazu, 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

Heroes with a Heart Three-course dinner with live entertainment in support of the Sonoma Developmental Center. Apr 13. $150. Vintners Inn Event Center, 4350 Barnes Rd, Santa Rosa.

Jennifer Luttrell Chef from Farmstead crew uses Pt Reyes cheese in threecourse menu. Apr 11, 6:30pm.

$55. Next Key Center, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 211.

Readings

Old-Fashioned Barbecue

Book Passage

Cotati Historical Society’s annual fundraiser. Music by Gil Gardner. Apr 14, 12pm. $10-$12. Cotati Community Center, 216 E School St, Cotati.

Timeless to a Tea Contest of artistic table setting. Enjoy tea and cookies while voting for your favorite decorated table. Apr 13, 1pm. $10. Steele Lane Community Center. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Women, Wine & Cheese YWCA fundraising gala honoring women winemakers. Apr 12, 11am. $150. Sonoma Mission Inn & Spa, 18140 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma.

Lectures Callings: The Power of Passionate Work Two seminars led by Greg Levoy, author of “Callings: Finding & Following an Authentic Life.” Apr 11, 1:30 and 6pm. $10. Carole Ellis Auditorium, SRJC Petaluma Campus, Petaluma.

Euro Area: Phoenix or Fantasy? UC Berkeley professor Barry Eichengreen describes the Euro crisis and ongoing reform efforts. Apr 12. $30. Hilton Sonoma Wine Country, 3555 Round Barn Blvd, Santa Rosa.

More Than a Catfight Fear, lies and social class in the lives of Irene Redfield & Clare Kendry, moderated by Abby Bogomolny. Apr 17, 12pm. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Wardrobe as Autobiography Professor Jo Ann Stabb focuses on the Charmian London Costume Collection and its historical and aesthetic significance. Apr 13, 10am. $25. Sonoma Developmental Center, 15000 Arnold Dr, Eldridge.

Cornel West One of America’s most provocative public intellectuals has a penchant for justice and politics. Apr 11, 7pm. $20. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Apr 10, 7pm, “The Myth of the Perfect Girl: Helping Our Daughters Find Authentic Success and Happiness in School and Life” with Ana Homayoun. Apr 11, 7pm, “The Flamethrowers” with Rachel Kushner. Apr 12, 7pm, “Carry on Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed” with Glennon Melton. Apr 13, 1pm, “The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance” with Thomas McNamee. Apr 13, 4pm, “Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste” with Bea Johnson. Apr 13, 7pm, “Beyond Sugar Shock: The 6-Week Plan to Break Free of Your Sugar Addiction & Get Slimmer, Sexier & Sweeter” with Connie Bennett. Apr 13, 7:26pm, “The Knot Untied: New Poems” with Patrice Veccione. Apr 14, 1pm, “My Mother’s Wars” with Lillian Faderman. Apr 14, 4pm, “West Marin Review - Issue IV.”. Apr 15, 7pm, “Tiger Writing: Art, Culture, and the Interdependent Self” with Gish Ten. Apr 16, 7pm, “The Burgess Boys” with Elizabeth Strout. Apr 17, 7pm, “The Dream Merchant” with Fred Waitzkin. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Apr 11, 3:30pm, “Rapture Practice” with Aaron Hartlzer. Apr 11, 6pm, “The Interestings” with Meg Wolitzer. Apr 13, 7pm, “Deadly Stakes” with J.A. Jance. Apr 16, 3:30pm, “Isabella Star of the Story” with Jennifer Fosberry. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Apr 11, 4pm, “Beyonders #3: Chasing the Prophecy” with Brandon Mull. Apr 12, 4pm, “Relish” with Lucy Knisley. Apr 17, 7pm, “The Accursed” with Joyce Carol Oates. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Apr 14, 3pm, “The Golden Shore: California’s Love Affair with the Sea” with David Helvarg. 11445 Shoreline Highway, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Apr 13, 7pm, WordTemple Poetry

Charlie Gessell

36 A E

WHERE YOUR WINE COMES FROM ‘Harvest’ examines the lives and struggles of

grape pickers and vineyard owners; it screens at Rialto Cinemas on April 10. See Film, p35.

Series with Kjell Epsmark and Dana Gioia. 707.829.1549. 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

Tudor Rose Tea Apr 12, 6pm, “Leaving Everything Most Loved” with Jacqueline Winspear. $50. 733 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Theater Act!vated Story Theatre High-energy dramatizations of folktales, with kids invited onstage as guest stars. Apr 11, 4pm. Free. Belvedere-Tiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.789.2665.

Chihuahua Costume Contest Winner receives four tickets to “Legally Blond The Musical” at SRJC. Apr 16, 12pm. Free. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

Enchanted April Romantic comedy set in 1920s London. Two frustrated housewives who take a trip to Italy in hopes of rediscovering themselves. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Apr 14. $22-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

French Lessons Staged reading of a new comedy by Martin Russell. Directed by Phoebe Moyer.

Apr 10, 7:30pm. $10. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Happy How vicious and enviable we can be of people possessed with a natural joie de vivre, but absolution in attitude can win the day. World Premiere. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Apr 21. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

takes on Shakespeare’s tragic romantic comedy in an up-close style. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Apr 20. $12-$15. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody Musical comedy bringing naughty fun of the bestselling book to life. Apr 10, 7:30pm. $35-$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Imaginary Invalid

Viva Cuba

A man who’s convinced he’s sick is surrounded by friends and family, some who’d like him to stay convinced, some who wouldn’t. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Apr 28. $11-$23. Raven Performing Arts Theater, 115 North Street, Healdsburg. 707.433.5900.

Provocative blend of culture and expression presented in dance to original songs. Apr 12-13, 8pm. $10-$20. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Love Letters Play by AR Gurney recounts the lifelong correspondence between a romantically attached couple. Presented by Porchlight Theatre Company. Locations and times vary, see www.porchlight.net for details. Fri-Sat through Apr 28. $15$30. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas.

Not a Genuine Black Man Brian Copeland’s comedic solo show about race in the Bay Area. Apr 13, 8pm. $25$30. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Romeo & Juliet Santa Rosa’s Actors Basement

The Whipping Man Days after the Emancipation Proclamation, two former slaves find themselves caring for their former owner’s son. Tues-Thurs-Sat-Sun, 2 and 7pm and Wed, 7:30pm. through Apr 21. $20-$52. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

žŚ N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

E^][r=k'AZgrZ;Zkma K^Ze<Zk^K^Ze=h\mhkl +-(0LZ_^O^kb_b\Zmbhg MhmZeer<hg_b]^gmbZe

O]ddEYl[` Any Local Price

JnZebmr B=<Zk]l

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

=hpgmhpgLZgmZKhlZ30-*.maLm9>Lm

> Personal Service > New everyday discounts > Widest selection of edibles > Bonus for new members and referrals M, T, F 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5; W, Th 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, Sat 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5 Highway 101 at Steele Lane 2425 Cleveland Ave, Suite 175

707.526.2800

Astrology

FREE WILL

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

žź

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of April 10

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) German theologian Martin Luther (1483â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1546) was a central ďŹ gure in the rebellion against the Catholic Church that led to the Protestant Reformation. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never guess where he was when he was struck by the epiphany that became the core axiom of his new religion. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you: he was sitting on the toilet in the Wittenberg Monastery. The Holy Spirit gave him the crucial knowledge then and there, or so he testiďŹ ed. In this spirit, Aries, keep a very open mind about where you will be and what you will be doing when your illuminations arrive this week. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) Your task is to

 :FBS"QSJM "OOJWFSTBSZ

FREE 420 Commemorative T-Shirts to the first 100 customers at the Santa Rosa location PLUS first 50 customers in Cotati FREE grab bag with every purchase! (While supplies last.) FREE food & drinks "--%":4"-& 0/&7&3:5)*/( (-"44 °0'' "--(-"44

pipes and waterpipes including

+6/#0Â&#x2DC;141Â&#x2DC;18'4'+)06; Syn and more!

1FBDFQJQF 4BOUB3PTB"WF 4BOUB3PTB *OUIF#SJHIU#MVF#MEH (SBWFOTUFJO)XZ $PUBUJ

 UIFQFBDFQJQFTNPLFTIPQDPN

uncover the semi-happy ending that was hidden back in the storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beginning. Once you do that, you may be able to create a graceful and honorable climax. In fact, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you will be able to bring about the semi-happy ending any other way. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crucial that you return to the original ďŹ&#x201A;ash of inspirationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the time when all the plot lines that eventually developed were ďŹ rst germinating. You need to remember fateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primal promise. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to read the signs you missed in the early going.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) If you play poker, the odds are one in 649,740 that you will get a royal ďŹ&#x201A;ush. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an ace, king, queen, jack and 10 of one suit. As for drawing a straight ďŹ&#x201A;ushâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;any ďŹ ve consecutive cards of one suitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the odds are one in 72,192. Judging from the current astrological omens, Gemini, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say your chance of getting one of those hands is far better than usualâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe one in 88,000 for the royal ďŹ&#x201A;ush and one in 8,888 for the straight ďŹ&#x201A;ush. But those still arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t great odds. On the other hand, getting a ďŹ&#x201A;ushâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; all ďŹ ve cards of the same suitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is normally one in 509, but these days itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty likely for you. The moral of the story, not just for when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing cards, but in whatever you do: Expect really good luck, but not miraculous, out-of-this-world luck. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wherever you stand, be the soul of that place,â&#x20AC;? wrote the poet Rumi. This is excellent advice for you right now, Cancerian. You are nearing the peak of your power to express yourself with beautiful accuracy. You have more skill than usual at understanding and conveying the interesting truth. As a result, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a position to wield extra inďŹ&#x201A;uence. People are receptive to being moved by your heart-felt intelligence. So please do more than simply push for greater efďŹ ciency, order and discipline. Those things are good, but I hope you will also be a radiant role model who exempliďŹ es what it means to be soulful.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Golden Rock is a Buddhist holy site in Burma. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small pagoda built on top of a giant boulder that in turn seems to be precariously balanced at the edge of a down-sloping bed of rock. How does the boulder remain stationary? Why doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it roll off the edge? It appears to defy gravity. Legend says that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s held in place by a single strand of hair from the Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head. I suspect that many of you Leos will soon have access to a tricky asset with resemblances to that magic strand. True, it might be merely metaphorical. But if used correctly, it could become a key element in a future foundation. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SoulSearching Seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a good time to go in search of your soul. To aid your quest, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll offer a few lines from â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Few Words on the Soul,â&#x20AC;? a poem by Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a soul at times,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got it non-stop, for keeps. Day after day, year after year may pass without it. For every thousand conversations, it participates in one, if even that, since it prefers silence. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s picky: our hustling for a dubious advantage and creaky machinations make it sick. Joy and sorrow arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t two different feelings for it. It attends us only when the two are joined. We can count on it when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sure of nothing and curious about everything. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say where it comes from or when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking off again, though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clearly expecting such questions. We need it but apparently it needs us for some reason too.â&#x20AC;? (Translation by Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh. Read the whole poem here: http://tinyurl.com/SearchSoul.)

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do not believe in God,â&#x20AC;? said Mexican painter Diego Rivera, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I believe in Picasso.â&#x20AC;? My poet-musician friend Tanya has a similar philosophy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in God, or even Goddess, for that matter,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I do believe in Patti Smith.â&#x20AC;? Do you have a God-substitute, Libra? Or, if you do have faith in a Cosmic Wow, is there also a more approachable, second-tier source of divinity you love? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you would really beneďŹ t from feeling an intimate kind of reverence right nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a tender devotion for something higher and brighter that awakens the sleeping part of your lust for life. SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) This would be an excellent time to stage staring contests with yourself in the mirror. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a high likelihood that you will win every time. I think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also have great success whenever you try to read your own mind. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got an uncanny knack for plucking buried secrets and self-deceptions out of their hiding places. One more thing, Scorpio: Have you ever considered how fun it might be to wash your own brain and kick your own butt? Now would be an excellent time to experiment with those radical acts of healing.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so hard to forget pain, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even harder to remember sweetness,â&#x20AC;? writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.â&#x20AC;? Your assignment in the coming days, Sagittarius, is to prove Palahniuk wrong. As the surges of sweetness ďŹ&#x201A;ow through you, as your secret joy ripens into bright blooming bliss, imprint the sensations on your memory. Vow to remember them for the rest of your life. Make these breakthrough moments into talismans that will serve as magical spells whenever you need rejuvenation in the future. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein had his priorities straight. This is what he said about his profession: â&#x20AC;&#x153;In philosophy the race is won by the one who can run slowestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the one who crosses the ďŹ nish line last.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my belief, Capricorn, that a similar rule should apply to you in the coming daysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no matter what project youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on or goal youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to accomplish. Proceed slowly enough to be absolutely thorough, meticulous and conscientious. As you make your way to the ďŹ nish line, be as deep as you dare. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) In Samuel Beckettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel Molloy, the main character talks about a long overland journey he took on foot and by bicycle. Before the trip, he had read somewhere that when people are lost in a forest, they often imagine theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving in a straight line when in fact theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going in a circle. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why, during his own travels, he intentionally walked in a circle, hoping thereby to go straight. Although this might sound like a loopy strategy, Aquarius, I think it will make sense for you to adopt in the coming week. Your apparent path may be very different, maybe even opposite, to your actual path. PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Are you in competition with someone who is doing mediocre work? Do you ďŹ nd it incomprehensible that anyone would pay attention to that weak expression instead of ďŹ&#x201A;ocking to your beautiful vibe? If so, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my advice. Withdraw your attention from your inferior opponent. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t waste a minute feeling jealous or resentful or incredulous. Instead, concentrate your energy on making your production so strong and smart and irresistible that you simply overshadow and overwhelm your rivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žŝ

1$Š

WJSVTSFNPWBM BEXBSFSFNPWBM TQZXBSFSFNPWBM EBUBSFDPWFSZ OFUXPSLJOTUBMMBUJPO CVJMEJOHDPNQVUFST FNBJMTFUVQ

$POUBDU /FJHICPSIPPE(FFL 3FQBJSTDPN



Â&#x2019;QO`^S\b`g^OW\bW\U Â&#x2019;aSWa[WQ`Sb`]TWb Â&#x2019;ab`cQbc`OZe]`Y Â&#x2019;abcQQ]Q]\Q`SbS Â&#x2019;UcbbS`QZSO\W\U Â&#x2019;`]]TW\U

4/@E3AB@3AB=@/B7=< 1=<AB@C1B7=< %% &"&' 4O`ESab1]\ab`Q][ 8W[9S\\SRg1 /:WQS\aS%&$&'

WHY: Free 3-Day pass, Free t-shirt, Free lectures & workshops, Free access to 300+ exhibits, Networking opportunities, and FUN HOW: Sign up at a www.newlivingexpo.com/volBusiness Opportunities New Living Expo â&#x20AC;&#x201C; unteers_register.php New Liv- Adult Massage Volunteers Needed! ing Exp COMIC & TOY DEALERS A Wild Irish Rose We are looking for volunteers New Living Expo WANTED to assist with this premier 415.382.8300 Mature, Independent in SANTA ROSA TOY CON 2013. and dynamic annual event. Marin. Call for photos. Please CONTACT: WHEN: April 26â&#x20AC;&#x201C;28, 2013 call before 11pm. No calls santarosatoyshow@gmail.com WHERE: Concourse Exhibition from blocked phone #. Center, 8th & Brannan, San Kara, 415.233.2769. Francisco

g Employment

General Notices

Adult Services

g

Place your Health & Well-Being ad here. Call 707.527.1200 x215 today!

Alternative Health&Well-Being

g Chiropractic

HEALTH MASSAGE

BODY MASSAGE

55/hr

$

FOOT MASSAGE

1999/45 min

$

Open 7 days, 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

g

RELAX! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 12 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856.

g Massage & Relaxation

Great Massage

Santa Rosa

Meditation Group of Self-Realization Fellowship

T

VIVI

MASSAGE STUDIO

Public welcome. No charge. 795 Farmers Lane #22 24/7 VM 707-523-9555

FOOT REFLEXOLGY THERAPEUTIC BODY MASSAGE

www.srf-santarosa.org www.yogananda-srf.org

707.981.7128

Need relaxation and pampering after a hard days work? Just call 707.795.9538.

Finding inspiration & connecting with your community

he timeless, scientific methods of yoga meditation taught by Paramahansa Yogananda enable one to discover, by direct personal experience, the universal consciousness of God that dwells within.

MASSAGE SPECIAL

Stress? Tension?

Connections

1112 Morgan St ->Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x2021;°Â&#x2122;Ă&#x2021;n°Ă&#x17D;ÂŁÂŁn 2460 Mendocino Ave ->Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;,Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;äĂ&#x2021;°xĂ&#x2021;n°Ă&#x17D;änn

Healing & Bodywork

50% off your first hour massage. Strong, Thorough, Intuitive 30 yrs. Experience Colin CMT 707. 823.2990 www.colingodwin.blogspot.com

SPIRITUAL

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel: 707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Paramahansa Yogananda author of

Autobiography of a Yogi

620 E. Washington St. Suite 208, Petaluma

A Safe Place To Be Real

Full Body Sensual Massage

Holistic tantric masseuse/surrogate. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. Spring Discount. Please call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232.

With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

A Finer Touch

Swedish massage, body elecBy Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub tric experience. Petaluma. Jack CMT. 707.888.8266. and pool available. Will do In/Outcall. outcalls. 707.228.6883.

*Custom Massage* Certified Therapist Kneads You! Private incall. Blondie. 707.322.7230.

Bearhands4u Massage for men, Sebastopol. Mature, strong, professional. 707.799.0637. Days, evenings, weekends $60/hr. Outcalls available

Relax, Release, Rejuvenate Massage for men. Muscular, , professional, mature. Clean, warm studio in the country, shower available. 707.696.1578.

Guilty Pleasure? NOT!!! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your pleasure, my business.â&#x20AC;? Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy.

Win Free

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | A P R I L 1 0 -1 6, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

?8E;PA@D

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We’re here to help you help yourself. CO WORK at SHARE SPACE

• Subutex/Suboxone available • Providing Treatment since 1984 • Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

Spring Health Detoxification Program

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone.

• MediCal accepted

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for

Thursday April 25 7–8:30 PM Wifi, video conferencing, meeting & event space. At Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, Other @ Health First Pharmacy Windsor — by Naturothe Share Exchange. 531 5th St, Santa Rosa shareOpiate Withdrawal! pathic Doctors - Dr. Moses Goldberg & Dr. Dana exchange.coop. Confidential Program. 707.576.1919 Michaels — Information on 14 day program and effective strategies that work — $20 Pre-Registration Is Required 707.284.9200.

We’re here to help you help yourself.

Don’t Miss Dirt Days 2013 at WYATT — It’s All About the Soil! 1016 Lakeville Street – Petaluma – 707.762.3747 – April 25–26–27 Lowest Prices of the Season— JOIN US!

Move In Specials 5 X 10…

starting as low as $

Hair Stylists Wanted Upscale, fashion forward full service salon & spa. Clientele required, knowledge, retail sales exp, interest for advanced education, booth rental or commission. (1st mo. free) Submit resume to beauty@lecarresalonspa.com Le Carre Salon & Spa, 170 Railroad St, Santa Rosa 707.636.7300. www.lecarresalonspa.com

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone.

Delta Delivery Call 415.786.2363

• SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE AVAILABLE • CONFIDENTIALITY ASSURED • MEDICAL ACCEPTED

Best Medical Collective in Marin — complimentary welcome package - delivery always free – menu at www.delta11.org

75 per month

$

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

707-546-0000 707-578-3299

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

 First Place 

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE

1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at— www.PeaceinMedicine.org

707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

WALK-INS ONLY. For energy, immune, fatigue, anxiety – Integrative Medical Clinic of SR – Dr. Dana Michaels Win Free Stuff ND and Dr. Moses Goldberg ND – 175 Concourse Blvd. – 707.284.9200 bohemian.com/northbay/freeStuff

BOHEMIAN’S ANNUAL

DONATE A CAR Free towing. Running or not. Tax deductible. Help the Polly Klaas Foundation #800.322.4234.

Resident Tourist Issue ISSUE April 17

starting as low as

Providing Treatment since 1984

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER

B-12 Shots Happy Hour! — Thursdays 4–6pm. Only $18 (30% off)

30 per month

10 X 10…

DEADLINE April 11

BEST DIVE BAR! We’re flattered, of course.

We’ve been quenching thirsts for X? years now. We don’t pretend to be anything fancy. We’re just about the only BAR without a RESTAURANT in Napa Valley. You want arugula, go somewhere else. You want a cold one and some pretzels, pardner, you sure came to the right place.

Ride on in.

Pancha’s of Yountville 6764 Washington St, Yountville 707-944-2125


NBB1315