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Win tickets to Tara Erraught at the Green Music Center bohemian.com

Distillery Samples p9 Lydia’s Organics p12 Paquita! p26

Page Turners A special look at local authors p17

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Experience a Once in a Lifetime Opera Extravaganza

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4 Pampered Feet Reflexology Center

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

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Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover altered-book sculpture by Isaac Salazar. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

This photo was submitted by Mike Herrera of Petaluma. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘What if Salinger followed in his father’s footsteps and sold cheese for a living?’ COVER FEATURE P17

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Distilleries’ Fight for Tasting Rooms P6 Experience the Mighty Buffkin P1 2 Studio Ghibli’s Newest P25 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Dining p12 Restaurants p14 Wineries p16

Swirl p16 Cover Feature p17 Culture Crush p23 Stage p24 Film p25

Music p26 Concerts & Clubs p27 A&E p30 Astrology p34 Classified p35

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST Isaac G. Salazar is an American book artist from Artesia, New Mexico. He has never taken an art class. Finding inspiration in used bookstores and shelves, he likes to take books that would otherwise end up in a landfill and turn them into art. Find more of his work at www.isaacgsalazar.com.

Drifting second hand smoke from your home can impact your neighbor’s health. Celebrate Smoke-Free Sonoma County All multi-unit residential housing in the unincorporated areas are now smoke-free.

Learn more at www.sonoma-county.org/BreatheEasy County Ordinance No. 5947

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

nb TRANSFORMED SKYLINE

We admit it—Ricky Watts has been in our pages a lot lately. But his mural-in-progress on the Phoenix Theater is just too cool.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Critical Justice On ‘The Central Park Five’ BY JUDY WALENTA

I

am a white woman who jogs. Sometimes I jog after dark. I was active in the ’60s Civil Rights movement. I went to jail in order to integrate schools and lunch counters. I testified against New York transit officers who participated in the fatal beating of an African-American art student in 1983. I have spent most of my life opposing racism in its many insidious forms. My daughter’s father is AfricanAmerican. My daughter is bi-racial. The film The Central Park Five, recently screened at the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival, tells the story of five young men of color who were wrongfully convicted of brutally attacking a young, white, female investment banker who was jogging after dark in New York’s Central Park in 1989. Fortunately, through some miracle, she survived and eventually recovered. The five happened to be in the park that night. They were arrested and coerced into confessing. Later they recanted. Convicted by the press and the courts, each served between seven and 13 years in jail. Thirteen years later, the real rapist confessed. The convictions of the five were vacated, but they report being permanently scarred by the experience. Even with all of the anti-racist work I have done, I drank the KoolAid. I believed the press hysteria. I believed the story, created by the press and police, about gangs of teenage boys of color going out on “wilding,” or rampaging, missions. I eyed suspiciously any group of boys of color whom I encountered. I was not the only one. Most New Yorkers of any race believed it. Protests against the shameless railroading of these five children, ages 14 to 16, were so limited as to be nearly nonexistent. In the film, Craig Wilder, head of MIT’s history faculty, concludes, “We are not very nice people.” This incident glaringly demonstrates how easily we are manipulated by the media, how quick to mentally judge someone based on a story in the press or on TV—or even on hearsay from another person. We could all benefit from being more discerning about information we cannot verify. Failure to do so could have a devastating effect on the life of an innocent human being. Judy Walenta is a nurse practitioner living in Sebastopol. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Breaking: Fluffy Is Alive and Well

James Knight mentioned in his recent article about Buena Vista Winery the fact that a colony of feral cats lived on the grounds for generations (Swirl, March 27). But the story of that colony is missing, and there is one glaring inaccuracy. The origination of the colony, or “clowder,” can be found in the museum of neighboring Bartholomew Park Winery, where there are displays about the history of the cat colony and pictures of the cats in the home of Robert C. and Kate Birdsall Johnson, who built a monstrous Gothic Victorian “castle” on the property in 1880. Kate Johnson would today be considered a cat hoarder, but at the time, as she was rich, she was considered “eccentric.” Mrs. Johnson had a home in which she could easily accommodate and properly care for several dozen Persian and Angora cats; in fact, they occupied one entire floor of the mansion. Local legend had it that Kate hoarded as many as 200 cats, but according to F. Turner Reuter Jr., author of Animal and Sporting Artists in America (2008), “at the time of her death [she] had thirty-two cats and may have had as many as forty-six at one point.” Reuter wrote about Austrian artist Carl Kahler, a cat and horse painter of international reputation who was commissioned by Kate for $5,000 to paint a portrait of her 42 cats in 1891. Kahler was living in San Francisco from 1890 to 1893, and his portrait was life-sized, measuring 6-by-8.5 feet, and is titled My Wife’s Lovers. To “amuse” the cats, Kate Birdsall also kept parrots and cockatoos, and even housed on the property “donkeys imported from Jerusalem, said to be descended from the one that Christ rode.” Her husband preceded her in death in 1889 (leaving her in his will half his

estate and the castle), and their adopted and disabled daughter, Rosalind, died of tuberculosis in 1890. All alone in the castle now with her cats, Kate stipulated in her own will that the castle and a full third of her estate should pass, upon her death (which occurred in 1893), to the local Roman Catholic archdiocese to be used as a home for disadvantaged women. But she also bequeathed $20,000 to a distant relative to use to care for the cats in perpetuity.

The relative took care of the cash, but the cats may have been left to care for themselves. The church let the property sit untouched until 1920, at which point it was sold to the state of California, which used the so-called Johnson Castle as the “State Farm for Delinquent Women,” namely prostitutes, drug addicts, con artists and petty thieves. One of the “wayward women” supposedly torched the mansion in 1927. It burned to the ground, and the Johnson cats were forced to live in the wild on the property as a feral clowder. Now, as for Fluffy, the last member of the Johnson clowder to survive on the property, Mr. Knight reports that Fluffy “passed away only months ago.” This is incorrect. I used to visit Buena Vista Winery four days a week when I was hosting tours aboard the Sonoma Valley Wine Trolley. Fluffy and I became friendly, and I often told the staff that one day I should take her home to live with me and my husband and our cat and dogs. When the winery’s renovation began, staff members came to me and said, “Jean Charles [Boisset] said we have to get Fluffy off the property. Will you please take her home?” So, as a matter of fact, Fluffy Birdsall Johnson, the last surviving member of the historic Johnson clowder living ferally on the former Buena Vista Ranch and Bartholomew Park, is still alive and well, living at my house in Petaluma since Jan. 16, 2012. Thank you for your attention.

CHRISTOPHER LINNELL Petaluma

Rants

In Defense of Capitalism I was enjoying the latest issue of your publication until I read “The Cost of Privilege” by Carl Patrick (Open Mic, March 13). The article was all right, until I got to the last sentence. His statement that “it’s time to get free of capitalism” bothered me. Yes, capitalism isn’t perfect, but you wouldn’t have a newspaper without capitalism. If I were an advertiser of yours I think I would be upset that such statements are made in the Bohemian.

RICK CALL Via online

Hi Rick, thanks for writing. Open Mic is an op/ed section where readers are free to express their opinion.—The Ed. Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 The Krush transforms

back to KVRE on April 1, with Murray, Kinzey, Daisy, et al

2 Matt Taibbi visits

Sonoma County Jail for story on three-strikes law

3 Sadly, My Baby News

in Santa Rosa to close; liquidation sale this week

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4

Associated Press changes stylebook to ban use of “illegal immigrant”

5 Baseball’s back; Buster Posey signs deal, will be with Giants up to 2022

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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A Fair Pour

Tribal Plight

New bill would allow microdistilleries, like wineries, to have tasting rooms BY RACHEL DOVEY

A

ccording to Arthur Hartunian, it’s easier to operate a microdistillery in socially conservative Utah than in California. Hartunian is president of the California Artisanal Distillers Guild, a collective of beverage makers taking aim at the Golden State’s byzantine hard-alcohol

laws, some of which are downright counterintuitive. For example, distillers cannot sell their product directly to consumers. With one kind of license, a type 4, they can offer tastings, but they can’t charge for them. This creates a scenario akin to walking into Russian River Brewing Company, sampling a very small amount of Pliny and then being told that nobody can order a pint, or visiting a winery tasting room and

Courtesy Charbay

OUT OF THE BARREL Marko Karakasevic is a 13th-generation distiller in St. Helena who can’t directly sell his own product.

Nella Larsen’s 1929 novel Passing tells the story of two mulatto AfricanAmerican women in Harlem. One of the childhood friends passes for white and uses the ambiguity to escape from Harlem and live a different life, marrying a white man at a time when it would be illegal for her to do so. The novel is the subject of the SRJC’s spring lecture series, drawing immediate parallels to the current Supreme Court debate on the so-called hazards of gay marriage. The 1967 Supreme Court decision striking down laws prohibiting interracial marriage keeps popping up on Capitol Hill; “That was a different time,” conservative justices like Antonin Scalia argue, while making the same arguments against gay marriage that were made against interracial marriage. Hopefully, history will repeat itself. The Loving Story, a documentary about that 1967 decision, screens with a discussion on Wednesday, April 10, in Newman Auditorium at the Santa Rosa Junior College. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 6pm. Free.

being barred from buying a bottle of wine. “It’s been extremely crippling to my business,” says Marko Karakasevic, owner of Charbay in St. Helena and another member of the guild. “This year is our 30th anniversary. For 30 years, I’ve never been able to sell a single bottle to anyone coming to our distillery.” Instead, California distillers are bound to what’s known

) 11

In 1851, there were roughly 8,000 Wappo Indians in the valleys of Sonoma and Napa. That number has dwindled to 340, concentrated in the Mishewal Wappo Tribe of Alexander Valley. Tribal chairman Scott Gabaldon is now fighting for federal recognition, arguing that it was an act of Congress in 1959 that took away their land and tribal status in the first place. Fears of nonexistent casino plans are forcing him to fight harder, with a July 25 U.S. District Court date to determine the tribe’s fate. Gabaldon tells the story of his tribe in the SRJC’s Newman Auditorium on Friday, April 5, at 7pm. Free.—Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Paper THE

Fighting for Recognition

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

as a three-tier system. They sell to distributors. Distributors sell to retailers and bars. Bars can then serve the vodka or scotch to the fair consumer. All these middlemen increase costs, and for makers of hard alcohol, cutting out these middlemen is illegal. Partially, this is due to a wellmeaning but antiquated bit of legislation left over from Prohibition. “A lot of the social problems that led to Prohibition were the result of cross-ownership,” says Matthew Botting of the state’s Alcohol Beverage Control, describing a time when temperance leagues targeted saloons for the commonly attendant gambling, prostitution and theft. Coming out of the national dry spell, states like California imposed regulations that, in the ’30s, made cultural sense, the idea being “to mitigate the relationship between alcohol manufacturers and retailers, to limit the economic motive of retailers to sell as much alcohol as possible,” Botting says. But fast-forwarding 80 years, a simple question must be asked: If liquor laws for winemakers and brewers have changed, why not for distillers? Higher alcohol content is a factor, according to the ABC. But there’s something else causing this lopsided regulatory system, which even the state regulator describes as “restrictive.” “The wine industry has a strong economic industrial base,” Botting says. According to Botting, this simply means that the wine industry “has more political influence. We [ABC] don’t go out to the State Legislature. It’s an industry-driven legislative process, and [the wine industry] has been more involved in that process over the years, and thus has affected more change.” The microdistillery industry, on the other hand, is still small; according to Hartunian, there are only around 30 craft distillers in California. “It comes down to money,”

Hartunian says. “If you’re bigger, you can make more changes that will benefit your industry.” Hartunian says that several bills have been crafted to address the three-tier system for distillers in the past, but none has even made it to the floor for a vote. He believes national distribution companies like Southern Wine & Spirits, which reported $9 billion in revenue in 2011, have a vested interest in keeping the system intact. The guild is currently backing AB 933, a bill introduced by Assemblymembers Nancy Skinner and Isadore Hall, which would allow distilleries to operate tasting rooms that charge for samples. The bill does not delve further into the three-tier system. “The three-tier system is fine,” Karakasevic says. “We need our distributors, but the reality is that microdistilleries are businesses and should be able to sell their own product. So let me have my products available to taste and let me sell them, and therefore pay my distributors more money.” Hartunian says the guild envisions a California-sourced microdistillery scene, in which Golden State farmers and distillers work together to create a product that is completely Californiamade. To help in the legislative process, the guild has contracted with lobbying firm DiMare, Van Vleck & Brown, which represents companies that aren’t exactly players in the go-local scene; the firm also represents Safeway and multinational manufacturer Siemens Corporation, among others. “They have good relationships with the distributors and are able to make our pitch,” Hartunian explains. “We have the need for an experienced, well-connected lobbying firm to help us navigate some of the political waters that we don’t have experience in, being a smaller, younger industry.” As it is now, he says, “we’re unable to help [our distributors] help us. We want to apply the business model that has worked for wineries and breweries. Distillers are getting the short end of the stick.”

Dining Nicolas Grizzle

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

12

BEIN’ GREEN Lydia’s hearty Super Burger comes on a buffkin made from ingredients like spinach, kale and parsley.

Clean Living At Lydia’s Organics, you don’t need to ask—everything is vegan, gluten-free and organic BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

I

n my pre-coffee morning haze, before shower, pants or even sitting upright, I often find myself wondering what breakfast meat I’ll have that day. I very much enjoy eating animal products, but that doesn’t mean I’m married to them. Every once in a while, it’s good to sneak in some earth-grown goodness to balance out

my inner lion. It’s a day like this that I’m grateful for Lydia’s Organics. Lydia’s Organics was founded 18 years ago in Fairfax, when Lydia Kindheart opened what some tell her was California’s first raw restaurant. After a hiatus due to Kindheart’s refocus on catering and wholesale, it reopened nine years ago, adding cooked items to the menu of mostly raw offerings. The journey continued with a

move in December 2011 to her current location in Petaluma, relaunching the restaurant to include an events center and community gathering space. The Sunflower Center hosts classes, concerts, gatherings and a health-centered restaurant. Here, there’s no need to ask— everything on the menu is vegan, gluten-free and organic. About half the menu is raw, as well, a break from the 100 percent–raw philosophy she once embraced. “I want to serve healthy food to

people,” says Kindheart. “And some people might not want raw foods.” Lydia’s best moments are its original ones. The “famous” raw green soup ($3–$5) is an example. A cold and smooth blend of kale, avocado, cucumber, cilantro, ginger, celery, parsley, basil, lemon and dulse seaweed, it’s so refreshing it may be confused for a drink. In fact, says Kindheart, many people do drink it from a glass. As for the taste? “Imagine a salad with everything in it,” she says. “It makes people really feel good.” Another popular item is Sunflower’s burger patty. This cooked item isn’t trying to fool anyone: “I’m not meat,” it screams, with its red, mushy texture and burst of earthy flavors, “but you’re gonna love me just the same.” Made with quinoa, carrots, beets, celery, kale, parsley, basil, herbs and sesame, sunflower and pumpkin seeds, it’s extremely flavorful and soft, with a consistency between hearty paste and moist cake. The Super Burger ($9) comes with the patty, avocado and cashew “cheez,” which is far better than it sounds. It’s available on a housemade bun or a large, bright green buffkin ($2.50), made of spinach, kale, parsley, sprouted brown rice flour and coconut and sunflower oils. The buffkin serves not only as a light, fluffy, chlorophyllpacked way to contain the wallto-wall health-fest within but also as an easy way to eat more nutrient-rich greens. Reinventing well-known dishes by adding vegan substitutes can have mixed results. The Middle Eastern plate ($12.50) features an excellent Greek salad with delicious walnut “kreem” in place of feta. But dolmas made with marinated collards and raw “rice” (in quotes on the menu) are a bit too tough and stringy, and the coconut-almond hummus, paired with crackers, was a bit dry compared to most other versions. Elsewhere on the menu, the alchemy of vegan substitution

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

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Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Organics and the Sunflower Center, 1435 N. McDowell Blvd., Ste. 100, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

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works much better. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheezâ&#x20AC;? is a strange way to refer to the nut butters in many of Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dishes; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a spreadable, viscous plasma that Kindheart stores in squeeze bottles. DeďŹ nitely not cheese, it is rich and creamy, and the ďŹ&#x201A;avors are complex enough to add another dimension to an entrĂŠeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or to be used as a base itself. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always thought cheese out of a squeeze bottle was pretty awful,â&#x20AC;? says Kindheart. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I realized, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, I created one!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Some products are available to go: snacks like beet chips and kale chips, as well as desserts like cheez cakes, brownies, pies and more, all raw. (Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to know thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s someone who can make brownies if the power goes out for a few days). Drinks are another highlightâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;try the ginger lemonade ($2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$3). The SunďŹ&#x201A;ower Center is more than a restaurant, with an events calendar bustling with workshops, concerts and, in June, a hemp-history week featuring musician and actor John Trudell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always liked to bring people together,â&#x20AC;? says Kindheart. Despite (or perhaps because of) the connectedness of people through social media, she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;people are the loneliest theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever been.â&#x20AC;? The interior is inviting, a peaceful environment where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to strike up a conversation. Calm lighting, open space and friendly people are natural stress relievers, as is a session on an air chair; these oneperson hammocks melt away the harping voice of a clueless boss better than any violent daydream or mocking web comic. Between the food and atmosphere, the whole experience at Lydiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feels like an unmanned therapy sessionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a way to cleanse the body and refresh the head. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lullaby for my inner lion, letting the beast take a welldeserved rest.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 316 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Chloe’s French Cafe

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and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

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French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

Three Squares Cafe Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Cucina Paradiso Northern Italian. $-$$. Delicious innovative fare. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 114 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.782.1130.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner daily. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

Hang Ah Dim Sum Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

La Fondita Mexican. $. Hearty, filling, very tasty. No glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

Peter Lowell’s California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

Russian River Brewing Co Eclectic. $. Decent pizza and excellent brews. Two words: beer bites! Lunch and dinner daily. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-in-thewall as they come. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 811 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Dinner, TuesSun. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner daily. 975 First St, Napa. 707.266.3976.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in

15

SMALL BITES

Beer Here Now

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Beer connoisseurs rejoice this week as hundreds of brewers come out of the garage, kitchen, cellar or wherever dark, cool place their business is done to participate in two beer celebrations. One could spend an entire lifetime, or several lifetimes, hoping to attain Beervana. But this weekend, the body, mind and taste buds coalesce into eternal oneness simply with a trip to Sonoma. The third annual Beervana celebration boasts over 30 breweries and over 125 homebrewers sampling their wares. There will be food pairings and live music by the Jason Bodlovich Group and Ragtag Sullivan. In Santa Rosa, Battle of the Brews features almost 40 breweries in fierce competition for the crown of People’s Choice. And in its second incarnation, the Craft Cup brings in professional brewmasters to taste and judge beer with a sophisticated palate. To sop up the suds, there’s a sandwich competition dubbed the ’Wich Hunt, and music by the Pat Jordan Band and Cover Me Badd provides drinkers a way to get nice and sweaty on the dance floor. Beervana gets sudsy on Friday, April 5, at the Sonoma Community Center. 126 First St. W., Sonoma. 5:30pm. $45. www.svbo.org. Battle of the Brews fills the Grace Pavilion on Saturday, Apr. 6, at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa. 1-8pm. $95. www. battleofthebrews.com.—Nicolas Grizzle

barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like

sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Downtown Wine Casual spot with LP records on the turntable and relaxed vibe, founded by surfer-skater turned winemaker. Offers an eclectic range of wines from delicate, Thai-cuisine–inspired Banyan whites to rustic, brambly Hobo reds inspired by the open road. Folk Machine and Branham Estate Wines, too. Don’t skip the refreshingly dry Santa Lucia Highlands Riesling. Ramble on in. 132 Plaza St., Healdsburg. Open Thursday–Monday, 11am to 6pm. Tasting fee, $5. 707.473.0337.

Graton Ridge Cellars Formerly an apple shed beloved by regular customers who drove up to get juice and apples, this tasting room is clean and contemporary, with a bit of vineyardy wine country art on the walls, and an apple dessert wine. The apples are not gone after all. 3561 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Sebastopol. Tasting room open Friday–Sunday, 10am– 4:30pm. No fee. 707.823.3040.

Korbel Champagne Cellars A large, ivy-covered winery with a huge tasting room, fun staff, excellent deli and hourly tours, a perfect stop on the way to the Russian River. 13250 River Road, near Rio Nido. Open daily, 10am– 5pm daily. 707.824.7316.

Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.528.9463. Paradise also offers its food-friendly wines at an accessible little shack in the heart of Sonoma Valley. Try structured clarets from the estate’s high-elevation Rockpile vineyards; do some time with “the Convict” Zinfandel. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 8860 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.282.9020.

Sheldon Wines Globetrotting harvest hoboes who caught wine fever like an express train and held on tight. New, industrial Urban Winery Village location; same Rhône-style and offbeat varietals from small, family-run vineyards. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Friday–Monday noonish to sixish; fees $5–15. Food carts join Thirsty Thursdays, 4–8pm. 707.865.6755. Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

N A PA CO U N TY

Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Black Stallion Winery

Paradise Ridge Winery

Castello di Amorosa

A gorgeous, provocative sculpture garden with annually changing exhibits set amid a pygmy forest. Stay for sunset Wednesday evenings April–October. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa.

Not only an “authentic Medieval Italian castle,” but authentically far more defensible than any other winery in Napa from legions of footmen in chain mail. In wine, there’s something for every

Owned by a pair of Midwest liquor-distribution barons who hired a capable winemaker and envision it to be a retaildestination winery. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.253.1400.

taste, but don’t skip the tour of great halls, courtyards, cellars, and–naturally–an authentic dungeon. . 4045 N. St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 9:30am–5pm. Tasting fees, $10–$15; tours, $25–$30. Napa Neighbor discounts. 707.967.6272.

Eagle & Rose Estate (WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Hall Winery (WC) Craig and Kathryn Hall specialize in “beefy” wines favored by Robert Parker. Intensely modern art and all things Austrian. New tasting room will be by Frank Gehry. 401 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5:30pm. 866.667.HALL.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Rhone Rangers Ride Again Frontier still open for Rhône-style wines BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

t’s been a while since the term “American Burgundy” was in general circulation. True, you can pick up a jug of Hearty Burgundy, if you squat down by the low shelves (don’t bend at the waist; it’s a gallon, and you could hurt yourself), but that’s another story. Americans have come to love the way “Pinot Noir” and “Chardonnay” drip off the tip of their tongue. Until Picpoul Blanc and the rest of the 22 grape varieties recognized by the Rhône Rangers get their very own festival, however, this one’s called the “16th Annual Celebration of American Rhône Wines.” Rhone Rangers was founded in 1997, back when varietal wines like Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre and Roussanne were the mere sideshow that they still are. That’s just fine, if it means you can stroll the entire Festival Pavilion at Fort Mason, uninterrupted, from one end to the other. There was an eager huddle around Qupé, sure, and another cluster at Tablas Creek. But it’s easy to get a drink at Kieran Robinson Wines, a onewine outfit staffed by a young winemaker of the same name. With his plate full, making Cab for a Napa Valley winery, what does Robinson do with his free time? He makes a big, brooding 2009 Vivio Vineyard Bennett Valley Syrah ($53). “I sell more of it in Sonoma than Napa,” he says. Just around the corner, Herb Quady, scion of sweet wine from Madera, pours a dry Quady North 2012 Rosé ($14). With pink grapefruit flavor and sizzling acidity, this quaff from “the state of Jefferson” reminds me of a recent tank sample of Santa Rosa’s Argot Wines’ 2012 Grenache Rosé—both made as rosé from the outset, not byproducts of a red wine. Look for more of this refreshing, honest style of rosé this spring. Over here, I’m hailed by Chuck Mansfield, who, charged with Pinot Noir and Chardonnay production at Hop Kiln (Swirl, Oct. 5, 2011), also finds time to make a 2011 El Dorado Grenache ($18) at Four Fields Wines, the winery he owns. With all the success that Martinelli Winery has had with Pinot and Zin, only a jackass would persist with Syrah like the 2009 Zio Tony Ranch Russian River Valley Syrah ($75), with its seriously smoky, sauvage aromas . . . Mmm, but hey, isn’t that a lot for a Syrah? Not for a pretty good Côte-Rôtie, it’s not. You want value, listen to what Kieran Robinson has to say about California Syrah’s current fan base: “It’s a wine lover’s wine.” Folks pay good money for marketing messages like that, and he’s just giving it away. Rhone Rangers, Albion. 800.467.0163. www.rhonerangers.org.

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Words from Around the Way Our twice-annual look at authors from Sonoma, Napa and Marin BY GABE MELINE, NICOLAS GRIZZLE AND TAYLOR MAY

E

ach spring and fall, we at the Bohemian shine a light on local authors’ work, and each spring and fall, we receive more and more submissions. This is due in part to the rise of selfpublishing, sure—anyone with a Word file, an internet connection and a few hundred dollars can produce slick-looking paperbacks to give to friends and sell in local bookstores. Because of the runaway success of Fifty Shades of Grey—originally a print-on-demand book that turned into a New York Times juggernaut—there’s a virtual gold rush craze on self-publishing.

Thirty-three years after the groundbreaking The Way of the Shaman was published, Mill Valley resident Michael Harner has produced a follow-up guide showing more evidence of heavenly realm. ‘Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Spirits and Heavens’ (North Atlantic Books; $19.95) is written like a scientific thesis, using

personal accounts and interviews of others to support Harner’s explanations and conclusions. Many of these experiences involve ayahuasca, a strong psychedelic brew with effects similar to DMT, widely used in ceremonies by Peruvian shamans. Harner explores ayahuasca as well as drumming as ways to make the connection to other worlds. This is heady stuff. To be able to agree or disagree with its principles, one must first be able to understand them, and that’s easier said than done. But by

But there’s something else at play here, and that’s this: more accessibility to publishing means more of an impetus to open that Word document titled “Novel.doc” on one’s desktop and start to let the words flow. The numbers of writers, especially in our region, is growing, and so are the opportunities for writers to be read. Without that shot, where might some of our best writers be? What if Salinger followed in his father’s footsteps and sold cheese for a living? Below are our twice-annual synopsized works from local authors—both with and without publishers. Until we get simply too many submissions on our doorstep here at the Bohemian, we feel that all are deserving of notice.—G.M.

using shamanistic techniques, Harner argues, now tens of thousands are able to “enter another reality to travel to other worlds as well as work here in this world to provide healings and other shamanic help.” Harner also posits that, in the future, shamanic treatment of illness will become as important and useful as anything in the Western medical world. If the Western world continues the trend of focusing on profit over patients, he might be right.—N.G.

North Bay writer David Madgalene is back with another letter-sized, self-published anthology of stories, poetic verse and sexual fantasy, ‘The Hoodoo Dog’ (Israfel; $7). I have grown to love Madgalene’s work, although my favorite way to read his books is not to start at the beginning, ) 19

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Local Lit ( 17

Reading ‘Because You Have To: A Writing Life’ (University of Notre Dame Press; $18) by Santa Rosa author Joan Frank, my right forearm begins to tingle. Then it starts to tense up, like it’s being stretched like taffy on the boardwalk. It could be my tendonitis flaring up, or it might be a psychosomatic reaction to reading a book about writing. This isn’t a Dummies guide or a “Secrets to Success” book; it’s more like therapy for those who wield a pen or a keyboard to survive. The desire to write doesn’t live in everyone alongside the ability to do so, and vice-versa. But the gift lies in the ability, and the curse lies in the desire. Even when both match up equally, the results are more often than not less than satisfactory. Thus, the title of this book, set in lowercase typewriter font (as are the chapter titles), beams as a lantern in a dark, lonely forest to those underdog, underappreciated artists of the alphabet. This is for the minds that cannot turn off, with moleskin journals of caffeine-

enjoy short reads with plenty of imagery and context left the imagination will want to seek out this collection.—G.M.

When William Koval’s wife is tragically murdered, he is left alone, withdrawn and absorbed in his work. He’s forced to use, or lose, his accrued vacation days, so he decides to go on the English walking tour he was planning with his wife three years earlier. The tour does not go exactly as expected. He and his fellow tourists deal with complications, and each other, as they explore the English countryside. Santa Rosa author JC Miller’s ‘Vacation’ (Last Light Studio; $14.99) is a story about love, loss and friendship that blends humor and romance and shows how new experiences can heal old pain.—T.M.

Jacob Needleman is a philosopher who has had a distinguished career of writing and teaching for over 50 years, and has seen his influence spread to D. Patrick Miller, a leading writer in the journalism of consciousness. Napa native Miller has followed Needleman closely for decades, and has recently released his book ‘Necessary Wisdom’ (Fearless Books; $14.95). The book is a series of conversations between himself and Needleman on subjects like time and love, the meaning of money, the soul of America and meeting God without religion. From this book, readers will learn to question deeper and to practice their own philosophy, which has been the goal of Jacob Needleman’s career.—T.M.

Brevity is the soul of flash fiction, and to do it well, one must have a concept and execute it with no wasted words. Far too often, logorrhea remains hard to restrain for most authors. Conversely, ‘The Ice Cream Vendor’s Song’ (Wordforest; $8.95) benefits from Sonoma County author Laura McHale Holland’s compact vision. In stories as short as four sentences, she’s able to convey a full picture, or at least enough of the full picture for readers to want desperately to fill in the details on their own. There’s a subtle Raymond Carver streak running beneath Holland’s stories, and a story like “Still There,” in which a man is telling a woman he’s had enough, appears to veer into “Little Things” territory from the start. Holland is smarter than that, though, and the twist that comes five paragraphs later is entirely unexpected. Those who

Sonoma’s extensive history is massive, but ‘A Short History of Sonoma’ (University of Nevada Press; $21.95) instead succinctly wraps up key events in the town that was once the county seat. One thing’s welcome: it’s much more in-depth than those Arcadia postcard galleries so cheaply passed off as history books, thank heavens. Those might begin at the Bear Flag revolt, if you’re lucky. Written by fifth-generation Sonoma resident Lynn Downey, this history goes all the way back to the Native Americans, when Sonoma was a border area for Patwin, Pomo, Miwok and Wappo tribes. Downey swings into the Bear Flag Revolt and General Vallejo’s era nicely, and covers

surrounding areas like Agua Caliente, Fetters Hot Springs and El Verano. Jack and Charmian London receive a whole chapter, as does “The Tourist Trade,” which shows that out-of-towners have always received a mixed welcome. Downey’s success here is in writing an accessible story that never delves too much into historian nerdiness; it would be just as appropriate on hotel nightstands for visitors as it is bookshelves for Sonoma residents.—G.M. ‘Know Yourself, Forget Yourself’ (New World Library; $14.95)—the very title is a paradox, and that’s no mistake, writes Marc Lesser. In fact, the Mill Valley author’s five “core truths” also include “be confident, question everything,” “fight for change, accept what is,” “embrace emotion, embody equanimity” and “benefit others, benefit yourself.” Lesser, an “executive coach and mindfulness teacher” who lived for 10 years at the San Francisco Zen Center, explains these seeming paradoxes with the goal of helping readers see the bigger picture. Why, Lesser asks, do we do what we do? Is our daily work building to a higher goal in life, or is it mere tedium? Optimistically, Lesser presumes the former, and hopes to tease it out of the reader. Those who work minimum wage may not connect with some of the book’s loftier language, and that’s OK; Lesser is not paid to aid those toiling at Target to find the joy inherent in restocking shelves. Founded in the Silicon Valley at Google, his Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute assists companies, like Farmers Insurance, in finding balance and direction. The good news is that Lesser’s writing style is plain and direct, and the book makes its point in anecdotes, citations from Buddhist texts and personal reflection.—G.M. ) 20

19 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

but to open to any page and read aloud whatever first couple sentences the eye falls upon. Examples of random passages picked in this style follow: “The monster had the face of a pussycat with the bill of a duckbill platypus. It had the ears of an elephant and it had a squirrel for a toupee.” “Several small children join the crowd—demon children obviously sired upon Devil’s Prick. A couple of bluefooted boobies in heat run by and pink cockatoo, its gargantuan head bob, bob, bobbing like a red, red robin, lands on Yoko the Houseboy’s shoulder and takes a shit.” “Daniel picked up that there stick and ran to shove it up Rambo’s ass. Rambo was nowhere to be found.” Man!—N.G.

fueled rants and burning forearms from pen-scrawled manifestos in flipbook notepads. This is for writers.—N.G.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Local Lit ( 19

In the vein of Michael Pollan, ‘Hungry For Change: Ditch the Diets, Conquer the Cravings and Eat your Way to Lifelong Health’ (Harper One; $26.99) brings in several doctors, case studies and

San Leandro author Scott Terry grew up believing that the world would end in 1975. After all, Terry was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness, and that’s what his church told him. Needless to say, said Armageddon didn’t arrive as predicted, and that’s not the only belief Terry began questioning. ‘Cowboys, Armageddon, and the Truth: How a Gay Child Was Saved From Religion’ (Lethe Press; $18) is Terry’s story of leaving the church, joining the rodeo and embracing his sexuality while overcoming parental physical abuse and religious homophobia. Terry’s tumultuous childhood, with beatings and bruises, is spent in Fillmore, Calif., whose motto is “The Last, Best Small Town.” A sense of traditional small-town values pervades Terry’s story, with one conspicuous, modern upgrade. Terry travels from Missouri to Chico and comes

to terms with being gay, no longer needing to pray to God to wash his desires away. He finds community in the rodeo, and then is amazed at his first trip to the Castro to learn that most men he meets are like him. Told in simple language redolent of the range, Terry’s memoir serves both as a reminder of a more repressed era in America and an empathetic tale for those who’ve left their religious upbringing in the dust. Recommended.—G.M. Joelle Burnette had already seen cancer disrupt or take the lives of several family members when she was tested for and diagnosed with the BRCA genetic mutation. In other words, Burnette was likely to get cancer herself, and for the sake of her children, she began the preemptive process of removing perfectly healthy parts of her body most prone. ‘Cancer Time Bomb: How the BRCA Gene Stole My Tits and Eggs’ ($14.99) is just as frank as its title implies, and though the specific subject matter is the BRCA gene and Burnette’s resultant oophorectomy and masectomy, the themes of anxiety, courage and family are universal. Burnette, who covered Rohnert Park for the Press Democrat’s Towns section from 2010 to 2012, chronicles her three-year journey in great detail, with what seems like nearly every step, conversation and thought along the way presented on the page. The story of meeting with the doctor to discover the results of her initial test takes up 24 pages, including such passages as an argument with her daughter about what to wear in the morning and an idle musing on the exterior colors chosen for Port-a-Potties. In the midst of all this, deeper philosophical truths emerge in blunt fashion. After telling her mother she needs to get laid, Burnette writes, “I’ve had one sister who has already died, and that’s when most people start echoing the well-established

mantra to appreciate every day and live life as if it’s your last. Fuck that. I was 12 when my best friend in the world was yanked out of my life. The horrible experience didn’t turn me into a cheery person. Yes, life is precious, Yes, life is short. And blah, blah, fucking blah . . .”—G.M. The earth speaks to authors Ellae Elinwood and Mary Lanier, and they in turn speak back. Now the two speak for the earth in ‘Earth Is Your Sweet Spot: A Woman’s Guide to Living Beautifully’ (Confluence Books; $12.95). This book is an interactive guide of feminine wisdom that offers practical and supportive information for living beautifully. Through femininity and aligning oneself with the earth’s pulse, this book teaches how to enjoy a clear, comfortable and confident mind, body and spirit.—T.M. Reading ‘The Lotus Cross’ (Dark Planet; $16.99), I found myself constantly thinking loudly to no one in particular, “It belongs in a museum!” Ray Anderson, Santa Rosa resident and minister in the United Centers for Spiritual Living, has penned an adventure novel revolving around a historical religious artifact that many had thought to be a myth. The Lotus Cross contains traces of blood from a risen Christ, and once its existence is confirmed, agencies from the British Secret Service to fanatical religious groups vie for possession. The premise sounds familiar: an archeology professor fends off others in an international expedition riddled with clues to find an artifact of religious significance, but in this case, it happens to ) 22

21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fred Abercrombie, who organizes an annual facial-hair appreciation festival known as the Petaluma Whiskerino, now has a book honoring the beer-beard connection. ‘Craft Beerds’ (Abercrombie Alchemy; $19.95) collects photos of craft beers from around the world (mostly from the United States) with label artwork celebrating the inexplicable love of beards by brewers. This could be a kitschy coffee-table book, but thanks in large part to a fun layout and professional photography by Tyler Warrender and David Hodges, it’s actually tough to put down. Funded by a Kickstarter campaign that received 134 percent of its goal, this hardcover book is packed with over 250 pages of photos and perfectly brief explanations of beer labels, with the North Bay well represented. Lagunitas, a proud sponsor of the Whiskerino, is featured with the mustached dog logo, as is North Coast’s burly Rasputin imperial stout, which was cited as inspiration for the book. Rouge, Bell’s and other beard-friendly breweries make several appearances in chapters like beardly beerds, Vandyke beerds, red beerds, devilish beerds and more—17 in total. Even looking only at the labels in the book, with no mention of flavors, popularity or technique, inspires a dip into a cask-pulled stout and a lick of the foam off a bushy moustache.—N.G.

scientific facts to support the claims we should all know to be true. James Colquhoun and Laurentine ten Bosch, producers of the documentary of the same name, put down the information on paper and give suggestions as to why we, as a nation, are so unhealthy. Solutions explored include include: eat organic; use a juicer; limit gluten intake; no processed sugary foods; read labels; and eat good fats. There are also healthful alternatives to everyday foods like milk, white bread, white sugar and soda. Sure, some are far-fetched; not many people are going to immediately adopt pumpernickel in lieu of the starchy white bread or start drinking macadamia milk in place of moo juice. But there are plenty of good ideas, and about half the book is made up of simple recipes to get the ball rolling. It doesn’t take a crazy diet to lose weight; it just takes information and a little extra effort to cook that burger at home instead of idling in the drive-through.—N.G.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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contain DNA from a long-dead being. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the long-awaited combination of Indiana Jones and Jurassic Park. The chapters are short, and most of the book is dialogue; this puppy is tailormade for Hollywood. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even a preface stating the people and events in the book are completely ďŹ ctional, though the settings may be historically accurate. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be in my Jeep with fedora and bullwhip, ready for the midnight screening.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;N.G. Much of the story of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Gift of Guylaine Claireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (Two Rock Press; $14.95) consists of a family sharing memories of a murdered Canadian sculptor. Taking place in the days preceding the funeral after the sculptor was slain in a cross-ďŹ re between Mounties and an indigenous splinter faction, the family is forced to dodge media inquiries and piece together the missing threads of the murder on their own. The gathering reveals as much about the family members as Guylaine (pronounced â&#x20AC;&#x153;geelainâ&#x20AC;?). The result is a celebration of the woman who found her own meaning through living a creative life and staying true to her beliefs. Sonoma County author A. V. Walters was born in Canada, but has lived in California for 37 years. Though her accent may have waned, her love of French names has not, and there is a pronunciation guide in the beginning of the book to help with phoneticsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just about every character in the book has a French name.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;N.G. Sonoma author Jill Koenigsdorf has penned a poignant, comedic novel with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Phoebe & the Ghost of Chagallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (Macadam Cage; $24). Phoebe is a struggling artist making a living by painting labels for wineries, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

getting tough to pay the bills, and her home falls into foreclosure. The ghost of 20th-century Russian painter Marc Chagall appears and helps her ďŹ nd a painting of his that he intended for her father to keep after the liberation of France. The valuable painting would surely help Phoebe pay her bills, but the adventure leads her to France to uncover hundreds of missing Chagall paintings. The two main characters are engaging on their own, but the kooky folks they meet along the way really give the book a lighthearted touch that helps the freewheeling story ďŹ&#x201A;y right by enjoyably.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;N.G. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The NapaLife Insiderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ($24.99) is an unusual reference book for the Napa Valley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s written to be used with a smartphone or tablet,â&#x20AC;? writes author Paul Franson, who explains that this basic list of tips, information and opinions doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;waste space on details of attractions, which are readily available online and change often.â&#x20AC;? Thus, the book is essentially one manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Yelp reviews of everything in the Napa Valley. Instead of explaining destinations in detail, the author suggests that, with his expertise, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best just to take his word on these things. In Fransonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 16 years of living in and writing about the Napa Valley, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been just about everywhere and done almost everything; he also publishes a paid weekly newsletter with his insider news about the Napa Valley. This book is geared toward tourists, and Franson is their nononsense tour guide.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;N.G. For more local author reviews, see www.bohemian.com.

Crush C rush

CULTURE CRUSH | THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

INSIDE OUT Artist Jimmy Tomorrow paints live models to look like portraits at ‘Pop Outs,’ on April 6 at the Barracks in Santa Rosa. See Galleries, p30.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deliciously Unsettling!â&#x20AC;? PARIS, JE Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192; RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE Ă&#x201C; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­£Ă&#x201C;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\Ă&#x17D;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x160; Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

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DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PENTAGON PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 /Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC; 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture 7i`]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŤÂ&#x201C; In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 7Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-ÂŤiVÂ&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; iVÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;7i`]Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ÂŁxÂŤÂ&#x201C; 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

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At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Happiness is mere delusion in new play BY DAVID TEMPLETON

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;H

appiness,â&#x20AC;? says playwright and educator Robert Caisley, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is the perpetual act of deluding oneself.â&#x20AC;?

Caisely, who teaches playwriting and dramatic literature at the University of Idaho, didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually say that. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a quote (â&#x20AC;&#x153;And probably a totally butchered quote,â&#x20AC;? he laughs) from the famously unhappy English author Lytton Strachey, who preferred sad people to happy ones. The sentimentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that a sense of happiness may be just a pathetic delusionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is front and center in Caisleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new comedy-drama, opening this weekend in the Studio at Sixth Street Playhouse, where the playwrightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popular show Kiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Book had a run in 2011. Directed by Lennie Dean, and featuring Ed McCloud, Liz Jahren, Brian Glenn Bryson and Rose

Roberts, Happy is part of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;rolling world premiereâ&#x20AC;? that includes productions in Miami, Montana and New Jersey. According to Caisley, the idea for Happy came about while grading papers for a literature class he teaches every year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the assignments I give,â&#x20AC;? he explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is for students to write a paper about the tragic ďŹ&#x201A;aws of a famous protagonist from the Western canon. A few years ago, as I was reading paper after paper, I realized that a characterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tragic ďŹ&#x201A;aw, in most literature, is something negative. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bloodlust or avaricious ambition or blind folly, or something recognizably bad like that.â&#x20AC;? As he read, Caisely began set himself an interesting challenge: to write a play in which the protagonistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fatal ďŹ&#x201A;aw was not negative at all, but something typically regarded as a positive thing. Something like . . . happiness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What happens,â&#x20AC;? he asks now, â&#x20AC;&#x153;if a person, a sculptorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;by all reports the happiest person youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever meetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;encounters someone who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe in the concept of happiness, who believes that happy people are deceitful and devious, are lying to themselves and others? What would happen if, over the course of an evening, that sense of contentedness is chipped away at, little by little, until the protagonist begins to question his own sense of identity completely? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever happens next,â&#x20AC;? Caisley laughs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to be pretty interesting, right?â&#x20AC;? Interestingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and unpredictable. One has to wonder, with such a potentially farcical set-up, loaded also with conďŹ&#x201A;ict and drama, is Happy, the play with the upbeat name, a comedy or a tragedy? To answer that question, Caisley paraphrases yet another quote, this one from the great playwright Harold Pinter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a comedy,â&#x20AC;? he says with a laugh, â&#x20AC;&#x153;until it stops being a comedy.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Happyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, March 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21 at the Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.523.4185.

-CHRIS PACKHAM, THE VILLAGE VOICE

“CAPTURES MID-‘70S SUBURBIA WITH A MERCILESS ACCURACY NOT SEEN SINCE ‘ THE ICE STORM.’” -STEPHEN HOLDEN, THE NEW YORK TIMES

MOLLY PARKER

JOHN HAWKES

It’s 1975. Do you know where your parents are?

STARTS FRIDAY, APRIL 5

SUMMERFIELD CINEMAS 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa (707) 525-4840

LET’S GO! Goro Miyazaki directs this affecting Studio Ghibli film.

Land of Rising Son ‘From Up on Poppy Hill’ passes the torch BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he dubbed version of the feature-length cartoon From Up on Poppy Hill, co-written by master animator Hayao Miyazaki and directed by his son, Goro, has a taste of expurgation. In 1963, Umi (voiced by Sarah Bolger), a high school girl from the green outskirts of Yokohama, is working hard in the kitchen of her grandmother’s boarding house, her father having been killed under unexplained circumstances.

The post-WWII relations between Korea and Japan are a loaded subject, dense with mutual prejudice. If indeed these are the details that are missing— because something is certainly missing—they explain the nature of the family secrets keeping Umi and her lover, Shun (voiced by Anton Yelchin), apart. Shun has a political cause: the ancient, rickety student union called “the Quarter Latin” is scheduled to be demolished, and he and his friends want to save it. This old firetrap is a

symbol, naturally; as in so many Studio Ghibli films, the tension lies between renovating the past and cherishing tradition. The movie is staged during a beautifully chosen moment of transition—the months right before the Tokyo Olympiad. (Goro Miyazaki was a landscape architect before joining the family business; watching From Up on Poppy Hill, the old career seems significant—the movie is full of vistas.) With affection and loving detail, Goro Miyazaki shows this realm behind the crossed young lovers, who navigate it on a bicycle. And there’s the perfect evocative song accompanying them, “Ue o Muite Arukou” sung by Kyu Sakamoto—best known as “Sukiyaki.” The film is bittersweet, and at its best recalls Meet Me in St. Louis. But to watch From Up on Poppy Hill is to realize that a style is coming to an end. It’s not just that no one is making movies like this anymore; it’s that, soon, nobody is going to be making movies like this at all.

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25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

“OUTSTANDING... A FUNNY, SAD AND ULTIMATELY REDEMPTIVE STORY.”

Music

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

ALL WOMAN In Paquitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s songs, men

are two-legged rats who deserve to die.

Mujeres Mandan Hide your sonsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paquita Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

BY ESTEFANY GONZALEZ

DeLone 7:30pm

:HG$SUĂŁSP

The Crux & Supermule

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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Patterson Hood

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Live Music Sunday Brunch

PLUS JUSTIN YOUNG & FAITH AKO TRIO 3!4s0-$//23s!$6$/3s FOLK/ROCK

Zigaboo Modeliste

PLUS JILL COHN 4(52s8PM DOORSs$26 s ALTERNATIVE/INDIE/ROCK

of The Drive-By Truckers with Jay Gonzalez & Brad Morgan

with Justin Farren SP

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

ANUHEA

IT'S A BEAUTIFUL DAY

& the New Aahkestra Funkify Your Kids

PORTUGAL. THE MAN

7XHV$SUĂŁSP

35.s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s ALTERNATIVE ROCK

Carioca

Contemporary Brazilian Jazz 7KXU$SUĂŁSP

Ben Sidran )UL$SUĂŁSP

Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

PLUS WILDCAT!

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TOAD THE WET SPROCKET PLUS

JESSIE PAYO

3!4s0-$//23s$46 s BLUES

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7

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o those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an appreciation for ranchera music, it may be hard to imagine why a woman who resembles Mimi from The Drew Carey Show has such a large fan base.

Francisca Viveros Barradasâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or, as she prefers to be called, Paquita la del Barrio (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paquita from the Hoodâ&#x20AC;?)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;is no stranger to Latino culture. She has nearly 40 albums available and has been broadcast on nearly every Spanish radio station and TV channel. The reason Paquita is such a big hit in Latino culture is simple: sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncut and never afraid to put her thoughts out there. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s known for her ranchera songs (a sort of Mexican version of country music), in which she sings about her disappointment

in men. But instead of sorrowful laments, Paquitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s songs are confrontational, usually referring to men as snakes or vermin. Paquita is a huge feminist, and insists that â&#x20AC;&#x153;las mujeres mandanâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a woman should have the ďŹ nal say over everything. Because these types of sayings have been known to piss off many men, her fan base mostly consists of other women who, like her, have been done wrong or been mistreated. Her catch phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;Me estas oyendo, inĂştilâ&#x20AC;? roughly means â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are you listening to me, you useless man?â&#x20AC;? Paquita says this often, both in concert and in several of her songs, and she usually follows it with other comments about men being good for nothing or simply embarrassing. In her hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hombres Malvados,â&#x20AC;? Paquita comments on serial cheating by both her grandfather and father, and states that she hates all men for â&#x20AC;&#x153;letting out their dogsâ&#x20AC;? and measuring their machismo by their conquests. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tres Veses,â&#x20AC;? a song about cheating on her man three times and then tossing him to the curb, was written to make all the â&#x20AC;&#x153;useless menâ&#x20AC;? suffer. And in her biggest hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rata de Dos Patas,â&#x20AC;? she refers to her lover as a ďŹ lthy two-legged rat who is the scum of life and deserves to die. Beyond the bleach-blond hair and ďŹ&#x201A;ashy clothes, Paquita is a symbol of female empowerment with a large audience of Latino women who are tired of the tradition of staying with men who treat them like crap. More remarkably, she began her career in the 1970s, when views like these were seen as outrageous. Paquita encouraged women to reevaluate their self-worth and question Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s then-sexist male culture. At 65, after over 30 years of performing, Paquita continues to bash men in defense of women everywhere. Paquita performs on Saturday, April 6, at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. $60â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$100. 8pm. 707.546.3600.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Jonn Hart Former member of R&B group Tha Outfit appearing with Bobby Brackins, Royalty, Furious, Tino Cochino, the Juxtones and Authentic. Apr 5, 8pm. $20. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Jeff Mangum Leader of Neutral Milk Hotel on a rare solo acoustic tour after a long absence. Apr 9, 8:30pm. Sold out. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Gurf Morlix Songwriter for Lucinda Williams and others plays his own honest folk tunes. Apr 5, 8pm. $25-$27. Sebastopol Community Center Annex, 350 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Paquita la del Barrio Renowned Mexican singer has made her name as a leading interpreter of feminist songs. Apr 6, 8pm. $60-$100. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Dark Star Orchestra Will they perform a show based on a set list from the

Grateful Dead’s 30 years of touring, or create a new set list of Dead tunes? Apr 9, 8pm. $40. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Dark Star Orchestra Acoustic Grateful Dead tribute band plays a set list from the Dead’s 30 years of touring. Apr 10, 8pm. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Dumpstaphunk Ivan Neville’s New Orleans funk ensemble. Apr 3, 7pm. $20. Hopmonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-892-6200.

Patterson Hood Leader of the Drive by Truckers on his own. Appearing with Jay Gonzalez and Brad Morgan. Apr 5-6, 9pm. $27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

New Century Chamber Orchestra Program features Golijov, Mozart and Chausson with pianist Anne-Marie McDermott. Apr 7, 5pm. $29$59. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band Bluegrass singer’s career has led him to play with just about everybody in the genre. Apr 6, 8pm. $20-$25. Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts, Osher

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Zigaboo Modeliste & the New Aahkestra New Orleans drummer has been a source of inspiration for funk, hip-hop, R&B and more. Apr 7, 3pm. $7-$12. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

Apr 5

THE WILSON-HUKILL BLUES REVUE

Rancho Debut!

Obscure/Contemporary Blues 8:15 / No Cover

Sat

Apr 6

NAPA COUNTY

STOMPY JONES The Coolest Swing 8:30

FREDDY CLARKE Apr 7 Classical/Flamenco Guitar Virtuoso Sun

Jesse Cook Fiery and percussive guitar work from this groundbreaking flamenco artist. Apr 6, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

5:00 / No Cover

JUSTIN FARREN Apr 12 West Coast Songwriters Fri

Rancho Debut!

2012 Song of the Year 8:15 / No Cover

SHANA MORRISON Apr 13 Sassy Songwriter/Singer 8:30 Sat

Clubs & Venues

Apr 14 JEREMY D’ANTONIO AND FRIENDS 5:00 / No Cover Sun Fri

Apr 19

SONOMA COUNTY

WHISKEY & WOMEN Rancho

WITH ACCORDIONIST

RENEE DE LA PRADE

Debut!

8:15 / No Cover

Sat

Apr 20 JOHNNY ALLAIR’S

Aubergine

Birthday Dance Party 8:30

Apr 4, African Showboyz. Apr 5, the Silver Threads, the Golddiggers, Driftwood. Apr 6, Mountaindawg. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

HOUSTON JONES Apr 21 High Octane Americana 5:00 Sun

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Christy’s on the Square Apr 4, Ethereal, the Fatal Crush, Icarus the Owl, These Paper Satellites (Acoustic). 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center Apr 5, Tony Furtado, Luke Price. 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Devi Yoga Center Apr 6, Kirtans and Jnana with Kaliji. 7151 Wilton Ave, Sebastopol. 707.318.6538.

MITCH WOODS and HIS ROCKET 88s

Thank yyou o ou Bohemian Readers! Bohemian R eaders! s Best Bookstor Bookstore, e, Used, Mar Marin! rin!

Apr 5, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Flamingo Lounge Apr 5, Sugar Rush. Apr 6, Sugarfoot. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club Apr 5, Circus Moon. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Green Music Center Apr 6, Sonoma Musica Viva: Transfigured Night. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Green Music Center 1029 Apr 10, Shawn Baltazor with Kermit Driscoll. ) SSU, 1801 E

28

Saturday, April 6

Wed, Apr 3 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, Apr 4 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club

Finley Community Center

TRUCKIN’ Patterson Hood of the Drive-By Truckers plays Sweetwater on April 5 and 6. See Concerts, above.

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Books, CD’s, Books, CD’s, DVD’s, DVD’s, Vinyl Vi ny l B uy, ssell, ell, ttrade, rade, g ift ccertificates ertificates Buy, gift S poken word/music word/music e ve n t s Spoken events Customer C ustomer Reward Reward Cards Cards L oc al a rtists ccards ards Local artists Hand-made H and-made French French ttruffles r u f fl e s

Fri, Apr 5 7–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Apr 6 7–11pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts MITCH WOODS AND THE ROCKET 88S

Sun, Apr 7 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5pm–9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

“The B Biggest iggest Little Little Bookstor Bookstore re in the U n niverse” Universe”

Mon, Apr 8 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

2EBOUND"OOKSTORE 2 EBOUND"OOKSTORE

Tues, Apr 9 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

16 611 11 4 4th th S Street, treet, San San Rafael Ra f a e l 415.482.0550 41 5.4 82 .05 50 www.reboundbookstore.com w w w.reboundbooks tore.com

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.



NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Music ( 27 Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Guerneville Community Church Apr 7, River Choir: Bachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cantata No 4. 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Apr 5, Lynx, DJ Delphi, Aima the Dreamer, Dakini Star. Apr 6, California Honeydrops. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Apr 5, Loosley Covered. Apr 6, Girls & Boys. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

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$$15 15 A ADV/$17 DV/$17 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ SUN SU N â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 7 MONTHLY M ONTHLY E EVENT VENT BS SAGE AGE P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

Lagunitas Tap Room

$$55 SLIDING SLIDING SCALE/DOORS SCALE/ DOORS 8PM/ALL 8PM /ALL AGES AGES

Apr 3, the Easy Leaves. Apr 4, Cascada. Apr 5, the Resonators. Apr 6, the Pine Needles. Apr 7, Sean Carscadden. Apr 10, Katie Garibaldi. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

THE T HE ABBEY ABBEY & CUALLI CUALLI T T.. EVENTS EVENTS PRESENT PRESENT

Last Day Saloon

POETRY/SPOKEN PO ETRY/ SPOKEN WORD/LYRICISM WORD / LYRICISM

NORTH N ORTH BAY BAY POETRY POETRY SLAM SLAM

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Apr 5, Ozzy Alive, Ancient Mariner, Hell Fire. Apr 6, Zulu Spear, DJ Crisp. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

BOOGIE B OOGIE DOWN DOWN B BABY ABY

OVER O VER 25+ 25 + FABULOUS FABULOUS RAFFLE R AFFLE PRIZES!! PR I Z E S ! ! PRICE PR I C E P PER ER R RAFFLE AFFLE TICKET TICKET IS IS $2! $2 ! $$44 KIDS/$8 KIDS/$ 8 ADULTS/DOORS ADULTS/ DOORS 1PM/ALL 1PM /ALL AGES AGES MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 8 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

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$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+ MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APR APR 1 15 5 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK D DANCEHALL A N C E H ALL M MASSIVE ASSIVE & JJUNIORS UNIORS BIG BIG PLATE PLATE PRESENT PRESENT REGGAE R EGGAE | ISLAND ISL AND SOUL SOUL

Fri April 12

Del The Funky Homosapien plus 'Ĺ?Ĺ&#x152;ŽĨ'Ä&#x201A;Ä?

Apr 5, Blue Steel, Smoke & Mirrors. Apr 7, Soul Patrol. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Monroe Dance Hall

An evening with Helen Reddy

Apr 6, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Fri April 26

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

Wed April 17

Dead Can Dance Sat April 20

Music Meets Movies

ĨÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?hĎŽÍ&#x2014;ZÄ&#x201A;ĆŠĹŻÄ&#x17E;Î&#x2DC;,ƾž

Sat April 27

Foghat Fri May 3

Apr 5, Liz Brown & Adam Traum. Apr 6, Andrew Freeman. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

An evening with Tainted Love

Mystic Theatre

Sat May 18 Adam Carolla Î&#x2DC; Dr Drewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Apr 3, Anuhea, Justin Young, Faith Ako trio. Apr 6, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Beautiful Day, Jill Cohn. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Reunion Tour Fri May 24

Naughty By Nature Sat May 25

dĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśWĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĆŠÇ&#x2021;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ĺśplus Ben Taylor Fri May 31

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT M MNE NE SINGERS SINGERS SERIES SERIES W WITH IT TH

THIRD ANNIVERSARY PARTYĨÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?  Big Bad Voodoo Daddy plus The Deadlies

$3 $ 3R RED ED S STRIPES TRIPES & $ $4 4 JJAMESON AMESON A ALL LL N NIGHT IGHT $$10 10 PRE/$12 PRE/$12 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

Berlin plus Big Country

THE T HE PAULA PAULA F FUGA UGA A AND ND MIKE MIKE LOVE LOVE TRIO TRIO

Main Street Station Apr 3, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Apr 6, Yancie Taylor Trio. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP H HOP OP

Sat June 8

&Ä&#x201A;Ä?&ŽƾĆ&#x152;Í´dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;hĹŻĆ&#x;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;dĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ä?ĆľĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E; Sat June 29 Thur July 18 JewelÍ´'Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;,Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć?dŽƾĆ&#x152; Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Occidental Center for the Arts Apr 7, Great Wave of the Heart. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Cover Me Neutral Milk Hotel contest winner announced! Sure, we knew there were some creative musicians out there who might enter our Neutral Milk Hotel cover song contest. But how could we have expected what musical treasures you, dear readers, sent in? There was the in-the-red, gleefully distorted version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardenhead/Leave Me Aloneâ&#x20AC;? sent in by Ted Farber, and the hornflavored version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Baby for Pree / Where Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Find Me Nowâ&#x20AC;? by Chris Alarie. John Gabyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s autotuned â&#x20AC;&#x153;Communist Daughterâ&#x20AC;? changed the time signature to 6/8 with a circus feel, and Brian Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor played with chromatics and fretboard slides in a version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The King of Carrot Flowers, Part II.â&#x20AC;? We even got a crazy cut-and-paste edit called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two-Headed Sex Machine Manâ&#x20AC;? from Ricardo Mâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ohaire that chopped together samples of James Brown, Neutral Milk Hotel and various spoken-word recordings. But when it came time to select a winner, we went with Dustin Healdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imaginative cover of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Passed,â&#x20AC;? played on guitar, darbuka, zils and melodica. Without trying to emulate the letter of Mangumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delivery, the version captures the slight Middle Eastern spirit of the intro lick and takes the song to another place entirely. Congratulations, Dustin, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve won two tickets to Jeff Mangumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sold-out show at the Phoenix Theater on Tuesday, April 9. Thanks to everyone who sent in their songs; to hear all entries in the contest, visit www.bohemian.com.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Phoenix Theater Apr 5, Jonn Hart, Bobby Brackins, Royalty, Furious, Tino Cochino, The Juxtones, Authentic. Apr 6, Fog of War, Premunition, Hemotoxin, Trecelence, Maldicion. Apr 9,

Jeff Mangum (Sold Out). 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Apr 10, Buzzy Martin, Nate Lopez, Linda Ferro Band.

Apr 5, Kinerktube.

Redwood Cafe

San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

River Theatre

19 Broadway Club

Apr 5, Safety Orange. Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Apr 3, Sol Horizon, Worlds Finest. Apr 5, Prezident Brown. Apr 6, Miles Schon Band, Moods of Melody, Run Down Radio. Apr 7, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Russian River Brewing Co Apr 6, HugeLarge. Apr 7, Critical Measures. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Sebastopol Community Center Annex Apr 5, Gurf Morlix. 350 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Spancky’s Apr 5, Dry Country Drinkers. Apr 6, Down Dirty Shake. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sunflower Center Apr 5, Motoshi Kosako. Apr 6, Aykanna. Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Toad in the Hole Pub Apr 7, Girls & Boys. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre

Old Western Saloon

Apr 7, San Francisco Opera Ensemble. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix

Apr 9, Dark Star Orchestra. Tues, American Jubilee. Wed, Terrapin Family Band Bar Show. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY

Peri’s Silver Dollar

ECHO Gallery

Apr 3, the Weissmen. Apr 4, the Incubators. Apr 5, Elephant Listening Project. Apr 6, the Gravel Spreaders. Apr 9, the Pickups. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Apr 6, 6pm, Comfort Slacks, Magnanimous. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Napa First United Methodist Church

Rancho Nicasio

Apr 7, Guitello Bach Suites 1-3 with Jeffrey McFarlandJohnson. 625 Randolph St, Napa. 707.253.1411.

Apr 5, the Wilson-Hukill Blues Revue. Apr 6, Stompy Jones. Apr 7, Freddy Clarke. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Studio 55 Marin Apr 6, inVoc. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Apr 3, the Crux, Supermule. Apr 5-6, Patterson Hood. Apr 7, Zigaboo Modeliste & the

Napa Valley Opera House Apr 6, Jesse Cook. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Apr 5, Wolf Hamlin & the Front Porch Drifters. Apr 6, Soul Train Tribute Dance Party. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Trinidad James Gold-bedecked rapper has a song called “My Last Molly Song Ever I Promise.” Apr 4 at the Mezzanine.

Hiromi

Apr 5, Modern Mandolin Quartet. Apr 6, Reckless in Vegas. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Japanese-born jazz pianist settles in with trio for fournight residency. Apr 4-7 at SFJAZZ Center.

George’s Nightclub

Odd Future’s resilient DJ plays small club show with Trev Case and Koslov. Apr 5 at the New Parish.

Apr 5, Purple Haze. Apr 6, Stephanie Teel Band. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Apr 3, Dumpstaphunk. Apr 4, Bandworks School of Rock. Apr 5, Zydeco Flames. Apr 6, Nova Albion. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-892-6200.

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts Apr 6, Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band. Apr 7, New Century Chamber Orchestra. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No

29

Terrapin Crossroads

Apr 6, Parlor Tricks. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Apr 3, Tam High’s Broadway Review. Apr 4, Chris Webster & Nina Gerber. Apr 5, Tom Rigney & Flambeau. Apr 6, Joel Harrison & Spirit House. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace

New Aahkestra. Apr 9, Carioca. Apr 10, Dark Star Orchestra Acoustic. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Syd the Kid How to Dress Well Chamber music in space zapped by a silk raygun and transformed into pulsing R&B. Apr 9 at Rickshaw Stop.

Alt-J Britain’s latest invasion comes live from Leeds with Mercury Prize-winning ‘An Awesome Wave.’ Apr 10 at the Fillmore.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ORGANIC ACOUSTIC MUSIC

At 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flower Power,â&#x20AC;? using flowers as a central theme. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

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At 5pm. Perdita Productions, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out Come the Divs,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Laine Justice. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.290.8866. At 6pm. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Minidoka on My Mind,â&#x20AC;? paintings of Roger Shimomura. Artist presentation, Apr 6, 2pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA. At 6pm. Seager Gray Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Postcards,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Chris Gwaltney. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

Apr 6 At 3pm. Quercia Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Point of View,â&#x20AC;? landscape paintings by Alan Lunt and sculptures by Ann Frowick. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243. At 5pm. Gallery 300, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light/Wave 450nm,â&#x20AC;? collaborative Sculptures by Virginia Harrison and Patrick Scott. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

SONOMA COUNTY The Barracks Apr 6, 1-4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop Outs,â&#x20AC;? human bodies painted and then photographed by Jimmy Tomorrow. 3840 Finley Ave, Santa Rosa. 415.947.9751.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usable, Loveable Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? highlights

from 33 years of Peanuts products. Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Line,â&#x20AC;? describing Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Apr 9-May 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earthbound,â&#x20AC;? ceramics from Eileen Jungwirthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pegasi series. Apr 9-May 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring Art Exhibitions,â&#x20AC;?featuring works by Lynnie Rabinowitsh and Eileen Jungwirth. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Apr 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alkonost,â&#x20AC;? two- and three-dimensional art from Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery 300

Markham Vineyards Through Jun 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Groupies,â&#x20AC;? work by Rolling Stone photographer Baron Wolman. Reception, Apr 13, 11am. 2812 St Helena Hwy N, St Helena.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through May 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;M for Mystique,â&#x20AC;? exploring the theme of intrigue. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Perdita Productions Apr 5-May 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Out Come the Divs,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Laine Justice. Reception, Apr 5, 5pm. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.290.8866.

Petaluma Arts Center Apr 6-Jun 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cosmic Terrain,â&#x20AC;? individual and collaborative works by Mars-1, Damon Soule, Oliver Vernon and Ricky Watts. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Through Apr 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light/Wave 450nm,â&#x20AC;? Collaborative Sculptures by Virginia Harrison and Patrick Scott. Reception, Apr 6, 5pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Quercia Gallery

Graton Gallery Apr 9-May 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Look Back,â&#x20AC;? paintings, block prints and wood engravings by Rik Olson. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through May 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Photography Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring local artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Apr 10-May 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scissors... Wax... Glue,â&#x20AC;? collages of found, painted or collected materials. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Apr 4-May 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flower Power,â&#x20AC;? using flowers as a central theme. Reception, Apr 4, 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Local Color Gallery Through Apr 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Illusions,â&#x20AC;? distinctive, imaginative, abstract paintings by David Kingwill. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

Mahoney Library Gallery Through Apr 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Diversity of Cuba: Images of Today,â&#x20AC;? photos, paintings and video by artists who have traveled and lived in Cuba. SRJC, 680 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 9 to 1; Sat, 10 to 3. 707.778.3974.

Apr 4-29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Point of View,â&#x20AC;? landscape paintings by Alan Lunt and sculptures by Ann Frowick. Reception, Apr 6, 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Sebastopol Gallery Through Apr 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Feast Your Eyes,â&#x20AC;? featuring work by ceramicist Chris Boyd and painter Paula Matzinger. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Apr 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Dixon: The Metalsmithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Workshop,â&#x20AC;? well-known metalsmith was the brother of painter Maynard Dixon. Through Apr 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mail Call,â&#x20AC;? story of military mail and communication from the American Revolution to current

House Dr, Ste 100, Rohnert Park. 707.794.1240.

Dance

Field Trips

Spreckels Performing Arts Center Apr 5, 7:30pm, Universal, a hip-hop-based show by Studio Gray and the Unit Dance Crew. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Events Green Drinks ‘CLASSMATES’ Roger Shimomura’s work reflects his family’s experiences in a

WWII internment camp; his new exhibit, ‘Minidoka on My Mind,’ opens April 5 at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art. See Receptions, adjacent. wars. Through Jun 2, “Tools as Art,” collection of witty and light-hearted works based on familiar forms. Artist talk with Monty Monty, Apr 4, 7pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Adrian Curtet. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Route One

three-dimensional media. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Apr 6-Jun 16, “Minidoka on My Mind,” paintings and lithographs of Roger Shimomura. Reception, Apr 5, 6pm. Artist presentation, Apr 6, 2pm. 551 Bd’wy, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Through Apr 28, Eric Engstrom’s digital photography of the American landscape. Through Apr 28, “Mars’ Book: Confessions of My Inner Dog,” paintings by Dorothy Nissen. Through Apr 28, “The True Cost of Plastic,” mixed-media installation by Judith Selby Lang and Richard Lang. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. WedMon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

University Art Gallery

Marin Community Foundation

Through Apr 30, “Postcards,” paintings by Chris Gwaltney. Reception, Apr 5, 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Through Apr 14, “Juried Student Exhibition,” featuring student art. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Apr 30, “Lost in Translation,” paintings by Orin Carpenter. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Bolinas Museum

Through May 31, “Millennial Abstractions,” choice of color, form, shapes and mark making are transformational and inspiring in the deepest sense. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum History Center Gallery Through Apr 6, “Dorothea Lange at Steep Ravine,” photos of Marin Coast in 1950s. 1026 Court St, San Rafael.

Through Apr 27, “Cross Pollination,” molas and huipiles from the collection of Sandy Dierks. Through Apr 28, “Of Golden Light,” Photographer Patty Mulligan’s prints on glass backed in gold. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Marin MOCA

Elsewhere Gallery

Marin Society of Artists

Through Apr 10, “Thresholds,” a mother-son collaboration between Nadine Gay and

Through Apr 14, “AB/Normal,” works by Dan Herrera, Aron Meynell and Paula Moran that skew the idea of normalcy through surreal and nostalgic narratives. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Apr 7-27, “Open Craft & Sculpture,” Juried exhibit of

Through Apr 30, “Myths of your Life,” abstract and expressionistic mixed-media art works that reflect the world of dreams. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery

NAPA COUNTY ECHO Gallery Through Apr 30, “Radiant Ruins,” local artists focus on dimension, reflection and process. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Apr 30, “Vernal Equinox,” paintings by Sandra Juniper Booth and Kim Frances. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Apr 9-30, “Angels of the Valley,” photographer Mars Lasar’s unique collection on display. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Westin Verasa Hotel Through May 31, Paintings by

Relax, mingle and network with people who are living and working green. Apr 9, 5:30pm. Free. Marin Youth Center, 1115 Third St, San Rafael. 415.459.6884.

Low-Cost Physicals Family physicals for adults and children by appointment. Ongoing. $20-$65. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

100,000 Poets for Change Three days of poetry, music, dance, art and workshops in the name of peace and sustainability. See www.100tpc. org for details and schedule. Apr 5-7. Donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Peace in Process Relax deeply within a gentle immersion into ancient modalities to help realign with balance and strength. First Sun of every month, 10:30am. Donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Backyard Naturalist Program on Wildflowers Biologist Jeanne Wirka leads exploration of the amazing world of angiosperms (flowering plants) at the preserve. Apr 6, 9:30am. $25. Bouverie Preserve, 13935 Hwy 12, Glen Ellen.

Bird Walk Bring the binoculars. Apr 3, 9am. Free. Bolinas Lagoon Preserve, mile marker 15.45, Hwy 1, north of Stinson Beach, Bolinas.

Public Season See one of the most studied great egret nesting sites on the West Coast. Sat-Sun through Jul 14. Free. Martin Griffin Preserve, 4900 Shoreline Hwy 1, Stinson Beach. 415.868.9244.

Spring Feather Fest Docent-led bird and nature walk, followed by a tailgate party. Apr 7, 9am. $2.50. Shollenberger Park, Parking lot, Petaluma.

Spring Wildflower Walks Preserve known for one of the most incredible wildflower displays in Sonoma County. Thurs, Apr 4, 10am and Sun, Apr 7, 10am. Free. Van Hoosear Preserve, Grove Street, El Verano.

Film Celebrate Sonoma County

Explore the wonders of electricity and renewable energy with PG&E experts. Apr 6, 1pm. Free. Environmental Discovery Center, Spring Lake, Violetti Road, Santa Rosa. 707.539.2865.

Series featuring films shot in Sonoma County. Apr 5, “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.” First Fri of every month. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Teen Health Clinic

Jewels

Thurs, 3:30-6pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Performance by the Mariinsky Ballet Company with George Balanchine. Apr 7, 1pm. $8-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Professional volunteers build websites for nonprofits in a single day, featuring food, drink and live music. Apr 6, 9am. Free. Sonoma Mountain Business Cluster, 1300 Valley

My So-Called Enemy Director Lisa Gossels in attendance of this documentary following Palestinian & Israeli teen girls after a leadership program. Apr 10, 7pm. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Notorious Tale of espionage and romance by Alfred Hitchcock from 1946. Apr 8, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Who Killed Vincent Chin? Documentary on the murder of young Chinese American in Detroit in 1982. Apr 5, 7pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Will the Real Terrorist Please Stand Up? Documentary chronicles half a century of hostile US-Cuba relations by telling the story of the “Cuban Five,” whose mission was to penetrate Cuban exile terrorist groups in Miami. Apr 5, 7:30pm. Free. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

Food & Drink Battle of the Brews

Science Saturday

WIMPgives Charity Hackathon

with Abby Bogomolny and Anne Marie Insull afterward. Apr 10, 6pm. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

The Loving Story Documentary about the 1967 US Supreme Court decision that struck down laws prohibiting interracial marriage. Panel discussion

Over 24 breweries and food producers in a huge craft beer competition and sandwich contest. Benefits childrens programs, now in 17th year. Features live music by Pat Jordan Band and Cover Me Badd. Apr 6, contest 1pm, main event 4pm. $40-$95. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa.

Beervana Winners of amateur beer competition from over 275 entries announced at celebration including tastings, food, live music and silent auction. Apr 5, 5:30pm. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. $40$45. 707.938.4626.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat

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Mike VanDuyn. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa.

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Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Early Summer Farm Forum Panel discussion about the future of food and farming in Sonoma County with chefs, farmers and butchers. Apr 4, 5pm. $15. St. Francis Winery, 500 Pythian Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.538.9463.

Pick of the Vine Tastings from over 35 wineries, hors d’ oeuvres and desserts, live jazz and a Brent Farrisemceed live auction. Apr 6, 6pm. $60. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.4108.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Farmers Market First Wed of every month. Oakmont Farmers Market, Oakmont Drive and White Oak Drive, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Lectures

Keep Your Credit Healthy Presentation by Gary Gottlieb, private mortgage banker from Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. Apr 9, 5:30pm. Free. Sonoma County Family YMCA, 1111 College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.545.9622, ext 12.

Passing with Purpose Moderated by Lauren Servais and Angela Romagnoli. Part of Work of Literary Merit lecture series. Apr 3, 12pm. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Reform Immigration Platform The Immigration Task Force of the North Bay Organizing Project (NBOP) outlines “11 Moral Principles for a responsible immigration program.” Apr 3, 5pm. Free. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Speed Drawing Birds Workshop with John Muir Laws on sketching birds on the move. Apr 4, 10am-4pm. $75. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Readings Book Passage Apr 3, 7pm, “The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards” with Kristopher Jansma. Apr 4, 7pm, “Beautiful Whale” with Bryant Austin. Apr 5, 7:15pm, “The Longevity Kitchen” with Rebecca Katz. Apr 6, 1pm, “The Walking” with Laleh Khadivi. Apr 6, 4pm, “Market Street” wiht Anita Hughes. Apr 6, 7pm, an evening with 16 Rivers Press featuring Gerald Fleming & Barbara Swift Brauer. Apr 7, 5pm, “Everybody Matters: My Life Giving Voice” with Mary Robinson. Apr 8, 7pm, “Our Last Dance” with Madeleine Zeldin. Apr 9, 7pm, “Tapestry of Fortunes” with Elizabeth Berg. Apr 10, 7pm, “The Myth of the Perfect Girl: Helping Our Daughters Find Authentic Success and Happiness in School and Life” with Ana Homayoun. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Apr 3, “Dark Triumph” with Robin LaFevers. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Understanding Oil Paint

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Understand the different types and grades of oil paint and media, when to use them and how to combine them. Apr 6, 1pm. $40-$50. Napa Valley Art Supplies, 3250 California Blvd, Napa. 707.224.2775.

Dance Palace

Mark Wellman Author, filmmaker and motivational speaker appears in support of disability awareness week. Apr 9, 7pm. Free. Cooperage, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Battle for Wappo Tribe Recognition

Women Writers in a Man’s World

Talk by Scott Gabaldon, tribal chairman of the 340-member Mishewal Wappo tribe of Alexander Valley, the last remaining Wappo tribe in existence. Apr 5, 7pm. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

“Nella Larsen and the Hidden History of the Harlem Renaissance,” moderated by Ajuan Mance. Apr 8, 12pm. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Israel & Palestine

Yom HaShoah VeHaGevurah Observance

Kenny Walter discusses the current US role in the conflict. Sponsored by Praxis Peace Center. Apr 7, 12:30pm. $5. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Remembrance of the Holocaust and acts of courage, with three survivors telling personal stories of survival. Apr 7, 4pm. Free. Congregation Rodef Sholom, 170 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael.

Apr 9, 4pm, “Almost Identical” with Lin Oliver. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618. Apr 6, 3pm, “Marin’s Mountain Play - One Hundred Years of Theatre on Mount Tamalpais” with Elisabeth Ptak. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Redwood Cafe Second Tuesday of every month, 8:30pm, Slamazon Poetry Slam, All-women’s open mic with competitive poetry and a headlining poet. $5-$10. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

Santa Rosa High School Apr 6, 8pm, “Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants” with Jane Goodall. $35. 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Family Theater. Apr 9, 6pm. $12-$17. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Dance with Me Presented by Curtain Call Theatre. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, Apr 7, 2pm. through Apr 6. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Enchanted April Romantic comedy set in 1920s London. Two frustrated housewives who take a trip to Italy in hopes of rediscovering themselves. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Apr 14. $22-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

French Lessons Staged reading of a new comedy by Martin Russell. Directed by Phoebe Moyer. Apr 10, 7:30pm. $10. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Happy How vicious and enviable we can be of people possessed with a natural joie de vivre, but absolution in attitude can win the day. World Premiere. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Apr 21. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Improv Invitational Bay Area improv troupes compete for points from judges. Every other Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Apr 6. $14. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Into the Woods Jr Favorite fairy-tale characters are encountered as a couple ventures into the woods. Presented by Stonebridge School. Apr 4-5, 7pm and Sat, Apr 6, 10am. $5-$10. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Ivy & Bean

Theater

The mischievous second-grade heroines of the “New York Times” bestselling stories plot their exploits onstage in this lively musical. Sat, 10:30am and 12:30pm. through Apr 6. $15$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Beauty & the Beast

Love Letters

Join Beauty as she discovers the goodness within the Beast. Presented by American

Play by AR Gurney recounts the lifelong correspondence between a romantically

Planting Ideas Jane Goodall’s new book is not about chimps Hairy arms, legs and your boyfriend’s hairy ass—these aren’t the only similarities between humans and chimps, according to Jane Goodall. Goodall should know—she spent 45 years studying wild chimpanzees in Tanzania. Since, she’s spent a large portion of her time devoted to advocacy on behalf of chimpanzees, established the Jane Goodall Institute, written numerous books and even had a Simpsons character based on her. And somehow, in the midst of her many projects, Goodall found time to write a new book, Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants. A book on plants might seem unlikely from the woman known for going ape, but Goodall’s love for botany started at a young age, when she spent her days climbing trees and making elderberry wine with her grandmother. Her book introduces readers to botanists around the world, unveils the secret world of plants, and discusses the potential plants contain for healing the human body and the planet. Presented by Copperfield’s Books, Goodall appears in Santa Rosa on Saturday, April 6, at the Santa Rosa High School Auditorium. 1235 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $35 includes book. 707.578.8938.—Estefany Gonzalez

attached couple. Presented by Porchlight Theatre Company. Locations and times vary, see www.porchlight.net for details. Fri-Sat through Apr 28. $15$30. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas.

Lynn Manning Playwright performs his oneman show, “Weights: One Blind Man’s Story.” Apr 4, 7:30pm. Free. Ives Concert Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. )

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

The Memory of Water

BY ROB BREZSNY

Three sisters recollect memories at their mother’s funeral in this comedy. Directed by John Craven. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Apr 7. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

For the week of April 3

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “Art cannot be modern,” said Austrian painter Egon Schiele. “Art is primordially eternal.” I love that idea. Not all of the artifacts called “art” fit that scrupulous definition, of course. Katy Perry’s music and the film Wreck It Ralph may have some entertainment value, but they’re not primordially eternal. I bring this up, Aries, because I think you have entered a particularly wild and timeless phase of your own development. Whether or not you are literally an artist, you have a mandate to create your life story as a primordially eternal work of art.

Murder at the Taylor Estate Murder mystery dinner fundraiser for Analy Arts Theatre Department set in 1928. Sun, Apr 7, 5pm. $35-$40. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Panache A rich society woman from Scarsdale discovers that a fry cook in Brooklyn has the vanity plate she wants, which reads “Panache.” Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Apr 7. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

The Price Two estranged brothers meet to dispose of their late father’s belongings in this powerful play. Dates and times vary. Through Apr 7. $15$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Readers’ Theater Plays by local authors, directed by Damien Olsen. Sat, Apr 6, 2pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody Musical comedy bringing naughty fun of the bestselling book to life. Apr 10, 7:30pm. $35-$45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

West Side Stories Five-minute true stories told live onstage without notes. Apr 3, “Practical Jokes”; May 1, “The Greatest Game Ever”; Jun 5, “I’ll Never Do That Again.” First Wed of every month, 7:30pm. through Jun 5. $5. Sonoma Valley Portworks, 613 Second St, Petaluma. 707.769.5203.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Pieces of April Enchanting, Tonywinning play in Ross

Sometimes, a change of scenery is all that’s needed to alter a gloomy outlook. It doesn’t hurt when that change includes old Italian castles and a great deal of wisteria. The Enchanted April, Elizabeth von Arnim’s forgotten 1922 novel, might not be known at all today were it not for the 1992 film adaptation starring Miranda Richardson, Alfred Molina and Joan Plowright. It was that low-budget charmer by director Mike Newell that fluttered into the hearts of moviegoers, making possible playwright Matthew Barber’s magical stage adaptation in 2003. A hit on Broadway, it came out of nowhere to take the Tony for best new play. And now it comes to the Ross Valley Players, running through April 14. Enchanted April is the story of four very different British women who are joined together by a newspaper ad inviting renters to a fortnight in Italy. Nicely directed by Cris Cassell, with a dash of puppy love and a pinch of old-fashioned farce, Enchanted April features strong performances, an eye-pleasing set and even a tasteful bit of (very funny) nudity. A story of unexpected transformations, this irresistible offbeat charmer is a trip well worth visiting. For showtimes and prices, see wwwrossvalleyplayerscom. —David Templeton

The Whipping Man Days after the Emancipation Proclamation, two former slaves find themselves caring for their former owner’s son. Tues-Thurs-Sat-Sun, 2 and 7pm and Wed, 7:30pm. through Apr 21. $20-$52. Marin Theatre

Astrology

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“All my best ideas come from having no answer,” said pioneer filmmaker John Cassavetes, “from not knowing.” I hope that testimony cheers you up, Taurus. As hard as it may be for you to imagine, you are on the verge of a breakthrough. As you surf the chaotic flow and monitor the confusing hubbub, you are brewing the perfect conditions for an outburst of creativity. Rejoice in the blessing of not knowing!

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Sant is a Hindi word that comes from a Sanskrit verb meaning “to be good” and “to be real.” Personally, I know a lot of people who are either real or good. But few are both. The good ones tend to be overly polite, and the real ones don’t put a high priority on being nice. So here’s your assignment, Gemini: to be good and real; to have compassionate intentions even as you conduct yourself with a high degree of authenticity; to bestow blessings everywhere you go while at the same time being honest and clear and deep. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have the power to pull off this strenuous feat. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Let’s take a look back at the first three months of 2013. How have you been doing? If I’m reading the astrological markers accurately, you have jettisoned a portion of the psychic gunk that had accumulated in you during the past six years. You have partially redeemed the shadowy side of your nature and you have to some degree ripened the most immature part. There’s also the matter of your heart. You have managed some healing of a wound that had festered there for a long time. So here’s my question for you: Is it possible for you to do more of this good work? The target date for completion is your birthday.

LEO (July 23–August 22) Naturalist Charles Darwin formulated the theory of evolution, which has been one of history’s most influential hypotheses. A crucial event in his early development as a scientist was a fiveyear boat trip he took around the world when he was in his 20s. The research he conducted along the way seeded many of his unique ideas. The writing he did established his reputation as a noteworthy author. And yet before his journey, his father tried to talk him out of embarking, calling it a “wild scheme” and “a useless undertaking.” Did your parents or other authorities ever have a similar response to one of your brilliant projects? If so, now would be a good time to heal the wound caused by their opposition. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

I’ve got three sets of affirmations for you, Virgo. Say them out loud and see if they might work for you. 1. “I will be engrossed in fascinating experiences that feed my curiosity, but I will not be obsessed with grueling frustrations that drain my energy.” 2. “I will be committed to love if it opens my eyes and heart, but I will not be infatuated with maddening conundrums that jiggle my fear.” 3. “I will give myself freely to learning opportunities that offer me valuable lessons I can use to improve my life, but I will be skeptical toward rough-edged tests that ask far more from me than they offer in return.”

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “Pole of inaccessibility” is a term that explorers use to identify places on Earth that are hard—and interesting!—to get to. On each continent, it’s usually considered to be the spot that’s farthest from the coastline. For instance, there’s a pole of inaccessibility near the frozen center of Antarctica. Its elevation is over 12,000 feet and it has the planet’s coldest average temperatures. As for the

oceanic pole of inaccessibility, it’s an area in the South Pacific that’s most remote from land. By my reckoning, Libra, you would benefit from identifying what your own personal version of this point is, whether it’s literal or metaphorical. I think it’s also a great time to transform your relationship with it.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Every April, the ancient Romans celebrated a festival known as Robigalia. Among the rites they performed were ceremonies to exorcize the god of rust and mildew. I suggest you consider reviving that old practice, Scorpio. You would benefit from spending a few days waging war against insidious rot. You could start by scrubbing away all the sludge, scum and gunk from your home, car and workplace. Next, make a similar effort on a metaphorical level. Scour the muck, glop and grime out of your psyche.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “You know that place between sleep and awake, the place where you can still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always love you. That’s where I’ll be waiting.” Tinkerbell says that to Peter Pan in J. M. Barrie’s famous story. Sometime soon, I think you should whisper words like those to a person or animal you love. It’s time for you to be as romantic and lyrical as possible. You need to bestow and attract the nourishment that comes from expressing extravagant tenderness. For even better results, add this sweetness from French poet Paul Valéry: “I am what is changing secretly in you.” And try this beauty from Walt Whitman: “We were together. I forget the rest.”

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Naturalist John Muir (1838–1914) had an ecstatic relationship with the California wilderness. He studied it as a scientist and he worshiped it as a mystical devotee. During the course of his communion with the glaciers and peaks of the Sierra Nevada range, he came close to seeing them as living entities that evolved over long periods of time. “Glaciers move in tides,” he wrote. “So do mountains. So do all things.” With Muir as your inspiration, I invite you to identify the very gradual currents and tides that have flowed for years through your own life, Capricorn. It’s prime time to deepen your understanding and appreciation of the big, slow-moving cycles that have brought you to where you are today. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) American author William Faulkner won a Nobel Prize for literature, an indication that he had abundant talent. The prose he wrote was often experimental, cerebral and complex. He was once asked what he would say to readers who found it difficult to grasp his meaning “even after reading it two or three times.” His reply: “Read it four times.” My counsel to you, Aquarius, is similar. When faced with a challenging event or situation that taxes your understanding, keep working to understand it even past the point where you would normally quit. There will be rewards, I promise. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“Dear Rob: I just consulted an astrologer, and he told me that my planets are very weak because they’re in the wrong houses and have bad aspects. Please tell me what this means. Am I cursed? Is there any way to remedy my afflictions?”—Paranoid Pisces. Dear Pisces: Whoever told you that nonsense is an incompetent astrologer. You shouldn’t heed him. There’s no such thing as one’s planets being weak or being in the wrong houses or having bad aspects. There may be challenges, but those are also opportunities. Luckily, the coming weeks will be prime time for you Pisceans to overthrow the influence of inept “experts” and irresponsible authorities like him. Reclaim your power to define your own fate from anyone who has stolen it from you.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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