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Ĺ´ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

WEILL HALL AT SONOMA SONOMA O S STATE TAT TE UNI UNIVERSITY VERSITY

‘‘A feat of visual and acoustic wonder‌’’ Architectural Digest

UPCOMING CONCERTS

Vadim Repin

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&M€Â?OB(BSBOˆ DB Tue, Apr 9, 8pm Her beautiful voice, compelling stage portrayals, and impeccable musicianship have established this Latvian mezzo-soprano as one of the world’s newest opera TUBST%POUNJTTIFSFYDJUJOH#BZ"SFBSFDJUBMEFCVUĂ? PART OF THE JAN SHREM AND MARIA MANETTI SHREM VOCAL ARTS SERIES.

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An evening with Professor Cornel West Thu, Apr 11, 7pm "QSPNJOFOUBOEQSPWPDBUJWFEFNPDSBUJD intellectual, he is a Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice at Union Theological Seminary and Professor Emeritus at Princeton University. His greatest passion is to keep alive the powerful legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Ĺľ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Since when did your vacation Since help endangeredd species? speci Since you stayed at

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4 Pampered Feet Reflexology Center

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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Presents the 6th Annual

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Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

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Interns

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Estefany Gonzalez, Taylor May

Contributors Michael Amsler, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Jonah Raskin, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

Design Director

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Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Zarrinnaal

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers

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March 21-24 2013

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4 Days 60 Films Opening Night Film & Party Thursday, March 21, 7pm

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

www.sebastopolfilmfestival.org 707.829.4797 707-322-3272 www.incrediblecanine.com

Cover photo of Tim Bodell by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

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Some weeks, itโ€™s just like there are piles to do and a messy house and work is insane and, oh, the hell with it, letโ€™s go to that wonderful little dive bar.

This photo was taken at Panchaโ€™s in Yountville. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

โ€˜We tried to raise the $50,000 ransom, but only managed to get about 15 bucks.โ€™ COVER STO RY P1 5

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies The Cost of Privilege Remembering that not all of us are so lucky BY CARL PATRICK

L

ast June, I observed a Santa Rosa police officer arresting a homeless man during the Wednesday Night Market. For the crime of observing this, I was arrested and spent half a night in jail. I was then charged with obstructing an officer.

I am grateful to say that after months of court dates and pushing this case all the way to a jury trial, the charges have been dismissed. Sometimes white privilege means that going into court against the law enforcement establishment might actually work in your favor. While I’m thrilled to not have a bogus charge on my record, I also have to face the fact that things may very well have worked out differently if my skin had looked a little bit different, or if I hadn’t been born in this country. We have a lot of work to do to dismantle white supremacy and capitalism, and part of that work starts with realizing how this system has a plan for destroying the lives and families of people of color, through prison, deportations, economic exploitation, state violence, pollution of poor neighborhoods and so many more little evils that go unnoticed by most of us. I am grateful to live in a community of thoughtful and radical individuals who are not afraid to resist these injustices. I specifically want to hold up the event being organized by the D.R.E.A.M. Alliance of Sonoma County on March 27 at SSU’s Mario Savio Speaker’s Corner called “Coming Out of the Shadows,” with immigrant youth speaking on their experiences in the United States. I also want to remind folks to check out a great event on Tuesday, March 19, at the Arlene Francis Center, with author and activist Chris Crass, author of Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis, and Movement Building. The struggle continues. I am glad to be free of the court system. Now it’s time to get free of capitalism. Carl Patrick is a member of Occupy Santa Rosa and the Sonoma County Solidarity Network. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Scientology Slam A thought does occur that the usual location for picking up a copy of the Bohemian at the Station in downtown Mill Valley had no copies. Could the Scientologists be collecting stacks to minimize publicity of DeWolf’s appearance at the North Bay Poetry Slam?

ROBERT JONES Via online

I Don’t Like Tom Tomorrow I’m just wondering why you feature Tom Tomorrow. Most political cartoons extend false logic to a familiar scenario in order to illustrate how ridiculous the logic is. His cartoons distort the logic and apply it to equally ridiculous scenarios for who knows what end. I’m almost always left understanding his point but being neither intellectually nor comically amused. Which begs the question: Why the illustration and punch line, if you’re just providing droll, trite commentary?

JONATHAN ZWART

of mindful thinking, and look at the original intention of the Second Amendment: “The strongest reason for a people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.” (Thomas Jefferson.)

As Obama enlarges his drone assassination list of robotic death from above and the criminal banker elite rob many American families openly for fun and profit, this quote from the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and the third president of the United States speaks far better to us on the subject than Mr. Tomorrow’s cartoon.

DREW LEWIS Santa Cruz

Hi Drew, thanks for writing. But— whoops—Thomas Jefferson never actually said those words. The quote first showed up in an op-ed piece in 1989, and no one knows where the author got it. It’s been floating around since, despite no record of it in any of Jefferson’s speeches, papers or letters. Talk about “propagandistic manipulation”! In the meantime, a six-month-old baby girl named Jonylah Watkins was shot five times with a gun and died last week in Chicago. Have a fun day!—The Ed.

Via email

Hi Jonathan, thanks for writing. Not everyone gets the ending of ‘La Dolce Vita,’ either. Marcello on the beach, with the dead, bulbous carcass of a sea creature? Paola trying to yell to him from across the estuary, her words drowned out by the waves? Boy, is it ever weird.—The Ed.

Proof of Intent? I was very disappointed in your choice of Tom Tomorrow’s twisted cartoon on the Second Amendment (Feb. 20). In these difficult times, let us not be distracted and confused by propagandistic manipulations which are the antithesis

Fee-and-Dividend The level of contaminants released into the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels is threatening our air, food, water and health. The rising ocean from the melting polar ice is slowly inundating the coastal land. The transition to clean-energy technologies is the best way to curb greenhouse gas and other pollutants released into the atmosphere. A dozen countries in Europe have succeeded in reducing emissions by employing carbon tax to encourage cleaner energy. Among several carbon bills that have been introduced in the Congress, feeand-dividend has the best chance of

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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promoting job growth, encouraging conservation and, with household income from the dividend, stimulating the economy. The fee-and-dividend proposes that the revenue from the fee-on-carbon be paid out equally to every citizen. With the current CO2 emissions of 6 billion tons, the proposed $15/ton fee for the first year would be approximately $750/year per capita. For the Pacific West, where hydroelectric power is abundant, the impact on heating, cooling and transportation cost is insignificant. Higher oil cost brought on by the $15/ton fee is expected to add $0.10 to a gallon of gas. An average driver who drives 12,000 miles per year would pay roughly $40 more a year at the pump, assuming the car gets 30 mpg.

MICKEY NOJIRI Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1 BottleRock adds comedy!

TUESD AY S | 6-9 6--9 PM P M | BEGINNING BEGINNIN G APRIL APR IL L9 TUESDAYS 10151 MAIN ST, ST, STE S TE 128, PENNGROVE, PENN GR OVE, CA 94951 9 R EGISTER O NLINE | BAUMANCOLLEGE.ORG B AUMAN CO LLEGE.O R G | 800-987-7530 800 0-987-7530 REGISTER ONLINE

Jim Gaffigan, Tig Notaro, Kristen Schaal, many others

2 Still no winner in first

vote for new pope; Nicolas Grizzle says he’ll do it

3 GMO labeling to be

mandatory in Whole Foods markets by the year 2018

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

4 Bob Weir yells “Shut the fuck up” to chatty crowd at Sweetwater Music Hall

5 “Bigfoot Sighting in Santa Rosa” sadly becomes our most-viewed post of the week

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

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Paper THE

CIRCUIT BREAKER Smart & Final may be the only store to take advantage of Santa Rosa’s ‘food desert’ designation.

Grocery Squeeze Walmart’s exploitation of food deserts becomes a preemptive concern for the Living Wage Coalition BY RACHEL DOVEY

W

ith Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” campaign, the topic of food deserts—lowincome areas with few grocery stores and little access to fresh produce—has become a national concern. But a Santa Rosa legal scuffle illuminates a curious and perhaps unintended consequence of

this national campaign: multinational chain stores gaining easier entry into urban areas where they would historically face opposition. On Sept. 18, Santa Rosa’s city council adopted a plan to facilitate the opening of grocery stores in the city’s USDAdesignated food desert, which stretches between Rohnert Park and Highway 12 along Santa Rosa

Avenue. The city amended zoning codes so that food vendors retenanting existing spaces won’t need to apply for a conditional use permit; these permits cost around $12,000 and require a public hearing. In October, Santa Rosa’s Living Wage Coalition filed a lawsuit against the city for this move, claiming it violates the general plan and will allow new stores to open without the necessary

Rachel Dovey

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

environmental and public considerations. “We don’t think this was about getting healthy food to low-income people,” says Marty Bennett, co-chair of the Living Wage Coalition (LWC). “We think it was about giving a free pass to a developer, and potentially we thought a Small Mart [smaller grocery stores operated by Walmart] could come into the vacant Circuit City building.” In 2011, the multinational chain announced its intent to open between 275 and 300 stores in federally designated food deserts, stating, “We believe every single person should have access to an abundant selection of fresh fruits and vegetables at an affordable price.” The superstore, however, pays poverty-level wages—a national average of $8.81 an hour—employs roughly one-third of its employees without benefits and exports the majority of its earnings to its Bentonville, Ark., headquarters, creating a robust case that the city council’s quickfix answer may hurt food deserts more than it helps them. “We don’t think Walmart can solve the problem of low-wage people getting access to healthful food,” Bennett says. But according to assistant city attorney Molly Dillon, the Santa Rosa City Council’s amendment was merely a response to the food desert designation. The superstore has not approached the city about opening in its southeast quadrant, she says. “So far as I know, there was no application from Walmart nor any contact with Walmart about the area along the Santa Rosa corridor,” she says. A Smart & Final store was approved under the new, relaxed zoning code, and is set to open in the old Circuit City building along Santa Rosa Avenue. Nevertheless, a proposed settlement has been drawn up between Santa Rosa and the LWC. The coalition stipulates that if the city throws out the amendment and reinstates its former zoning requirements, it will not press the lawsuit. According to Dillon, staff plans to recommend that the council comply with the terms of

9

Musical Chairs

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

this settlement at a city council meeting on March 19. “The pending litigations would be expensive for the city in time and resources that could be better spent elsewhere,” she says. “And there is some relief in that area now— one additional resource [Smart & Final] that was not available.” Under the terms of the potential agreement, Smart & Final will be allowed to go forward as the only store to have taken advantage of the city’s relaxed zoning measures. “We’re prepared to fully comply with the terms of the settlement,” Bennett says. In a strange twist to this story, a spokesperson representing Walmart contacted the Bohemian through email on Feb. 27, asking about the paper’s upcoming story on “food deserts in Santa Rosa.” The Bohemian had not approached the superstore prior to receiving this inquiry. When asked why Walmart believed the Bohemian was working on an article, the representative replied that “the Living Wage Coalition posted something about it.” But according to Bennett, nothing was ever posted on the LWC’s website or social media pages. Their only mention of this newspaper was a line written in the organization’s private email list, forwarded out to 250 people on Feb. 23—one of whom, it would seem, has an inside connection to Walmart’s communications team. The spokesperson responded to questions regarding where such information came from, saying, “I can’t tell you . . . it was forwarded to me. That’s funny how that happens, huh?” The spokesperson also said Walmart had been under the assumption that the Bohemian was writing about a different lawsuit involving the superstore in Rohnert Park, and added that Walmart had no comment on the food-desert issue in Santa Rosa. This directly contradicts Walmart’s initial email and is without precedent; the store has directly engaged on the fooddesert issue in the opinion pages of the Press Democrat. The Bohemian invited further comment from the chain and has yet to hear back.

Activism is a popular hobby in Cotati. On March 13, one new member will be chosen out of nine applicants for an open seat on the city council of Cotati, a city of 7,330. Contrast that with last year’s Santa Rosa City Council race, which featured nine candidates for four spots on the city council of a city of 169,292. The new appointee will serve until December 2014 in replacement of longtime council member Pat Gilardi, who left in January to take a position on newly elected Sonoma County Supervisor Susan Gorin’s staff. The four-member council will interview applicants and make the appointment at its regular meeting this evening. The group includes some familiar names and some new faces: George Barich, Isaac Freed, Linell Hardy, Ed Hirsch, Sky Matula, John Moore, Ashley Veach, Eris Weaver and Alan Wintermeyer. Former council member Barich was recalled in a special election in 2009, one year after being elected. He had run for council previously and has run for council every opportunity since then. Hardy, a former Cotati planning commissioner, was fined by the Fair Political Practices Commission for her role as former council member John Guardino’s treasurer in a 2010 campaign finance scandal. And John Moore’s wife Lisa served on the council from 2002 to 2006, holding the position as mayor in 2005. Two of the current council members, Mayor Mark Landman and Vice Mayor John Dell’osso, originally found their seats by special appointment. —Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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including works by Mike Kelly, Erik Shearer, and Marie Shelley

Opening Reception with live music: Saturday March 23 7–9pm

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From I Do to I Still Do

ECHO gallery in Calistoga brings together three local artists interested in dimension, reflection and process.

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S O N OMA CO U N TY Bistro Ralph Bistro. $$. Classic and classy–bistro food at its best. Wine bar. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sun; brunch, Sun. 109 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.1380.

Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Dierk’s Parkside Cafe American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955.

Garden Court Cafe & Bakery American. $-$$. Traditional diner food treated with utter respect; the quality ingredients make for sublime eating. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 13647 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.1565.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Hang Ah Dim Sum

Healdsburg Bar & Grill American. $-$$ Gourmet burgers and potent cocktails from the owners of Cyrus. It ain’t fancy, but it’s awfully good, with topnotch ingredients and low prices. Lunch and dinner daily. 245 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3333.

top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza. $. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

Peter Lowell’s California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

Risibisi Italian. $$-$$$. An oasis of urbanity that will transport you to New York, Paris even. The menu keeps freshly seasonal and changes weekly. Lunch and dinner daily. 154 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7600. Simply Vietnam Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Three Squares Cafe Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$.

Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle

39

$

1ST COURSE

WILD ARUGULA SALAD

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Toasted Hazelnut Vinaigrette, Warm Sonoma Goat Cheese and Shaved Apple and Fennel

2ND COURSE

(Chose one of the following)

SONOMA DUCK BREAST Duck Confit Spring Roll, Sautéed Pea Shoots and Caramelized Blood Orange Reduction

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Poggio Italian. $$-$$$.

Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

SOCIAL CLUB 3-COURSE RESTAURANT WEEK MENU

Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Wed-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper ) way to travel

12

W NTO N JOE W

or YUKON POTATO GNOCCHI Tomato Saffron Sauce, Baby Spinach, Bellwether Farms Ricotta

or NIMAN RANCH PORK CHOP

’S

Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A

Citrus & Spice Thai/

Garlic Braised Red Chard, Warm Bacon Vinaigrette

ST PATTY’S DAY STREET FESTIVAL MARCH 17, 11–8 Corned Beef & Beer Live music featuring The Mountain Squirrel, The Sorry Lot, music sing along with Kevin Belton & Bag Pipes with James Beatty

902 Main St, Napa 707.258.2337

BR E ERY W

3RD COURSE

BANANA BREAD PUDDING Coconut-Rum Crème Anglaise Caramel Sauce photo: Marilee Koll

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

DO

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

11

Boca South American. $$$-

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

132 KELLER STREET, PETALUMA 707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

12

Dining ( 11

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

®

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

$ 29 2 9 prix p r i x ffixe i xe

Appetizer: A ppetiz i er: Nonni's Nonni's SSpecial pecial CCaesar, aesar, hhearts ear t s of of romaine r omaine llettuce e t t uce topped t opped with with our our marinated m a r in a t e d

sun dried dried tomatoes, t omat oes , crumbled crumbled blue blue ccheese heese and and pine pine nnuts uts sun orr BBeet eet Insalata, Insalat a, llocally ocally ggrown rown ssweet weet beets beet s with with mandarin mandarin oranges oranges & creamy creamy ggoat oat ccheese hee s e r usche t t a, ttoasted oa s t ed PPugliese ugliese bbread, r e ad, m mozzarella, ozzarella , ggarlic, ar lic, aand nd ffresh r esh ttomatoes oma t oe s or BBruschetta,

Entree: E ntrree : Nonni's Nonni's Homemade Homemade Gn Gnocchi, occhi, ppotato o t a t o dumplings, dumplings , ffresh r esh sage s age inin a Gorgonzola G or gonzola aand nd PParmesan ar mes an cheese cheese ssauce a uc e or Hom Homemade emade Ravioli, Ravioli, PProsciutto, r osciu t t o, sspinach pinach aand nd ccheese heese rravioli avioli ttopped opped wwith ith f r esh basil, ba sil, ggarlic, ar lic, aand nd ttomato oma t o ssauce a uc e fresh or RRisotto, iso t t o, Italian t alian rrisotto iso t t o with w i t h locally loc ally grown gr own mushrooms mushr ooms and and chicken chick en

Third T hi r d C Course: ou r se : Nonni's Nonni's FFamous amous TTiramisu ir amisu or 2 LLayer ayer CChocolate hocola t e FFudge udge Cake Cake sserved er ved wwarm ar m ttopped opped wwith i t h our our homemade homemade chocolate chocola t e sauce s a uc e

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bounty Hunter Wine

420 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa 707.527.0222 www.nonnisrestaurant.com

$

39 Restaurant Week Menu

Choice of Starters: >PSK4\ZOYVVT 9VHZ[LK-LUULS:V\W‹99=.HYKLU.YLLUZ  *VS\TI\Z7YVZJP\[[V‹)VKLNH)H`+\UNLULZZ*YHI*HRL Choice of Entrees: >PSK4\ZOYVVT9H]PVSP‹7HU:LHYLK*HSPMVYUPH:LH)HZZ *YPZW`:VUVTH+\JR3LN*VUMP[‹.YPSSLK7YPTL5L^@VYR:[LHR($9 Supplement) Choice of Desserts: *OVJVSH[L)YLHK7\KKPUN‹3LTVU*\YK;HY[

6WLU+H`Z‹Tasting Room Open DailysBrunch - Lunch - Dinner 5700 Hwy. 116‹707.887.3344‹www.Corks116.com

country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

SMALL BITES

Flavor of Two Valleys Twenty-two wineries throughout Sonoma Valley come together this weekend for Savor Sonoma Valley 2013. Wineries will showcase 2012 vintage wines straight from the barrels, sample new releases and offer pairings with culinary creations prepared by local chefs and restaurants. Meet winemakers and mingle with wine lovers while perusing local artists’ work and listening to live music on Saturday and Sunday, March 16–17, at various wineries throughout the valley. Full weekend pass $65; Sunday only, $50. For more, see www.heartofsonomavalley.com. The 20th annual Taste of Yountville celebration to showcase the town’s finest food, wine and art kicks off on Friday, March 15, with the Taste of Yountville Show & Sale artist reception from 6pm to 8pm, where attendees can view and purchase the works of local Napa Valley artists. The celebration climaxes on Saturday, March 16, from noon to 5pm, with the Taste of Yountville block party. Renowned restaurants and wineries will serve up delicious food, microbrews and wines all along Washington Street. Admission is free; tasting tickets are only $1 each. For more, see www.yountville.com. —Taylor May

Checkers California. $$.

Fumé Bistro & Bar

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Compadres Rio Grille Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American.

Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

$-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 224.8555.

Wineries

13 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY Bartholomew Park Winery A scenic locale for something that sounds like it belongs in a Henry James novel. Sauvignon Blanc and Cab are kings here. 1000 Vineyard Lane, Sonoma. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 707.935.9511.

Fritz Underground Winery Partly underground tasting room overlooks the hill country north of Dry Creek Valley at this familyowned estate. Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon plus Lost Canyon wines (formerly of Oakland). 24691 Dutcher Creek Road, Cloverdale. Tasting 10:30–4:30 daily; $5 fee. 707.894.3389.

Jacuzzi Family Vineyards So Californian? So Italian. Replica Italian villa with tour-bus parking offers rare Italian-varietal wines in well-staffed tasting room, all thanks to a therapeutic water pump that became a household name. Oily goods on offer in the adjacent Olive Press. 24724 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily 10am to 5:30pm. No fee for most tastings; $1 reserves. 707.931.7575.

Mercury Geyserville No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville! Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Pellegrini Family Vineyards Why not take Olivet, and find some of the area’s best Pinot Noir and old vine Zinfandel. Family-owned winery offers well-priced Pinot from its Olivet Lane vineyard in the barrel room; local St. George cheese yours

for the munching. Tasting appointments can generally be arranged upon sticking one’s head through the cellar door. 4055 West Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open 10:30am–4:30pm by appointment. No fee. 707.545.8680.

Russian River Vineyards The iconic, Fort Ross–styled building may have bats in the attic, but the remodeled tasting room and restaurant feature crisp, delicious libations and a new menu. Nice Chileno Valley Riesling and Sonoma Coast Syrah. Look for the Bat Blend; proceeds benefit the bats. 5700 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Forestville. 11am to 5pm daily. $5 fee. 707.887.3344.

NAPA COUNTY Ceja Vineyards To Ceja Vineyards’ motto, “Vinum, Cantus, Amor,” and when there’s wine, song and love, there’s dance. Founded by one-time field workers, the Mexican-American-owned winery celebrates culture and wine at this sleek downtown lounge. Wine flights, light bites and one of the few full-bodied rosés “con huevos” in the county. On Saturdays, free salsa lessons and dance party spice up the night. Bailamos! 1248 First St., Napa. Sunday– Friday, noon–6pm, Saturday, noon–10pm; free salsa class starts at 7:30pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.226.6445.

Far Niente (WC) Far Niente was founded in 1885 by John Benson, a ’49er of the California Gold Rush and uncle of the famous American impressionist painter Winslow Homer. The estate boasts beautiful gardens as well as the first modern-built wine caves in North America. 1350 Acacia Drive, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2861. Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley.

Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Dine

with Us!

Round Pond Estate Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc served tableside on the terrace with scrumptious food pairings. Who can’t imagine cozying up next to the big gas-burning hearth, watching the sun set and savoring that Rutherford dusk? 875 Rutherford Road, Rutherford. Tastings by appointment daily, 11am to 4pm. $25. 888.302.2575.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

SSanta a nta Rosa Rosa

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

Oaxacan Family Recipes Savory Vegetarian Specialties Single Village Mezcals & Mole Local Produce

707.433.2411 www.Agave-Mex.com 1063 Vine Street, Healdsburg

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Silver Oak Cellars

Going strong for over 40 years, no joke BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

t is surely an homage to success when a wine is so well-known, so ubiquitous in nationwide distribution channels, that it’s shadowed by its very own pun, popular among wine snobs: “Silver Joke.”

march 18-24, 2013

EDB Sonoma County

Economic Development Board

www.SonomaCountyRestaurantWeek.org

For the Health of Your Neighbors… KEEP YOUR HOME SMOKE-FREE

Drifting second hand smoke from your home can impact your neighbor’s health. Celebrate Smoke-Free Sonoma County All multi-unit residential housing in the unincorporated areas are now smoke-free.

Learn more at www.sonoma-county.org/BreatheEasy County Ordinance No. 5947

But the numbers are in favor of Silver Oak fans, who showed up to cheer on the winery in every corner of the United States during a 2012 tour across the country to celebrate its 40th anniversary. In the starring role, a 12-foot “mini-me” replica of Silver Oak’s trademark water tower was hauled from state to state on a trailer, and posed for photos on the National Mall, under Yosemite Falls, overlooking the Grand Canyon, tagged on Cadillac Ranch. Minime inspired impromptu parking-lot parties, took third place in a Fourth of July parade and called on special fans like Utah’s tattooed lady, who sports a full-arm logo in memory of her father, who liked his Silver Oak. What inspires such devotion to a wine? Let’s start with the tower. There is no tower. Well, there is and there isn’t. When Ray Duncan and Justin Meyer founded Silver Oak in 1972, they chose to model their label after the venerable Chateau Latour—with a Napa Valley twist. The towers that you see today—one each for the Oakville and Geyserville locations—weren’t built until much later. When I peer inside, it appears to be empty, except for a humming pump churning out water for the fountain. The Oakville winery, rebuilt in 2008 after a fire, is a handsome structure of reclaimed stone from a Midwestern mill. The interior is suggestive of an abbey, the destination of a pilgrimage. Inside a temperature-controlled shrine, colossal corks lay aside outsized bottles, while hundreds of library vintages shimmer on the walls. Silver oak trees grow in Australia, and have naught to do with this Cab shop; it’s named for Silverado Trail plus Oakville Cross. So there’s no oak? No, there’s oak. A lot of it. The custom-coopered barrels are, famously, all-American oak, mostly all new. I enjoyed the softness and appealing vanilla, savory olive aromas of the 2003 Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($95) somewhat more than the dusty 2008 ($70). The 2008 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($110) showed similar, dusty wood notes, a bit of olive and graphite, and flavors that melded nicely together in a mélange of somewhat understated Cab characteristics. “This wine affects people in deep ways,” my host interjects. Of that, I have no doubt, and in that respect, Silver Oak truly is a cult wine, confounding, perhaps, to outsiders who don’t feel the magic. Silver Oak Cellars, 915 Oakville Cross Road, Oakville. Monday–Saturday, 9am–5pm; Sunday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.942.7022.

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Tabletop Talent

Local chefs offer deals with Sonoma County Restaurant Week

I

f you’re like us, you’ve combed the couch for change at least twice in the last month. You eye your shelves looking for books or records to sell, you scour the Craigslist “free” section and you save all those 15 percent–off coupons that show up in the mail.

You also like to go out to dinner every once in a while.

Enter Sonoma County Restaurant Week, which annually provides the more economically minded among us an excuse to splurge on a nice night out. With over a hundred restaurants taking part, local diners have plenty of choices for special prix fixe menus at one of three discounted price tiers—just $19, $29 and $39—with each level buying a three-course dinner. Running from March 18–24, Sonoma County Restaurant Week

has a full restaurant list up at sonomacountyrestaurantweek.org. For us, it’s a chance to shine a light on some of our local chefs participating in Restaurant Week: John Franchetti from Rosso, Tim Bodell from Rustic, Jack Mitchell from Jack & Tony’s, Arturo Cardenas from Caffe Portofino and Claudio Capetta from Cafe Claudio. Read on and eat away—because this week, you might not even have to raid the couch for it. ) 16

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sara Sanger

16

Restaurant Week ( 15

The Director’s Chair

Tim Bodell, Rustic

Curdled Curiosity

John Franchetti, Rosso Pizzeria & Mozzarella Bar Quick, think of pizza. The first things that come to mind are dough and cheese, right? Since they’ve already perfected the dough, when Santa Rosa’s Rosso Pizzeria opened a second location in Petaluma, it was time to get cheesy. Inspired by a visit to a cheese bar in Rome, Rosso chef and owner John Franchetti has now brought a little piece of Italy back to Sonoma County. “I was tasting the different burratas available for purchase, and being the chef that I am, I said, ‘I could make this,’” says Franchetti. So, with little training outside of YouTube, and with a lot of curd from water buffalos in Two Rock, Franchetti crafted his own buffalo burrata. The result is an extremely creamy, spreadable cheese with flavor that lingers and teases the tongue long after it’s been devoured—a staple of Rosso Pizzeria & Mozzarella Bar in Petaluma. A recent special of buffalo

burrata with a poached egg and black truffle shavings was almost too good, making the trio of traditional burrata, stracciatella and goat cheese with mint ($9) seem almost pedestrian in comparison. Like a big, meaty red wine, it’s best to work up to the buffalo flavor monster. There’s nothing wrong with eating only cheese for dinner—especially this cheese. But it would behoove hungry diners to try the new additions to Rosso, which opened its Petaluma location about a year ago. Dinner entrées, formerly rotating specials, are now menu staples. Hearty plates like fried chicken with smashed potatoes ($15) and forever roasted pig with pappardelle ($13.50) are satisfying with or without appetizers. Rosso shines brightest, of course, with its pizza. “I really try to emulate what happens in Naples,” says Franchetti. “The difference is, Naples is really

rustic; they just throw their ingredients on there. Americans are used to placed ingredients.” It is difficult to find anything wrong with the traditional margherita, made with red sauce, mozzarella, basil and olive oil. More adventurous diners might lean toward the Moto Guzzi, made with smoked mozzarella, Caggiano Italian sausage, smoked olive oil, Swiss chard and slow roasted onions. After a few tries and a little advice, Franchetti started smoking the water used to make the cheese instead of just coldsmoking the cheese itself; the result is a strong flavor that’s not overpowering but definitely in charge. But for a chef who can make just about anything he sets his mind to, Franchetti keeps things fairly simple when it comes to his own preference. “If I need to eat a pizza,” he says, “I’m having the pepperoni pizza.”—Nicolas Grizzle

From dishwasher to line cook to culinary manager and chef, Tim Bodell believes that every station not only deserves respect, but presents a potential learning opportunity. “I tell the people that I mentor that you can learn something from everybody, every day,” Bodell says. “And if you’re not learning something, you’re not doing something right. You’re not having an open mind.” That’s no mere kitchen homily coming from Bodell, who’s worked them all, from the bottom up. Growing up in the Philadelphia area, his earliest memories were cooking with his mother. “I always loved food, always loved to cook,” he recalls. He wasted no time getting started in the restaurant business as a dishwasher in his early teens. When just 18, he worked with his first “real chef,” and after attending culinary school at Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I., Bodell led the itinerant life of a young chef on the move. “For me, in my 20s, my thing was to always stay for exactly one year and move on. There’s only so much you can learn form a mentor, and the learning curve is so dramatic. Every chef has different things to teach you. I wanted to diversify my knowledge.” In 2000, Bodell moved west to work at high-end golf communities, where his openness to learning new things led to a pastime that he didn’t know he’d ever even considered: getting in touch with his inner outdoorsman. “I had never hunted until I moved to Oregon and became great friends with a ‘ good old boy,’ a ‘redneck,’” he says with a laugh, “who showed me the way.” When he’s not spending time with his wife and 14-month-

Who’s Tony?

Sara Sanger

Jack Mitchell, Jack and Tony’s

old son, he takes his yellow lab duck hunting or foraging for mushrooms. “For me, there’s nothing as gourmet as traipsing around in the mud, coming home and preparing [mushrooms]. It’s really something I enjoy.” Meanwhile at Rustic, the restaurant at Francis Ford Coppola Winery inspired by the director’s favorite food from both his travels and his memories at the family table, Bodell finetunes small-plate wine and food pairings, makes fresh pasta and oversees two sous chefs and “an army” of line cooks, prep cooks and dishwashers. This January, he had the privilege of cooking at the James Beard House in New York City for the second time,

representing the winery. Bodell confirms that Coppola is very involved in Rustic. “I really enjoy working with Francis himself. He’s a storyteller, so I really have the pleasure of learning about him, his family and his family recipes.” Naturally, all of this makes Bodell a busy man. On a recent Saturday, the chef was taking a break from a 400-seat lunch rush, plus a wine club event serving 600 members. He had 220 reservations for dinner. “I’ve been here since 6:30,” Bodell says, without a hint of exhaustion. “I’ll be here a few more hours. I’m looking forward to that first cold beer, that’s for sure!”—James Knight

A few years ago, the owners of a building in Santa Rosa’s Railroad Square approached chef Jack Mitchell to open a restaurant. He declined. Though interested in a new endeavor, he was still running the popular restaurant Sassafras and had other plans in the works. “Then I had a dream,” Mitchell tells me recently, “and the entire concept came to me. Even the name.” And thus was born Jack and Tony’s Restaurant and Whisky Bar, named after the chefowner himself—and his alter-ego. While Tony’s function is mainly auxiliary—the staff enjoys making up stories about him—he does have his own email address and business cards. (Neither of which, apparently, came in handy during his latest kerfuffle, in which he was kidnapped and whisked off to Cancun). “Tony” may be getting into trouble south of the border, but Jack grew up way north of it, in St. Paul, Minn., where his interest in food started young. “My mom wasn’t a great cook,” he tells me, “so I’d sneak over to Grandma’s house to eat lunch with her.” He paid his way through college by working in restaurants, and by the time graduation rolled around, he was cooking in a four-star hotel. So instead of pursuing further education (“Culinary school,” he says, “is for people who don’t know how to cook”), he continued to move

through kitchens around the country. For eight years, Mitchell cooked fancy French cuisine in Arizona, but, as he puts it, “I was cooking for tourists; I could get away with anything.” San Francisco, with its promise of a more “informed clientele,” beckoned. In addition to working for the Real Restaurant Group and the Lark Creek Inn, he ran the kitchen at San Francisco’s Beach Chalet, which served a thousand tables a day. “It was a great experience,” he says, “but ultimately not fulfilling.” Drawn by abundant local produce, Mitchell moved to Santa Rosa. “The last thing this town needed,” he recognizes, “was another wine bar.” Whiskey might not drive the entire menu at Jack and Tony’s, but it certainly has a grip on the wheel. The apple tart, lox, oysters—all of them pair nicely with various gradations of the amber liquor. With a seasonally shifting menu, the industrious chef— he’s cooking a BLT and a cheeseburger, medium well, as we talk on the phone—is unabashed about the quality of his food. “We didn’t invent the caesar salad,” he says, “but we perfected it.” As for Tony? “We tried to raise the $50,000 ransom,” Mitchell deadpans, “but only managed to get about 15 bucks.”—Jessica Dur Taylor

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sara Sanger

17

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Sara Sanger

Restaurant Week ( 17

Nicolas Grizzle

18

Fourth Street Finesse

Claudio’s Way

Arturo Cardenas, Caffe Portofino

Claudio Capetta, Cafe Claudio

Arturo Cardenas never imagined he’d be head chef at a popular Italian restaurant in downtown Santa Rosa. He grew up in Michoacan, Mexico, and came to California for the first time in the ’80s to pick apples and grapes. But he found work in the off-season in the kitchen at Caffe Portofino, and 23 years later, he’s got a whole staff calling him “chef.” After learning from the prior chef how to prepare the menu’s staples, Cardenas was surprised when the owners wanted to send him to culinary school in San Francisco. (“I didn’t even know it was a career,” he says. “I just love what I do.”) He became sous chef and then, 10 years ago, under new ownership, head chef. “I was free to create new dishes,” he says. Not that the downtown Italian joint has changed much since then. The décor still looks much like it did when Cardenas began his career, and the menu, much to the relief of its fans, hasn’t seen too many new additions. Customers enjoy the old favorites so much that Cardenas says he gets complaints when something isn’t available. Dishes like

When I call chef Claudio Capetta on a recent Saturday, he’s just made some tiramisu, asparagus-stuffed tortoloni and gnocchi in anticipation of the evening’s dinner guests. I ask about his signature menu items, and he ticks off dish after dish—veal topped with prosciutto and pepperoni, spaghetti alla carbonara, gnocchi with creamy pesto, risotto del giorno, scampi fra diavolo—and then says, “Nothing major. I just try to cover the whole spectrum of Italian food.” Such nonchalance is befitting of the 72 year-old-chef, who had no qualms about opening a restaurant in a location that’s seen more turnover than a rookie basketball game. In less than a decade, the roadhouse bistro at 9890 Bodega Hwy. has been home to such promising eateries as P/30, Cafe Saint Rose and Two Crows—all of which turned off the oven sooner than expected. “The location doesn’t make the restaurant,” Capetta tells me, “the person running it makes the restaurant. You can’t just open a restaurant because you have the money. You must love it, too.” Capetta obviously loves it. Cafe

penne pasta with chicken and fettuccine pescatore are staples at Portofino—and by all accounts, will always be. Cardenas brings work home, too, as his nine children enjoy many of the recipes he makes for diners at the crowded restaurant. The oldest, now 23, helps out cooking for the other kids, the youngest of whom is just three. “I leave them instructions on what we’re having for dinner,” he says. “They make my life a lot easier.” Mom’s old saying “This isn’t a restaurant, you’ll eat what I make” doesn’t quite apply in the Cardenas household. The kids can be picky eaters, and the chef, trained in pleasing the customer’s palate, often obliges: “People say I spoil my kids because I make them three or four dishes.” The Caffe Portofino model follows the sage advice “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” The place is still packed most nights of the week, with homemade pasta, reliable favorites and a friendly staff (bar manager Su Wolfard has been there 25 years). Toss in a prime downtown location, and it’s a recipe for success.—Nicolas Grizzle

Claudio is his fourth restaurant in Sonoma County alone. “I used to call my restaurants Claudio’s Trattoria or Claudio’s L’Osteria, and then my daughter said I must modernize,” he says, laughing. “And so I called this one Cafe Claudio. And I got on Facebook and Instagram.” Originally from Liguria on the Genoa Coast of Italy, Capetta ran Claudio’s Trattoria in Sebastopol (where Sushi Tozai is now) for a few years before selling it to move down to Santa Barbara. The occasion? His daughter was going off to college. “My wife and I wanted to be near her,” he says matter-of-factly, as though parents routinely follow their kids to college. Years later, he’s doing it again, moving to Santa Rosa to be closer to his daughter and two grandchildren. As for Cafe Claudio, it remains as rooted as the patio herb garden and homegrown tomatoes planted out front 20 months after opening. “I’m not a spring chicken anymore,” says Capetta, who is nonetheless embracing the 21st century with aplomb. “But you can find me on Facebook!”—Jessica Dur Taylor

19 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

CULTURE

THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE

S A N TA R O S A

N A PA

SEBASTOPOL

Po-Po-Po-PoPoker Face

The Dance Goes On

My Little Pretty

Who knew gambling, beer and a good poker face could benefit the environment? The Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation is holding the Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament, a fundraiser for the largest area for wildlife in Sonoma County. The foundation works to preserve, restore and enhance the Laguna de Santa Rosa, which is also a part of the cities of Windsor, Rohnert Park, Cotati, Sebastopol and Forestville. First prize is $2,000; admission includes $10,000 in chips, plus a sandwich bar and free soft drinks. Go all in on Saturday, March 16, at the Laguna Environmental Center. 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa. 1–8pm. $125–$225. 707.527.9277.

What’s lightning fast with thunder to match? Irish step dancing, that’s what! The Napa Valley Opera House and Wells Fargo Center both celebrate Saint Patty’s day with modern interpretations of the classic Irish tradition, brought to popularity with Riverdance. ‘Celtic Fire’ offers traditional Irish music with a performance by Riverdance vocalist Michael Londra and world-class Irish dancers on Sunday, March 17 (Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa; 3pm; $30–$50; 707.546.3600), and ‘Rhythm of the Dance’ provides a two-act, 23-song show on Thursday, March 14 (Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St., Napa; 8pm; $40–$45; 707.266.7372).

This week, Poor Man’s Whiskey take a break from their Dark Side of the Moonshine tour—in which the band performs a bluegrass interpretation of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon dressed in costumes from the Wizard of Oz—to grace their hometown with a two-night stand in order to record a new live album. Each night offers three sets and starts with an acoustic performance, followed by the band’s “high octane hootenanny.” There’s never any telling what this kooky band has up their sleeve—see them Friday and Saturday, March 15–16, at the Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. $15. 8pm. 707.829.7300.

N A PA

Mintin’ Wynton

M I L L VA L L E Y

From the Hills The last time Richard Buckner made a record, he was held up in a murder investigation when a headless body was dumped in his car. On top of that, his laptop with all his music was stolen. Surrounded, Buckner’s new record, has no such holdups, and to celebrate, the gothic-tinged folksinger will play a few shows. Catch him on Thursday, March 14, at the Sweetwater Music Hall. 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. $20. 8pm. 415.388.3850.

He received a trumpet on his sixth birthday, and simply could not put it down. New Orleans–born Wynton Marsalis, with more Grammys than Lindsay Lohan has arrests, joins forces with 15 of jazz’s leading soloists in the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. As one of the world’s first jazz artists to perform and compose across the full jazz spectrum, from its New Orleans roots to bebop to modern jazz, Marsalis performs on Thursday, March 16, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8:30pm. $80–$85. 707.266.7372.

—Estefany Gonzalez

ArtsIdeas Courtesy Aldo Leopold Foundation

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Leopold was a dedicated family man, college professor and government employee. Unlike Carson, who achieved sudden fame, he never received national acclaim in his lifetime, not even from conservationists. Still, over the past decades, his work has gained respect. His stunning essay â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking Like a Mountainâ&#x20AC;? has inspired half a dozen or so imitations with titles such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking Like a Watershedâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking Like a River.â&#x20AC;? Pretty soon, ecologists everywhere may be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking Like Leopold,â&#x20AC;? if they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already, which means thinking ethically about the earth.

T SHACK LIFE Aldo Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sand County Almanacâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is a sacred text for the conservation movement.

For the Love of Leopold

Geography of Hope Conference honors famed conservationist, environmentalist and author Aldo Leopold BY JONAH RASKIN

A

brave yet bashful author, Aldo Leopold never cared for fame and fortune. Though his classic 1949 collection of essays, A Sand County Almanac, has sold millions, he himself remains largely

unknown today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aldo who?â&#x20AC;? a quiz show contestant might well ask. But for decades, family members, friends and followers have kept his ďŹ&#x201A;ame burning brightly. Now, scientists, teachers and activists want to make the visionary environmentalist, who

died in 1948 at the age of 61, as well-known as his book, and as respected a ďŹ gure as Henry David Thoreau, author of Walden; John Muir, founder of the Sierra Club; and Rachel Carson, whose feisty polemic Silent Spring helped create the Environmental Protection Agency. Unlike Thoreau and Muir,

he year 2013 might be the Leopold moment for our time, and just in â&#x20AC;&#x153;the nick of time,â&#x20AC;? to borrow Thoreauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phrase, now that climate change has undeniably arrived. A snazzy documentary about Leopold titled Green Fire, completed two years ago, is now reaching large audiencesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in April, it airs nationwide on PBSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the prestigious Library of America has just published a collection of Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best works edited by Curt Meine. Meine headlines the three-day Geography of Hope Conference, running March 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17 in Point Reyes Station, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the author of A Sand County Almanac. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no more ďŹ t setting for the conference than West Marin with its rich agricultural history, brave new organic farmers and ferocious battles about trees, water and, most recently, the oyster, the lowly mollusk that made Point Reyes legendary and that continues to divide friends and families ever since the federal government ordered the closure of Drakes Bay Oyster Company. The wounds havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t healed yet. Robert Hass, a former U.S. poet laureate

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lmost everyone who writes about Leopold has an epiphany. Meineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s took place in 1982 in the University of Wisconsin library. An eager graduate student, he opened a box with Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s papers and held them in his hands as though they were the Dead Sea Scrolls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That particular box contained the papers that were in his desk when he died,â&#x20AC;? Meine tells me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some were typed, some handwritten, some the barest of fragments.â&#x20AC;? Three decades later, he looks back at the evolution of his career from ďŹ&#x201A;edging student to venerable scholar. He also sees, perhaps clearer than ever before, the growth of Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thinking about the wilderness, that quintessential American landscape. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a young man, the wilderness was his hunting ground,â&#x20AC;? Meine says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Later, he prized it as a historical site, because so much of the American past was enacted there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the 1930s, with the Dust Bowl, he developed an ecological sense of the wild. In the 1940s, he recognized its importance as a living laboratory for scientists, and, near the end of his life, it became a spiritual place. On his deathbed, he was a staunch advocate for wild lands and at the same time a defender of farms and farming.â&#x20AC;? The ďŹ lm Green Fire shows Leopold wearing all his many colorful hats. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a stunning image of him, for example, in 1909 in the Arizona territory. A recent graduate of the Yale ) 22 School of Forestry, he

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21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Art

in a community, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point Reyes or his own in the Driftless area of Wisconsin, a Midwestern version of Northern California. Like Leopold and Stegner, Meine expresses hope about the environment, though he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lapse into glib optimism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every landscape is pregnant with hope and despair,â&#x20AC;? he tells me the day we talk, which happens to be the anniversary of Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth. He adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;No landscape is so bleak that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hopeless. Even in the most despairing environments, something positive can be done.â&#x20AC;?

Gallery

and a longtime resident of Marin, hopes that the conference will create a calm atmosphere to talk about the oyster wars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oysters and the environment are an inescapable topic,â&#x20AC;? he told me the day after he returned from a trip to Myanmar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conference is more relevant to Marin than any other weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever had.â&#x20AC;? Co-sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service, the Aldo Leopold Foundation and the Center for Humans and Nature, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get-togetherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the fourth in ďŹ ve yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;brings together scholars, activists and poets from near and far. Geography of Hope fans and followers can hear lectures, watch the ďŹ lm Green Fire and meet its producers, go on outings to farms and ďŹ elds, watch birds, learn about habitat restoration and taste organic goat cheese at Toluma Farms in Tomales. The documentary Rebels with a Cause will also be shown. Never before have so many outstanding ecologists and conservationists come together to talk about Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identities, ideas and ethics that, Leopoldians insist, can help save the earth if farmers, hunters, ranchers and tourists work together. The rallying cry for the 2013 conference, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Igniting the Green Fire: Finding Hope in Aldo Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Land Ethic,â&#x20AC;? grew organically from previous gatherings about farming and water. The very ďŹ rst conference, in 2009, focused on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;geography of hope,â&#x20AC;? a phrase coined by Pulitzer Prizeâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;winning novelist Wallace Stegner, who died in 1993. These days, Stegner serves as a friendly environmental ghost who haunts West Marin and its park rangers, tree huggers and citizens who want to wander wild lands beforeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as Joni Mitchell lamented in her pop anthem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Yellow Taxiâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re â&#x20AC;&#x153;pavedâ&#x20AC;? over with parking lots. In the crowded ďŹ eld of Aldo Leopold studies, nobody knows more about him than his official biographer, Curt Meine. A modest Midwesterner like Leopold, Meine gives credit to all the players on the Leopold team and insists that the ecologistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legacy ought to be written and rewritten by everyone

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

recreated himself as a cowboy with a six-gun and a Stetson, employed by the fledgling National Forest Service. Leopold’s friend, Rube Pritchard, boasted in a letter to his mother that he’d rather work in an American forest than be crowned king of England. Leopold added modestly, “I’m beginning to agree.” Co-produced by Ann and Steve Dunsky, both of whom work in Vallejo for the U.S. Forest Service, Green Fire offers Leopold’s own words as read by Marin County’s inimitable Peter Coyote, whose deep, resonant voice is instantly recognizable. “I never prepared to read from Leopold,” Coyote tells me. “I’ve done voiceovers for hundreds of films, and I always work like an improvisational jazz saxophonist.” Still, Coyote couldn’t have been better prepared. A longtime, heartfelt fan of Leopold’s work, he grew up on a farm, and later learned about nature and spirituality from California Indians, Zen Buddhists and from his buddy, Gary Snyder, who taught him that “the wild has his own dictates.” “Coyote is amazing,” Ann Dunsky tells me. “He read perfectly from A Sand County Almanac on the first take.” She and her husband come to Leopold’s work from opposite directions. He’s an Easterner; she’s a Westerner. He grew up thinking hunters were evil; she came from a family of hunters. He’s a dogged researcher; she’s a creative filmmaker. These days, they share a love of Leopold, whom they see as a lifelong moderate who avoided extremes and whose work can bridge clashing communities and opposing schools of thought. “When I first read A Sand County Almanac as a teenager,” Steve Dunsky tells me, “I saw it as the ruminations of an old man with quaint stories. I went back to it in my 40s and found it a complex work that examines the big picture and sees human beings as a part of the natural world. His ‘land ethic’ links all of us and every species on the earth.” Professor Kathleen Moore, a philosopher and ethicist at

Courtesy Aldo Leopold Foundation

22 Aldo Leopold ( 21

BIRD MAN Outdoorsman and avid hunter Leopold gamely cleans a woodcock on hunting day.

Oregon State, believes that everyone who graduates from college ought to have read Sand County Almanac and understood it. “If students are too busy to read it,” she tells me, “they ought to see Green Fire.” When undergraduates and colleagues want to know her favorite passage in Leopold’s classic, she turns instantly to the section titled “The Outlook” and reads: “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.” A fiery teacher, impassioned moralist and compassionate writer, Moore doesn’t think the sky is falling, but she insists that the oceans are rising fast and furious, and argues that if humans don’t act wisely, quickly, “we’ll soon be caught between hell and high water.” Leopold’s ethical values can help, she says, “if humans stop thinking of themselves as solitary beings and recognize they’re part of a system and have an impact on it.” Like Meine and Stegner, she’s hopeful and whimsical, too. “The beavers are back in the woods of Oregon,” she tells me. “They’re resurgent, though I can’t speak for the beavers on the football team.” Wendell Gilgert calls himself a Leopoldian, and though he’s not a professor, writer or filmmaker, he does have a BA and an MA from

Chico State. In high school in 1964, his English teacher told him to go to the library, find a book and read it. A Sand County Almanac changed his life. For decades, he worked with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service. In 2011, he became the working landscapes program director at Point Reyes Bird Observatory Conservation Science, a Marin County nonprofit. These days, he goes into fields and farms, talks the farmer talk and walks the rancher walk. “I don’t tell anyone what to do or how to improve what they’re already doing,” he explains. “I suggest tools they might use. I learned that from Leopold.” Gilgert hopes farmers and ranchers will be effective stewards of the land, protect watersheds, enhance soils and guard wildlife habitat. Mike and Sally Gale in Chileno Valley, and Loren Poncia in Tomales, operate sustainable ranches that might be emulated, Gilgert says. he most surprising take on Leopold comes, not surprisingly, from Robert Hass, a guiding light of the Geography of Hope Conference who put Marin’s geography on the literary map of America in volumes of poetry such as The Apple Trees at Olema. During the course of our early morning conversation, Hass compared

T

Leopold to T. S. Eliot, another Midwesterner, born a year after Leopold, whose quintessential modernist poem The Waste Land offers a geography of despair in lines such as “Here is no water but only rock.” On first glance, Leopold and Eliot seem like polar opposites, but Hass argues that A Sand County Almanac, like The Waste Land, is a modernist work in that it’s made up of “patches and fragments.” Furthermore, he believes that The Waste Land is an ecological poem and that, despite Eliot’s sense of alienation and despair, was written “out of a hunger for wholeness.” If anyone at the Geography of Hope Conference can fuse seeming opposites and bring together apparent foes, it’s surely Hass. No one followed Marin’s oyster wars as sensitively as he, and no one hungers more for the wholeness of the community than he. Hopeful and fearless, he’s prepared to talk about the links between Wallace Stegner and Aldo Leopold, and eager, too, to persuade the volatile members of Marin’s divided community to sit down with one another and share ideas. “I hope that there’s time for poetry, too,” Hass says, instantly conjuring an image of a hawk from the work of Robinson Jeffers. “We’ve got to have poetry to have a geography of hope.”

Eric Chazankin

SALESMAN Siebert knew some of the

original Broadway cast of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Price.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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Charles Siebert stars in Arthur Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY DAVID TEMPLETON

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deeply moving, to me,â&#x20AC;? says actor Charles Siebert, discussing Arthur Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1968 play The Price, opening next weekend at the Cinnabar Theater. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like almost all good dramas,â&#x20AC;? he observes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;like Death of a Salesman, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, this play is about family, and what we do to one another as family. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about how we love one another and hate one another and drive each other crazy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deeply, deeply touching.â&#x20AC;? Siebert, an acclaimed New York theater and television actor (Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Gingerbread Lady, Trapper John, M.D.) who retired to Sonoma County several years ago, admits that he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t very familiar with The Price when he was ďŹ rst cast

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, March 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 7, at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 N. Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.763.8920.

WELCOMING. WE LCOMING. E ENTERTAINING. NTERTA AINING. INS INSPIRING SPIRING

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An intimate celebration of unforgettable cinema, world-class food and wine on Sonomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic plaza

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

in the Cinnabar production. Directed by Sheri Lee Miller, with a cast that also includes John Shillington, Samson Hood and Madeleine Ashe, the tightly written, intimately crafted story is set in the attic of a New York City brownstone, where two estranged brothers, a cop and a surgeon, meet to decide the fate of their late parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; furniture. Gregory Solomon (Siebert) is the Russian-Jewish antique dealer who enters the picture to appraise the furniture, and perhaps bring some wisdom and perspective to the brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 16-year-long feud. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew two of the original Broadway cast,â&#x20AC;? Siebert says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kate Read, who plays the wife of one of the brothers, played Big Mama in the Cat on a Hot Tin Roof that I did on Broadway, when I played Gooper. And Pat Hingle, who played the cop in The Price, he was the original Gooper in Cat. When I did it, he came backstage and we talked. After that, we worked together a few times in L.A. He guested on Trapper John. He was a wonderful guy.â&#x20AC;? When told that early reviewers described The Price as one of Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most â&#x20AC;&#x153;theatricalâ&#x20AC;? plays, Siebert laughs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand why they say that,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His writing is usually so . . . severe. And there is so much talk. In The Price, a lot of the theatricality springs from that family dynamic I was talking about, and also from this character Solomon. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little bit of comic relief, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much to him. That part is a gift to an actor. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so clever and so interesting a part, taken in the context of the rest of the play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no accident heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s named Solomon,â&#x20AC;? he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The two brothers stand before him, and in a way, he does offer his judgment. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty theatrical.â&#x20AC;?

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A nostalgic, patriotic, upbeat musical revue featuring the music of Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, The Andrews Sisters and more! 19 on stage: Big Band with six singers and some high-flying swing dancing!

Thursday, Mar 21 ~ 3 pm Marin Center San Rafael 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415-473-6800 www.MarinCenter.org

Saturday, March 23 3 pm matinee & 7:30 pm

Wells Fargo Center For The Arts 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa 707-546-3600 www.wellsfargocenterarts.org

presented by:

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

Film

PULLED PLUG Film festivals are the only place you’ll see this probing doc on

Andrew Bird, who canceled its theatrical and DVD release at the last minute.

screenings all over the world, from Copenhagen to Cleveland. But the Illinois native is particularly excited to return to Sonoma County where she lived for a year and a half, attending the California School of Herbal Studies in Forestville just after high school. (“I knew I was going to film school,” she explains, “but I wanted to get a handle on my body first.”) Aranda’s corporeal fascination is evident in Fever Year, which captures the fluid physicality of everything Bird does, from whistling to swimming to bowing his violin. “Imagine the worst year of your life, physically, emotionally and romantically,” Aranda says of the film, “and there is now a permanent record of it.” Perhaps that explains why Bird, who approved of each edit along the way, unexpectedly pulled the plug at the point of release. No DVDs and no theatrical release, he

decided. Just film festivals. Aranda is characteristically blunt and resilient about this drastic change of plans. “It’s definitely a shit sandwich,” she says, laughing. “But the lemonade of it is this: people who see it are supporting their own local arts organizations. And they see it as close to my intentions sonically and visually as I could want.” Despite all of her unpaid hard work, Aranda has no regrets about making Fever Year. “It’s like a big musical hot tub,” she says, “and who wouldn’t want to get into a big musical hot tub with Andrew Bird?” ‘Fever Year’ screens with Xan Aranda in attendance on Friday, March 22, as part of the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 7:15pm. $10. 707.829.4797. www.sebastopolfilmfestival.org.

Spirit Animal

Programmer’s Picks

Andrew Bird documentary ‘Fever Year’ at the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival

Don’t-miss films selected by artistic director Jason Perdue

BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

D

uring the summer of 2009 in Chicago, musician Andrew Bird had been touring for years at such a constant pace that he’d literally made himself sick, “either sweating bullets or freezing cold,” as he put it. He was approaching his 165th and final show of the year with a band he probably wouldn’t ever play with again, and he wanted it documented. So Bird asked his friend, the filmmaker and producer Xan Aranda, to make a movie about him. But even though they’d been friends for several years and had already collaborated on two animated videos and live show projections, Aranda said no. “I was busy and afraid,” she tells me over the phone recently. After her conversation with Bird, though, she hopped on her bike,

and before even getting halfway home, she says, “I had a flood of ideas. I called him up and said, ‘Let’s talk about it.’” The result is Fever Year, a film so viscerally beautiful and sonically precise that it will delight the cult follower and the Andrew Bird newcomer alike. Part documentary, part concert film, Fever Year is as much about the creative process as it is about Bird, whose latest album, Break It Yourself, was released in 2012. “Have I simply been ill this year,” Bird wonders, “or am I turning into another type of animal?” Fever Year is Aranda’s directorial debut. “I wanted something that would challenge me almost to the death,” she says of making the film, which she likens to getting a master’s degree. “It was expensive and I’m still paying for it,” she says, “but afterward, I knew I’d walk away a director.” Racking up praise, awards and air miles, Aranda has traveled to

La Source Opening night in the new home of the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival, Sebastopol Center for the Arts at the Sebastopol Veterans Building. Thursday, March 21, at 7pm. The Lost Bird Project Special screening at the Laguna Foundation’s new Heron Hall. Story of an artist’s quest to honor species of extinct birds, followed on Saturday morning by a birdwatching tour through the Laguna. Friday, March 22, 7pm. Lost Landscapes of San Francisco Special interactive presentation of lost and never-before-seen films of historic San Francisco with archivist Rick Prelinger. Audience participation is encouraged. Saturday, March 23, 1:30pm. Where Heaven Meets Hell Beautifully shot story of the back-breaking work involved in mining sulfur on the side of an Indonesian volcano. Saturday, March 23, 2pm. Informant Story of celebrated activist-turned-FBI-informant Brandon Darby. Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the DOC NYC festival. Saturday, March 23, 7pm. The Invisible Men Following three courageous gay Palestinian men as they flee their families and threats of death to go undercover in Israel. Filmmaker Yariv Mozer will be in attendance from Tel Aviv, Israel. Sunday, March 24, 1:15pm. Betting the Farm Following film, Slow Food Russian River hosts dairy-themed tasting to close festival. Sunday, March 24, 6pm. Tickets available through www.sebastopolfilmfestival.org or the Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S. High St., Sebastopol. 707.829.4797. For more information about films, venues and prices, visit www.sebastopolfilmfestival.org.

BIG WEENIES Comfort Slacks: coming soon to a chocolate aisle near you!

Cats Are Fun

Comfort Slacks brighten Napa music scene with silly pop BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

C

omfort Slacks are serious about making music that stands out against the doldrums of daily life. “It’s boring, boring, boring; there are no fun colors, no fun sounds, no fun challenges,” says Jessie Fagan, who makes up half of the Napa electropop duo with her husband, Matt. “This band is a great opportunity for us to break away from our mundane lives and do something fun.” The songs on the band’s debut EP, Biscuit Face, can seem innocuous or obscure, but they’re all driven by a sense of fun. Take “Coffee,” for example, which proclaims matter-of-factly, “We like to hang out with the cops at the doughnut shops / We drink

Comfort Slacks play an EP release show Friday, March 15, at Billco’s Billiards & Darts. 1234 Third St., Napa. 7pm. Free. 707.226.7506.

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

lots of coffee and we fuck all night / We smoke lots of weed and we get real high, yeah.” After such an emotionally deep and provocative verse, the chorus goes downright philosophical: “Ring-ding-ding, I like my coffee.” (The song has inspired two dozen karaoke-style video responses online thus far.) There’s obviously a lot of thought put into Comfort Slacks’ execution, but it doesn’t veer from the lighthearted core of the people who make it. Their music and live performances could be compared to the Aquabats or the Phenomenauts, but this duo is not relegated to the speedy, upbeat guitar strums of third-wave ska. The Fagans’ intimacy and awkward-yet-appropriate blend of solo male and female vocals can draw a brief comparison to Mates of State, but it fades quickly as Comfort Slacks establish themselves as far more unique. With live shows not heavily dependent on the actual playing of instruments, the duo sometimes dress up in costume. “I dare you to find a live show that’s as wacky and weird and chaotic and strange as ours,” says Fagan. “And fun.” The couple, now in their mid30s, moved here from Jersey City, N.J., five years ago. “One of the first things we noticed is that it smells very nice,” says Fagan. But without friends to show them around, they found themselves bored. Matt had been in metal bands in New Jersey and plays several instruments, so Jessie taught herself piano and learned how to program drums and synthesizers. The resulting lo-fi electronic sound is spiced up with physical instruments in a tasty mix. For all their carefree demeanor, things get serious when Fagan mentions their love for animals, especially cats. Felines litter their website, and there are undoubtedly several hidden mentions of cats in the band’s songs. “Everybody thinks we are doing it because it’s cool, but it’s real stuff,” she says without a hint of sarcasm. “We really love cats.”

Music

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26 33/15 /15 – 33/21 / 21

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551 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 07 719

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY JGB with Melvin Seals Keyboardist with the Jerry Garcia Band helped define the jam-band genre. Mar 17, 8pm. $30. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

KRS-One The conscience of hip-hop is back, with Souleye and Zahira Soul. Mar 15, 9pm. $25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Poor Man’s Whiskey Bluegrass rock group plays three sets each night recording for an upcoming live album. Mar 15, 8pm and Mar 16, 8pm. $15. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Santa Rosa Symphony with Zuill Bailey Program includes Elgar, Penderecki and Tchaikovsky’s Sixth Symphony with cello soloist. Mar 16, 8pm, Mar 17, 3pm and Mar 18, 8pm. $10-$75. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Skerik’s Bandalabra Former Claypool jam mate and sax master leads new funky jazz quartet with serious chops. Mar 16, 8pm. Forestville Club, 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Sol Horizon Sonoma County roots reggae rockers released its fourth album last year. Mar 16, 8:30pm. $10. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Trio Con Brio Copenhagen Program includes Haydn, Martin, Mendelssohn and Norgard. Presented by Sonoma Classical Music Society. Mar 16, 3pm. $10-$25. Trinity Episcopal Church, 275 E Spain St, Sonoma.

MARIN COUNTY Richard Buckner Songwriter with much critical

acclaim plays acoustic show. Matt Lax opens. Mar 14, 8pm. $15-$20. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Jaime Kyle with David Jenkins Songwriter behind hits by Heart, Faith Hill and others plays with vocalist from Pablo Cruise. Mar 14, 7pm. $50. Hopmonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Les Claypool’s Duo De Twang Primus frontman and bassist leads this slightly folksy, very funky twosome. Mar 20, 7pm. $35. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Mar 14, DJ KudJo. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Mar 14, Joanne Rand Band. Mar 15, Maia Sharp, Jon Gonzales. Mar 16, Sol Horizon. Mar 17, Baby Seal Club, Bent Knee, the Stages of Sleep. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Christy’s on the Square Mar 14, Manzanita Falls, Ash Thursday. 96 Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Cloverdale Center for the Arts Mar 14, Jim Demartini & Shea Breaux Wells. 105 E 1st St, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

Pep Love

Flamingo Lounge

SF Stress Free tour featuring rapper from Heiroglyphics crew. Mar 20, 9pm. $15. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Mar 15, Groove Foundation. Mar 16, Jeff Edwin Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Skerik’s Bandalabra

Mar 16, Skerik’s Bandalabra. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Former Claypool jam mate and sax master leads a new funky jazz quartet with serious chops. Mar 13, 8pm. $12. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Unbroken Chain Benefit with Phil Lesh Terrapin’s one-year anniversary with Phil Lesh, Jackie Greene, Tony Leone, Stu Allen & Jeff Chimenti. FridaysSundays, 7pm. through Mar 17. $65. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis One of the brightest jazz minds alive leads a 15-piece orchestra of superstars. Mar 16, 6 and 8:30pm. $80-$85. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Pablo Cruise Pop group from the ‘70s and ‘80s dares you to discover who “Pablo” really is. Mar 16, 8pm. $30. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Forestville Club

Green Music Center Mar 16-18, Santa Rosa Symphony with Zuill Bailey. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Mar 16, Nicolas Bearde Jazz Experience. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Mar 13, Carrie Manolakos. Mar 15 and 16, Poor Man’s Whiskey. Mar 17, JGB with Melvin Seals. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Mar 15, Black Cat Bone. Mar 16, North Pacific String Band. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Mar 15, Gaea Schell & Eugene Warren. Mar 16, David Udolf Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Mar 13, Emma Lee. Mar 14, Of Like Mind. Mar 15, Love Leighs. Mar 16, Jinx Jones. Mar 17, the Mad Maggies. Mar 20, Grandpa

Tune into

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Mar 17, Captain Paisley. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Monroe Dance Hall Mar 15, the Crabapples. Mar 16, Hoedown with Lawrence Johnson. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

with

Sinatra

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Mar 15, Kith & Kin. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Horn of Plenty Skerikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anything-goes saxophone playing Sax, drugs and rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rollâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Seattle-born saxophonist Skerik has done it all. Trying to label Skerikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound, be it jazz, punk, punk-jazz or metal, is like handling the keys on a greased saxophone: it keeps slipping through your ďŹ ngers.

Last Day Saloon Mar 15, Kevin Russell Band, the Sorrentinos, Grace in the Woods. Mar 16, Cosmos Percussion Orchestra. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Mar 16, Wendy Dewitt. Mar 17, Dag Nabbit, Rowdy River Special, Bohemian Hwy Trio. Mar 20, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Mar 14, Susan Sutton. Mar 18, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB

Thur, Mar 14 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Mar 15 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance presents THE CRABAPPLES

Newman Auditorium

Sat, Mar 16 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm CIRCLE Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARE HOEDOWN with Caller LAWRENCE JOHNSON and cuer Red Light/Green Light and cuer Jeanne Van Blarcom

Mar 15, Bennett Friedman Quartet. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Sun, Mar 17 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

Occidental Center for the Arts

Mon, Mar 18 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Mystic Theatre Mar 15, KRS-One. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Mar 16, Patrick Ball. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

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Mar 17, Les Amis Zydeco. 10005 Main St, Penngrove. 707.664.8018.

Tues, Mar 19 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

Phoenix Theater Mar 15, Rocker-T, Persistence, Ancient Mystic, Mendo Dope, Pure. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mar 15, Death Under Fire, the King Must Die, Glacial Palace Kings. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Mar 16, Luv Planet. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868. Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Russian River Brewing Co

Thursday Night Karaoke featuring KJ JT (Josh from Ritas)

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3/14

8 pm start | no cover | 21+

3/15

The Kevin Russell Band

+ The Sorrentinos + Grace In The Woods

Cosmos Percussion Orchestra (The Bay Area's 3/16

premier world fusion band)

Mar 16, Incubators. Mar 17, Grampaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chili. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewpub

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Mar 15, Wayward Winds Quintet. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Society: Culture House Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs,

THE LAST DAY SALOON 120 Fifth Street, Santa Rosa, CA

blues rock pop | 8 pm door | $10 | 21+

River Theatre

Mar 15, Hardly Strictly Mash-up Boys. Mar 16, the Leftovers. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610. Banana. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Wed, Mar 13 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:45pm 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

k!

Skerik (born Eric Walton) picked up the sax in the fifth grade and was influenced early by the Rolling Stones and Pink Floyd, bands that incorporated saxophone into rock music. But like a human sponge, Skerik continued to soak up any possible kind of music, from classical to African soukous, and incorporated it into his own. For Skerik, music is more about the concept than the skill. This philosophy has landed him gigs like playing as a member of local hero and bass legend Les Claypoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fancy Band and Frog Brigade and touring with the likes of Pearl Jam, R.E.M., Bonnie Raitt and Roger Waters. Through his career, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a member of Critters Buggin, Garage a Trois, Crack Sabbath and the Dead Kenny Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Skerik performs with another one of his many bands, Bandalabra, on Wednesday, March 13, at the Sweetwater Music Hall (19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley; 8pm; $12; 415.388.1100) and on Saturday, March 16, at the Forestville Club (6250 Front St., Forestville; 8pm; $5; 707.887.2594).â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Taylor May

27

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world fusion | 8:30 pm door | $15 | 21+

3/22 Generation Esmeralda

+ Tudo Bem (with Dave Aguilar) Latin rock funk | 8 pm door | $15 | 21+

3/23

The Chop Tops

+ Henchmen + St. Peterbilt rockabilly | 8 pm door | $10/13 | 21+

3/29

Cruella

+ Electric Funeral + High Voltage rock | 8 pm door | $10 | 21+

3/30 LUTAN

FYAH 707.545.5876 - LASTDAYSALOON.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Mar 15, Invasion. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

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CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Mavericks

NORTH 13-19, 2013 NORTHBAY BAYBOHEMIAN BOHEMIAN | |MARCH MARCH 13-19, 2013| |BOHEMIAN.COM BOHEMIAN.COM

28 Ĺ´Ĺş

Music ( 27

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR SINGLES S INGLES TO M MEET E ET BEST B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

Mar 15

STAGGERWING AND THE INCUBATORS

Roots Rock and Americana 8:00

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY PRESENTS PRESENTS

THE ZYDECO FLAMES Mar 16 West Coastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Zydeco Band

AN A NE EVENING VE N I NG W WITH ITH

Sun

WED W ED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 13 13

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CARRIE C ARRIE MANOLAKOS MANOLAK KO OS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+ THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M MAR AR 1 14 4 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ C ABARET/ VARIET Y

GET LUCKY GET LUCKY WITH WITH C ABARET D EC ALIENTE CABARET DE CALIENTE $ 4 JAMESON $4 JAMESON & ORGANIC O R G AN I C Y ERBA MATE MATE COCKTAILS COCK TAILS YERBA $$10 10 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI & S SAT AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M MAR AR 1 15 5 & 16 16

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Mar 23

BLUEGRASS B LUEGRASS | FOLK FOLK | JAM JAM

((2 2 NIGHT NIGHT LLIVE IVE RECORDING RECORDING ALBUM!!) ALBUM ! !)

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$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SUN S UN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M MAR AR 17 17

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY PRESENTS PRESENTS JJAM AM | FO FOLK LK | R ROCK O CK

ST. S T. PATS PATS DAY DAY WITH WITH

JGB JG B FFEAT. EAT. T. M MELVIN ELVIN S SEALS EALS

RON THOMPSON AND THE RESISTORS WITH SPECIAL GUEST

GUITAR SLINGER LAURIE MORVAN!

Real Blues 8:30 Sun

Mar 24

EMILY BONN AND THE VIVANTS

Rancho Debut!

Old-Time Dance to Honky Tonk 4:00 / No Cover

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

POOR P OOR MA MANS NS W WHISKEY HISKEY

Celebrate St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day THE MAD HANNANS WITH THE JERRY HANNAN BAND 6:00

STEFANIE KEYS Mar 30 Americana/Rock 8:30 Sat

RANCHO NICASIOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Easter Sunday Buffet

MARCH 31, 10AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4PM Reservations Advised Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP HOP HOP

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Rancho Nicasio

Mar 15, McKenna Faith. Mar 16, Counterbalance. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Mar 15, Staggerwing. Mar 16, Zydeco Flames. Mar 17, the Mad Hannans. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

Sausalito Seahorse

Mar 16, Pat Jordan Band. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Toad in the Hole Pub Mar 16, the Welcome Matt, HugeLarge. Mar 17, Pogues Tribute. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Trinity Episcopal Church Mar 16, Trio Con Brio Copenhagen. 275 E Spain St, Sonoma.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Mar 15, Los Pinguos. Mar 17, Black Brothers Band. Mar 18, Fath Chamber Players. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace Mar 16, Golden Bough. Fifth and B, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1075.

Mar 14, Ramana Viera. Mar 15, the Final Touch. Mar 16, Rolando Morales & Carlos Reyes. Mar 17, Mazacote. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mar 15, the Nomads. Mar 16, the Gas Men. Mar 17, Lucia Comnes. Mar 19, Dirty Cello. Mar 20, Jesse Brewster. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mar 14, Charlie Docherty. Mar 15, the Mad Hannans. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Mar 17, Paul Knight & friends. Mar 18, Blue Mondays. 11180 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Mar 15, Wake the Dead. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Mar 13, Skerikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bandalabra.

Terrapin Crossroads Mar 14-17, Unbroken Chain Benefit with Phil Lesh, Bob Weir, Jackie Greene and more. Mar 20, Les Claypoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duo De Twang. Wed, Terrapin Family Band. Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House Mar 15, Altan. Mar 16, Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Mar 16, Pablo Cruise plus the Edge (not the guitarist from U2.) 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

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Mar 14, Richard Buckner. Mar 15, the Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit & Danny Barnes with Matt Sircely. Mar 17, Moonalice. Mar 19, Fighting Smokey Joe with Bitch Franklin. Mar 20, Jeffrey Halford & the Healers with Chris Donohoe. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Mar 14, David Mâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ore. Mar 15, Terrie Odabi & Pure Soul. Mar 16, Revolver. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT $3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM/21+ TUES T UES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 19 19 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT W WITH ITH E EVAN V N VA FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES T THUR HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MAR MAR 2 21 1 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

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Mar 15, Swoop Unit. Mar 16, Culannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hounds. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

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Mar 15, Praire Prince. Mar 16, Evolution. Mar 17, Amber Morris & Talking Book. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Mar 14, Jaime Kyle with David Jenkins. Mar 16, Lonesome Locomotive. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-892-6200.

19 Broadway Club Mar 14, Black Nature Band. Mar 15, Fantan Mojah & Al Pancho. Mar 20, Pep Love. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino Mar 15, Open Sky. Mar 16, Denise Perrier. Mar 17, Marcelo Puig & Seth Asarnow. Mar 19, Shoe String Trio. Mar 20, Groupo Buongiorno. Mar 13, Jonathan Poretz. Mar 14, Passion Habanera. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Mar 13, Kurt Huget. Mar 14, Wanda Stafford. Mar 19, Swing Fever. Mar 20, J Kevin Durkin. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Mariza Among new crop of fado singers following the Amalia Rodrigues star, Mariza leads. Mar 14-17 at SFJAZZ Center.

Martha Wainwright Sister of Rufus, daughter of Loudon & Kate McGarrigle never fails to entertain. Mar 15 at Swedish American Music Hall.

Jim Jones Harlem MC and founder of Diplomat label brings hits like â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Fly High.â&#x20AC;? Mar 16 at the Mezzanine.

Michael Rose Leader of most popular era of Black Uhuru appears with Sister Carol. Mar 19 at the Independent.

Chelsea Light Moving Thurston Moore drops in with new post-Sonic Youth, post-Kim band. Mar 20 at Great American Music Hall.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center and Cumulus Presents proudly present

Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet

Friday, March 15, 8:00 pm

A FRESH ST START TART TART FOR 2013!!

From Austin, Country-Americana

Kelly Willis & Bruce Robison Friday, April 19, 8:00 pm

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(Apple Blossom Festival eve) Sebastopol

Also Coming Soon Ruthie Foster (solo) – May 11 in the Annex Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

MUSIC FESTIVAL KATE WOLF JUNE 28-30

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Prices increase March 25th AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. www.katewolfmusicfestival.com

Sat March 16

Sun March 17

CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY HERE

Pablo Cruise plus The Edge

Live bands - BBQ - Drinks and Good Company ALL DAY

Thur March 21

This month we bring you RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE

An evening with >ĞŽ<ŽƩŬĞ SOLD OU

Fri March 22

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Boz Scaggs

Special Guest: DJ Harry Duncan

Fri March 29 As seen in "The Hangover"

The Dan Band Sat March 30

Crystal Bowersox

(Afrobeat Funk Cuban Latin) Party every other Thursday starting the 14th

Fri March 22 thru Sun March 24

REGGAE WEEKEND BLOCK

ƒ–ƒ”…Š͚͛ȈARDEN PARK ROOTS TOUR with BELLYFULL and CONSCIOUSNESS SCIENCE —ƒ”…Š͚͜ȈKING HOPETON classical Reggae trained pianist

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Wed April 17

Dead Can Dance Sat April 20 An evening with Helen Reddy

Sat May 18 Adam Carolla & Dr Drew’s

Reunion Tour

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Berlin plus Big Country Fri Aug 9

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dance show with Cajun legends

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Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

TAP ROOM

Galleries

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

RECEPTIONS Mar 14 At 4pm. University Art Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Student Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? featuring student art. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295. At 4:30pm. Marin Community Foundation, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millennial Abstractions,â&#x20AC;? color, form, shapes and mark making. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Mar 15

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At 5pm. City Council Chambers, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Places Near and Far,â&#x20AC;? paintings by EG Singer. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Mar 16 At 2pm. Local Color Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Illusions,â&#x20AC;? imaginative paintings by David Kingwill. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744. At 4pm. Petaluma Arts Center, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Shapes the World,â&#x20AC;? youth art exhibit. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600. At 5pm. Sebastopol Gallery,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Feast Your Eyes,â&#x20AC;? work by ceramicist Chris Boyd and painter Paula Matzinger. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7200.

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Art Without Labels Through Mar 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the Rough,â&#x20AC;? highlighting the work of artists facing mental health challenges. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.775.3794.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peanuts Celebrationsâ&#x20AC;? highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays. Through

Apr 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usable, Loveable Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products. Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Line,â&#x20AC;? describing Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through May 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Places Near and Far,â&#x20AC;? paintings by EG Singer. Reception, Mar 15, 5pm. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Apr 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alkonost,â&#x20AC;? two- and three-dimensional art from Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery 300 Through Mar 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty Boy,â&#x20AC;? new paintings by Jennifer Hirshfield. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Mar 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eight-Year Anniversary,â&#x20AC;? works by various artists celebrating the galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Local Color Gallery Mar 13-Apr 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Illusions,â&#x20AC;? distinctive, imaginative, abstract paintings by David Kingwill. Reception, Mar 16, 2pm. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

New Leaf Gallery Through Apr 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sisters,â&#x20AC;? ceramic sculptures by Jane and Tyler Burton. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Petaluma Arts Center Mar 15-29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Shapes the World,â&#x20AC;? youth art exhibit. Reception, Mar 16, 4pm. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Photography Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring local artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and

Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sandy Eastoak Studio Mar 15, 4pm and Mar 16, 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Karma,â&#x20AC;? art sale to benefit Pomo Project. 540 DuFranc Ave, Sebastopol.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Mar 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gardens and Figures,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Diane Toso and sculpture by Jonnie Russell. Through Mar 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Playground,â&#x20AC;? art inspired by childhood. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Apr 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Feast Your Eyes,â&#x20AC;? featuring work by ceramicist Chris Boyd and painter Paula Matzinger. Reception, Mar 16, 5pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Apr 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Dixon: The Metalsmithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Workshop,â&#x20AC;? well-known metalsmith was the brother of painter Maynard Dixon. Through Apr 21, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mail Call,â&#x20AC;? story of military mail and communication from the American Revolution to current wars. Storytelling with Kenneth Foster, Mar 21, 7pm. Through Jun 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tools as Art,â&#x20AC;? collection of witty and light-hearted works based on familiar forms. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

University Art Gallery Mar 14-Apr 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Student Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? featuring student art. Reception, Mar 14, 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Apr 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost in Translation,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Orin Carpenter. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Art Works Downtown Through Mar 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shadows,â&#x20AC;? three prominent, women artists from Marin whose work explores the past, memories and emotions. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

31

Elsewhere Gallery

Marin MOCA

Downtown Napa

Through Apr 10, “Thresholds,” a mother-son collaboration between Nadine Gay and Adrian Curtet. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Through Apr 14, “AB/Normal,” works by Dan Herrera, Aron Meynell and Paula Moran that skew the idea of normalcy through surreal and nostalgic narratives. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Ongoing, “Art on First,” the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Main and Third streets, Napa.

Forma Home & Office Through Apr 30, “Fine Art Botanicals,” paintings by Robert Ahrens on cracked linen. Reception, Apr 13, 4pm. 930 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley.

Gallery Route One Through Mar 17, Igor Sazevich, paintings of landscapes of the mind, mirages shaped by colors and forms. Through Mar 17, “Ineffable-Canto XXIV,” Diana Marto works and dances, creating site-specific performances along with art installations of related works on paper. Through Mar 17, “An Inventory of Al-Mutanabbi Street,” artist books and broadsides witnessing the bombing of the street of booksellers in Baghdad. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 31, “Millennial Abstractions,” choice of color, form, shapes and mark making are transformational and inspiring in the deepest sense. Reception, Mar 14, 4:30pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum History Center Gallery Through Apr 6, “Dorothea Lange at Steep Ravine,” photos of Marin coast in 1950s. 1026 Court St, San Rafael.

Marin Society of Artists Through Mar 30, “Spring Rental Show,” works for rent by MSA members. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Mar 28, “Darkness and Light,” mixed media exploring the relationship between these two oppositional elements. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Mar 29, “Celebrating Color Eight Different Ways,” work of eight artists and friends. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Mar 31, “MFA Selections: A Salute to Bay Area Emerging Artists,” artists who recently completed MFA degrees explore sculpture with light, sound, textiles and other unusual materials. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Mar 31, “Proof of Some Existence,” works by Maki Aizawa, Peter Hassen, Angela Willetts and Michelle Wilson. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Apr 30, “Vernal Equinox,” paintings by Sandra Juniper Booth and Kim Frances. Reception, Mar 23, 6pm. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Comedy Socofu Standup series brings the comedy underground to Sonoma County. Third Sun of every month, 7pm. $10. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Myles Weber Bay Area comedian appears with Nick Aragon and Kenny Thomas. Mar 16, 6pm. $20. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Dance Rhythm of the Dance Traditional Irish dance and music meet the ) conveniences of

32

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

BACK IN BUSINESS ‘Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid’ screens March 15, with a ‘Best Hat Contest’ and barbecue dinner, at Cameo Cinema. See Film, p32.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | MARCH 13-19, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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( 31

modern stage technology. Mar 14, 8pm. $40-$45. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa 707.226.7372.

Michael Londra’s Celtic Fire Vocalist from Riverdance in new show with a live band. Mar 17, 3pm. $30-$50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events Geography of Hope Literary festival celebrating conservationist father figure Aldo Leopold. Mar 15, evening, “Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time,” Toby’s Feed Barn, includes panel discussion; Mar 16, Keynote speakers at Dance Palace, field trips and film festival; Mar 17, Panel discussion. Mar 15-17. $125. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Resource Clinic Get info on housing, transit, food stamps and Medi-Cal. Wed, 11am-1pm. Free. Petaluma Health Center, 1301 Southpoint Blvd, Petaluma. 707.559.7500.

Songs of the Soul Poetry and sacred music festival sponsored by International Association of Sufism. Fri, Mar 15, 7:30pm, Sat, Mar 16, 9am-9pm and Sun, Mar 17, 9am-6pm. $20-$200. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael. 415472-6959.

Texas Hold’em Poker Tournament Fundraiser for Laguna Foundation with a $2,000 grand prize. Mar 16, 1pm. $125. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Field Trips Bill & Dave’s Hikes Hike the lower trails within the park and appreciate the beauty of the waterfall. Mar 16, 9:45am. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Egret Season See one of the most studied great egret nesting sites on the West Coast. Sat-Sun through Jul 14. Free. Martin Griffin Preserve, 4900 Shoreline Highway 1, Stinson Beach. 415.868.9244.

Film Best of the Fest Selections from the Healdsburg International Short Film Festival. Mar 15, 4:30pm and Mar 16, 11am-8:30pm. $10-$18. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid Paul Newman cowboy classic with barbecue dinner and a best hat contest. Mar 15, 8pm. $25. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

Claire’s Knee Cultural attache Jerome spends his last holidays as a bachelor at Lake Annecy where he meets Aurora, an Italian writer and old friend. Mar 16, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Dodes’Ka-den Allegorical tale of Tokyo slum dwellers directed by Akira Kurosawa. Fri, Mar 15, 7pm and Sun, Mar 17, 4pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Food & Drink Persian Feast Persian New Year feast with traditional cuisine. Mar 20, 6pm. $50. Baci Cafe & Wine Bar, 336 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8111.

Popcorn with Pinot Terroir Tour

wineries in the Sonoma Valley. See www.heartofsonomavalley. com for details. Mar 16-17, 11am-4pm. $10-$65. Deerfield Ranch Winery, 10200 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.833.2270.

St Patrick’s Feast & Limerick Challenge Dinner and five-line poems of varying tastefulness. Mar 14, 6pm. $30. Chef Patrick’s, 16337 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.9161.

Stone Bridge School Extravaganza Special guest chefs pair dishes with wine, followed by dancing. Mar 16, 6pm. $85. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Taste of Yountville Food-focused events all weekend, culminating in a block party on Saturday with tasting opportunities. Mar 1416. Free. Downtown Yountville, N/A, Yountville.

Lectures Biochar: Carbon for Soil Health First-ever community meeting of the Sonoma Biochar Initiative. Mar 13, 6:30pm. Free. Sonoma Valley Grange Hall, 18627 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs.

Black Holes & Space Time Shed some light on black holes with the concepts of gravity and space-time. FriSat, 7pm and Sun, 1:30pm. through Mar 31. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Emily Dickinson Symposium Local poets and authors discuss Emily Dickenson’s poetry. Mar 14, 2pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Grand opening of the La Follette tasting room. Winemaker Greg La Follette pairs his wines with different flavors of popcorn. Mar 16, 12, 2 and 4pm. Free. La Follette Wines at the Barlow, 180 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.827.4933.

Highway 101 Interchange Project

Savor Sonoma Valley

Mystery of Bird Song

Taste vintage wines from the barrel paired with exquisite cuisine at 22 participating

Explore the magical world of bird songs and learn the many ways and reasons that birds

Community meeting and open house on the Highway 101 Airport Boulevard interchange and Windsor sound wall projects. Mar 14, 5pm. Free. Sonoma County Water Agency, 404 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa.

vocalize with David Lukas. Mar 14, 9am. $45. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Robert Louis Stevenson & the American West Museum director Marissa Schleicher talks about Robert Louis Stevenson’s trek from Scotland to California in 1879. Mar 13, 7pm. Free. Robert Louis Stevenson Museum, 1490 Library Lane, St. Helena. 707963-3757.

Science Buzz Cafe Mar 13, “Animal Tracking & Bird Language” with Jim Sullivan, tracker. Wed, Mar 13, 6:30pm. Institute of Noetic Sciences, 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. $4. 707.824.2030.

Tillie Hardwick Lecture Series Lecture on past, present and future of Indian casinos. Sat, Mar 16, 1:30pm. Donation. California Indian Museum & Cultural Center, 5250 Aero Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.579.3004.

Readings Aqus Cafe Mar 19, 6pm, “Forged in Grace” with Jordan E Rosenfeld. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Mar 19, “Towards Collective Liberation: Anti-Racist Organizing, Feminist Praxis and Movement Building” with Chris Crass. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Book Passage Mar 13, 7pm, “Top Dog” with Po Bronson. Mar 14, 7pm, “Mary Coin” with Marisa Silver. Mar 15, 7pm, “When Someone Dies: The Practical Guide to the Logistics of Death” with Scott Smith. Mar 16, 1pm, “Fast Times in Palestine: A Love Affair with a Homeless Homeland” with Pamela Olson. Mar 16, 7pm, “Uncivil Liberties” with Georgia Kelly. Mar 17, 1pm, “Astonished: A Story of Evil, Blessings, Grace and Solace” with Beverly Donofrio. Mar 17, 4pm, “Not Less Than Everything: Catholic Writers on Heroes of Conscience, from Joan of Arc to Oscar Romero” with Catherine & Tobias Wolff. Mar 18, 7pm, “Her” with Christa Parravani. Mar 19, 12pm, “Oleander Girl” with Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, Price ) includes lunch and

34

Goliath Meets David Wife of Amazon CEO to appear at Copperfield’s Books Some days, you think you know the world and the way it works. Other days, the wife of the CEO of Amazon.com is going on a book tour of small independent bookstores. You read that right: Mackenzie Bezos, wife of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, has written a novel. Cute idea, right? After all, when the family business model is based on suffocating and killing small bookstores, spending millions lobbying to keep from paying sales tax on those loss-leader books and maintaining sweatshop-like conditions at distribution warehouses to send those books out all over the country for maximum profit, it’s only a matter of time before one thinks, “Gee, these ‘authors’ must be on to something. I’ll try it, too! Maybe I can go around to talk about it at some quaint little bookstores, if there are any left.” Mackenzie Bezos’ book, Traps, is the story of four women whose lives intersect, transforming them forever, etc., etc. What you really want to know is: how does Copperfield’s feel about this? “We try to look at the author independent of whom they are married to,” says Copperfield’s spokesperson Vicki D’Arman, adding: “Bezos himself—not happening.” Anyway, see the wife of Amazon’s CEO appearing at the very type of small independent bookstore that Amazon has so successfully squashed on Monday, March 18, at Copperfield’s Books. 775 Village Court, Montgomery Village, Santa Rosa. 7pm. Free. 707.578.8938.—Gabe Meline

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34 A E

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signed book. $55. Mar 19, 7pm, “Raising Cubby: A Father and Son’s Adventures with Asperger’s, Trains, Tractors and High Explosives” with John Elder Robison. Mar 20, 7pm, “The Dark Legacy of Shannara: Bloodfire Quest” with Terry Brooks. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Mar 18, 6pm, “Traps” with Mackenzie Bezos. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Mar 13, 6pm, “Jacob’s Folly” with Rebecca Miller. Mar 14, 7pm, “Fight Song” with Joshua Mohr. Mar 16, 7pm, “Astonished: A Story of Evil, Blessings, Grace, and Solace” with Beverly Donofrio. Mar 19, 7pm, “Oleander Girl” with Chitra Divakaruni. Mar 20, 7pm, “Code: A Virals Novel” with Kathy & Brendan Reichs. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Mar 14, 7pm, “Murder Below Montparnasse” with Cara Black. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.433.9270.

h2hotel Mar 20, 7pm, “The Drunken Botanist” with Amy Stewart. 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Northwest Regional Library Mar 20, 11am, “If You Lived in Sam’s Neck” with Nina Tepedino. 150 Coddingtown Center, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2265.

College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Chasing Wade Staged reading of comedy by Carey Pepper. Mar 13, 7:30pm. $10. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Disney’s Aladdin Jr Students from Saint John Catholic School bring this show to life. Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Mar 24. $5-$12. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Enchanted April Romantic comedy set in 1920s London. Two frustrated housewives who take a trip to Italy in hopes of rediscovering themselves. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Apr 14. $22-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

A Few Good Men

Almost, Maine As the northern lights hover in the star-filled sky above, Almost’s residents find themselves falling in and out of love in unexpected ways. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Mar 24. $20. Calistoga Art Center, 1435 North Oak St, Calistoga. 707.942.2278.

Big River Characters from Mark Twain’s novels come to life in this musical. Directed by James Dunn. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Mar 17. $10-$25.

Mere Mortals Collection of six short comic plays combining wit, satire and comedy. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Mar 17. $15-$20. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

My Son, the Waiter Part theater, part standup comedy makes up this oneman show by Brad Zimmerman. Mar 16, 8pm. $20-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

One Page Plays Submissions on the theme of “water” from faculty, staff and student writers. Directed and staged by students. Mar 13, 7:30pm. Free. Ives Hall Studio 76, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Student performance of Aaron’s Sorkin’s 1989 drama about three young lawyers representing two Marines accused of a hazing death at Guantanamo Bay. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Mar 17. $12-$15. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Panache

The Gruffalo

Peter Pan

Magical, musical adventure based on the award-winning picture book. Mar 13, 6:30pm. $12-$17. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

La Traviata Giuseppe Verdi’s classic presented by Livermore Valley Opera. Mar 13, 8pm. $60. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Left After Not

Theater

Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292.

Inspired by Farid Ud-Din Attar’s “The Conference of the Birds.” Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Mar 16. $15-$25. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Lend Me a Tenor It’s 1934 and the biggest night in the history of the Cleveland Grand Opera Company. But the tenor is drunk! Hillarity ensues. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Mar 30. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe Classic tale of Narnia by Marin Theatre Company. Mar 16, 11am.

A rich society woman from Scarsdale discovers that a fry cook in Brooklyn has the vanity plate she wants, which reads “Panache.” Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Apr 7. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido. Musical adaptation of classic story presented by Performing Arts Academy of Marin. Thurs, Mar 14, 7pm, Fri, Mar 15, 7pm and Sat, Mar 16, 2pm. $14$18. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Wake Up Laughing This dynamic duo–two personalities, one body–deliver a one-two punch line of cosmic comedy and healing laughter. Mar 16, 7:30pm. $20-$25. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of March 13

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “If it’s stupid and it works, it’s not stupid.” That could turn out to be a useful mantra for you in the coming week. Being pragmatic should be near the top of your priority list, whereas being judgmental should be at the bottom. Here’s another mantra that may serve you well: “Those who take history personally are condemned to repeat it.” I hope you invoke that wisdom to help you escape an oppressive part of your past. Do you have room for one more inspirational motto, Aries? Here it is: “I am only as strong as my weakest delusion.” TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Don’t you just love to watch the spinning of those wheels within wheels within wheels? Aren’t you grateful for the way the ever-churning plot twists keep you alert and ready to shift your attitude at a moment’s notice? And aren’t you thrilled by those moments when fate reveals that its power is not absolute—that your intelligence and willpower can in fact override the seemingly inexorable imperatives of karma? If you are unfamiliar with the pleasures I’ve just described, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to get deeply acquainted.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) It won’t be a good week to issue unreasonable, illogical and self-centered demands. And please don’t make peanut butter and jelly a part of your sex life, take a vacation in Siberia or photocopy your butt and deliver it anonymously to your boss. On the other hand, it will be an excellent time to scrawl motivational poetry on your bedroom wall, stage a slow-motion pillow fight and cultivate your ability to be a deep-feeling free-thinker. Other recommended actions: give yourself a new nickname like Highball or Root Doctor or Climax Master, write an essay on “The Five Things That the Pursuit of Pleasure Has Taught Me” and laugh uproariously as you completely bypass the void of sadness and the abyss of fear. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

In the mid-19th century, prospectors mined for gold in the mountains of western Nevada. The veins weren’t as rich as those in California, but some men were able to earn a modest living. Their work to extract gold from the terrain was hampered by a gluey blue mud that gummed up their machinery. It was regarded as a major nuisance. But on a hunch, one miner took a load of the blue gunk to be analyzed by an expert. He discovered that it contained rich deposits of silver. So began an explosion of silver mining that made many prospectors very wealthy. I suggest you be on the alert for a metaphorical version of blue mud in your sphere, Cancerian—an “inconvenience” that seems to interfere with the treasure you seek, but that is actually quite valuable.

LEO (July 23–August 22) When pioneer filmmaker Hal Roach worked on scripts with his team of writers, he sometimes employed an unusual strategy to overcome writer’s block. He’d bring in a “Wildie” to join them at the conference table. A Wildie was either a random drunk they found wandering around the streets or a person who lived in an insane asylum. They’d engage him in conversation about the story they were working on, and he would provide unexpected ideas that opened their minds to new possibilities. I don’t necessarily recommend that you seek the help of a Wildie, Leo, but I hope you will come up with other ways to spur fresh perspectives. Solicit creative disruptions! VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Is the term “unconscious mind” a good name for the foundation of the human psyche? Should we really be implying that the vast, oceanic source of everything we think and feel is merely the opposite of the conscious mind? Dreamworker Jeremy Taylor doesn’t think so. He proposes an alternate phrase to replace “unconscious”: “not-yet-speech-ripe.” It captures the sense of all the raw material burbling and churning in our deep awareness that is not graspable through language. I bring this up, Virgo, because you’re entering a phase when a lot of not-yet-speech-ripe stuff will become speech-ripe. Be alert for it!

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) In 1928, biologist Alexander Fleming launched a medical revolution. He developed the world’s first antibiotic,

penicillin, making it possible to cure a host of maladies caused by hostile bacteria. His discovery was a lucky fluke that happened only because he left his laboratory a mess when he went on vacation. While he was gone, a bacteria culture he’d been working with got contaminated by a mold that turned out to be penicillin. I’m thinking that you could achieve a more modest but quite happy accident sometime soon, Libra. It may depend on you allowing things to be more untidy than usual, though. Are you game?

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“I am iron resisting the most enormous Magnet there is,” wrote the Sufi mystic poet Rumi. He was wistfully bemoaning his own stubborn ignorance, which tricked him into refusing a more intimate companionship with the Blessed Source of all life. I think there’s something similar going on in most of us, even atheists. We feel the tremendous pull of our destiny—the glorious, daunting destination that would take all our strength to achieve and fulfill our deepest longings—and yet we are also terrified to surrender to it. What’s your current relationship to your Magnet, Scorpio? I say it’s time you allowed it to pull you closer.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) NASA used whale oil to lubricate the Hubble Space Telescope and Voyager spacecrafts. There was a good reason: whale oil doesn’t freeze at the low temperatures found in outer space. While I certainly don’t approve of killing whales to obtain their oil, I want to use this story to make a point. It’s an excellent time for you, too, to use old-school approaches for solving ultra-new-school problems. Sometimes a tried-and-true method works better, or is cheaper, simpler or more aesthetically pleasing.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The theory of the “butterfly effect” proposes that a butterfly flapping its wings in China may ultimately impact the weather in New York. Here’s how the writer Richard Bernstein explains it: “Very slight, nearly infinitesimal variations and the enormous multiplicity of interacting variables produce big differences in the end.” That’s why, he says, “the world is just too complicated to be predictable.” I find this a tremendously liberating idea. It suggests that every little thing you do sends out ripples of influence that help shape the kind of world you live in. The coming week will be an excellent time to experiment with how this works in your daily life. Put loving care and intelligent attention into every little thing. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Former football quarterback Joe Ayoob holds the world’s record for throwing a paper airplane the longest distance. After it left his hand, the delicate craft traveled over 226 feet. I propose we make Ayoob your patron saint and role model for the coming week. From what I can tell, you will have a similar challenge, at least metaphorically: blending power and strength with precision and finesse and control. It’s time to move a fragile thing or process as far as possible. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

A source of fulfillment you will enjoy in the future may seem almost painful when it initially announces its presence. In other words, your next mission may first appear to you as a problem. Your situation has a certain resemblance to that of prolific Russian composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who produced a wide variety of enduring works, including symphonies, ballets, operas and concertos. When he was a precocious child, he was assailed by the melodies and rhythms that frequently surged through his mind. “This music! This music!” he complained to his mother. “Take it away! It’s here in my head and won’t let me sleep!”

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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