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n i p S , s n i P n i G & City hipsters discover bowling alley bars while North Bay throwbacks attract a different clientele p18 BY RACHEL DOVEY

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is

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5

‘Hey, that’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’ ‘No, it’s my stick!’

This photo was submitted by Susan Seitz of Cazadero. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘Nowadays, people go out to get laid or get on the dance floor. Bowling alley bars are still a secret.’ COVER STO RY P1 8 So Much for the ‘Redwood’ Highway T H E PAP E R P 8

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies The Right Thing SSU’s new Ethics Center compromised BY SHEPHERD BLISS

S

onoma State University’s new Ethics Center has caused quite a stir among my colleagues and students during the first week of classes.

The notorious American International Group gave two-thirds of the new center’s $16,000 first-year budget. One might wonder what AIG’s intentions were for funding the center; AIG is not known for its ethics. In fact, the insurer’s risky bets on derivatives were central to the 2008 economic crash. Of course, they were rewarded with a $182 million bailout. Retired SSU professor Robert Plantz reminded the university community on the faculty email list that AIG is “talking about suing our government for what they think is a lousy deal in the bailout.” So much for gratitude and ethics. They appear to be one more megacorporation jumping on the bandwagon to further privatize SSU and direct its studies. “Any entity designated as an ‘Ethics Center’ has a special responsibility to scrutinize the moral and ethical correlates of its own supporting foundation, structure and functioning, especially its filtering of acceptable and unacceptable issues,” noted sociology professor Noel Byrne. The public first heard about the Ethics Center in an article headlined “Some Topics Too Close to Home for SSU Ethics Center,” in the Jan. 16 Press Democrat. Its subhead? “Director of new venture opts not to weigh in on donor AIG’s role in economic crisis.” “The Ethics Center has a basic challenge to speak to the ethics of taking money from AIG,” notes retired political science professor John Kramer. I welcome the Ethics Center, whose first event will be a Feb. 6 lecture by Judge Brad Seligman on “Big Law, Small Law: Old and New Civil Rights in the 21st Century,” in the Warren Auditorium at 4pm. I hope that such presentations will become forums to discuss controversial issues. The new center plans to deal with issues such as immigration, water use, food ethics, clean technology and income inequality, according to its director, philosophy lecturer Joshua Glasgow. But if it’s not willing to discuss AIG, what other mega-corporations or millionaires might already be knocking on SSU’s door? Walmart? Chase? Monsanto, which funds UC Irvine’s agriculture department? Shepherd Bliss (3sb@comcast.net) teaches college and farms. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

severe pain and minor injuries, but they also need access to care and prescription refills for chronic conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure and asthma.

School Segregation

It was horrifying to read this article (“A School Divided,” Jan. 23) and realize that nothing has changed since 1960 when the school committee in Sausalito launched the first integration attempt of the schools by removing me and five boys from Bayside school and bussing us into the MLK (Richarson Bay School) in 1960. It is an abomination to hear that nothing has changed in the self-proclaimed “most progressive state in the nation.” What century are we in? The segregation of students in Sausalito and Marin City led to race riots when all students joined together at Tamalpais High School in 1960, as students tried to accommodate to new cultures totally foreign to them. This segregation was and continues to be a travesty. I ask that you all consider carefully the fact that there should be no Marin City. Sausalito should catch up with the rest of the nation and integrate the two areas, with low-income housing available throughout the two areas and thus stopping the cruelty of segregation for all of its citizens, the most valuable being children.

COLLEEN RYDER Via Online

More Important Than Yoga Re: “Road to Wellville,” (News, Jan. 16), the Sonoma County Economic Development Board’s 2012 report, Sonoma County Indicators Abridged Edition, states that 14.4 percent of our residents had no healthcare coverage in 2011. Per U.S. census estimated county population, that means 70,289 people with no insurance, no Medi-Cal, and no MediCare. These people not only need access to urgent care for issues such as high fevers, dehydration, flu complications,

While uninsured mothers continue to have nowhere but the emergency room to take their sick kids, and while uninsured people are going without their necessary prescription medications, it seems ludicrous to celebrate primary prevention measures like exercise, smoking cessation and yoga becoming readily available to the insured. We must find a way to provide primary care to our population of over 70,000 uninsured Sonoma County residents. Obamacare may bring about meaningful improvements in a year or two, but meanwhile, we have expensive suffering that needs to be addressed now.

KATHY KLADAR, RN Santa Rosa

$25 Weddings Are Awesome Oh, Bohemian! Have you lost your way? How bohemian is it to include a guide to the wedding industry (Jan. 9) without some counter-article on alternative weddings? Forty-one years ago last June, we married in our backyard, held a potluck reception on the lawn and had a wedding we’ll remember until our memories fail (four cakes, one of which was declared the wedding cake until the children ate it, so another took its place). Total cost: $25, including my sweetie’s wedding dress and the invitations (mimeographed—nowadays they’d be photocopied or sent out on the internet). It’s not necessary to enslave yourself to the wedding industry to have a great, memorable event. The love between the couple and among family and friends makes for a great and memorable wedding; the rest is just decoration. I know that you probably got some needed revenue from this advertising insert, and I don’t begrudge you the revenue. But still . . .

BILL HOUGHTON Sebastopol

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Whistleblowers John Kiriakou, former CIA officer and whistleblower, has been sentenced to 30 months in jail. In 2007, he confirmed the use of waterboarding and described it as torture. He joins Daniel Ellsberg, Bradley Manning and many others pursued by the government in an effort to intimidate those with access to “secrets” from releasing them. When President Obama was campaigning, he indicated he would support whistleblowers. Now in power, he doesn’t. And no one involved with torturing detainees has been sent to prison. What a surprise! For a democracy to function, citizens need to know what’s really happening. And we don’t.

MOSS HENRY Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

info: Izzy 530.340.0517

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8

THE CHOSEN SPOT? Redwood trees, which once defined Sonoma County as the Redwood Empire, are now defined as ‘debris.’

Deadwood Hwy.

Ghilotti Construction to sell redwoods from Highway 101 for a cool $98,000; meanwhile, open space is forfeited BY RACHEL DOVEY

I

n a profitable twist of fate, a private construction company is selling $98,000 worth of redwood trees to a public agency, largely from public land.

Last December, Ghilotti Construction was awarded a $30.5 million contract to replace the Airport Boulevard overpass

along Highway 101, according to Caltrans’ website. The overpass will include new, longer on- and offramps, one of which will extend over Mark West Creek, and will result in the permanent closure of ramps just south at Fulton Road. The project requires the removal of roughly 600 trees, underway now. With Ghilotti subcontractor Atlas Tree Service

on site, stumps and bare logs now take the place of the redwoods, visible to motorists on the road. Like so many of the redwoods along the northern corridor, these were non-native trees planted for aesthetic reasons decades ago in the early stages of the freeway’s construction. According to the project’s EIR, the redwoods “reinforce motorists’ perception of the regional landscape

character and Highway 101 as the ‘Redwood Highway.’” Many of the trees towered on land in Caltrans’ existing right-ofway, according to documents on Sonoma County Transportation Authority’s website. Highly detailed maps from a 2001 project study report show state right-ofway as a dotted line extending several feet beyond Highway 101’s border on either side, and stretching around the circular onand offramps of both the Fulton and Airport overpasses. The majority of redwoods being felled are in grassy islands inside these snaking ramps. Strangely, Ghilotti assumes possession of the valuable trees once cut down. In fact, the Sonoma County Water Agency is buying 200 logs from Ghilotti at the aforementioned cost of $98,000, according to SCWA spokesperson Brad Sherwood. The logs will provide structural enhancements along Dry Creek, which will be widened and shaped to benefit endangered coho and steelhead as part of ongoing improvements. That’s a selling price of $490 a log—a cost that Sherwood says is fair value lumber price. “Thirty-foot logs go for anywhere from $400 to $500,” he says. “The logs we’re purchasing are anywhere from 20 to 30 feet.” Still, how can the property of a public entity be ceded to a private corporation and then sold to another public agency for a profit, with taxpayer money on both ends? Kevin Howze, an engineer with the county’s department of planning and public works, has worked alongside staff from the Sonoma County Transportation Authority and Caltrans on the Airport Boulevard project. He says he isn’t aware of the details of this particular lumber transfer, but adds that it isn’t unprecedented. “It’s not uncommon that debris can be the contractor’s responsibility,” he says. “Sometimes it has value; other times it’s nothing more than a nuisance.” When asked if the deal could be complicated by the fact that many of the trees are on public state

A

s redwoods from the state right-of-way are being sold to the SCWA, a plot of land between the two onramps that was designated as county open space is also going away to Caltrans for construction. A document from the Transportation and Public Works board meeting dated March 20, 2012, details the transfer, which includes two parcels of land in a 610-foot strip near Mark West Creek. “The Specific Plan for the Sonoma County Airport Industrial Area, dated July 13, 1987, designates a portion of the subject property as a riparian conservation and enhancement corridor,” the document reads. “The State’s proposed use of the subject property as a freeway project is clearly incompatible with the Specific Plan designation.” However, the document concludes, Caltrans would likely seize the property via eminent domain for the freeway widening project if the county agency attempted to hold on to it. The open space land was ultimately offered to the state via a possession and use agreement, which stipulates that Caltrans “make its best efforts to convey easements to the County over the subject property and other adjoining land in the vicinity for future public access purposes.” One of these uses will ideally be a pathway near the creek

that runs under the freeway. In the county’s 2010 general plan, a multi-use pathway is called for the site, running between Old Redwood Highway and the SMART railroad tracks, similar to the Prince Memorial Greenway along Santa Rosa Creek. As it stands now, the county will have to hope Caltrans operates in good faith to allow the county usage of the former open space land. “If we went to court, we would just get money, so hopefully we’ll still have something we can negotiate with,” says Eric Nelson, an agent with the Transportation and Public Works Department. He points out that this piece of land isn’t unique; it’s one of many being used by Caltrans for the widening project, part of the Highway 101 congestion relief program begun in 2004 (or, as local bumper stickers once famously declared, “Three Lanes All the Way”). Though concern has arisen over the highly visible redwood removal along the freeway in Petaluma, Nelson says he hasn’t heard any protest about the Airport- and Fulton-area trees from local conservation groups. “As to the ugliness of taking down the redwoods, we haven’t really had an oar in that water,” says Steve Birdlebough, chair of the local Sierra Club chapter. “Maybe we should have. That’s when the chickens come home to roost for a lot of folks. It’s the final realization of ‘Oh dear me, what have we done?’” Most of the Sierra Club’s efforts were in the EIR stage of the 101 expansion, Birdlebough says, ensuring that HOV lanes to encourage carpooling were part of the mix. “In the ’70s and ’80s, the Sierra Club’s concern was much about visual scenery,” he says. “In the ’90s and ’00s, our concern has turned toward the question of climate disruption and use of fossil fuels, of changes so serious we humans may not be able to adapt fast enough.” Perhaps not. But in the meantime, freeways expand, trees turn a nice profit, and the “Redwood Highway” is becoming ever more a misnomer.

9

It’s Swinth I guarantee you this: the name Robin Swinth was on the lips of Santa Rosa City Council members well before the interview process to replace Susan Gorin’s council seat unfolded this past Monday. Swinth was being mentioned by council members as a highprobable pick well before the 16 other applicants turned in their papers to city hall—and, yes, even before the open applications themselves were available for pickup to the general public. Was Swinth a foregone conclusion, and Monday’s interview process a sham? Not exactly; other candidates, Hans Dippel primarily, were also spoken of as contenders. But in hearing what I heard firsthand (when you’re an editor of a paper, your ears become well-tuned to loose lips), I can’t help but agree with the common feeling that Monday’s production was at least in part a requisite bit of political theater.

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That said, Swinth is, to be clear, an excellent choice. She has the experience for the job, with past responsibilities on the Planning Commission and the Board of Public Utilities. She aced her interview. As of this writing, she appears to claim no allegiance to the so-called pro-business or progressive sides of the council, and that’s another mark in her favor as the council begins to play nice. Even Scott Bartley and Gary Wysocky, who’ve routinely leveled passive-aggressive insults at each other behind the dais, have of late been claiming the council is no longer divided and saying complimentary things about each other in public. Was there some sort of Winter-break “beer summit” we missed? If so, that’s the sort of backroom deal we would have liked to see. —Gabe Meline

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land and being sold—by a private company—to a public county agency, Howze responded that though unusual, “there’s nothing inherently wrong with it.” “It was explained to me that Ghilotti is contracted with Caltrans to clear the site,” Sherwood says, adding that he, too, asked how the trees became the contractor’s property when he heard about the deal, and that county contractors and legal counsel were contacted to ensure this was standard practice. “As part of that responsibility,” he says, “they essentially own whatever’s on the site.” Ghilotti did not return a call seeking comment.

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10

Quench This Teen gets flame retardant pulled from Gatorade

Best Indoor Air!

Breathe Easy at Home! CELEBRATE C ELEBRATE SM SMOKE-FREE OKE-FREE SONOMA SONOMA C COUNTY! OUNTY! On January 12, 2013, all residential multimulti-unit -unit housing in the uninc unincorporated corporated area goes smo smoke-free. oke-free. Learn more at www www.sonoma.county.org/BreatheEasy .sonoma.county.org/Brea atheEasy County Coun nty Ordinance No. 5947

BY BRETT ISRAEL

I

n response to customer complaints, PepsiCo Inc. will remove a controversial chemical added to orange Gatorade. Outcry over the chemical, known as brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, had been building over the past year. Patented as a flame retardant, BVO is used as an emulsifier in fruitflavored drinks and has been linked to a number of health hazards.

Environmental Health News reported on BVO last year, and the story inspired a Hattiesburg, Miss., teenager, Sarah Kavanagh, to petition PepsiCo to remove the chemical. Kavanagh found the story after searching for information on an ingredient she saw on a Gatorade label. What she read inspired her to start a petition on Change.org calling for the

removal of BVO from PepsiCo’s products. The petition gathered nearly 200,000 signatures from around the world. The news that PepsiCo was removing the chemical from Gatorade was reported last Friday in Beverage Digest, though a spokesperson for PepsiCo told the Associated Press that its decision had been in the works for the past year and was not in response to the recent petition. And as the FDA allows low doses of the chemical— 15 parts per million—in fruitflavored beverages, its decision was also not based on any health concerns, according to PepsiCo’s spokesperson. The chemical won’t be removed from other citrusflavored sodas made by PepsiCo, such as Mountain Dew. BVO was patented by chemical companies as a flame retardant, and has been banned in food and beverages in Europe and Japan. In 1970, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration conditionally approved the interim use of BVO in soft drinks. More than 30 years later, BVO’s status is still listed as interim, despite concerns from scientists that the research is outdated and insufficient. Meanwhile, BVO could be building up in human tissue. In studies with rats, large doses caused reproductive and behavioral problems. And after extreme binges of sodas that contain BVO, a few patients have needed medical attention for skin lesions, memory loss and nerve disorders, all symptoms of overexposure to bromine. Kavanagh said she got the news about PepsiCo’s decision from a voicemail during her algebra class. She asked her teacher to be excused to go the restroom. “I was very, very excited,” Kavanagh said. “I called my mom and I was, like, ‘Mom, we won!’” Kavanagh said she’s unsure about the next move in her fight against BVO, but she said “there will definitely be something coming up in the future.”

SHARED PASSION Octavio Diaz with mother Juana, who routinely travels to Oaxaca to buy ingredients for her famed mole.

Healdsburg’s Royal Family The Diaz dynasty: Molé, Agave and a whole lot of corazón BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

W

hen he was just five years old, Octavio Diaz was burned by a kettle of hot milk while watching his mother make hot chocolate over their open-flamed adobe oven. Despite the pain to his chest

and arms, Diaz stuck by his mother’s side, absorbing her techniques, her recipes—and mostly, her passion. “We are the first generation of men in my family who love to cook,” he says of himself and his brothers. For the past decade, the Diaz

family has steadily climbed the culinary ladder in Healdsburg, where they now own two restaurants and a market. Diaz’s brother Pedro runs El Farolito on Plaza Street, having started as a dishwasher eight years ago; his youngest brother, Francisco, runs a second location in Windsor. On Cinco de Mayo 2010, Diaz opened

Agave Restaurant & Tequila Bar in Healdsburg’s Safeway shopping center, a location that belies the restaurant’s gastronomic sophistication. And just this past August, with a music- and masquerade-filled celebration, Diaz opened Casa del Molé Mercado y Carniceria on Center Street (formerly Los Mares), named for his mother Juana’s increasingly famous mole negro, which she makes from scratch weekly. Every few months, Diaz’s parents return to the Zocalo market in their native Oaxaca to procure several of the 32 total ingredients—which include plantains, walnuts, animal crackers, chocolate, and a variety of chiles—that give mole its distinct flavor. Passed down through four generations of Oaxacan women, Juana’s unique recipe contains no lard or sugar, though she does use local Gravenstein apples and golden raisins for sweetness. The entire process takes about three days, from the first roasting of the chiles to the final jarring of the sauce, which is available for purchase at Casa del Molé ($12.99 for a 16-ounce jar). “One of our secrets,” Diaz confides, “is to remove all the seeds from the peppers, because they are bitter. It takes a lot of work, but it’s worth it.” Hard work comes naturally to Diaz, for whom success is the only option. “I cannot fail,” he tells me matter-of-factly. As the oldest of seven siblings, he feels the pressure of being a leader for his family, many of whom have gained citizenship over the past decade, and whose generosity made his restaurant dream a reality. “In this economy, our family is our bank,” says Diaz, “which allows us to stay out of debt and not pay interest.”

W

hen he was 13 years old, Diaz left Oaxaca to live with his aunt and uncle in Rohnert Park. During high school, he worked as a busboy at ) 12 the Red Lion Hotel (now

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Diaz ( 11 the Doubletree), where he met a hostess and college student named Nancy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I used to ride my bike to SSU from Rancho Cotate to see her,â&#x20AC;? Diaz says of the woman whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been his wife since 1997. Red Lion proved auspicious in another way as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where I discovered my love for hospitality,â&#x20AC;? he says. Though Diaz toyed with the idea of being a teacher, one semester of teaching a beveragemanagement class in the SRJC culinary program convinced him otherwise. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was very hard,â&#x20AC;? he admits, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I realized I wanted to stick with restaurants instead. I have the highest respect for teachers,â&#x20AC;? says Diaz, who credits the SRJC with helping him achieve his goals. When it comes to food, Diaz is committed to bringing more vegetables into Mexican cuisine. Casa del MolĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s produce section is even bigger and more colorful than the pastry case, and Diaz gets as excited about cabbage as he does about their homemade chorizo and goat stew. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like having our own farmers market,â&#x20AC;? he says of Casa del MolĂŠ, which supplies all three of the Diaz restaurants, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open every day.â&#x20AC;? Even though Agave offers

standard taqueria items like burritos and nachos, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the traditional Oaxacan food that Diaz is most proud of: molotes, deep fried masa stuffed with potato, chorizo and herbs ($10); pollo asado, grilled chicken thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been marinated in a secret sauce de la casa ($11); tlayuda, a corn tostada topped with beans, cabbage, avocado, salsa and queso fresco ($10); and of course, the molĂŠ de Oaxaca, served atop chicken ($13) or enchiladas ($12). True to its name, Agave also offers a huge selection of tequilas and mescals, many from familyrun distilleries in remote Oaxacan villages. Like Agaveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu, Diazâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world straddles the old and the new. Though he comes from a family of seven siblings, he is stopping at two when it comes to his own kids, in part, he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because I want to give them the best life possible.â&#x20AC;? He is an intrinsic part of the Healdsburg community, greeting nearly every other person he sees as we walk from Agave to Casa del MolĂŠ on a recent Thursday afternoon. But his ties to Oaxaca, where his grandmother still lives, remain strong. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part of my motivation to work hard is to make my grandma proud,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because we are like the harvest of her hard work.â&#x20AC;?

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Barndiva California cuisine. $$-$$$. Delicious food with outdoor seating great for balmy summer nights. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 231 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.0100.

Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

Cafe Cape Fear Cafe. $$. Comforting atmosphere and Southern-kissed California flavors. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 25191 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.9246.

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner Wed-Mon. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

Dierk’s Parkside Cafe American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

LoCoco’s Cucina Rustica Italian. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic-style Italian with a touch of Northern California, and a favorite with those in the know. Get the

cannoli! Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun. 117 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.2227.

Lynn’s Thai Thai. $$. A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.793.9300.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza. $. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Lunch and dinner daily. Three locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.989.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

and operated with superfresh ingredients and a full kids’ menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 701 Sonoma Mt Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.765.9800.

Ravenous Bistro. $$. Returning to its original small, five-table location next to the Raven Theater, this Healdsburg mainstay continues to have inventive menus in a cozy setting. Dinner, Thurs-Sat; brunch, Sun. 117 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1770.

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. The Red Grape Pizza.

Small plates and a few larger entrées with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Roberto’s Restaurant

Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Rocker Oysterfeller’s

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty

American. $$-$$$. Friendly, warm service in a spot whose menu is thick with local, organic ingredients. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 14415 Coast Hwy 1, Valley Ford (at the Valley Ford Hotel). 707.876.1983.

family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Peter Lowell’s California. $-$$. Casual,

La musique de Paris

Special Valentine’s Day Dinner and a Show Thursday, Feb 14

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Thai. $$. Family-owned

$-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$.

Bring your Sweetheart for a Romantic Evening with

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Tai Yuet Lau Chinese. $$.

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Reservations Advised 415.662.2219 On the Town Square, Nicasio, California www.ranchonicasio.com

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organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

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WE BUY GOLD

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Sell Local in Old Downtown Windsor 707.836.1840

Atmosphere is nothing to write home about, but the food will bring you back. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 941 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.545.2911.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $.

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180

Mattioli on Wine Boxes Art Show Opening Saturday, Feb 2 8pm

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

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Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Robata Grill & Sushi

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Boca South American. $$$-

Salito’s Crab House

$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Citrus & Spice Thai/

Small Shed Flatbreads

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy

weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$-$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era

SMALL BITES Move over, Rome. For beer aficionados from across the globe, all roads lead to Santa Rosa, where the Russian River Brewing Company unveils its limited edition Pliny the Younger every February. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pliny the Elder on steroids,â&#x20AC;? co-owner Natalie Cilurzo says of the famous brew, which contains three times the hops of their regular IPA. Beginning at 11am on Friday, Feb. 1, the brewery will dole out the rationed beer one 10-ounce glass at a time every day until Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. Repeatedly voted the No. 1 beer in the world, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no wonder Pliny the Younger draws people from as far away as Japan and Europe waiting up to five hours for their turn. Because the line sometimes snakes all the way down to D Street, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been offered $100 to sneak people in the back door before,â&#x20AC;? says longtime RRBC employee Gabe Rivera. (Schucksters, take note: he refuses all bribes.) Despite its cult-like following, Pliny the Younger is not the cash cow one might assume. In fact, the beer is available only once a year precisely because it takes so much time, effort, space and money to brew. For the region at large, however, the economic benefits are substantial, which is why Pliny the Younger figures prominently in a current study by the Sonoma County Economic Development Board regarding the impact of local craft breweries. This year, the Flamingo Hotel is even offering a special â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pliny the Youngerâ&#x20AC;? rate for out-oftowners. Howâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ya like those suds? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jessica Dur Taylor

steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dry-aged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;nostalgiaâ&#x20AC;? cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$.

Compadres Rio Grille

California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily.

PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Fine Art and Crafts by Local Artists www.sebastopol-gallery.com 150 North Main 829.7200

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroir-informed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

"RUB-AL-KALI 8a" by James Ford Grant, 2004

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707.781.707tcalabigallery.com

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pliny Time

1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

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Wineries

the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

Point Reyes Vineyards

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Bohème Wines Earthy, balanced Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from an enterprising young winemaker who’s found a home in this redoubt in the redwoods. Also try the Bodega Rancho coolclimate Syrah. 3625 Main St., Occidental. Friday, 3pm to 6pm, Saturday–Sunday, noon to 5pm, or by appointment. No fee. 707.874.3218.

DaVero Sonoma Get lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000. Eric K. James Vineyards Venture down to an off-the-Plaza arcade to find refuge from the maddening crowds, day-brightening Pinot Noir and Syrah, plus the prettiest Rosé in the valley. A grower’s collective for several Carneros-area vineyards. 452 First St. E., Sonoma. Open Friday, noon–8pm; Saturday– Sunday, noon–5:30pm. No fee. 707.996.1364.

Hawley Winery Barrelfermented Viognier, kiwistyle Sauvignon Blanc, plus toothsome reds. Winemaker John Hawley helped to grow some of the big-name brands; now his sons have joined him in this small, Dry Creek Valley family business. 36 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 6pm; $5 fee. 707.473.9500.

John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115.

Larson Family Winery Barbecue wine alert! 23355 Millerick Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.938.3031.

Mauritson Family Winery Zinfandels are the hallmark of this fledgling winery. Reserve vintages routinely sell out, including the much sought-after Rockpile Zinfandel. There’s a lot of buzz about wines from the Rockpile Appellation. 2859 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting room open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.431.0804.

Old World Winery Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, familyowned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Sojourn Cellars Complex but lissome Sonoma Valley Cab is the star at comfortable tasting salon just off the Sonoma Plaza that’s as comfortable as a living room. No need to fear sit-down, appointment-only tastings; just focus on Sojourn’s lawn chair logo and relax. 141 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Complimentary tasting by appointment. 707.938.7212. Truett-Hurst Newly planted biodynamic estate features patio seating, gardens, steelhead habitat, plus frisky goats and sheep. Taste brambly Zin and “Burning Man” Petite Sirah in airy, barnlike house, furnished with rough-hewn recycled materials. 5610 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting, 11am–5pm daily, no fee. 707.433.9545.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590. Valley of the Moon Winery This winery was once owned by Sen. George Hearst. Perhaps instead of the

epochal utterance “Rosebud,” we could dub in “Rosé.” 777 Madrone Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.996.6941.

Viansa Winery Large and filled with crosspromotional products, a deli and a pseudo-Italian marketplace. 25200 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.935.4700.

Vinoteca Vinify Wine Services is like a Russian doll of wineries within wineries making brands for still more clients. It’s in a generic industrial-park location, but with unique, single-vineyard wines from Frostwatch, Baker Lane, Bjornstad, Super Sonoman and others. 3358 Coffey Lane, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $10 fee. 707.542.3292.

VML Winery Acronym of

The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

N A PA CO U N TY Brown Estate Vineyards

Virginia Marie Lambrix, who practices organic and biodynamic winegrowing— the artist who created VML’s wacky new labels said, “Ah, so you’re a witch!” Bewitching Russian River Valley Chard and Pinot, to be sure. 4035 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. $10 fee. 707.431.4404.

(WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500-square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Westwood Winery

Ceja Vineyards To Ceja

Wonky wine scientist crafts soil-driven wines of beguiling complexity from the promising Annadel Estate vineyard, on the western frontier of Sonoma Valley. Tucked away in historic downtown Sonoma, the handsomely furnished tasting salon is a casual setting for a serious sit-down tasting of food-friendly Pinot Noir and some of the most savory Rhône west of the Rhône. 11 E. Napa St., #3, Sonoma. Hours by appointment; tasting fee $10. 707.935.3246.

Vineyards’ motto, “Vinum, Cantus, Amor,” and when there’s wine, song and love, there’s dance. Founded by one-time field workers, the Mexican-American-owned winery celebrates culture and wine at this sleek downtown lounge. Wine flights, light bites and one of the few full-bodied rosés “con huevos” in the county. On Saturdays, free salsa lessons and dance party spice up the night. Bailamos! 1248 First St., Napa. Sunday– Friday, noon–6pm, Saturday, noon–10pm; free salsa class starts at 7:30pm. Tasting fees vary. 707.226.6445.

MARIN CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn

Domaine Carneros Inspired by Taittinger’s Château de la Marquetterie of Champagne, this house of premium sparkling wine is a hard-to-miss landmark on

the Carneros Highway. Enjoy a private Balcony Package for special occasions or taste sparkling and still wines paired with artisan cheese and caviar with the masses. Luxury bubbly Le Rêve offers a bouquet of hoary yeast and crème brûlée that just slips away like a dream. 1240 Duhig Road (at Highway 12/121), Napa. Wine flights $15; also available by the glass or bottle. Open 10am– 5:45pm. 800.716.2788.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Grgich Hills Mike Grgich’s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30am–4:30pm. 707.963.2784. Hagafen Cellars There shall be no wine before it’s certified kosher. Wide variety of varietal wines, the go-to choice for many a White House state dinner. 4160 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am to 5pm (yes, they’re open Christmas). $5–$15. 707.252.0781.

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-to-end. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25. 707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Phifer Pavitt Wines Lots of cowgirl sass but just one wine: “Date Night” Cabernet Sauvignon. Hale bale seating. 4660 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4787.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: “This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.” But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.

Uncorked at Oxbow Across from the Public Market, this remodeled house in Napa’s historic “Little Italy” is a casual and unaffected joint. Ahnfeldt and Carducci wines include estate Merlot, Syrah, Cab, vinted by Paul Hobbs. Don’t ask about the horse. 605 First St., Napa. Open daily, noon–8pm; winter hours vary. Tasting fee, $10–$20. 707.927.5864.

V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9am–6pm. 707.963.7774.

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It’s Late Harvest Sémillon time BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

he main problem in pairing Super Bowl party food with suitable wine is the objections that will have already arisen before I get to the end of this sentence. Is it not an insult to the spirit of a quasinational holiday dedicated to consuming buckets of corporate beer and bags of high-saturated fat snacks, all while celebrating an athletic contest—in between multimillion dollar advertisement from those selfsame corporate beer giants?

Not if Dick Vermeil has something to say about it. Just ask him, he’s right here. The legendary coach who led the St. Louis Rams to victory in Super Bowl XXXIV is here in cardboard likeness, anyway, beside an enormous bottle of wine (a Superthuselah?). A Calistoga native, Vermeil is entrenched in Philadelphia, but he comes out during harvest to tool around on a tractor and catch the Calistoga Speedway’s sprint car races, which his father founded 75 years ago. Remodeled since our last visit, the space hosts a museum of Vermeil’s long career. You can enter a drawing to win an autographed football, or pose for a picture with Vermeil’s standin. Mary Sue Frediani, whose parents met while hanging out at Louis Vermeil’s auto-body shop, runs the tasting room; husband Paul Smith is the winemaker. All the grapes are sourced from the Frediani and Luvisi vineyards. If the football on the label isn’t permission enough to enjoy the light, fresh and pink 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon Rosé ($20), try the barrel fermented 2011 Sauvignon Blanc ($24), with a baked-pear richness you’d expect from Chardonnay. Pair with baked brie en croute, if you’re having that kind of party. Smith’s OnThEdge 2009 Charbono ($40) has a spicy, blueberry aroma and a fine, dry finish; buffalo wings might overpower it, but if there’s any pan-seared duck breast with tamarind sauce on hand, that’s the ticket. Fans save the 2009 “XXXIV” Proprietary Red ($42) for special game days; turn to the 2008 Luvisi “1908” Vineyard Zinfandel ($38) for the brightest cherry fruit of this lineup. Nonna Frediani’s Rosedale Red ($19.57) is rustic and ready for a big slab of lasagna. What about potato chips? The 2009 Late Harvest Sémillon ($18) has just the right amount of sweet peach nectar flavor for a winning sweet-and-salty pairing. And what a great picnic wine—for those nonconforming sorts who can not buck up and take an interest in either commercials or sports franchises, even for one day. Poor folks have got the beaches all to themselves. Vermeil Wines and OnThEdge Winery, 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Sunday–Thursday, 10am–5:30pm; Friday–Saturday, 10am–8pm. Tasting fee, $12. 707.341.3054.

WORST. DATE. EVER. Dating! Ain’t it grand? Well, except when it ain’t. You know you’ve been there at some point: sitting in the car, walking home the next morning, or trying to flag a taxi to get-the-hell-outta-there. Your only consolation is texting your friend: “Worst. Date. Ever.” The other consolation lies in the fantastic leverage you now weild during “worst date” storytime, which, for the Bohemian, falls in our dating-themed Sex & Valentines issue, publishing Feb. 6. That’s right: we want you to spill the beans on your worst date ever. Tell us how terrible and awkward it all was, in grisly and humorous detail, and you may be selected as one of the top three winning stories to be published on Feb. 6! Stories should be no longer than 400 words and emailed to: letters@bohemian.com. Stories can be published with a pseudonym if desired. Winners are chosen by an editorial panel and awarded prizes; entries must be submitted by Friday, Feb. 1.

Love & Kisses, The Bohemian

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Vermeil Wines

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Late Night at the Lanes Traipsing through the North Bay’s few remaining bowling-alley bars BY RACHEL DOVEY

W

here else are you gonna find a middleaged Cubs fan bumping and grinding on a pool cue?” I’m in the lounge at Double Decker Lanes in Rohnert Park and the scene that 21-year-old Travis Byrd describes is, indeed, happening. The silver-haired

dancer in a blue Cubs jersey will later ascend a karaoke stage to groove and enunciate his Chicagoloving heart out in a passionate rendition of AC/DC’s “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap.” It’s this growling tribute to cyanide and neckties—and things like it—that draws Byrd’s group of twenty-something friends to the Double Decker bar, one of whom says he has never bowled here.

“This is a working man’s bar,” says 23-year-old Dillon O’Halloran, looking around at the leather stools, faux-rock wall and big-screen TV set on MLB. Built in the ’70s at the suburbs’ end, often marked by flickering Bud signs, bowling alleys and the bars inside them are indicative of another time, when roller rinks weren’t creepy and brushing PBR foam from your ’stache was neither

ironic nor cool. In the shelf life of hip, this of course means they’re about to hit their critical retro date and become the darlings of Instagram-users everywhere—San Francisco’s just-opened Mission Bowl, with its wunderkind chef, grapefruit cocktails and regularly scheduled brunches, serves as a preview to this inevitable trend. But what of North Bay bowling alley bars? Are they still the

Sara Sanger

T authentic home of longtime regulars—true flannel-andwhiskey dives? Or are they, too, being co-opted by the young and beautiful, those with disposable incomes and nostalgia for a sepiatoned past they never actually knew?

T

he phrase “kids these days,” which I overhear at Boulevard Lanes in

Petaluma, doesn’t seem out of place. Bartender Sasha Barrios confirms that Boulevard’s lounge clientele is generally older. She stands behind a center island made of dark wood and Greek columns, which was remolded after the bar was built, but no one can remember the exact year— sometime during the Reagan era. It looks like it belongs in

he vibe at Windsor Bowl is similar, at least at 5pm. In the warm, wood-paneled interior, a group of men discuss their local Elks Club. A woman sits at the far end of the bar, nursing a beer, and remarks sadly, “I remember the day I turned 40.” And at Double Decker in Rohnert Park, bar manager Shelly Brewer says there’s a steady group of older regulars—“some of them really old”—who come in for a drink every day after work. In the 12 years she’s been here, a number of them have passed away.

Drown Your Sorrows at a Bowling Alley Bar Boulevard Lanes 1100 Petaluma Blvd. S., Petaluma. 707.762.4581. Double Decker Lanes 300 Golf Course Drive, Rohnert Park. 707.585.0226. Windsor Bowl 8801 Conde Lane, Windsor. 707.837.9889. Country Club Bowl 88 Vivian Way, San Rafael. 415.456.4661. Napa Bowl 494 Soscol Ave., Napa. 707.224.8331. (RIP: Continental Lanes, Holiday Bowl, Nave Lanes, L & L Lanes, Cloverdale Bowl and so many others . . . )

“There’s no real label to who comes in here—they’re from all walks of life,” she says. But as the Friday evening hours tick by, Double Decker increasingly swells with younger people who weren’t even alive when a dollar would rent four pairs of bowling shoes—and it’s precisely the bar’s dated, dive aesthetic that draws them, according to O’Halloran and Byrd, who sit across from each other on a pair of leather couches like foils in a bromance. “Nowadays, people go out to get laid or get on the dance floor,” O’Halloran says. “Bowling alley bars are still a little bit of a secret, so no one’s putting on airs.” He has perfect posture, a black coat and says I should refer to him in this piece as “an Adonis in a scarf.” Byrd, meanwhile, sports a T-shirt and slicked-back

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Tom Selleck’s house. Two bigscreen TVs broadcast a 49ers win, signs for Bud, Coors and Miller Lite line the walls, and a small group of patrons reference Cheers and address each other by first name. “Most of our regulars are league bowlers, people who have been bowling for years,” Barrios says. One such regular is a man who asks that I refer to him only by his first name, Kip. He has silver hair and is dressed simply, in boots and denim. He’s been coming to Boulevard for roughly 10 years and has been part of the bowling world for much longer. At the age of 17, he began working as a bowling-alley mechanic, fixing the pinsetters that deposit neat triangles of 10 at the end of each lane. This was in the mid- to late ’70s, he recalls, at bowling alleys in Greenbrae, Millbrae, Novato and San Rafael, most of which have long since closed. “The only one still up is the Country Club in San Rafael,” he says, lamenting the rising cost of the sport. When he first started working, it cost 65 cents to play and 25 cents for shoes, and with the youth discount, it was 40 cents a game and 15 cents for shoes. But although he’s no longer a mechanic, he still enjoys Boulevard’s bar. “I know a lot of the people,” he says. “It’s just comfortable.” Barrios agrees. “The regulars depend on me, I know everyone’s drinks,” she says, adding, “I wouldn’t want to deal with a bunch of kids.”

Bowling ( 19 Rachel Dovey

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hair, and sprawls across the couch in a leisurely slouch as he names the supposed vices of other local watering holes. They suffer from a host of things, he says: fraternity assholes, sorority girls, people the pair went to high school with and bathrooms full of pubic hair. “The thing about this is it’s bluecollar,” O’ Halloran says. They two both work—one at UPS, the other as an EMT—and live with their parents. Neither of them went to SSU. They met in high school at Rancho Cotate, in a scenario involving a comic book store, an Iron Maiden concert or one of their sisters, but because they keep revising the story, I can’t know which one is actually true. I ask if their lifestyles fit with the working-man image they’re conjuring, or if they are, in fact, simply hipsters hopping on the next trend. “Fuck, yes,” says Byrd, when I ask if they’re actually blue-collar. “I leave work sweating every day after busting my ass. I’m not part of that hipster bullshit.” But O’Halloran is less sure. “I guess this is the new cool, like intentionally going to a thrift store,” he says.

“We’re part of it,” he concludes, after considering for a moment and looking genuinely sad. “I should just go hop on my fucking fixedgear. We’re part of the scene that is ruining the bowling alley bars.”

A

fter that, their discussion gets heavy. They talk about unions, guns, Nintendo 64, “the fucking iPad,” the feeling of disdain they have for other Millennials and their lingering fear that they won’t be able to hand a life of security and comfort to their own children in this insecure, post-recession world. “Our generation is lost,” 23-yearold O’Halloran concludes. On the small stage, a karaoke regular I’d met earlier named Karla Mayer belts out “lordy, lordy, lordy, lordy” and assures the Friday-night crowd that freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose. Her soulful voice fills this room full of pool tables and Cubs fans and careworn young adults, warming and soothing a glass full of something amber and familiar knocked back again and again.

Orchard View School K-12 Orchard View School is an independent study charter school serving students in K-12

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UĂ&#x160;VVĂ&#x20AC;i`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;7iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Schools & Colleges UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;7Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;} UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;viĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;ii`i` UĂ&#x160;"Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;-VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;VÂ?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160;Â&#x2021;nĂ&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2026;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;VÂ?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;1° °Ă&#x160;>ÂŤÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;i`Ă&#x160;VÂ?>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â?Â?i}iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;iÂ?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>LĂ&#x160;-VÂ&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x192; UĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x20AC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; Â?Ă&#x2022;L UĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;VĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?Â?Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-,

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Follow Your Path! 707.823.4709 www.orchardviewschool.org 700 Watertrough Rd. Sebastopol, CA tel 707.823.0871 fax 707.823.5832 twinhillsusd.org

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Saturday, February 9, 2013

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The Art of Academic Excellence

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22

CULTURE

Crush

The week’s events: a selective guide

CORTE MADERA

P E TA L U M A

Speaking of Sex

On the Edge

When one is a practicing sex educator and clinical sexologist with several degrees to her credit, it’s only a matter of time before a book deal or movie option comes around. Now a major motion picture nominated for an Oscar, The Sessions is the story of one of Cheryl Greene’s patients who was confined to an iron lung after contracting polio at age six. The devoutly religious man wanted to know what it’s like to “be” with a woman in the Biblical sense; Greene served as his sex surrogate and, lo and behold, it changed his life and inspired a Hollywood script. Greene speaks about her new book, An Intimate Life: Sex, Love and My Journey as a Sex Surrogate Partner, on Friday, Feb. 1, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.

If you can’t get up to Tahoe, you can always live vicariously through the Tahoe Adventure Film Festival. Now with POV footage from GoPro-style cameras, skiing and snowboarding videos are more amazing to watch than ever. But it’s not just winter sports highlighted here. Kayaking, rock climbing, surfing, skating and mountain biking films are included, as well as BASE jumping—you know, when people put on a wing suit and fly at high speeds like a squirrel through the air. Or, if you don’t know, be sure to see the Tahoe Adventure Film Festival on Friday, Feb. 1, at the Mystic Theatre. 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 7:30pm. $15. 707.765.2121.

CLOVERDALE N A PA

Africa’s Dylan Mix some Bob Dylan, a little Marvin Gaye and a touch of Paul Simon, ship it to South Africa and back, and you’ll have a sense of Vusi Mahlasela’s music. The title track from his debut album When You Come Back became an anthem 20 years ago in the fight to end apartheid. “Sing loud, sing to the people,” he sings. “Let them give something to the world and not just take from it.” He’s huge in his home country, and is such a tremendous guitarist and songwriter that it’s baffling why he isn’t more popular in the United States. Vusi Mahlasela plays Thursday, Jan. 31, at Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $15–$20. 707.226.7372.

Pie for Breakfast? Cloverdale? Isn’t that the blink-andyou’ll-miss-it town on the way to River Rock Casino? Maybe, but it’s also home to a fine performing arts center hosting the Brothers Comatose. This folk string quintet has no ego when it comes to where they play. Whether it’s festivals like Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, Strawberry, High Sierra, Outside Lands, Kate Wolf, SXSW or hometown hootenannies at tiny clubs for dedicated fans, it’s refreshing for a group’s personality to match its sound so well. They wrote a song called “Pie for Breakfast,” and that says a lot, right there. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to find a pie . . . The Brothers Comatose play Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Cloverdale Performing Arts Center. 209 N. Cloverdale Blvd., Cloverdale. 7pm. $20–$25. 707.894.2214.

—Nicolas Grizzle SOME LUCKY NIGHT My boyfriend and yours M. Ward plays the Uptown Theatre on Feb. 6. See Concerts, p24.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PREOCCUPIEDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ricky Wattsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new work uses pen and ink, watercolor and colored pencil to mix innocence and reality.

Final Fantasy

Petaluma graffiti artist Ricky Watts hits new stride in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Destination Unknownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY GABE MELINE

I

n his woodstoveheated Sebastopol studio, overlooking his grandparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; old backyard where he used to hunt Eater eggs as a child, Ricky Watts remembers the ďŹ rst time he got arrested.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was 15,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and it was a citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrest. A guy was walking his dog and saw us painting under a bridge, and he called the police. And the police were so quick to move on us that we had nowhere to go.â&#x20AC;? Watts had some explaining

to do to his parents, and went to court, but fortunately, it would also be his last arrest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was always very lucky,â&#x20AC;? Watts says carefully, â&#x20AC;&#x153;for the amount of illegal graffiti that I did over the span of 10 to 12 years.â&#x20AC;? The image of a wide-eyed kid

who just wanted to paint being thrown in a police car could serve as a blueprint for the dichotomy between innocence and maturity that fuels Wattsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new pieces in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Destination Unknown,â&#x20AC;? a collection of new paintings at Boomerang Gallery inside Heebe Jeebe in Petaluma, opening Feb. 2. In the pieces, children play obliviously in front of a train wreck; hot-air balloons soar over coastal ghettos; smoke and rubble from the 1906 earthquake give way to a colorful street scene, and more. Now 32, Watts no longer goes out on all-night sojourns with a backpack full of supplies like he used toâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;though one wall of his studio is still entirely covered with spray paint cansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and instead has graduated to creating detailed works over the course of several months rather than minutes. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s regularly commissioned to paint murals, signs, storefronts and even cars, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s his intricate paintings, blending the realistic and the phantasmagorical, that consume most of his passion. That passion has paid off. Taking a cue from his Symphony of Perception, a large re-imagining of Brazilian favelas that sold for $8,000 last year, Wattsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new works in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Destination Unknownâ&#x20AC;? combine ďŹ&#x201A;oating orbs and strange animals with an incredibly disciplined attention to architecture. A painted illustration of the Fox Theater in Oakland is particularly intricate, with impossibly miniscule lines making up the stained glass, the stonework and the lettering on the marquee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usually, about halfway through every drawing,â&#x20AC;? Watts laughs, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think to myself, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What the hell am I doing?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Because it gets so detailed, I get so overwhelmed.â&#x20AC;? Watts, the grandson of a ) 24

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ArtsIdeas

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The NEW Spreckels Theatre Company Presents

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Burt Shevelove & Larry Gelbart

FEBRUARY 8 - 17

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFH H  VSUHFNHOVRQQOLQHFRP

Ricky Watts ( 23 sign painter and woodworker, was raised in Petaluma, where he drew comics for himself in elementary school. When he was 13, he discovered graffiti. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I [found] a graffiti magazine, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when I saw the real artistic, colorful murals that people were doing,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what blew my mind. I thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not really good at this vandalism part.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; You know? I would feel guilty about doing it. But I thought how cool it would be to create these big, colorful murals with spray paint.â&#x20AC;? Soon, Watts teamed up with his friend Jared Powell, with whom he still works and collaborates, and the two became late-night spray-paint partners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we had no idea what we were doing,â&#x20AC;? he explains of those teen years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was all very trial-and-error. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very different now. There are these websites that will literally teach you how to build up a complex piece of graffiti; it shows you the step-by-step process. And we were doing it completely backwards.â&#x20AC;? A breakthrough came when Watts was 16 and Tom Gaffey let him paint a mural inside the Phoenix Theater, legally and on his own time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It really helped build that foundation of learning different techniques,â&#x20AC;? Watts says. Those techniques eventually led Watts to a long-running abstract stage in his artâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;lots of swirling patterns that laterally resemble oceanic eels or muscle tissue. But a recent series of 10 line illustrations based on the 19th-century architecture of Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which, unlike Santa Rosa, was unaffected by the 1969 earthquakesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;opened him back up to the ďŹ ne-tip pen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very drawn to the history of Petaluma, and that could be something I get from my mom, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of a Petaluma historian,â&#x20AC;? Watts notes. The series included the McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s building, the Masonic building and its iconic clock tower, and a street scene looking east on Washington Street, including Volpiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the Petaluma Hotel and the California Theater. In one, a large chicken

stomps along Petaluma Boulevard, destroying the town that over time has lost its title as the chicken capital of America.

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncommon for graffiti artists to morph into renowned names in the ďŹ ne art world, though there is a growing number of examples. Barry McGee, the San Francisco legend once known as Twist, has substantial pieces in the SFMOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permanent collection and last year put together a massive retrospective for the Berkeley Museum of Art. His current styleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most widely known by small faces painted on glass bottlesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is starkly different from his late-1980s tags and murals. Stephen Powers, a Philadelphia graffiti artist known as ESPO, began expanding the typography of tagging, left graffiti in 2000 and is now commissioned to paint large murals worldwide. His series A Love Letter for You covers aged buildings throughout Philadelphia with phrases like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miss You Too Often Not To Love Youâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Everafter Is All Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Afterâ&#x20AC;? painted in vintage billboard style. Wattsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most high-proďŹ le job came last year at the Outside Lands music festival in Golden Gate Park, which chose his Bone Shaker to use on the gigantic scrim banner of one of the stages. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a lark; a dry-erase board in the studio shows a full slate of upcoming work, and between art and graphic design, Watts is paying the bills. Watts plans to move back to Petaluma this year, and in another sort of coming home, has been asked by the Petaluma Arts Center to paint the south wall of the Phoenix Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a massive, 50by-40-foot urban canvas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always been a dream of mine to paint that wall,â&#x20AC;? he says, cracking a sly smile of his former graffiti-artist self. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll easily be the largest wall Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever painted.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Destination Unknownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Feb. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;28 at Boomerang Gallery inside Heebe Jeebe. Opening reception, Feb. 2, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm. 46 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 707.773.3222.

CLEAN THAT UP! Stephen Cannon

and Tim Shippey in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Odd Couple.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Buddy System Raven Players serve up Neil Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Odd Coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY DAVID TEMPLETON

O

scar and Felix.

Even people whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen the 1965 Neil Simon play The Odd Couple will recognize those iconic namesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the slob and the neat freak, forced to become roommates, constantly on each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nerves. Adapted to the screen in 1968, The Odd Couple, originally performed on Broadway by Walter Matthau and Art Carney, became a national phenomenon in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, with the long-running television series starring Jack Klugman and Tony Randall. In 1985, Simon rewrote the play as a vehicle for two female actresses, and there are those who ďŹ nd The Female Odd Couple, as it was titled, to be even funnier than the original. And there are those among us, myself included, who still prefer the strange 1975 animated TV show The Oddball

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Odd Coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Feb. 10 at the Raven Performing Arts Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$23. 707.433.6335.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t D onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t M Miss iss tthe he F First irst E Ever ver

ArtQuest A rttQ Que u st

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Saturday, February 2 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:00pm Brought to you by Friends of ArtQuest

Friedman Event Center Dancing to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gatorbeatâ&#x20AC;? Cajun-style dinner with local wines Amazing auction Mardi Gras festive attire welcome!

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Stage

Couple, in which Oscar and Felix were transformed into a dog and catâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;named Fleabag and Spiffy. Still, it is good, now and then, to return to the source material, and under the direction of John Green, Healdsburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Raven Players are giving the original play a jaunty, pleasurable revival at the Raven Performing Arts Theater. Though conspicuously dated, with popcultural references that lack the sizzle they once carried, there is much that is genuinely funny about these characters. Oscar (played with a gruff and natural charm by Tim Shippey) is a slovenly, long-divorced sportswriter, who offers his New York apartment to his best friend, the uptight, recently separated Felix. Felix is played by Stephen Cannon, who curiously adopts a dreamy, distanced, passive-aggressiveness instead of the expected highstrung single-mindedness that deďŹ nes Felix in most versions, including the one where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cat. Still, Cannon nails much of the physical comedy, including the classic scene where Felix attempts to clear his sinuses with a series of weird nasal noises, a wonderful little gem of a comic moment. The supporting cast is strong, with Jeremy Boucher leading a pack of local character actors as Oscarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly poker buddies, and Karen Wallace and Tory Rotlisberger delivering delightfully ďŹ&#x201A;irty performances as Cecily and Gwendolyn Pigeon, two buxom British sisters whose hilarious double-date with Oscar and Felix leads to irreparable complications. Director Green keeps the story clipping along steadily, though he misses a few big opportunities to deliver the kind of madcap sitcom energy that playwright Simon built into the script. On the whole, though, this Odd Couple delivers the goods. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gently funny jab at people who carry their mistakes from relationship to relationship, and the ups, downs and ultimate limits of real friendship.

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Film

MUSICAL MAGIC Sezen Aksu, considered the voice of Istanbul, in Fatih Akin’s new film.

Instant Istanbul

A cultural moment in Turkey, captured BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

O

ne of the best German films of the last decade was director Fatih Akin’s Head-On, a comedy about a drunken, sullen Turkish hanger-on at a bar in Hamburg’s notorious St. Pauli district. Akin’s documentary follow up, Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul, playing for one night at SSU’s Sonoma Film Institute, is a musical exploration of Istanbul, that ancient city on its severed isthmus, caught between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean. Akin’s on-screen interviewer is Alexander Hacke, bassist from the industrial band Einstürzende Neubauten; he’s a gregarious German eccentric introducing us to such acts as BaBa ZuLa, Orient Expressions and Sezen Aksu, as well as street performers. A contortionist breakdancer, spinning to Istanbul hip-hop, is followed by a sold-out auditorium where a tuft-haired, multipierced wind instrumentalist solos on Sufi music. The band’s dervish dancer, a young female American with cropped red hair, describes her process: “You achieve this kind of space that

makes it easier to continue whirling than to stand still.” This isn’t Third World music, but what Brian Eno called “fourth world.” There’s Gypsy music influenced by blues; at a corner jam session with cigarettes, close your eyes and it sounds like Richie Havens. We hear Eastern glissandos on the kind of icy zither usually reserved for spy films, and we attend to the virtuosity of Orhan Gencebay on the baglama, with its lathlike neck. (This skill is contrasted with an equally robust part of his career: clips of some of the sweaty, zoom-lensmaddened Turkish film melodramas he acted in when he was younger.) City music scenes tend to evaporate fast. And as seen in the documentary No One Knows About Persian Cats, the hard-line Islamic world restricts the live performance of music to what Catholics used to call “a near occasion of sin.” Akim’s irresistible documentary may be one of the last great records of a time of overflowing musical richness. ‘Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul’ screens Friday, Feb. 1, at 7pm and Sunday, Feb. 3, at 4pm at the Sonoma Film Institute at SSU.

RESONATION Some of the best

luthiers are here in Sonoma County.

Wooden Wonders Day-long guitar fest hits Sebastopol

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

M

usic saved my life,â&#x20AC;? says Kevin Russell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was a kid, we moved a lot. One of the constants in my life turned out to be music.â&#x20AC;? His appreciation of music led Russell to organize the Sebastopol Guitar Festival, a day-long celebration of the craft and art of making and playing the six-string sword. This appreciation led Russell to organize the Sebastopol Guitar Festival, showcasing the art of making and playing the six-string sword on Feb. 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just in love with guitars,â&#x20AC;? says Russell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guitar is probably the most popular instrument in the world, and I wanted to do something that celebrated that.â&#x20AC;? Not just another guitar concert, the event highlights luthiery, the craft of building guitars by hand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have some of the best guitar builders in the world right here,â&#x20AC;?

The Sebastopol Guitar Festival is on Saturday, Feb. 2, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. Noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$40 ($25 day-long pass with special code Kebtone). 707.823.1511.

27 22/1 /1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 22/7 /7

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WWWMCNEARSCOM

THE LAST DAY SALOON 120 Fifth Street, Santa Rosa, CA TM

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raw and Riveting!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling Stone Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:15 9:45 RR

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Feb 26th at 7:15 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROUS Ă&#x201C; \Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x201C;\{äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D; \Ă&#x160;­£Ă&#x201C;\£äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x160; SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA

Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x192;V>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Starts Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x2022;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;itĂ&#x160; Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! ­£Ă&#x201C;\äxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\xxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\xäĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 "Ă&#x192;V>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iiĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160; >Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;7>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;t 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH ­£\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\ÂŁxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS {Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x192;V>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;VÂ?Ă&#x2022;`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;t 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

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Crusn Karaoke by Rick

EVERY TUES. 8 pm show | FREE | all ages

2/3 SF Feetwarmers + jam sessions by T.R.A.D. J.A.S.S. Dixieland jazz | 12:30 pm door |$10 | all ages

C-Money & The Players Inc. featuring

2/7

members of Slightly Stoopid + Agent 22 feat. Rymo of Slightly Stoopid reggae | 9 pm door |$10/12 | 21+

2/8 Bob Marley Birthday Celebration

Inner Riddim with Sky I + Jah Wave + Amha Selassie Baraka reggae | 9 pm door | $10 | 21+

2/9 Comedy Night presented by Holy City Zoo with

Andrew Norelli

+ Dhaya Lakshminarayanan + Matt Larson comedy | 7:30 pm door | $15/18 | 21+

2/15

Natural Vibrations

+ Thrive + Bellyfull

reggae | 9 pm door | $12 | 21+

2/16

Davey Pattison

LEAD SINGER OF GAMMA, ROBIN TROWER, MONTROSE

707.545.5876 - LASTDAYSALOON.COM

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JA N UA RY 3 0 - F E B R UA RY 5, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

Music

says Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and those luthiers are building the best guitars ever made, he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people say weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the golden age of luthiery right now.â&#x20AC;? The eight luthiers scheduled to give workshops at the event are all local, differing from the much larger Healdsburg Guitar Festival, a bi-annual event attracting talented craftsmen from around the globe. Luthiers scheduled to speak at the Sebastopol Guitar Festival include acoustic guitar builder Bruce Sexauer, arched-top guitar specialist Tom Ribbecke, and Harry Fleishman, who runs a luthiery school. Films about legendary guitarists screen throughout the day in a separate room before the main event at 8pm, when Stevie Coyle and Mike Dowling take the stage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not the kind of guys that would get attention from the mass media,â&#x20AC;? says Russell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re stunning, stunning musicians.â&#x20AC;? Dowling is a former session guitarist who spent his time in some of the biggest studios in Nashville. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the guy is one of the best guitar players on the planet,â&#x20AC;? Russell gushes. Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enthusiasm for music stems from a young age. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I fell in love when I was ďŹ ve years old looking at my uncleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guitar. I know it sounds weird, but I actually had a viceral experience in my body,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnt feel that feeling again until I fell in love with the ďŹ rst girl I fell in love with.â&#x20AC;? He now plays both electric and acoustic guitar in several bands, including the Rhythm Rangers and the Country Trainwrecks. Even guitars made in the same factory by the same company in the same year can have different qualities. Some call it â&#x20AC;&#x153;toneâ&#x20AC;?; others have more mysterious names for it. Whatever that special quality is, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s irreplaceable. Russell sums it up understatedly: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every guitar sounds different.â&#x20AC;?

Music

N O RT H BAY B O H E M I A N | JA N UA RY 3 0 - F E B R UA RY 5, 2 0 1 3 | B O H E M I A N.COM

28 BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR SINGLES MEET S INGLES TO M E ET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE

THUR T HUR – JAN JAN 3 31 1

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

132 KELLER STREET PETALUMA

HAPPY HOUR Mon–Fri 4:30-6:30pm Saturday Feb 2 The Designer Deejays featuring

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK UN K | B BOOGIE O O GI E B BREAKS R E AK S | G GYPSY YPSY DOODLE D O O D LE

DJ JUST

MANCUB ((SPACE MANCUB SPACE COWBOYS) COWBOYS) VS M MATT ATT HAZE HAZE ((SLAYERS SLAYERS CLUB) CLUB)

9:30–1:30 No Cover

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

SUNDAY SUPPER

OPPOSING O PPOSING M MEDIA EDIA PRESENTS PRESENTS

with a live preformance by "America's Got Talent" Semi-Finalist

+ MALARKEY MALARKEY

FRI F RI – F FEB EB 1

SSTAND TAND UP UP COMEDY COMEDY

OPPOSING MEDIA OPPOSING MEDIA AND AND WORLDS WORLDS B BIGGEST I G G E ST C COMEDY OMEDY D DUO UO

"COMEDY OV "COMEDY OVERLOAD" ERLOAD" STYLE MOVIE & MST3K MST3K S TYLE M OVIE R IFFING RIFFING

+ A LIVE LIVE MOVIE MOVIE RIFFING RIFFING COMEDY COMEDY $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 77:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT – F FEB EB 2

THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY PRESENTS PRESENTS SOUL SO UL | POP POP | FUNK FUNK

8TH 8 TH G GRADER RADER

+ TINY TINY PYRAMIDS PYRAMIDS & DJ PAUL PAUL TIMBERMAN TIMBERMAN $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ M MON ON – FEB FEB 4 WEEKLY W EEK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK K DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE PRESENTS PRESENTS

Sunday Feb 3

TIM HOCKENBERRY 6pm–9pm, No Cover Sunday Feb 3

SUNDAY BRUNCH 9:30pm–2:30pm

SUPER BOWL PARTY 3pm–7pm Saturday Feb 9 Live Performance by

CHRIS CLOUSE 707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

REGGAE R EGGAE | DANCEHALL DANCEHALL | HIP HIP H HOP OP

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT

Country music superstar. Nataly Dawn opens. Feb 1, 8pm. $50-$65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

M. Ward Indie-rock darling and Oregonian troubadour (and half of She & Him) tours with solo material. Alela Diane opens. Feb 6, 7pm. $27. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Tommy Emmanuel Australian guitarist uses all 10 fingers to play his instrument like a piano. Feb 2, 8pm. $30-$40. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Jan 30, Stefanie Keys & Dave Shul. First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater Feb 1, Kingsborough. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009. Jan 31, KWTF Fun(d)raiser. Feb 1, Mystic Man & Mackay, MidnightSun Massive, Soul Union. Feb 2, Nick Gravenites Band. Feb 3, Superbowl Party. Mon, Art & Music with Stanley Mouse. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Los Lobos

Cinnabar Theater Feb 1, Patsy & the Bobcats. Feb 2, Swing Fever with Denise Perrier. Feb 3, the Alphabet Players. 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

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Pablo Cruise ƉůƵƐdŚĞĚŐĞ

Sun March 3

Cloverdale Performing Arts Center

Fri March 8

AMERICANA A MERIC ANA | FOLK FOLK | ROCK R O CK

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 7:45PM/ALL 7: 45PM /ALL AGES AGES

One of the world’s premier slide guitarists. Feb 2, 8pm. $20. Hopmonk Tavern Session Room, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Sat February 23 ŶǀĞŶŝŶŐǁŝƚŚPride & Joy Sun February 24

NORTH N O R TH B BAY AY H HOOTENANNY O OT E N A N N Y P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

FEATURING FE ATURING JJAMIE AMIE DEWOLF DEWOLF

Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings

Lewis Black

Aaron Lewis

NORTH N ORTH BAY BAY POETRY POETRY SLAM SLAM

Hawaiian slack-key guitar master with an easygoing style. Jan 31, 8pm. $16-$22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Sat February 16

+T TBA BA

POETRY/SPOKEN PO ETRY/ SPOKEN WORD/LYRICISM WORD / LYRICISM

Led Kaapana

M Ward

$$15 15 ADV/DOORS ADV/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+ SUN SU N – FEB FEB 10 10 M MONTHLY ONTHLY E EVENT VENT BS SAGE AGE P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

Left Coast Chamber Ensemble premieres work by Jen Wang and Eun Young Lee. Program includes Takemitsu, Sazegari, Debussy and Crumb. Jan 31, 8pm. $15-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sun February 10

ůĂŶWĂƌƐŽŶƐ>ŝǀĞWƌŽũĞĐƚ

+D DUSTBOWL USTBOWL REVIVAL REVIVAL

Take a journey back to the days of highballs and hijinks with a tribute to the legendary Vegas act. Feb 2, 8pm. $35-$50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Cool Music, Clear Water

Wed February 6

MARIA MA RIA MULDAUR MULDAUR SAT S AT – F FEB EB 9

Sandy Hackett’s Rat Pack

MARIN COUNTY

ŶŝŶƟŵĂƚĞĞǀĞŶŝŶŐǁŝƚŚ

JB BOOGIE OOGIE !! !!

AMERICANA A MERIC ANA | FOLK FOLK | ROCK R O CK

Founders of hardcore punk on farewell tour. Harrington Saints, the Nerv, Hellbomber and Puke N Rally open. Jan 31, 8pm. $14. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Terrific bluegrass-sounding duo featuring Chris Wood on upright bass. Feb 5, 8pm. $17$19. Mystic Theatre, 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Clint Black plus Nataly Dawn

+ MALARKEY MALARKEY AND AND INI INI HO HOSTED STED BY BY RADIOACTIVE RADIOACTIVE !!! !!! THE T HE A ABBEY BBEY PRESENTS PRESENTS

D.O.A.

Wood Brothers

Fri February 1

6Y YEAR EAR A ANNIVERSARY NNIVERSARY

FRI F RI – F FEB EB 8

The funky folksters return to their ol’ stomping grounds. Feb 2, 7pm. $20-$25. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Clint Black

Aubergine

GHETTO G HET TO FUNK FUNK | BOOGIE BOOGIE BREAKS BREAKS | GYPSY GYPSY DOODLE D O O D LE

$$6/DOORS 6/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

Brothers Comatose

Bluesman appears with a fourpiece band on double bill with Paul Thorn Band opening. Feb 2, 9pm. $30. Last Day

((FUNKTION FUNK TION F FAMILY) AMILY)

WITH W ITH

SONOMA COUNTY

Tommy Castro & Paul Thorn

DJJ K D KURIOUS URIOUS

$3 $ 3R RED ED S STRIPES TRIPES & $ $4 4 JJAMESON AMESON A ALL LL N NIGHT IGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/ DOORS 7PM/21+ 7PM/21+ TUES T UES – FEB FEB 5 WEEKLY W EEK KLY EVENT EVENT HOPMONK H OPMONK K PRESENTS PRESENTS OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT HOSTED HOSTED BY BY E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES T THUR HUR – FEB FEB 7 WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

Concerts

NAPA COUNTY

Thur March 21

Feb 2, Brothers Comatose. 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Fri March 22

Club Credo at Credo High School

Sat March 16 ŶĞǀĞŶŝŶŐǁŝƚŚ>ĞŽ<ŽƩŬĞ SOLD OU

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Feb 1, David LaFlamme, Phil Lawrence Quartet. 1290 Southwest Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.664.0600.

Special Guest: DJ Harry Duncan

Fri March 29

The Dan Band Sat March 30

Crystal Bowersox Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

I GOTTA BE ME, OR SOMEONE ELSE Sandy

Hackett’s Rat Pack, complete with Sammy Davis Jr., hits the Wells Fargo Center Feb. 2. See Concerts, above.

Dry Creek Kitchen Feb 4, Christian Foley-Beining & Tom Shader. Feb 5, Susan Sutton & Bill Fouty.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Gaia’s Garden

Green Music Center Feb 3, Trio Navarro. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Concerts

The Sebastopol Guitar Festival

with master guitarists Stevie Coyle & Mike Dowling

Saturday, February 2, Noon-10:00 pm

Hopmonk Tavern Jan 31, Mancub vs Matt Haze. Feb 2, 8th Grader. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

A day of exhibits, workshops, talks & music! Presented by Kebtone Productions & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center Use coupon code BOHO for a $25 all access pass

Ferron

Hotel Healdsburg

Punk’s Not Dead (Yet) Hardcore forefathers D.O.A. embark on ‘farewell tour’ Punk’s not dead; it’s just looking for a way to smoke cigarettes in an iron lung. Legendary Canadian hardcore punk group D.O.A. are on a farewell tour. After 32 years, the group is calling it quits. As the old punk adage goes, when you’ve made more albums in a career than the number of beers you can drink in a night, it’s time to hang up the hair gel. With 18 full-length records, a live album, 21 seven-inches, countless compilations and even a book, Joey “Shithead” Keithley and friends are done with a career that helped birth a genre and pave the way for punk to get harder, faster and finally not care about fashion. Listening to D.O.A. never gets old, because the music pretty much stayed the same from day one: power chords and simple rhymes, a circle pit in 4/4 time. Today’s punk, if you can find it, compares to D.O.A. like a Shih Tzu to a Doberman. If you think you’re into punk and your favorite band is New Found Glory or Blink 182, go see D.O.A. at the Phoenix. Don’t wear Converse. Wear boots. And for fuck’s sake, turn your cell phone off. D.O.A. play with Harrington Saints, the Nerv, Hellbomber and Puke n Rally on Thursday, Jan. 31, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $14. 707.762.3565.—Nicolas Grizzle

Feb 1, Susan Sutton & Bill Fouty. Feb 2, Sam Grobe-Heintz Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Finley Community Center Feb 1, Larry Broderick Trio. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Flamingo Lounge Feb 1, Powerhouse. Feb 2,

Groove Foundation. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Feb 1, Bohemian HWY. Feb 2, Solid Air. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Saturday, February 9, 8:00 pm

Lagunitas Tap Room

Dave Alvin & The Guilty Ones and Marshall Crenshaw

Jan 30, David Thom Band. Jan 31, Daddy Squeeze. Feb 1, Dore Coller & Bermudagrass. Feb 2, Jinx Jones. Feb 3, Third Rail Lite. Feb 6, Chris Goddard & Doug Adamz. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Feb 2, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers, Paul Thorn. Wed, Caribbean Wednesday. Mon, karaoke. Thurs, Open Mic Jam Night with the Boomers. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Sunday, February 24, 7:30 pm

Sebastopol

Also Coming Soon Carrie Rodriguez with Keith Greeninger opening – March 1 Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet – March 15 Kelly Willis & Bruce Robison – April 19

Community

Cultural Center

Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Main Street Station Feb 1, Vernelle Anders. Feb 2, Yancy Taylor Trio. Feb 4, Gypsy Cafe. Feb 5, Maple Profant. Feb 6, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Feb 1, Counter Culture. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

1stt Annual 1s Annual

Latin L atin Jazz Jazz

Music Mu sic & D Dance ance

Festival F estival

presented b presented byy SSanta anta R Rosa osa Salsa S als a

iin n th thee FFlamingo la ming o B Ballroom/Lounge allroom/Lounge

FFebruary ebruar y 115–17 5–17

Monroe Dance Hall

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

THE BLUE DEVILS Feb 1 Dance to Blues with a Feelin’ Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

PETTY THEFT Feb 2 The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute Sat

8:30pm

THE TWO MIKES Feb 8 Nicasio’s Favorite Mikes— Fri

Feb 2, the Zydeco Flames. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jan 31, JP Soden. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Feb 5, the Wood Brothers. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

with Teresa Tudury opening

Jan 31, DOA, Harrington Saints, the Nerv, Hellbomber and Puke N Rally. Feb 1, Eat the Undead, Sanctuary Lost, Absolute Zero, Nick Petty & Water, Civilian Assault, Sepulchre. Feb 2, Charley Peach, Don’t Tip the Tweester, Soup Sandwich, the Jaded. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. ) 707.762.3565.

30

ic Plan a R Plan Romantic omantic V alentine’s Weekend al Weekend e nd Valentine’s

Room/Full Event Room/Full Event package package from f ro m $ 3379pp 79pp oorr rrooms ooms from f rom $11 119 9

Lipskin and Duke Together for the First Time! 7:30pm / No Cover Sat EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Feb 9 Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball 8:30pm Second Sunday Series Sun Feb 10 JEREMY D’ANTONIO AND FRIENDS 4:00pm / No Cover Thur Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Feb 14 THE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE 7:00pm

JL STILES Feb 15 Ragtime/Folk Songwriter Fri

8:30pm

WENDY DEWITT’S Feb 17 Piano Party 4:00pm / No Cover Sun

27 7 7 Fourth 2777 Four th Street, Street , Santa Sant a Rosa Rosa w w w.SRL ATINJA Z Z .com www.SRLATINJAZZ.com 70 7. 4 8 4 .6 0 8 6 707.484.6086

8:00pm / No Cover

DANNY CLICK AND THE HELL YEAHS Feb 16 Original Americana/Texas Blues Sat

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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Feb 1, Rory McNamara. Feb 3, Jazz Jam. Feb 6, Shade. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

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30

Music ( 29

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Feb 3, Primavera. Feb 5, Swing Fever. Feb 6, Joan Getz Quartet. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Feb 1, Boo Radleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Feb 2, the Bruthas. First Friday of every month, Dginn. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Society: Culture House First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room Feb 2, Stax City. Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Tradewinds Jan 30, Ricky Alan Ray Band. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Wells Fargo Center Feb 2, Sandy Hackettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rat Pack. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Jan 31, Friends of Finch. Feb 1, Soul Satellites. Feb 2, Elliottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Evil Plan. Feb 5, Dynamo Jones. Feb 6, Down with May. Mon, acoustic open mic. First Sunday of every month, Blues Jam. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jan 31, Led Kaapana. Feb 1, Nicki Bluhm & the Gramblers. Feb 2, Vinyl. Feb 4 and 5, Jorma Kaukonen of Hot Tuna. Feb 6, Ray Wylie Hubbard. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Rancho Nicasio

Terrapin Crossroads

Feb 2, Petty Theft. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sun, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Sausalito Seahorse Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes & Friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello & Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House Jan 31, Vusi Mahlasela. Feb 2, Tommy Emmanuel. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Feb 1, Danny Clickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Texas Blues Night. Feb 5, Drake Jazz Band. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Feb 1, Clint Black. Feb 6, M Ward. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Jan 31, Davis Jones. Feb 1, Afro Funk Experience. Feb 2, Swoon.

Feb 1, Rick Harris & Silverado. Feb 2, Elaine Lucia. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Irish Pub

ZYDECO FLAMES Saturday, Feb 2

Wed, Jan 30 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Jan 31 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Feb 1 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Feb 2 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise For Groundhog Day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Steve Luther presents THE ZYDECO FLAMES

Sun, Feb 3 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Feb 4 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Feb 5 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm BRAZILIAN MUSIC AND DANCE with Vitoria Strowbridge

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

HAPPY HOUR ~ all day Sunday   Č&#x2C6;  ~ Mondays ĆŹ  ~ noon till 2am Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Í Č&#x2C6;Soul Jazz hip hop Songstress

J.ROSS PARRELLI

with DJ LEX OF SOULS OF MISCHIEF Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Č&#x2C6;Í&#x;Č&#x201A;Í&#x161;Â&#x192;Â?Č&#x2C6;$2 Session Larger all night

Live Band Pro Jam & featured Vocalists, Singers & MC's

SESSIONS

Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Í&#x2122;Í&#x153;Č&#x2C6;Ital Lounge Valentines for Lovers only Night

LOVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROCK!

Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x17D; Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2022;Č&#x2C6;Roots, Reggae & Lovers Rock Top Rankin Reggae showcase presents

INNER RIDDIM

Í&#x161;Í?Í&#x2122;Í&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;

707.829.2062

Jan 31, Cool Music, Clear Water. Feb 2, Kimrea & the Dream Dogs. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace Feb 2, Peppino Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Agostino & David Tannebaum. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. Feb 1, Pop Fiction. Feb 2, Stephanie Teel Band. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Tavern Session Room Feb 1, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Feb 2, Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-892-6200.

19 Broadway Club Jan 30, Diamond Jazz. Jan 30, Down with May. Jan 31, Soul Union. Feb 1, AZ/DZ. Feb 3, Status, Justice League & Mod Squad of Berkeley. Feb 6, Safety Orange. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Local Natives Sweet harmonies and tight musicianship underscore bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hummingbird.â&#x20AC;? Jan 30 at Fox Theater.

Ian Hunter Frontman of Mott the Hoople and Mick Ronson affiliate sings for all the young dudes. Feb 1 at the Fillmore.

Rebeca MauleĂłn JesĂşs Diaz, Carlos Caro and other Latin jazz greats join pianist in Afro Kuban Fusion group. Feb 2 at SFJAZZ Center.

Solange BeyoncĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s younger sister, whose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Losing Youâ&#x20AC;? is one of the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best pop singles. Feb 5 at the Independent.

People Under the Stairs Sometimes, you have to write a bad review of a show. Take note: these guys will write back. Feb 6 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

31

Galleries RECEPTIONS Jan 31 At 4pm. University Art Gallery, “New York Paper,” art by Brian Novatny and Jennifer Nuss. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295. At 5pm. Marin History Center Gallery, “Dorothea Lange at Steep Ravine,” photos of Marin coast in 1950s. Reception with live music, curator’s talk and tour. 1026 Court St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538.

Feb 1 At 6pm. Seager Gray Gallery, “Arbors of Imagination,” paintings by Helen Stanley. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

Feb 2 At 1pm. RiskPress Gallery, “Abstraction,” art by David Kingwill & Carol Herzog. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Feb 5 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Bold,” mixed-media artworks that explore bold use of color. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation.” Through Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations” highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays throughout the year. Through Apr 28, “Useable, Loveable Peanuts,” highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products plus the licensing and manufacturing stories behind them. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers

Agrella Art Gallery Feb 4-Mar 7, “The Still Point: Abstract Constructions,” drawings, paintings and collages by Judith Foosaner, Connie Goldman and Emily Lazarre. Reception, Feb 7, 4pm. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat 12 to 4. 707.527.4298.

Artlife Gallery Through Mar 10, “Storied Lives: The Art of Narrative,” mixed media from 14 artists. 958 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Through Mar 10, “Four Weavers,” contemporary expressions of an ancient craft. Lecture, Feb 2, 1pm. Workshops, Feb 9, 1pm and Feb 23, 9am. Demonstration, Feb 16, 2pm. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

RiskPress Gallery Feb 1-28, “Abstraction,” art by David Kingwill & Carol Herzog. Reception, Feb 2, 1pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 3, “Winter,” photography by Lance Kuehne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Finley Community Center

Sonoma Academy

Through Feb 7, “Monty Monty’s Traveling Air Show & Aeronautical Wonders,” sculptures of fantasy flight contraptions. Through Feb 7, “Nik Catalina: Photographs,” the magic and wonder of nature. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Sonoma County Museum

Through Feb 21, “White Plus One,” open-juried multimedia exhibit. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Graton Gallery Through Feb 24, “Invitational Exhibition,” fine art by wellknown Northern California artists. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Museum

SONOMA COUNTY

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Mar 6, David Kingwill’s abstract paintings. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery One

Jan 30-Apr 20, “Healdsburg: 100 Years Past and Present,” Historical artifacts, ephemera and more from life 100 years ago. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 3, “Science Route,” featuring colorful land and seascape oil paintings by Linda Sorenson. Feb 6-Mar 11, “Multi-Medea,” featuring engravings and paintings by Rik Olson. Reception, Feb 9, 2pm. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

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Arts Events

Through Feb 27, art exhibit by painter Maja Ruznic. 2500 Farmers Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1770.

Through Feb 24, “In My Back Yard,” photography group exhibition taking the Sonoma County Museum as subject. Panel discussion, Feb 7, 6:30pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Towers Gallery Through Mar 11, “Bright Beginnings,” 40 local artists with a variety of mediums. Reception, Feb 9, 5pm. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

University Art Gallery Jan 31-Feb 24, “New York Paper,” art by Brian Novatny and Jennifer Nuss. Reception, Jan 31, 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Upstairs Art Gallery Feb 1-24, Lenona Winter, plein air paintings. Reception, Feb 9, 3pm. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

Worthy of Love Feb 1-Mar 2, “We Are Rising,” positive expression of women, their resiliency and their sensuality. )

32

Reverse Happy Hour in Lounge

Fri & Sat, 10pm until midnight

Bohemian Drink Special

3*XGLZ(KKXŠMention BOHO Drink

$

Terrace Grille

Happy Hour 3

$ 00

Mon–Fri, 4–6pm

Šall single liquor Well Drinks Š*XGLZ(KKXŠ.U[YK=OTK ŠAppetizers 9`KIN[GT=OTMYŠ)GRGSGXO Š)NOVUZRK9ROJKXY Rosemary Garlic Polenta Fries

FOR UPCOMING BANDS AND LINKS TO BAND WEBSITES: www.FlamingoResort.com/entertainment or call 707.545.8530 EXT. 727

Heirloom Craft Hub

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Each evening includes instruction for a specific craft. Last Thurs of every month. $5. Marin History Museum, Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538.

Mardi Gras Casino Night Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence help bring the Big Easy to the Laguna. Feb 2, 7pm. $75. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Karen Peterson Psychic and medium. Feb 3, 2pm. $45. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Windsor’s Got Talent Come see who’s got “it.” Fresh tamales or spare ribs with ticket purchase. Feb 2, 7pm. $10-$20. Mary Agatha Furth Center, 8400 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor.

Film BYGONE ERA Photos of midcentury Marin by Dorothea Lange are at the Jan. 31 opening of the Marin History Museum’s History Center Gallery. See Receptions, p31.

A E

( 31

226 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

MARIN COUNTY Bay Model Visitor Center Through Feb 23, “Reflections on Water,” photographic exhibition celebrating the life and beauty of Marin’s creeks. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 9, “BayWood Artists,” dedicated to painting and preserving Marin’s natural landscape. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Mar 5, “Larkspur Through the Eyes of an Artist,” paintings by Bryn Craig. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 3, “Out of the Blue,” annual juried show. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum History Center Gallery Jan 31-Apr 6, “Dorothea Lange at Steep Ravine,” photos of Marin coast in 1950s. Reception with live music, curator’s talk and tour, Jan 31, 5pm. 1026 Court St, San Rafael.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 24, “State of Mind,” member art exploring the concept. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Feb 5-28, “Bold,” mixed-media artworks that explore bold use of color. Reception, Feb 5, 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Seager Gray Gallery Feb 1-Mar 3, “Arbors of Imagination,” paintings by

Helen Stanley. Reception, Feb 1, 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Comedy Clara Bijl & Helen Pachynski

Celebrate Sonoma County Series featuring films shot in Sonoma County. Feb 1, “The Birds.” First Fri of every month. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Charlotte’s Web Family day at the movies featuring animated classic tale of a talking pig and his ghostwriting spider. Feb 2, 10:30am. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Center for the Performing Arts, Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Hawaii: A Voice for Sovereignty Documentary by photojournalist Catherine Bauknight exploring native Hawaiians’ culture and their connection to the land. Feb 5, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Live for Life French director Claude Lelouch brings this tale of a love triangle set against the background of late 1960s political unrest. Part of Mort Sahl film series. Jan 30, 7:30pm. $. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Stop the Rail to Jail Strategies to keep youth out of criminal justice system. Part of Black History Month film series. Feb 1, 7pm. Free. Community Baptist Church, 1620 Sonoma Ave, Santa Rosa.

Tahoe Adventure Film Festival Films cover the full spectrum of adventure including skiing, snowboarding, kayaking, rock climbing, surfing, skating, mountain biking, BASE jumping and more. Feb 1, 7:30pm. $15. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Until the Violence Stops Documentary is a celebration of women reclaiming their bodies and lives. Feb 3, 6:30pm. $5. La Dolce Vita Wine Lounge, 151 Petaluma Blvd S, #117, inside Theater Square, Petaluma. 707.763.6363.

Vhujan’s Divas, also performing are: Colleen Watson, Kristy Ono, Shanti Charan and Karinda Dobbins. Feb 2, 8pm. $10. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul Documentary on the Istanbul music scene. Fri, Feb 1, 7pm and Sun, Feb 3, 4pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Food & Drink

Events

The Dungeonmaster, MST3K Style

AAUW Santa Rosa Crab Feed

The World’s Biggest Comedy Duo riffs on the tale of the overlord of strange beasts and stolen souls. Feb 1, 7:30pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

All. You. Can. Eat. Crab. Feb 1, 6pm. $50. Saturday Afternoon Club, 430 10th St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8436.

ERTH’s Dinosaur Petting Zoo Cast of creatures that inhabited the landscape millions of years ago, featuring human powered puppetry and heaps of audience interaction. Feb 5, 6:30pm. $16-$20. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Happy Documentary explores the secrets behind our most valued emotion. Filmmaker Q&A after. Feb 2, 7:30pm. $10. Kanbar

Pliny the Younger! Annual release of triple IPA some call “the best beer in the world.” Be prepared to wait for several hours, but don’t worry, t’s worth it. Feb 1-14. Russian River Brewing Co, 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Pop-Up Local Chef Dinner Butcher Berry Salinas invites her favorite cooks to create comfort cooking made with locally grown and organic foods. Feb 1, 7pm. Butcher & Cook, 112 4th St., Santa Rosa. 707.205.6695.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Lectures All About Mason Bees Master Gardener Janet Calhoon presents an introduction to native bees. Feb 2, 10:30am. Free. Rincon Valley Regional Library, 6959 Montecito Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.537.1062.

Beekeeping Lecture Series Learn the basics and details of beekeeping. First Sat of every month. through Aug 3. Free. Whole Foods Market, 790 De Long Ave, Novato. 415.878.0455.

Citizen’s Academy First Fri of every monthnoon through Dec 6. Feb 1, Green Building. Free. Permit and Resource Management Department Hearing Room, 2550 Ventura Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.565.1900.

Education & Advocacy Meeting Lt. Corrado Ghioldi of the Sonoma County Jail, Mental Health Unit gives a brief overview of the Mental Health Unit, and talks about what to do if a family member with a mental health issue is arrested. Feb 6, 6pm. Free. NAMI Sonoma County, 1300 N Dutton Ave, Ste A, Santa Rosa. 707.527.6655.

Dr Jane M Healy Educational psychologist speaks on the topic, “Media and the Developing Child.” Jan 31, 7pm. $15. Showcase Theatre, Marin Center, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

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cheesemaker Sheana Davis. Feb 3, 1pm. $45. Epicurean Connection, 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Catherine McCauley Artist speaks about encaustic painting, (using beeswax, dry oil pigment and Damar resin crystals). Feb 5, 7:30pm. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Science Buzz Cafe “Insect Defenses: Mimicry, Camouflage & Other” with Frederique Lavoipierre, Jan 31. 6:30pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

So You Want to Start a Business Second of a three-part series on small business from the California Small Business Development Council. Jan 31, 6pm. $20. Venture Greenhouse, 30 Castro Ave, San Rafael. 415.497.3308.

Sonoma County’s Ecological Treasure David Bannister, executive director of Laguna de Santa Rosa Foundation, introduces the rich ecology of the Laguna and the variety of ways to discover its natural treasures. Feb 5, 7pm. Free. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.9025.

Winter Care & Pruning of Fruit Trees Master gardener Bryan Healey provides advice on how to select and care for fruit and citrus trees. Feb 2, 10:30am. Free. Sebastopol Library, 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Winter Snow Camping Basics Ryan Ammons covers planning, staying warm, selecting winter gear and what to expect when setting up camp overnight. Feb 6, 7pm. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.927.1938.

Work Smarter, Not Harder Master Gardener Pauline Haro discusses how to reduce time, energy and resources when doing garden chores. Feb 2, 10:30am. Free. Windsor Library, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

Readings Book Passage Jan 30, 7pm, “Packing for Mars” with Mary Roach. Jan 31, 7pm, “Women, HIV & the Church” with Dr Arthur J Ammann. Feb 1, 7pm, “An Intimate Life: Sex, Love and My Journey as a Sex Surrogate Partner” with Cheryl Greene. Feb 2, 1pm, “Buying the Farm: Peace and War on a Sixties Commune” with Tom Fels. Feb 2, 4pm, “Expanding the Pie: Fostering Effective Non-Profit and Corporate Partnerships” with Susan Ross. Feb 2, 7pm, “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets & Writers Respond to the March 5, 2007 Bombing of Baghdad’s ‘Street of Booksellers’” with Jane Hirschfield. Feb 5, 7pm, “Burden of Truth” with Terri Nolan. Feb 6, 6pm, “The Expeditioners and the Treasure of Drowned Man’s Canyon” with SS Taylor. Feb 6, 7pm, “Making Mavericks: The Memoir of a Surfing Legend” with Frosty Hesson. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Feb 1, 7pm, “The Death of Bees” with Lisa O’Donnell. Feb 4, 7pm, “Zom-B” with Darren Shan (Pizza Party). 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Dance Palace Feb 3, 3pm, “What Light Can Do: Essays on Art, Imagination and the Natural World” with Robert Hass. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Gaia’s Garden Feb 1, 7:30pm, Activist Lounge Poetry. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.544.2491.

Theater

of “Gone with the Wind” into one of the most beloved and successful films of all time. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 17. $15-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Odd Couple The ultimate roommate comedy still relevant today. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Feb 10. $19-$23. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

A Pack of Lies Cold War psychological thriller begins when Scotland Yard uses an English couple’s home to observe a Soviet spy ring. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 17. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Shirley Valentine A bored and disillusioned housewife finds herself talking to the walls. But on a trip to Greece she finds the adventure, hope, laughs and love she had been missing. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Feb 17. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of February 6

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “What we need is more people who specialize in the impossible,” said poet Theodore Roethke. For the foreseeable future, Aries, you could and should be a person like that. I’m not saying that you will forevermore be a connoisseur of amazements and a massager of miracles and a magnet for unexpected beauty. But if you want to, you can play those roles for the next few weeks. How many exotic explorations and unlikely discoveries can you cram into your life between now and March 1? How many unimaginable transformations can you imagine? TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

North America’s most powerful and iconic waterfall is Niagara Falls, which straddles the border between the United States and Canada. In 1969, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers managed to shut down the American side of this elemental surge for a few months. They performed their monumental magic by building a dam made with 27,800 tons of rocks. Their purpose was to do research and maintenance on the stony foundation that lies beneath the water. I’m thinking that you Tauruses could accomplish a metaphorical version of that feat in the coming weeks: some awesome task that allows you to peer beneath the surface and make refinements that enhance your stability for a long time.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

National Geographic reports that dung beetles have an intimate relationship not only with the earth but also with the stars. Scientists in South Africa found that the bugs use the Milky Way Galaxy to orient themselves while rolling their precious balls of dung to the right spot for safekeeping. The bright band of starlight in the sky serves as a navigational aid. I nominate the dung beetle to be your power animal in the coming weeks, Gemini. It will be prime time for you, too, to align your movements and decisions with a bigger picture and a higher power. (Read about the research here: http://tinyurl.com/GalacticBeetles.)

In an idealized ‘50s setting, the classic themes of love won, lost and imagined blend with hilarious set pieces and sliceof-life emotions. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 10. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) You should go right

Waiting for Godot

LEO (July 23–August 22) The collection called

Though they admit that they do not know him well and won’t even recognize him when they see him, they wait. They wait for Godot. Directed by Jasson Minadakis. TuesThurs-Sat, 8pm, Sun, 2 and 7pm and Wed, 7:30pm. through Feb 24. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Grimm’s Fairy Tales includes the story “The Devil and His Grandmother.” In one scene, the devil’s grandmother is petting and rubbing her grandson’s head. Or at least that’s what the English translations say. But the authors wrote in German, and in their original version of the text, grandma is in fact plucking lice from the devil’s hair. Your job in the coming week, Leo, is to ensure that no one sanitizes earthy details like that. Be vigilant for subtle censorship. Keep watch for bits of truth that have been suppressed. You need the raw feed that comes straight from the source.

January Plays Directed by Richard Edwards. “A Matter of Husbands” by Ferenc Molnar; “In the Trap” by Carl Williams; “You Can’t Trust the Male” by Randy Noojan; and “Annajanska, the Bolshevik Empress” by George Bernard Shaw (adapted by Richard Edwards). Wed, Jan 30, 7pm and Sat, Feb 2, 2pm. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Astrology

FREE WILL

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

ahead and compare oranges and apples in the coming week, Cancerian. Honey and butter, too; it’s fine to compare and contrast them. Science and religion. Bulldogs and Siamese cats. Dew and thunderclaps. Your assignment is to create connections that no one else would be able to make . . . to seek out seemingly improbable harmonies between unlikely partners . . . to dream up interesting juxtapositions that generate fertile ideas. Your soul needs the delight and challenge of unexpected blending.

show you that not all forbidden acts remain forbidden forever. What was unthinkable or out of bounds or not allowed at one time may evolve into what’s normal. I bring this up, Libra, because it’s an excellent time for you to divest yourself of a certain taboo that’s no longer necessary or meaningful.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

While trekking up Mount Katahdin in Maine, naturalist Henry David Thoreau had a “mountain-top experience” that moved him to observe, “I stand in awe of my body.” You’re due for a similar splash of illumination, Scorpio. The time is right for you to arrive at a reverent new appreciation for the prodigious feats that your physical organism endlessly performs for you. What could you do to encourage such a breakthrough? How can you elevate your love for the flesh and blood that houses your divine spark?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) How do you like your caviar? Do you prefer it to be velvety and smooth, or would you rather have it be full of strong, fishy taste? If it’s the first option, beluga caviar is your best choice. If the second, sevruga should be your favorite. What? You say you never eat caviar? Well, even if you don’t, you should regard the choice between types of caviar as an apt metaphor for the coming week. You can either have velvety smoothness or a strong taste, but not both. Which will it be? Set your intention. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “Dear Astrology Guy: I have been reading your horoscopes since I was 19. For a while, I liked them. They were fun riddles that made me think. But now I’ve soured on them. I’m sick and tired of you asking me to transform myself. You just keep pushing and pushing, never satisfied, always saying it’s time to improve myself or get smarter or fix one of my bad habits. It’s too much! I can’t take it any more! Sometimes I just want to be idle and lazy. Your horoscopes piss me off!”—Crabby Capricorn. Dear Crabby: I’ve got some good news. In the coming week, you are completely excused from having to change anything about yourself or your life. Stay exactly the same! Be frozen in time. Resist the urge to tinker. Take a vacation from life’s relentless command to evolve. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Young art student Andrzej Sobiepan sneaked into Poland’s National Museum with a painting he had done himself and managed to surreptitiously mount it on one of the walls. It hung there for a while before authorities noticed it and took it down. “I decided that I will not wait 30 or 40 years for my works to appear at a place like this,” he said. “I want to benefit from them in the here and now.” This is the kind of aggressive selfexpression I’d like to see you summon in the coming weeks, Aquarius. Don’t wait for the world to come and invite you to do what you want to do. Invite yourself. P.S.: The English translation of Sobiepan’s Polish last name means “his own master.” What can you do to be more of your own master? PISCES (February 19–March 20)

In her book Jung and Tarot, Sallie Nichols notes that the 16th card in most Tarot decks portrays lightning as a hostile force: “jagged, zigzag strokes that slash across the sky like angry teeth.” But there’s one deck, the Marseilles Tarot, that suggests a kinder, gentler lightning. The yellow and red phenomenon descending from the heavens resembles a giant feather duster; it looks like it would tickle and clean rather than burn. I suspect you’ll be visited by a metaphorical version of this second kind of lightning sometime soon, Virgo. Prepare to be tickled and cleaned!

Before any system can leap to a higher level of organization, says poet Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge, it has to undergo dissolution. “Unraveling or disintegrating is a vital, creative event making room for the new,” she declares. Guess what time it is for the system we all know and love as you, Pisces? That’s right: it’s a perfect moment to undo, dismantle and disperse . . . as well as to unscramble, disentangle and disencumber. Be of good cheer! Have faith that you will be generating the conditions necessary for the rebirth that will follow. “To change from one reality to another,” writes Wooldridge, “a thing first must turn into nothing.” (Her book is Poemcrazy.)

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Years ago, “bastard” was a derisive term for a child born to unmarried parents. It reflected the conventional moral code, which regarded a “birth out of wedlock” as scandalous. But I think we can safely say that this old dogma has been officially retired. According to recent statistics compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 40 percent of the kids born in the United States are to unmarried mothers. Just goes to

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

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Is it in Desperate Need of a Day at the Salon? I bet it does! Go to New Life Auto Salon—a full detail center using professional-grade products: 3M WINDOW TINTING, ACCESSORIES, AND 3M PAINT PROTECTION FILM. Open M–F 8–5, Sat 9–3 707.254.0223 684 Lincoln Ave. Napa

The Dungeonmaster, MST3K Style

University Art Gallery

Catherine McCauley

The World’s Biggest Comedy Duo riffs on the tale of the overlord of strange beasts and stolen souls. Feb 1, 7:30pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300

Jan 31-Feb 24, “New York Paper,” art by Brian Novatny and Jennifer Nuss. Reception, Jan 31, 4pm. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Artist speaks about encaustic painting, (using beeswax, dry oil pigment and Damar resin crystals). Feb 5, 7:30pm. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma, 707.762.5600.

DRIVERS NEEDED Every Wednesday, call 707.527.1200 ext. 201.

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We’ll Match Any Local Price

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1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St


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