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Bohemian

C O P P E R F I E L D ’ S B O O K S J A N U A R Y E V E N TTSS

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Sunday, January 27, 1 pm Thursday, January 17, 7pm

RICHARD GROSSINGER

Dark Pool Of Light

ERICA BAUERMEISTER

Contributors

The Lost Art Of Mixing

Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Jessica Dur Taylor, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

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SEBASTOPOL

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Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

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Wednesday, January 23, 4pm

AMY NOVESKY Imogen

PETALUMA

Tuesday, January 29, 6:30pm

REYNA GRANDE

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael Jovanovski, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

The Distance Between Us

Circulation Manager

PETALUMA HIGH SCHOOL

Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating

Tuesday, January 29, 7pm Thursday, January 24, 7pm

LOUISE ARONSON

 +"*."-:0(*4 The Fear Project

A History Of Present Illness

SEBASTOPOL

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the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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Cover photo of Niki Myles by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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nb EYES ON THE BALL A little remedy for those of us at the Bohemian who believe we print far too few pictures of dogs.

This photo was submitted by Stephen Gross of Monte Rio. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com

‘It’s really fun looking around, knowing I can deadlift people.’ COVER STORY P19

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies They’re ba-a-a-ck! Walmart’s Supercenter idea for Rohnert Park just won’t go away BY RICK LUTTMANN

W

almart is returning to the Rohnert Park Planning Commission on Thursday, Jan. 24, to ask once again for permission to expand its Rohnert Park store into a Walmart Supercenter. Despite overwhelming opposition in 2010 to Walmart’s proposal, and despite having lost a lawsuit over the proposal in June 2011, Walmart just won’t take no for an answer.

A number of labor, environmental and community organizations have joined together to oppose Walmart’s plans. There are many reasons why a Walmart Supercenter is a bad idea, not only for Rohnert Park but for the entire county. 1. Job loss and wage decline in the retail and grocery industry across the county. 2. Working poverty: Walmart workers make significantly less than a living wage for Sonoma County and less than other local grocers pay. 3. Gender inequity: Walmart is being sued for gender discrimination in California. 4. Healthcare and public subsidies: Fewer than half of Walmart workers have employer-provided healthcare insurance, and many must rely on healthcare services provided by local and state government. 5. Increased traffic congestion and reliance on the automobile, which undermines transit-oriented development on the 101 corridor. 6. A significant increase of greenhouse gas emissions. 7. Extra burden on law-enforcement services. 8. Unethical business practices such as the massive bribery scandal in Mexico. United States Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., has reported that one family, the Walton family of Walmart, owns more wealth than the bottom 40 percent of Americans combined. The two main factors that resulted in such a fabulous accumulation of wealth are the low wages paid to employees, and the intense pressure put on suppliers to keep cutting wholesale prices to them. How much is enough? The meeting on Walmart’s expansion is on Thursday, Jan. 24, at Rohnert Park City Hall (130 Avram St., Rohnert Park) at 6pm. Rick Luttmann is a resident of Rohnert Park, a professor at Sonoma State University, and a member of the Living Wage Coalition. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Visualize Whirled Peas

Thank you, Brian Gallagher, for your delicious counterpoint to the positive thinking (really nonthinking) crowd (“Visualize This,” Jan. 9). I might add that, in my experience, these blissed-out folks decline to engage in the frightening and important political, social and environmental issues of our times because they are too “negative” to think about. Like their religious and “spiritual” compadres, they cling to the notion that God (or Goddess) will handle the unpleasant business for us if we just smile, drop our quarters in the collection plate, visualize whirled peas or speak in pleasant platitudes. In abdicating the responsibilities of good citizens to participate in a meaningful way, they let the religious right, the gun-toters, big business, polluters, parasite, and bloated government hijack the public debate and have their way with the majority. They are not simply benign selfdelusionals. They are a big smiley player in the demise of democracy in America.

NANCY HAIR Sebastopol

In a culture in which negativity reaches epic heights, the Bohemian and Brian Thomas Gallagher pile it on in “Visualize This.” Being negative is not realistic. Cynicism is not realism either, though a lot of people falsely think that they are wise to be cynics. Pragmatism, though, and even skepticism can be useful. Unfortunately, Gallagher did not appear to be skeptical enough in his review of a book that is sloppy, unfocused and inadequately researched. It seems he swallowed Oliver Berkeman’s negativity whole, and persuaded Bohemian editors to feature it on the cover. Much of our TV encourages viewers to be fearful, judgmental smart alecs. News

media are mostly negative, too, following the motto “If it bleeds, it leads.” One can be in denial at either end of the optimism-pessimism continuum. Realism occupies the middle. My opinion of the Bohemian staff suffers after this issue. You folks can do better than this, and have in the past. Moving back to the middle could very well make readers, including this one, happier.

RICK CULLEN Petaluma You, too, can bestow with kisses and/or throw tomatoes at ‘Antidote’ author Oliver Burkeman when he appears at Book Passage in Corte Madera on Wednesday, Jan. 23, at 7pm.—The Ed.

Don’t ‘Mis’ It Last weekend, having exhausted the local holiday film fare, I was dragged, still protesting, to Tom Hooper’s Les Misérables. I had read Richard von Busack’s review of the film (“Nip It in the Bud,” Dec. 26) and was anticipating two-plus hours of tedious, overblown hooey. In the first minutes of the film, however, I was relieved by a spectacle that was obviously well-produced, and soon I found myself absorbed in the lives of Fantine, Jean Valjean, Cosette and Javert, pleased to be once again immersed in the dramatic and inspiring world of Victor Hugo’s great novel. (I confess, Les Misérables, required eighth grade reading, was my first favorite long read.) I found the casting surprising excellent, the acting consistently convincing (despite singing parts, verse and close-ups, which von Busack derided), and the director, Tom Hooper, to be congratulated, hopefully awarded, for bringing Hugo’s behemoth, via the stage production, successfully to the screen. The music, verse and, yes, even the closeups heightened effects, telescoping complexity and condensing into codas Hugo’s major themes—which remained, despite the complications of the tale, in the forefront. There were not many

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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people in the theater that evening, but those few, as the credits rolled, applauded. Hopefully, they found the ďŹ lm, as I did, fresh and full of heart. Sorry you missed it, von Busack!

SUSAN COLLEY Santa Cruz

Dept. of Napa Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s news story (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Money?,â&#x20AC;? Jan. 9) contained an erroneous reference to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;city of Napaâ&#x20AC;? and its checking accounts. As consistent with the rest of the story, it is the county of Napa that uses Wells Fargo and Bank of America for checking accounts.

THE ED.

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Farewell to George Snyderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;conservationist, journalist, friend

2

Jodie Foster can say whatever she wants and basically own the world

3

Lance Armstrong: Come on, now, is anyone really all that surprised?

4

Aaron Swartz, internet pioneer who helped you more than you know, RIP

5 Hidden-but-great

taqueria: Los Girasoles, on College in Santa Rosa

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Rants

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

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8

THE

Paper THIS AIN’T ‘E.R.’ Increasingly, hospitals are offering yoga, acupuncture, tai chi and more.

Road to Wellville

Hospitals and clinics move toward a preventative model of wellness BY LEILANI CLARK

W

hen was the last time you went to the hospital for yoga?

Though the hospital setting tends to go hand in hand more with illness, surgery and trauma care, recent developments in the healthcare industry signal a dramatic shift in the way that hospitals and healthcare clinics approach the treatment of chronic disease. Namely, moving

increasingly toward prevention and wellness—including programs for acupuncture, dance classes, tai chi and, yes, yoga. Such a shift couldn’t come at a better time for the United States. According to new report by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, Americans live shorter lives and experience more injuries and illnesses than those in comparable high-income nations. In terms of

life expectancy, the United States ranks at or near the bottom of a list of 17 countries. “If we’re able to educate people and the public, we’re going to have a healthier community, and that’s best for everyone,” explains Dr. Marko Bodor, medical director at the Synergy Medical-Fitness Center in Napa. Located on the campus of the Queen of the Valley Medical Center, Synergy opened its doors in 2006. Utilized

by both patients and fee-paying members of the public, the facility emphasizes the five aspects of wellness: exercise, nutrition, sleep, psycho-social and spiritual wellbeing and, of course, prevention, says Bodor. With its pool, dance classes, nutritionists, cardio and strengthtraining equipment, Synergy may look like a gym, but it goes beyond your standard 24 Hour Fitness, offering a breast and mammography center, a cardiac rehab facility, public talks on health and nutrition and an integrative health center. “Medicine for centuries was pretty much acute or terminal care. When you absolutely needed to see a doctor, you saw one,” says Bodor. “We’re definitely seeing a transformation in the way we treat things.” Because of healthcare reform, organizations will be more accountable for their outcomes, and prevention will become much more essential, he adds. By 2015, Santa Rosa may get its own medical-fitness center. A zoning amendment approved on Dec. 4 by the Santa Rosa City Council has opened the doors for the construction of a facility to be integrated with Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital. It’s part of an overarching goal of promoting wellness, preventative care and physical activity, says Katy Hillenmeyer, a spokesperson for the St. Joseph Health System. “Healthcare reform has provisions in it to minimize readmissions to the hospital for people with chronic illness,” she adds. “Anything we can do for the health of our neighbors outside of the hospital helps in combating chronic disease, and helps keep people healthy so that they don’t necessarily end up in an acute care hospital.” The shift toward a preventative model can be traced to two sources. The first is a change in public health needs. Infectious diseases, a cause for concern a hundred years ago, have been replaced with chronic disease from poor lifestyle choices. The second is the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, which allows for the creation of a prevention and public health fund, along with the issuance of community

For every dollar spent on prevention, approximately $6 are saved in healthcare costs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reality is that every time we keep someone out of the emergency room, it saves the public a lot of money,â&#x20AC;? says Michael DiRosario, clinic manager at the Forestville Wellness Center, which was opened in 2011 by West County Health Centers. Geared speciďŹ cally toward the uninsured and low-income populations that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t normally have access to alternative medical services and preventative health education, the wellness center offers acupuncture, nutrition for diabetes and smoking cessation group meetings, cooking demos, and Zumba and yoga classes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What lots of places are starting to focus on is how we can get people to think about wellness and lifestyle changes,â&#x20AC;? says doctor of osteopathy Connie Earl, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practiced integrative medicine at the Forestville Wellness Center since November 2011. Though most people dread entering clinical settings, creating community by focusing on healthy lifestyles has made a marked difference.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;People love coming here,â&#x20AC;? says Earl. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They say they love the feel of the place. It shifts the feel since theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re actually getting treatment for chronic medical conditions, and feel more empowered in their own healthcare.â&#x20AC;? The Petaluma Health Center is a federally qualiďŹ ed health center that serves approximately 18,000 patients. After moving to a 6,000-square-foot building in November 2011, the facility was able to expand the services in its Center of Good Health. Now, the primary care clinicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which serves low-income individuals along with those with private insuranceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is taking prevention to a level not often seen in healthcare settings. The center sees on average 200 wellness group visits a month, for sessions on smoking cessation, child obesity (an issue of serious concern in the United States) and chronic pain. The facility offers medical acupuncture (getting an average of 100 visits a month), yoga, Zumba, tai chi, meditation and hour-long integrative medicine consultations with Dr. Fasih Hameed, a doctor who recently spearheaded a conference in Santa Rosa focusing on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Integrative Medicine for the Underserved.â&#x20AC;? The crux is getting out of chronic-disease cycle, says Luke Entrop, wellness program manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tobacco use, poor diet and lack of exercise lead to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, lung disease and cancer, which account for 50 percent of U.S. deaths per year,â&#x20AC;? he adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we can get on the prevention end of things, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting to the heart of these chronic conditions of our time.â&#x20AC;? Entrop sees the Center of Good Health and the preventative approach as a way to promote healthy living for people of all backgrounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With more affordable healthcare coverage, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to reduce the cost of acute emergent health conditions by working on some basic behavior change and nutrition education,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are some of the driving factors of more expensive healthcare costs. By investing in prevention, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able to reduce costs in the long run.â&#x20AC;?

9

Drone Speak Last November, the Bohemian reported on Sebastopol resident Barbara Briggs-Letsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s participation in a delegation to Pakistan, where over 176 children and hundreds of other innocent civilians have been killed by U.S.led drone strikes. This month, Briggs-Letson, along with Toby Blome, an organizer of anti-drone vigils at Beale Air Force Base, and Dianne Budd, a physician who volunteers with Doctors Without Borders, report on their experiences and shed light on the problem with drones on Wednesday, Jan. 23, at the Peace and Justice Center. 467 Sebastopol Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. 707.865.8902.

Guns Away California already has among the strictest gun control laws in the United States, and North Bay communities are taking extra steps to ensure that guns donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fall into the wrong hands. On Jan. 21, the Marin County District Attorney sponsors a gun buyback program honoring the nonviolent ethos of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to reduce the total number of weapons in neighborhoods and on the streets. Those who turn in guns receive $200 for each operable semi-automatic handgun and/or long gun. Any other category of ďŹ rearm will receive $100. The person surrendering the weapon must provide documentation of residency in the county of Marin, San Francisco, Contra Costa or Sonoma. No questions will be asked, and no police investigative reports will be generated. The buyback date is Monday, Jan. 21, at the San Rafael Police Department. 1400 Fifth Ave., San Rafael. 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;8pm. A second buyback location receives ďŹ rearms at the Mill Valley Police Department. 1 Hamilton Drive, Mill Valley. 11am-8pm. 415.747.2241.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Elder States

Feeling awe, remembering what we already know BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

know an indigenous elder in Napa. He’s got olive-colored skin, salt-and-pepper hair, drives a Prius and has no idea I’m applying such a sacred term to him. He would disagree, because he yearly spends uncounted hours with the real deal—indigenous holy men in remote outposts of the Southern Hemisphere—absorbing their wisdom. It might not occur to my friend that in my urban neighborhood, he is to us what those men are to him, out in kivas and caves far away. He ponders deeply, speaks from his heart and inadvertently spreads hope and conviction in his words and actions every day. But if I make him the “wise one” and go no further, I miss the point; all cultures have indigenous roots. Therefore, each of us can dig down inside for the so-called blood

memory that reminds us what is right and who we are. (Of course it requires a time of disconnection from stimulation, including electronic devices.) According to a revered Peruvian elder, we need only “remember what we already know.” Amazing but true: we already know how to live in balance and teach others by example. The indigenous tribes that lived in North America had an earthcentered spirituality. They looked at trees and saw “our standing brothers and sisters.” But most of the conquering Europeans came from indigenous Celtic tribes that once took tree respect even further. For the Celtic tribes, before they began to forget, divine worship took place in groves. Trees were sacred individuals that inspired awe and reverence. At times, that awe awakes in us. It is convenient to make American Indians or indigenous people (misnomers notwithstanding) responsible for deep wisdom and connection to nature. Then we can pretend it does not belong to us. The speech attributed to Chief Seattle resonates: “This we know—that Earth does not belong to man. . . . All things are connected like the blood that unites one family. All things are connected. What befalls the earth befalls the sons of earth.” But Chief Seattle said no such thing. The speech came from screenwriter Ted Perry in 1971, and four decades later we still can’t believe it. Nobody wants heart-wrenching wisdom from a screenwriter named Ted; we want it from a distant romantic figure, a holy man or woman, an indigenous elder. That would be all of us. The words resonate because they make us “remember what we already know.” Chief Seattle and the “nobody” Ted Perry both reside in us, along with the responsibility to wake up and remember our indigenous roots, that we’re part of nature—siblings of those aweinspiring trees.

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Dining Sara Sanger

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14

IN THE MIX Amber Driscoll and Roger Tschann have discovered a secret-weapon chef from Guam.

The ’Til Two Speakeasy in Petaluma more than a night owl’s paradise BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

W

hen it comes to addictions, you could do a lot worse than waking up each morning and scrolling through Craigslist—especially if, like Roger Tschann, you’re opening a new restaurant and building it all from the ground up. A few months ago, having decided to open the tapas-style bistro Speakeasy in downtown Petaluma, Tschann and his

girlfriend, Amber Driscoll, were in need of things like shelves and sconces and, um, a chef. All of which they found on Craigslist. “Roger’s good at waiting patiently for what he wants,” Driscoll tells me on a recent Sunday evening. In fact, Tschann, longtime owner of local recording emporium Grizzly Studios, spent years waiting for the right restaurant space to open up, and when the site of the former Thai Ginger Bistro became available, “we dared each other to go for it,” he says.

Since the kitchen is too small to hold a walk-in freezer, the food is guaranteed to be “amazingly fresh,” as Driscoll puts it. The menu is also amazingly diverse, ranging from the classic French sandwich croque madame ($11) to vegetarian tacos with barbecued jackfruit and sweet and sour tempeh ($10). “It’s silly to put labels on our cuisine,” they tell me, “since tapas give us the flexibility to serve many different kinds of food.” At the gastronomic helm is Dindo Borja, the final—and best—interviewee out of over

a hundred who answered their chef-wanted Craigslist ad. A native of Guam and an alum of St. Helena restaurants Tra Vigne and Brix, “chef Dindo elevated our expectations,” gushes Tschann. “His food is art.” Open from 5pm until 2am every day of the week, Speakeasy is a gift to hungry bar hoppers and others tired of the same old greasy diner grub late at night. The cozy indoor eating area might only seat 20, but an outdoor patio spills into the Putnam Plaza courtyard, perfect for live music on summer evenings. Though both long harbored dreams of opening a restaurant, Tschann and Driscoll met only a year and a half ago. “I’m actually shocked at how well we get along,” Driscoll laughs, “given how much time we spend together.” Despite having very different personalities, each plays to their strengths: he built the bar with redwood from an old barn, she built the website. Tschann (and his steely-eyed greatgrandparents, whose framed photos grace the walls) is behind the turnof-the-century décor, including a lovely piece of antique stained glass mounted into the wall. In addition to the name, Driscoll is responsible for Speakeasy’s wealth of vegetarian options, which include edamame hummus ($6) and a house-made vegan veggie burger ($9) good enough to satisfy her meat-eating partner. Despite her vegetarianism (she once worked as a corporate liaison for PETA), Driscoll insists on tasting every menu item, from the sweet and spicy pork belly ($12) to the lobster mac and cheese ($13), so as to be “genuine and sincere when talking to customers.” Absolute commitment, it turns out, is an area in which both excel. Tschann hasn’t taken a night off since Speakeasy opened three months ago. “I go to bed at 3 and wake up at 6,” he laughs, “ready to go into the restaurant and tinker around with the new junk I found on Craigslist.” Speakeasy, 139 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Open 5pm–2am daily. 707.776.4631.

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The Art of Academic Excellence

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Dining

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 6-22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Caffe Portofino Italian. $$-$$$. Great flavors and some eclectic dishes at this Santa Rosa institution. 535 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.1171.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$.

Simply Vietnam

Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

MARIN CO U N T Y

top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza. $. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

Papas & Pollo Mexican. $. Tasty burritos, West Countystyle. That means tofu is more prevalent than pork, and it’s all organic. Fresh fish, too. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Thurs; lunch and dinner, Sat; dinner only, Fri. 915 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.829.9037.

Rocker Oysterfeller’s

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly,

Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

SSanta a nta Rosa Rosa

(at the Valley Ford Hotel). 707.876.1983.

American. $$-$$$. Friendly, warm service in a spot whose menu is thick with local, organic ingredients. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 14415 Coast Hwy 1, Valley Ford

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700. Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and home-

style at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900. Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French

classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panĂŠed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Happy Birthday, Delicious They grow up so fast. It seems like just yesterday Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oxbow Public Market was barely able to stand on its own, and look at it now, celebrating five years and looking more precious each day. There are several cute things this market does so well. Like the restaurants with everything from $8 duck tacos to freshly shucked oysters, and even fancy, sit-down places. So cute! Oh, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the little Ritual coffee bar with perfect cappuccinos served in those dainty cups with the handle thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too small for a guy to fit his finger through. Adorable! Oh my God, and have you seen that meat market? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the one with the raw beef insideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so much marblingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but the one around the corner from the main space, the Fatted Calf . . . The salumi there is so good, even slicing it is an art that requires a special, hand-cranked machine. The market celebrates its birthday with five days of fun, Jan. 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;25, including entertainment from high school music ensembles each day at 6pm. Friday, Jan. 25, seems to be the Kodak moment, with a book signing by Janet Fletcher (Eating Local: The Cookbook Inspired by Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers) and free birthday cake from Model Bakery and ice cream from Three Twins from 5pm to 8pm. 610 First St., Napa. Free. 707.226.6529. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates

the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum music & Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by Burt Shevelove & Larry Gelbart

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18

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Cellars of Sonoma Topshelf winos will want to roll down the tracks and check out this Railroad Square coop that serves product from six small family wineries. The attractive shop features the massive wood bar from the old Mixx restaurant, constantly shifting scenery on an array of flat panel screens ensconced in wine barrel heads and aroma seminars. Check out the dry Gewürtz and Estate Pinots. 133 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Sunday–Wednesday 10am–5pm, Thursday– Saturday 10am–7pm. $10 fee. 707.578.1826.

Field Stone Winery (WC) Popular with hikers and bikers passing through, Field Stone Winery is an idyllic 85acre visit-nature. It was also one of the first underground wine cellars, carved into the hill in the 1970s. 10075 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.7266.

Inspiration Vineyards The colorful pastoral depicted on the label does exist, but this small, family-owned labor of love is sensibly located in the Pinecreek Business Park. Stylish tasting room; Chard, Cab and Blanc. 3360 Coffey Lane, Ste. E, Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–4:30pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.237.4980.

Martin Ray Focus is on mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Pfendler Vineyards Petaluma Gap Chardonnay and Pinot have a milliondollar view, but winetasting is available at Vin Couture Lounge, 320 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. By appointment or Swirl After Six, 6–10pm, Thursday–Saturday. 707.431.8161.

Sausal Winery Simple, rural, without corporate crosspromotions and pretense. Good Zinfandel and nice cats. 7370 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.433.5136.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

N A PA CO U N T Y Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Far Niente (WC) Far Niente was founded in 1885 by John Benson, a ’49er of the California Gold Rush and uncle of the famous American

impressionist painter Winslow Homer. The estate boasts beautiful gardens as well as the first modern-built wine caves in North America. 1350 Acacia Drive, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2861.

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-toend. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25. 707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Trione Vineyards & Winery Family winery ascends a smaller peak BY JAMES KNIGHT

D

espite being the one-time owners of Geyser Peak Winery, and well-connected in business generally, the Trione family had no leg up when they opened this shop in the inauspicious year of 2008, says sales director Denise Trione. For one thing, the mighty Trione name didn’t travel too far outside Sonoma County. She and winemaker Scot Covington have had to hand-sell their wine across the country, while wearing all the different hats that a small winery requires. “It’s a different kind of animal,” Covington explains. It’s surely a different beast from the old Canyon Road Winery, this site’s former occupant, a sort of country cousin brand to Geyser Peak that has since been sent to pasture in Modesto. In a brandnew production facility that Covington designed to incorporate his experience at Pellegrini Family Vineyards and others, Trione operates on a “cream of the crop” model, in which Covington gets his pick from more than 600-plus acres of grapes that the Triones farm to make just 6,000 cases of wine. Located along a well-liked cycling route, Trione is a popular stop. You’re likely to be greeted by Denise Trione with a free welcome glass of crisp, elegant 2010 Russian River Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($23), or, more likely, first by Bubba, a friendly American bulldog, and Scout, a Jack Russell terrier who’s given to worrying a well-chewed doorstop before placing it expectantly at one’s feet. Midway through the wine list, here’s a little mystery solved. What happened to Geyser Peak’s once-celebrated, post-Aussie winemaker invasion Shiraz? The new owners quietly dropped it. But one wine’s still coded Shiraz in Trione’s SKU system. With savory, rural aromas of olives, leather and horse blanket—all in a good way—the 2008 RRV Syrah ($32) won’t be mistaken for your more typical Shiraz. This vineyard was planted in French, not Australian clones, after all. A core of stony, cherry and plum fruit becomes more fleshy with time, blueberry syrup entering the scene late. Not for everyone, but more sensuous than the technically polished Bordeaux blend. There’s a good Primitivo on hand, too, and a juicy, cranberry-and-cola flavored 2009 RRV Pinot Noir ($35), jazzy with Christmas spices of cinnamon and clove, like a mulled wine that’s been left out to cool. And how satisfactory when a tasting ends not with the thud of an overwrought Cab, but the engaging, lively and refined 2008 Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($65), as irresistible as a soggy doorstop to a terrier. Trione Vineyards & Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Thursday–Sunday, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5–$15. 707.814.8100.

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

I don’t think, “Oh, shit, this is 220 pounds,” even though it’s more than I’ve ever tried to lift before. I don’t think anything at all, really. I am focused on nothing but the white lights, the signal that will show if my lift was successful. I slam the wooden heels of my lifting shoes into each other, right on left—clack!—then left on right—clack! Now the crowd noise has died, and the silence mirrors my own intensity. I shrug my shoulders. Deep breath. Bend over, hook-grip the bar. Roll it out, roll it back into my barbell-scarred shins. Squat into position, staring straight ahead. Muscles tense up, the lift begins . . .

Cleaning Up Misconceptions

YOUNG BLOOD Athena

Schrijver, 11, holds 55 pounds over her head.

Olympic lifting is my sport, but it’s not apparent by my looks. I’m not one of those tall dudes with bulging neck veins and biceps the size of semi trucks, grunting and yelling with my eyes popping out of my head while maxing-out weights at the gym. I’m a big guy, but not like a football player. I run a 10-minute mile on a good day. With a tight shirt, I look three months pregnant. Despite all this, I’m more representative of your average weightlifter than the locker-room meathead stereotype. Take Santa Rosan Beth Steinmann, 29, whose main source of fitness was yoga before discovering Olympic weightlifting. Steinmann still looks like a yoga enthusiast, nimble and flexible. The snatch and clean and jerk were “strange and alien” lifts when she started about two years ago, but she became stronger than ever through training. “It is empowering for me to get behind the barbell as a tiny person and lift a lot of weight,” she says. Maya Uemura might agree with that. Now 12, she won the USA weightlifting national competition for her age group and weight class last year. “It’s fun to compete at weightlifting meets, and it’s fun to tell people at school that I’m a weightlifter, because it’s unique and they’re surprised,” says the Santa Rosa resident. “I also want to keep weightlifting so that I don’t end up being an old lady with a cane whose back hurts, and I can compete in weightlifting longer than I’ll be able to compete in gymnastics.” Flexibility is key in this sport, says Sonoma State University student Juliana Flynn, 18. In high school, her sports were track, cross country and soccer, but she’ll compete next month in the Olympic weightlifting Junior Nationals, the top echelon of competition at her age in this country. After trying Olympic lifting a year and a half ago at the urging of her sister Sara (a former gymnast who ) 20

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Olympic weightlifting: not just for muscled-up meatheads anymore

Photos by Sara Sanger

Heavy Lifting

I

’m looking for the white lights to know I’m still alive. My trainer whispers into the stat keeper’s ear, “One hundred kilograms.” As the attempt is announced to the crowd, the loaders put more round weights on each end of the barbell.

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20 Heavy Lifting ( 19

BACKBREAKER Freddie Myles assists USC decathalon athlete Jemal Williams, 19, with a lift in Petaluma.

has several Olympic weightlifting awards in her six years in the sport), Flynn became hooked. “I can be having a really crappy day and just go and lift heavy weights,” she says. “It lifts my spirits.” And there’s the feeling of setting a new personal record, which Flynn calls “the best feeling ever.” Freddie Myles, owner of Myles Ahead Fitness in Petaluma, specializes in Olympic weightlifting. “It’s more like gymnastics,” he says of the movements. The attitude is also different. “It’s positive, mellow, not the stereotypical yelling and stuff. It’s not who is lifting the biggest weight; it’s about cheering each other on.” At age 70, Penngrove resident Paul Marini isn’t trying to set records anymore. He started lifting

while in college, and has been at it off and on for the past 35 years, still training four times a week with Myles. Though he looks good for his age, “weightlifter” is not the first term that comes to mind to describe him. “There are not many lifters my age,” he says, pointing out that only 4 percent of the 8,000 records in the sport are held by lifters over age 60. His hobby, in addition to lifting, is analyzing data in the sport. He still lifts because it keeps him healthy and flexible, but even after lifting most of his life, “It’s a huge challenge to do it correctly,” he says.

Technique with Strength This sport only uses two lifts: the snatch, and the clean and jerk.

Both involve a loaded barbell lifted from the ground over one’s head. The snatch uses one movement to accomplish this and the clean and jerk, as its name implies, uses two. This also means more weight can be lifted in this lift, but champions are determined by the total of the best of both lifts out of three attempts for each. The world record is held by Hossein Rezazadeh, an Iranian whose body looks more like a walrus than an Olympic athelete. His 263 kilogram (580 pound) clean and jerk at the 2004 Olympics remains unbeaten, as does his 472 kilogram (1,041 pound) total at the 2000 Olympics. The snatch record is also held by a gigantic Iranian, Behdad Salimi, at 214 kilograms (472 pounds). Raising 580 pounds above

one’s head might seem a job for Hercules alone. But Olympic lifting is less about being the strongest or the most fit, and more about speed and mental toughness. The technique for both lifts begins with a deadlift, and the transfer of energy into the hips bumps the bar just high enough to allow a lifter to push himself under the bar for the split second that it defies gravity, catching it in a squat so low his butt nearly touches the ground. Then it’s a simple matter of standing up from this hyperextended position—with, you know, 500 extra pounds. Weights for the snatch are significantly lower than for the clean and jerk because the catch must be overhead, with elbows locked out, before standing. The clean only requires a catch at chest

Inner Competition “My friends have watched me lift,” says Kaylie Clark, 17, of Santa Rosa. “They’re surprised. They think it’s like bodybuilding. But it’s not; it’s about technique with strength.” Wearing a hoodie with the word “Love” printed across the front, Clark completes a 50 kilogram snatch lift with no problem, despite never having lifted that much before. She was in gymnastics before being concinved to try Olympic lifting a few months ago. “As of now, I’d like to go far in the sport,” she says. Already on her way, she’ll be competing in the Junior Nationals with Flynn, who trains in the same studio. “We’re not competing against each other—more against ourselves,” Clark says with a smile. Her movitation isn’t in being better than her peers, she says, but in the feeling of accomplishment after a successful lift. The same goes for John-Logan Coots, wearing a shirt that reads “Till I Collapse.” He was analyzing his lifts with coach Freddie Myles last week using a laptop camera and barbell tracking system. The big screen on the wall showed a slight flaw at the top of his lift, causing a bit of instability. Coots, who trains four times a week with Myles, owns Powerfit Personal Training in Rohnert Park and trains Olympic lifters (including

myself). He trains in the same class as those he might face in competition as well as other trainers, including Cortese. As Marini points out, “Freddie is well regarded as a trainer of trainers.” Joanna Sapir, 38, wears a “Find Your Inner Badass” shirt while stretching after working on the clean and jerk at Myles Ahead. She owns CrossFit Santa Rosa, and started training over four years ago to learn the lifts she would be teaching before opening Santa Rosa’s first CrossFit location (there are now three). “It’s a clear metaphor for life,” she says of Olympic lifting. “You can’t predict it, but if you put the work in, it will pay off. It’s a long journey.” She started working out, she says, because she was looking to lose weight after having two kids. The former soccer star found Olympic lifting to her liking. “When I don’t do it, I dream of doing it,” she says. The sense of personal accomplishment is what keeps her coming back. “It’s one on one, just you and the bar.”

Gaining Momentum CrossFit has exploded in popularity in the past couple years, due in large part to the CrossFit Games. The international fitness competition will likely have over 100,000 participants this year, up from 70,000 last year. After picking up sponsorship from Reebok the games were televised nationally on ESPN last year, and top CrossFit Games athletes will appear on the upcoming season of The Biggest Loser. Cortese says CrossFit has really brought the “secret” of Olympic lifting out of the gym and into the limelight. “A huge part of CrossFit is the Olympic lifts. Before that, you’d never see bumper plates in commerical gyms.” In the past four years, USA Weightlifting, the governing body of the sport in this country, has seen an increase in members, some estimates putting the boost as high as 30 percent (a spokesperson at the organization did not have exact figures). CrossFit is one of the few franchise gyms that focuses on the sport ) 22

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level before standing, and the lift is completed with the jerk, tossing the weight up from chest position and pushing onself under, locking out the elbows in a low lunge position before standing up and bringing both feet together. These lifts are among the most explosive movements in the Olympics. “Every athlete that comes in, that’s what they’re looking for,” says John Cortese, 26, owner of Olympic-lifting-focused Cortese Training Systems in Napa. He specializes in using the Olympic lifts to improve performance in other sports. “If you really break it down, agility is basically ability to absorb force.” In that case, throwing hundreds of pounds from the ground over one’s head is probably a good way to build agility.

Heavy Lifting ( 21

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FORESIGHT May Uemura, 12, is thinking decades ahead when it comes to

staying fit.

as part of overall fitness, and Sapir has doubled the number of Olympic lifting classes she offers. Competitors in the CrossFit Games focus on Olympic lifting, she says, since “that’s the weak link in their performance, because it’s the hardest thing they do.”

Mental Muscle So it’s not necessarily about strength, and it’s not entirely about flexibility. But it’s more than just technique. It’s about mental toughness. “The more you think, it kind of backfires on you a bit,” says Cortese. “The best lifters are the ones who just go up to the bar and do it.” Flynn agrees. “This is really a mental sport,” she says. “You push yourself to keep going. You tell yourself you can do it.” Woodacre resident Tamara Holland, 51, has been lifting for a year. Olympic lifting is “very humbling,” she says. But the strength and confidence she gains from the sport is worth it. Like most lifters, she doesn’t look like someone to be afraid of in a dark alley, but make no mistake: she’s sizing up everyone around her.

“It’s really fun looking around, knowing I can deadlift people,” she says.

White Light, White Heat With every muscle pulled tight, I deadlift nearly my own weight and bump the bar against my thighs, propelling it straight up with enough force to give myself time to get underneath and catch it on my collarbone. Balancing for a second, I stand to complete the front squat and a successful clean of 100 kilograms. Air is a precious commodity now, and I should wait to catch my breath. But adrenaline is fading fast. I gasp and toss the weight above my head with all remaining strength. Simultaneously throwing my legs into a lunge while pushing myself under the bar to lock out my arms, my feet land with the loud thwack of my wood-heeled shoes on the platform. My arms lock enough to ensure the weight doesn’t fall, and I stand up, feet together, to see white lights staring me in the face. Two hundred and twenty pounds. Just like that, I am still alive in this competition.

The week’s events: a selective guide

‘INNER EAR’ Work by Angela Willetts is on display at ‘Proof of Some Existence,’ opening Jan. 19 at ECHO Gallery in Calistoga. See Openings, p31.

N A PA

Silver Wings My grandma was a big Merle Haggard fan. We spent many a summer night, sitting on the back porch of her house in Arizona, Grandma drinking Budweiser, me drinking 7-Up, Merle or Willie on the cassette player; I liked singing the chorus of “Okie from Muskogee” at the top of my lungs, whenever possible. Now in his mid-70s, Haggard’s been at this country music business for a mighty long stretch, but age ain’t nothing but a number for the poet of the common man’s voice, energy or sense of humor. After all, this is the guy who

wrote, “Half of My Garden Is for Willie,” a song about growing tobacco, mushrooms and cannabis for his bandana-and-braided compadre. He plays Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $80–$90. 707.259.0123.

N A PA

Mr. December Chris Botti is a hunk. If they made a “Sexy Men of Jazz” calendar, he would certainly be Mr. December. Just ask Katie Couric! But beyond his all-American looks, the trumpeter possesses serious chops. Studying with Woody Shaw before moving to New York in the ’80s, he then went the pop route, forming creative partnerships with Paul Simon, Sting and Joni Mitchell. Though he’s

able to hold his own at the Village Vanguard, on his latest album Botti blends pop and jazz with Vince Gill, Mark Knopfler and Andrea Bocelli. He blows on Saturday, Jan. 19, and Sunday, Jan. 20, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8pm and 7pm. $80–$90. 707.226.7372.

CORTE MADERA

Write Stuff Biographies are a dime a dozen, but Pulitzer Prize–winning nonfiction writer Tracy Kidder’s Mountains Beyond Mountains—the story of renegade physician and Partners in Health cofounder Paul Farmer—stands out. Kidder is the type of writer that can teach the rest of us writers something real and, luckily, he’s written a new book, along with magazine and book editor Richard Todd, that does just that. Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction distills the stories and advice that developed from years of practice. Tracy Kidder talks about good prose on Tuesday, Jan. 22, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. 415.927.0960.

SEBASTOPOL

Coffee Champion I spent years behind coffeehouse counters, steaming up foamy lattes with glum despair before learning how to make a proper coffee drink. It took training by a boss who viewed coffee as an art form to change my ways. Under her tutelage, I learned the exact temperature at which milk caramelizes, how to make a superb espresso shot (tiger stripes, people), and the way to pour freshly steamed milk so as to produce crema-licious rosettes. I’m now as obsessed with a well-made cappuccino as the 30 Oliver’s Market baristas who’ve trained with Taylor Maid Farms for the past three months in preparation for the ultimate challenge. Bask in their knowledge and skill at the Battle of the Baristas Final Showdown on Thursday, Jan. 17, at Taylor Maid Farms. 7190 Keating Ave., Sebastopol. 6pm. 707.634.7129.

—Leilani Clark

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Crush CULTURE

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ArtsIdeas â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;AQUI Y AHERAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Franklin Ă lvarez FortĂşnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2009 painting greets visitors to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Revolutionary Island.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

A Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spirit

New exhibit in Sonoma encompasses the struggles and determination of the Cuban people BY GABE MELINE

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ven in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peripheral vision, the frame is distracting. Something about it is wrong: the top and bottom third are missing. Surely, this is a mistakeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;right? Looking closer, the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gambit reveals itself. On the right of the painting, a group of spectacularly garbed street performers, laughing, are shown to be pushing against the left portion. On the

left, a group of dour-faced government officials sit helpless, shoved out of the metaphorical picture and the literal frame. During the other nine months of the year, this homage to the peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power to overthrow their oppressors hangs in the San Francisco office of Darius Anderson. But through April 14, it welcomes visitors to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Revolutionary Island: Tales of Cuban History and Culture,â&#x20AC;? an impressive and expansive exhibit at the Sonoma Valley Museum of

Art of the Sarah and Darius Anderson Collection, opening Jan. 19. In keeping with the history of Cuba, repeated themes of oppression unite the variegated collection, and Anderson, a lobbyist, developer and newspaper owner, is clearly taken with Cubansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; conveyance of this through artistic means. Cumulatively, the exhibit elevates the spirit of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s people while indicting both the restrictive rule of Castro and the ongoing U.S.

embargo against the island. Anderson, who has traveled to Cuba over 50 times since 1986 and met with Fidel Castro repeatedly, says he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get involved in politics while in Cuba. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But what you ďŹ nd,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is an economic policy, really on both sides, that has failed. And I think the average Cuban is caught in the middle. There are a lot of people who have been hurt in the process. My wish is that eventually people will see the ills of their ways, and we will lift the embargo. And that as we lift the embargo, the Cubans will go ahead and do what they can to lift the restrictions on their citizens.â&#x20AC;? One large piece, Underwater Kingdom, impresses this bluntly. In it, people of all ages carry bags and boxes of meager possessions. Stepping back reveals the group to be underwater. The piece, with four attendant portraits, is made of the visages of those who died trying to come to immigrate to Miami. Another ďŹ ngers Castro with humor. A ďŹ gure of Pinocchio stands atop a pile of hardbound transcripts of Castroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourhour â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Will Absolve Meâ&#x20AC;? manifesto from 1953. Pinocchioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nose melts into white rope, which wraps around the Disney character like a tangled straitjacket. The message is clear: Castro is a liar. Castro is a prevailing presence in Revolutionary Island. In 2001, at a dinner with Castro that went until 3am, Anderson was gifted a wine glass by the president; it completes a display of cigar boxes, humidors and artifacts from El Floridita, a favorite nightclub of Ernest Hemingway, among other historical objects. Elsewhere, Castroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signed photo and original posters from the revolution hang in a room housing a huge tank modeled after the one driven by Castro and Che Guevara through

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What you find is an economic policy, really on both sides, that has failed.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Along with a chilling portrait of a toddlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head being crushed by a military boot, artist Franklin Ă lvarez FortĂşn is represented by a painting of an African-Cuban drinking out of a cup that reads â&#x20AC;&#x153;Made in China.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;That really symbolizes whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening with Cuba right now,â&#x20AC;? explains Anderson, â&#x20AC;&#x153;as they, in essence, are partnered with China, and China is trying to dominate the oil reserves there; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to buy all the best cigars, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to buy all the best rum, and they have an insatiable appetite and ability to consume. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a real struggle right now for the Cubans to not go ahead and say yes.â&#x20AC;? Not all work in the show is of a political nature. Caballo con NiĂąa is a 2008 work by Duvier del Dago made from hanging knotted string; and RubĂŠn AlpĂ­zar, inspired by the surrealists, places rotisserie knobs on his frames and employs tight detail in small portraits of John Lennon, the Dalai Lama, Charlie Chaplin, Martin Luther King Jr., Walt Disney, van Gogh, Frida Kahlo and others. At the front of the exhibit, large six-foot steel

clothespins by Nelson Dominguez stand in the entry beneath a hanging circle of baseball jerseys, including that of Adiel Palma, the pitcher who helped bring home the silver medal for Cuba in the 2006 World Baseball Classic. As Anderson says: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sugar, rum, tobacco and baseballâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all my favorite vices.â&#x20AC;? Over time, it has gotten easier for U.S. residents to visit Cuba, and Anderson receives a license to travel from the Treasury Department through his nonproďŹ t Californians Building Bridges. Though restrictions are placed on the amount per day visitors may spend, arts and educational materials are exempt from the spending limit. Still, it is not easy to get large works of Cuban art to America, and much of the show has been shipped with the assistance of galleries in Canada, Spain and Panama. Though he â&#x20AC;&#x153;absolutelyâ&#x20AC;? wants Revolutionary Island to be about the Cuban people and not himself, it is hard to separate the high proďŹ le of Anderson from this show. A controversial ďŹ gure in the city of Sonoma, where he plans to build a luxury hotel off the downtown plaza, Anderson last year led a group of investors to purchase the Press Democrat, adding to his newspaper ownership of the Sonoma IndexTribune. With his ďŹ rm Platinum Advisors, Anderson is also among the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most powerful lobbyists. Andersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impressive collection of art represents civic engagement, the voice of the people who have no voice, and one canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but feel that he is attracted to the direct purity of the Cuban artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; methods to express that which he is paid handsomely to amplify in America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What I hope,â&#x20AC;? Anderson emphasizes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is that one day Cuba will be free to express themselves and have direct representation in government the way we do.â&#x20AC;?

25

"RUB-AL-KALI 8a" by James Ford Grant, 2004

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707.781.707tcalabigallery.com

UNTAMED HEART Visions and Dream Currents by Susan St. Thomas January 14 through March 3 SEBASTOPOL GALLERY 150 N. Main Street 829-7200

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Revolutionary Islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens with a members-only reception on Jan. 18. On Jan. 19, Darius Anderson appears in conversation with artists RenĂŠ Francisco, Esterio Segura, Ruben AlpĂ­zar and Kadir and Kelvin LĂłpez (2pm; $20). The exhibit runs through April 14 at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.939.7862.

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Havana, created by Petaluma artcar guru David Best. To Kate Eilertsen, executive director at the museum, one large installation is destined to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;the showstopper.â&#x20AC;? Bundles of newspapers are arranged like a mattress, beneath typewriters hanging on the wall. A plaster-ofParis ďŹ gure lays ďŹ&#x201A;at on the papers, with no shirt or pants and closed eyes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is dreaming, dreaming of what it would be like to have freedom of expression, to be able to speak,â&#x20AC;? says Eilertsen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the message in this is wonderful: the only place he can really think of what he wants to say is in his dream life.â&#x20AC;?

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 6-22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

TRANCING QUEEN Rachel Custer and John Rowan in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Madness.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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HAPPY HOUR: Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm Single Liquor Well Drinks, Draft Beer, House Wine $4 Happy Hour Food Menu $3

oth David Mamet and Lanford Wilson, two playwrights whose work on and off Broadway began to win accolades in the 1970s, use overlapping dialogue, hyper-realistic language and poetic profanity in creating the stark, emotionally explosive worlds of their plays. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where comparisons end, however. Mametâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plays (American Buffalo, Glengarry Glen Ross, Race) for the most part carry a gleefully straightforward cynicism, while Wilson (Hot l Baltimore, Fifth of July, Talleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Folly) layers a more overt sense of sentimentality and compassion. Either way, their plays represent a challenge for actors, which is why so many stage performers relish the chance to tackle the works of Mamet and Wilson.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has deďŹ nitely been a tough project for my actors,â&#x20AC;? says director Susan Packer, whose production of Mametâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1976 one-act The Duck Variations runs side-by-side this month with Lanford Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1964 short play The Madness of Lady Bright. The double feature runs through Feb. 10 at Pegasus Theater in Rio Nido. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way to tackle this kind of writing, as a performer,â&#x20AC;? explains Packer, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is to really spend time mapping it out. There is usually a primary speech, with another character interjecting. It takes lots and lots of practice, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much fun.â&#x20AC;? In Duck Variations, Frank Ferris and Scott Kersnar play two elderly men who meet each day in the park, talking about their lives and views of the world, using the behavior of the ducks in a nearby pond to illustrate their opinions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very poignant and funny,â&#x20AC;? says Packer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tale of aging and loneliness, written with that blend of comedy and drama that Mamet is so good at.â&#x20AC;? In The Madness of Lady Bright, directed by Darlene Kersnar, another look at aging and loneliness is presented as a once-glamorous drag queen, played by John Rowan, grapples with the ghosts of her past, played by Rachel Custer and Conor Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shaughnessy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lady Bright is desperate for a sense of connection with someone, anyone,â&#x20AC;? says Kersnar, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directed a number of Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other plays in the past. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The walls of her apartment are covered in the signatures of people whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve visited, which is a really powerful idea.â&#x20AC;? Like Duck Variations, Kersnar says, Lady Bright is a play about how people deal with the passage of time, for good or bad. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In 45 minutes,â&#x20AC;? she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;this little play covers a lot of emotional territory. I think it will surprise people.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Duck Variationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Madness of Lady Brightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; run Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Feb. 10 at the Rio Nido Lodge. Canyon 2 Road, Rio Nido. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday at 8pm; Sunday at 2pm. Jan. 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20, pay-what-you-can. Through Jan. 9, $15. Feb. 10, $30 fundraiser. 707.583.2343.

Upcoming Concerts

Linda Tillery

and the Cultural Heritage Choir Friday, January 18, 8 pm

Redwith Molly

Anne & Pete Sibley opening Sunday, Jan. 20, 7:30 pm

Ferron

with Teresa Tudury opening

COLD HARD FACTS Death isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pretty; why should ďŹ lms about it be?

End of the Affair Michael Hanekeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Amourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; faces death head-on BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

hose familiar with Michael Hanekeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ lms realized that when he made a movie called Amour, it wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be an ordinary love story. What we see, in all of its horror, is the ďŹ nal stage of a successful love story, the end of the line. The ďŹ lm opens with doors thrown open on an apartment where an elderly womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;ower-bedecked corpse is discovered in a gas-ďŹ lled room by paramedics.

We ďŹ&#x201A;ash back to the events leading up to this moment. Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) and Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant, in his ďŹ rst ďŹ lm in nine years) are an elderly couple with a great love of classical music, relaxing in an apartment furnished with books, paintings and a grand piano. They discuss some of the usual pressuresâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;familiar unhappiness, mainly, since their daughter (Isabelle Huppert) is involved with a two-timing British husband. One morning during coffee, Anne stops in her tracks, dumbstruck. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lost a minute of her life to a stroke; this incident is followed by complications from surgery to relieve the damage. Then comes another stroke, paralysis and irreversible decline. Amourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfection lies in its clinical refusal to euphemize. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visible in the way the camera is positioned right at the foot of Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bed, as if standing in the place of someone who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the sick woman all that well, who can neither politely leave the room nor sit down close to her pillow like a daughter. The ďŹ lm has the 3am clarity of a fantasy of downfall, unredeemed by false uplift and spiritual afflatus about the satisfaction of dying in your own bed. (They take your bed, anyway, and replace it with one of those hospital models.) The beauty thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s said to be waiting at the end of life may just be something else that keeps people pliableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all of it just mystiďŹ cation, which Haneke proposes to strip away.

Saturday, February 9, 8 pm Also Coming Soon

Dave Alvin & the Guilty Ones and Marshall Crenshaw â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February 24 Carrie Rodriguez with Keith Greeninger opening â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 1 Community Beausoleil avec Michael Doucet â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 15 Cultural Center Kelly Willis & Bruce Robison â&#x20AC;&#x201C; April 19 Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

Ayurvedic

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132 KELLER STREET PETALUMA

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neck and shoulders â&#x20AC;˘ relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis

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Margery Smith 707.544.9642

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 4:30-6:30pm

Saturday Jan 19

DJ DON LYNCH 9:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30 No Cover Sunday Jan 20

SUNDAY SUPPER

with a live preformance by "America's Got Talent" Semi-Finalist Irish Pub HAPPY HOUR ~ all day Sunday   Č&#x2C6;  ~ Mondays ĆŹ  ~ noon till 2am Â&#x192;Â?Í&#x2122;Í Č&#x2C6;ÍĄÂ&#x2019;Â?Č&#x2C6;Í&#x2020;Í&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x203A; J Curtis Presents BELOW THE BELT Â&#x192;Â?Í&#x2122;ÍĄČ&#x2C6;ÍĄÇŁÍ&#x203A;Í&#x2DC;Â&#x2019;Â?Č&#x2C6; Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;

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Â&#x192;Â?Í&#x161;Í?Č&#x2C6;ÍĄÂ&#x2019;Â?Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D; Top Ranking REGGAE SHOWCASE Â&#x192;Â?Í&#x161;Í&#x17E;Č&#x2C6;Í&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;Â&#x2019;Â?Č&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Amourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens Friday, Jan. 18 at the Rafael Film Center.

Sebastopol

707.829.2062

TIM HOCKENBERRY 6pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm, No Cover

SUNDAY BRUNCH & NFL PLAYOFFS 9:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2:30pm

707.238.0158 info@socialclubrestaurant.com

for calendar of events & information

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 6-22, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Film

Cumulus Presents & Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 6-22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW

DORE COLLER AND BERMUDA GRASS Jan 18 Americana, Bluegrass, Reggae Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

THE TICKETS BAND Jan 19 Locally Grown Rock and Roll 8:30pm Sat

SPARK & WHISPER Jan 20 Northern Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Folk Duo Sun

4:00pm / No Cover â&#x20AC;&#x153;Double Troubleâ&#x20AC;? Jan 25 BESO NEGRO PLUS THIS OLD EARTHQUAKE 8:30pm Sat Dance Party! Jan 26 RON THOMPSON AND THE RESISTORS Blues and Rhythm & Blues 8:30pm Fri

W INTER LU â&#x20AC;&#x2122;AU Jan 27 L ED KAAPANA Sun

Slack Key Guitar & Ukulele Master 6:00pm

PETTY THEFT Feb 2 The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute Sat

8:30pm

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Feb 9 Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball Sat

Music

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

8:30pm

Thur

Celebrate Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with Feb 14 THE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE 7:00pm

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS Saturday, Jan 19

Wed, Jan 16 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Jan 17 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jan 18 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance presents WHIMSICAL Sat, Jan 19 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther hosts THE CALIFORNIA HONEY DROPS Sun, Jan 20 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Jan 21 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jan 22 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

PERPETUAL MOTION High-energy

shows are SambaDĂĄâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stock in trade.

Major Scale

SambaDĂĄ helps keep music in the schools Ë&#x153; BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

TAP ROOM

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 3!4s7PM DOORSss!,,!'%3 WORLD MUSIC

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THE PHS JAZZ ENSEMBLE &2)s0-$//23ss R&B/MOTOWN HITS

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

AN EVENING WITH

PRIDE & JOY

3!4s0-$//23ss WINE TASTING EVENT

THE PETALUMA GAP PRESENTS

WINTER WINE SOIREE

45%s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s COUNTRY

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.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

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Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

S

ome of the most famous and inďŹ&#x201A;uential people in America were in high school band. Film director Woody Allen played clarinet, as did Steven Spielberg. Actress Halle Berry, basketball great Vince Carter and even politico Alan Greenspan were all in band. Former president Bill Clinton once said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I might not have been president if it hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been for school music.â&#x20AC;?

Sadly, funding for the arts has been cut, and California schools are scrambling to supplement their meager budgets. To keep kids from having to pay for after-school classes, schools like Petaluma High are coming up with resourceful ways to keep the arts alive. Cliff Eveland, PHS band leader and director of the Petaluma Music Festival, credits the efforts

of the community and the Mystic Theatre for helping to save music for the next generation of students. Now in its eighth year, the Petaluma Music Festival beneďŹ t concert hosts Santa Cruzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entertaining seven-piece Brazilian band, SambaDĂĄ . â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting to do a fundraiser for music in the schools is awesome,â&#x20AC;? says SambaDĂĄ saxophonist Anne Stafford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is how music continues.â&#x20AC;? A Sonoma County band kid herself, Stafford is now an ethnomusicologist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was really lucky they had such a great jazz program at Slater Junior High. Frederick Colmanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the late, great band directorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;was amazing, and I credit everything Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done in music to his inspiring and teaching me. I would have never gotten into music if it hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been for public school music programs.â&#x20AC;? The SambaDĂĄ family recently welcomed new members, as several of the original male players are taking what Stafford calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;paternity leave.â&#x20AC;? Among them, Senegalese percussion master Ibou Ngom is taking SambaDĂĄ to a new level, and with capoeira â&#x20AC;&#x153;mestreâ&#x20AC;? and SambaDĂĄ founder Papiba Godinho, the band is now recording their fourth studio album. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a gift, this new journey that SambaDĂĄ is going through,â&#x20AC;? says lead singer Dandha da Hora. A Brazilian native, da Hora is a nationally renowned Afro-Brazilian dance instructor and lead dancer with IlĂŞ AiyĂŞ, one of Carnivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest performance groups. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t picture myself in this world without music,â&#x20AC;? says da Hora. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fundraiser for schools is to provide a world where kids and teenagers can understand what music will do for their lives, how it will change their lives. With so much violence in this world, we can see each other through music as equals, because music is universal and we should all have access. SambaDĂĄ is deďŹ nitely proud to deliver thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to show up for these kids and give them hope. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why SambaDĂĄ does what we do.â&#x20AC;? SambaDĂĄ and the Petaluma High School Jazz Ensemble play on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8pm. $20. 707.765.2121.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Bay Area Youth Orchestra Festival Featuring youth orchestras from Santa Rosa, Marin, Oakland, San Francisco and Berkeley. Jan 20, 3pm. $20$60. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Andre Nickatina SF hip-hopper comes back to P-Town. Yukmouth opens. Jan 18, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

The Temptations & the Four Tops Two legendary Motown groups in one night. Jan 18, 8pm. $45$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Winter Roots Featuring Arann Harris & the Farm Band, Church Marching Band and Tiny Television. Benefit for Food for Thought. Jan 19, 7pm. $15-$20. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

MARIN COUNTY John McCutcheon Folk music’s “rustic

Renaissance man” has earned seven Grammy nominations. Jan 19, 8pm. $11-$22. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Marin Symphony: Romantic Passions Guest violinist Nigel Armstrong appears in program highlighted by Tchaikovsky’s Symphony 6 “Pathétique.” Jan 20, 3pm and Jan 22, 7:30pm. $10-$70. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Tommy Igoe Big Band One of the world’s finest drummers leads an elite group of the Bay’s greatest musicians. Jan 19, 8pm. $25$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Gregg Allman Founding member of Allman Brothers Band flying solo. Jan 18, 7pm. $55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Chris Botti The largest-selling American jazz instrumental artist. Jan 19, 8pm and Jan 20, 7pm. $80-$90. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Green Music Center

Country music legend has been called “the poet of the common man.” Pete Stringfellow opens. Jan 19, 8pm. $80-$90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Jan 20, Bay Area Youth Orchestra Festival. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Keola Beamer & Jeff Peterson The legend and the prodigy of Hawaiian guitar. Jan 17, 8pm. $22-$28. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Theater Jan 23, Hydrogen Collective. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Jan 17, Sophistafunk, Koobi Fora. Jan 18, Blue Diamond Fillups. Jan 20, African Show Boyz. Mon, Art and Music with Stanley Mouse. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Epicurean Connection Jan 18, Wildflower Weed (Mountain Hippie Music). 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge Jan 18, Decades. Jan 19, Konsept Party Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 6-22, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

Merle Haggard

Hopmonk Sonoma Jan 18, Sean Carscadden. Jan 19, Girls & Boys. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hopmonk Tavern Jan 17, Family Room. Jan 18, California Honeydrops. Jan 19, Jerry Joseph. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Jan 18, Si Perkoff and Gary Digman Duo. Jan 19, Stephanie Ozer Trio with Peter Barshay and Kendrick Freeman. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Wed, Brainstorm. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jan 16, Emma Lee. Jan 17, the Shots. Jan 18, Jason Bodlovich. Jan 19, Hannah Miller. Jan 20, Todos Santos. Jan 23, Jenny Kerr. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Jan 17, Rushad Eggleston. Jan 18, Twice as Good. Jan 19, Poyntlyss Sistars Rockin’ Show Band. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Jan 16, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Jan 21, Gypsy Cafe. Jan 17 and , Jan 18, Susan Sutton. Jan 22, Maple Profant. Sun, Kit Mariah’s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Jan 18, Buck Nickels & Loose Change with Moonlight Rodeo. Jan 20, Ricky Alan Ray. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Roots Rave-Up Good causes, sure, but come for the nonstop dancing Any musician doling out advice on how to get press coverage will, at one point, roll his eyes and sigh. “You could always make it a benefit for something,” the ever-broke musician will say, cognizant of the power of charity to attract do-gooder media outlets. Though we believe in pure, honest charity that edifieth and does not puffeth up, it takes more than giving “a portion of the proceeds” (read: $10, possibly) to a good cause to perk up our ears. Which is why you’re reading about Winter Roots here; in addition to being serious about charity (the last event contributed $3,500 to bird rescue), the evening promises damn fine music. Feel like dancing? Look no further: Arann Harris and the Farm Band raise the barn roof with odes to chickens and country doctors; the Church Marching Band birth a raucous lovechild of Sousa and klezmer; Tiny Television (pictured) inject absolute rave-up to “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” and the Dixie Giants have sousaphone solos. Serious. Face to Face, the AIDS food bank, benefits, while Lagunitas beer and homemade tamales fuel the fleet-footed. Be there on Saturday, Jan. 19, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 7pm. $15–$20. 707.823.1511.—Gabe Meline

Monroe Dance Hall Jan 18, Whimsical. Jan 19, California Honeydrops. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jan 17, Adam Traum Trio. Jan 18, David Thom Band. Jan 19, Perfect Crime. Jan 20, Shards of Green. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

AND THE BAND PLAYED ON The Temptations perform with the Four Tops on

Jan. 18 at the Wells Fargo Center. See Concerts, above.

Occidental Arts & Ecology Center Jan 20, Mark Growden. 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

Phoenix Theater Jan 18, Andre Nickatina. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Mystic Theatre

Quincy’s

Jan 19, SambaDa. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jan 18, Tucker and the Twins. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Jan 19, Linda Ferro. Third Sunday of every month, Gold Coast Jazz Band. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592. )

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Music ( 29

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 6-22, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Russian River Brewing Co Jan 20, Nate Lopez, Matt Bolton. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE

Sebastopol Community Center Jan 19, Winter Roots. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

T THUR HUR – JAN JAN 1 17 7

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS HOUSE H OUSE | B BREAKS REAKS | DISCO DISCO

FAMILLY ROOM FAMILY ROOM W WITH ITH H TIM T IM & DOC DOC BROWN BROWN & REVEREND REVEREND

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI – JJAN AN 1 18 8

THE T HE ABBEY ABBEY PRESENTS PRESENTS

Tradewinds

AMERICAN A MERIC AN JAZZ JA ZZ | SOUL|BLUES SOUL|BLUES | FO FOLK LK

CALIFORNIA CALIFORNIA HO NEYDROPS HONEYDROPS

Jan 16, Frankie Boots. Jan 18, Crosscut. Jan 19, Bobby Young Project. Jan 20, Cadillac Phil. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

+T TBA BA

$$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT – JJAN AN 1 19 9

THE T HE ABBEY ABBEY PRESENTS PRESENTS

Wells Fargo Center

SSINGER INGER | SO SONGWRITER NGWRITER | ACOUSTIC ACOUSTIC

JJERRY ERRY JOSEPH JOSEPH

Jan 18, Temptations, Four Tops. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

((SOLO SOLO A ACOUSTIC) COUSTIC )

+T TBA BA

$$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ MON M ON – JAN JAN 2 21 1 W WEEKLY EEK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK K DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MARIN COUNTY

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT M MNE NE S SINGERS INGERS SERIES SERIES W WITH IT TH

142 Throckmorton Theatre Jan 19, Tommy Igoe Big Band. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

THE T HE LLEGENDARY EGENDARY

SANCHEZ SA NCHEZ

&T THE HE 7 7TH TH ST ST BAND BAND

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Peri’s Silver Dollar Jan 18, Acacia and Walking Spanish. Jan 19, Breakin Bread. Jan 20, the Jammists. Jan 22, the Gravel Spreaders. Jan 23, the Stages of Sleep. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Jan 18, Dore Coller, Bermuda Grass. Jan 19, the Tickets Band. Jan 20, Spark & Whisper. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Jan 17, Dee Bell & the Marcos Silva Band. Jan 18, Curtis Lawson. Jan 19, Wobbly World with Freddy Clarke. Jan 20, Julio Bravo. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jan 16, Kelly Peterson. Jan 17, Prisma Trova. Jan 19, Kyle Alden. Jan 20, Ray Obiedo & the Urban Latin Jazz Project. Jan 22, Songbook Night with Matt Herrero. Jan 23, Jack

Irving’s Songwriter Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Jan 17, Bridge Broke and FroZen. Jan 18, Michael Pinkham’s Jazz Night. Jan 19, Wasted Noise. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Jan 21, Paul Knight. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jan 16-19, Furthur (sold out). Jan 23, Michael on Fire. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House Jan 17, Keola Beamer & Jeff Peterson. Jan 19 and , Jan 20, Chris Botti. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Jan 18, Sing a Song. Jan 19. 707 Band. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jan 18, Gregg Allman. Jan 19, Merle Haggard. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Jan 19, John McCutcheon. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

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Jan 16, Con Quimba. Jan 17, Belinda Blair. Jan 18, Ken Cook Trio. Jan 19, Suzanna Smith. Jan 20, Thea Rose. Jan 22, Norris Clement. Jan 23, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

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$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

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Osteria Divino

Fri March 8

Thur March 21

>ĞŽ<ŽƩŬĞ Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

George’s Nightclub Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Tavern Session Room

San Francisco’s City Guide

The Budos Band Deep funk and double-crossing horn arrangements from Daptone heavyweights. Jan 19 at Mezzanine.

Jan 18, Beso Negro. Jan 19, Coco Montoya. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Yo La Tengo

Marin Center

Femi Kuti

Jan 20 and , Jan 22, Marin Symphony: Romantic Passions. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

19 Broadway Club Jan 16, Lucid Lion. Jan 16, Rockit Science. Jan 17, the Incubators. Jan 18, J-Stalin. Jan 19, Johnny Vegas & the High Rollers. Jan 20, Sanchez. Jan 23, Phil Hardgrave & the Continentals. Jan 23, Sky I, Inner Riddim. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon Jan 19, the Aktion. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Sinatra left Hoboken for fame and fortune; they only leave to go to the record store. Free in-store Jan 19 at Amoeba SF.

The most talented of the many, many offspring of the polygamist and musician Fela Kuti. Jan 19 at the Fillmore.

Quicksand Q: How long ago were Quicksand a thing? A: They headlined the very first Warped Tour. Jan 21 at Regency Ballroom.

Mistah F.A.B. & Talib Kweli Fabby hosts birthday celebration as Talib Kweli spins DJ set and Souls of Mischief wreck shop. Jan 21 at the New Parish.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Galleries OPENINGS Jan 17 At 4pm. Napa Museum, quilt exhibit. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Jan 18 At 4pm. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “Young Artists 2013,” works from elementary school students. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970. At 5pm. City Hall Council Chambers, David Kingwill’s abstract paintings. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Jan 19 At 6pm. Artlife Gallery, “Storied Lives: The Art of Narrative,” mixed media from 14 artists. 958 Gravenstein Highway S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881. At 7pm. ECHO Gallery, “Proof of Some Existence,” works by Maki Aizawa, Peter Hassen, Angela Willetts and Michelle Wilson. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays throughout the year and features the history of the Peanuts-themed balloons in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Through Apr 28, “Useable, Loveable Peanuts,” highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products plus the licensing and manufacturing stories behind them. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Mar 6, David Kingwill’s abstract paintings. Reception, Jan 18, 5pm. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center Through Feb 7, “Monty Monty’s Traveling Air Show & Aeronautical Wonders,” sculptures of fantasy flight contraptions. Through Feb 7, “Nik Catalina: Photographs,” the magic and wonder of nature. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Feb 2, “Holiday Lights Exhibit and Sale,” Becoming Independent’s two- and threedimensional arts and crafts. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

SONOMA COUNTY Artlife Gallery Jan 16-Mar 10, “Storied Lives: The Art of Narrative,” mixed media from 14 artists. Reception, Jan 19, 6pm. 958 Gravenstein Highway S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation” features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued from Schulz’s 1966 studio fire. Dec 1, Charles Solomon and Lee Mendelson talk about new book “The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation.”. Through Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations”

Through Feb 3, “Young Artists 2013,” works from elementary school students. Reception, Jan 18, 4pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 3, “Science Route,” featuring colorful land and seascape oil paintings by Linda Sorenson. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Amphitheater Through Feb 28, “Sky,” quilt exhibit by the Pointless Sisters. 4008 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 10, “Four

Weavers,” contemporary expressions of an ancient craft. Lecture, Feb 2, 1pm. Workshops, Feb 9, 1pm and Feb 23, 9am. Demonstration, Feb 16, 2pm. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Museum Jan 17-27, “Wings in Space: Tribute to the Space Shuttle Program” speaker series and exhibit. Featuring Photographer and visual effects designer George Murphy Jan 19 and space shuttle astronaut Jose Hernandez Jan 26. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Mar 30, “Free Flight,” paintings and sculptures with no restricted theme or size. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jan 28, “Scenic Journey: Sonoma County and Beyond,” a series of landscapes by Terry Sauvé. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 3, “Winter,” photography by Lance Kuehne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma Academy Through Feb 27, Art Exhibit by painter Maja Ruznic. 2500 Farmers Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1770.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Feb 28, “Our Home: Sonoma County,” Sonoma County Photography Group exhibition. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Mar 11, “Bright Beginnings,” 40 local artists with a variety of mediums. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Bay Model Visitor Center Through Feb 23, “Reflections on Water,” photographic

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Book Passage Through Feb 28, “Tom Killion Woodcut Prints,” Marin County artist and owned of Quail Press. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Falkirk Cultural Center Jan 18-Mar 9, “BayWood Artists,” dedicated to painting and preserving Marin’s natural landscape. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jan 16, Current exhibition features Jose Basso, Alberto Ludwig, Braulio Delgado and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 3, “Out of the Blue,” annual juried show. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Jan 19-Feb 24, “State of Mind,” member art exploring the concept. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Feb 7, “Passages (From Representational to Abstract),” non-juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; SatSun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

MFA Art Space Through Jan 31, New Year show featuring pieces by Ann Cohen, Zenovía Limberakis, Amie Klute and George Gorner. 827 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.713.3087.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jan 31, “Made up Stories from an Imagined Past,” paintings by Inez Storer. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jan 27, “Renaissance on Fillmore” examines San Francisco’s upper Fillmore district from 1955 to ‘65 with the work of 17 artists who

A Roast! Lousy bastard Steve Jaxon turns 60 Steve Jaxon has been telling me for the last two weeks that he can take the heat of a roast. After 40 years as a public figure, he’s got thick skin. But Jaxon called me up last night. “I’m starting to tell people that they can be just a little bit nice to me,” he said, clearly desperate. Ah. Wussing out, I see. He’s the one who called for a roast, and he’s getting a roast, dammit. Jaxon, host of The Drive, who celebrates 60 years on Earth and 40 years on the radio waves this week, is the victim of the Steve Jaxon 40/60 Roast—and boy, is he in for it. On board for the ruthless insults are comedians Will Durst, Johnny Steele and Dave Pokorny; the PD’s Chris Smith; councilmember Gary Wysocky; council hopeful Hans Dippel; Bohemian contributor Daedalus Howell; and longtime friend and partner in crime Blair Hardman. Guy Fieri? He’ll be there, too, probably trying to avoid some leveled barbs of his own. The Steve Pile Band provide the tunes, and yours truly, who drops by Jaxon’s show The Drive on KSRO every Wednesday, has been tapped as roastmaster. An FCC-friendly live broadcast airs 3–6pm on KSRO 1350-AM, and then the F-bombs fly for the real deal at 7pm on Friday, Jan. 18, at D’Argenzio Winery. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $20–$25. 707.546.2466.—Gabe Meline

either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Ongoing, “Art on First,” the third annual exhibition

bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists on display through 2013. Main and Third streets, Napa.

ECHO Gallery Ongoing, “Proof

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Arts Events

exhibition celebrating the life and beauty of Marin’s creeks. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

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of Some Existence,” works by Maki Aizawa, Peter Hassen, Angela Willetts and Michelle Wilson. Reception, Jan 19, 7pm. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jan 18, “Atatürk” series, Gordon Huether’s latest work, on display with a selection of Turkish rugs. 1465 First St, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jan 20, Quilt exhibit. Reception, Jan 17, 4pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Below the Belt Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper O’Farrell’s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Scott Capurro Cutting-edge, provocative comedy. Jan 17, 8pm. $18-$28. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Funny Frank & Bob Hartman High Voltage Comedy Jan 19, 8pm. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Open Mic Headlined by Chris Burns. Adult content. Jan 16, 9pm. $4 minimum purchase. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Santa Rosa Comedy Nights Comedy open mic hosted by MC Ricky Del Rosario. Third Thurs of every month. Free. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Center, 21 West Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0721.

Tuesday Evening Comedy

Puppet Show for Preschoolers

Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Rebecah Freeling combines traditional folk tales with her own through the magic of puppetry. Jan 19, 11am. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Events Battle of the Baristas Baristas judged on knowledge of coffee harvesting and processing techniques; taste, volume and texture of espresso; and presentation of drinks including latte art. Jan 17, 6pm. Free. Taylor Maid Farms, 7190 Keating Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.7129.

Bay Area Environmental Education Fair Hikers, bikers, teachers and budding environmentalists will find something to pique their fancy at the annual BAEER Fair. Jan 19, 10am. $8-$12. Exhibit Hall, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Oxbow Birthday Party Five-year anniversary of market’s opening featuring daily specials, live music, nightly drawings for great prizes and other surprises. Jan 21-25. Free. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Gilbert & Sullivan Sing-Along Produced by Ann Mac Nab with Chris Alexander at the piano, the Sebastopol Savoyards help you have a good sail, laced with laughter and drama. Jan 19, 7pm. $10. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

It’s Tokyo, Charlie Brown!

Improv Comedy. Jan 19, 8pm. $14. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Celebrating release of new graphic novel with authors. Jan 19, 1pm. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Socofu

Love Me, Fix Me

Standup series brings the comedy underground to Sonoma County. Third Sun of every month, 7pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern,

Low cost spay/neuter mobile clinic sponsored by Sonoma County Animal Control. Call 707.565.7100 for appointment. Jan 23. $15-$30. Western Farm

Sixth Street Improv

Registration Celebration Meet the teachers and enjoy light refreshments. Jan 20, 1pm. Free. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Rose Pruning Demonstration Crossing canes will be removed, root suckers and dead wood removed, diseased leaves will be removed, and each bush will be drastically reduced in size. Jan 19, 9am. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Steve Jaxon Roast Forty years in radio, 60 years on Earth, all of them wasted in a haze of chemicals, Frank Zappa songs and unrequited horniness. This dude is going down, courtesy of roasters Guy Fieri, Will Durst, Johnny Steele, Blair Hardman, Daedalus Howell and roastmaster Gabe Meline, editor of this very rag. The Steve Pile Band guests. Jan 18 at 7pm. D’Argenzio Winery, 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. $20-$25. 707.546.2466.

Wine & Dine with Local Authors Writers Frances Caballo, Linda McCabe, Mary Lanier, Katy Byrne and Theresa Dintino participate. Jan 22, 6pm. $4 minimum purchase. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Field Trips Beginner’s Bird Walk It’s like birdie bingo in the fresh morning air. Jan 19, 8:30am. Free. Lake Sonoma Visitor Center, Rockpile Road (off Dry Creek Road), Healdsburg.

Bird Walk Meet at Rush Creek trailhead at end of Bahia Drive.

Jan 17, 8:30am. Free. Rush Creek Preserve, Bahia Drive, Novato.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Family Nature Walk Led by Petaluma Wetlands Alliance. Rain cancels. Jan 19, 10am. Free. Shollenberger Park, Parking lot, Petaluma.

Winter Bird Walk Bird walk led by Sanctuary Manager and experienced birder Kerry Wilcox. Jan 19, 8:30am. $7. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon. 415.388.2524.

Film Big Easy Express Mumford & Sons went on tour and Emmett Malloy made a movie about it. Jan 22, 7pm. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Caravaggio Moretti and Monteverdi’s ballet featuring the Staatsballet Berlin conducted by Paul Connelly. Jan 19, 7pm. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Desk Set This 1957 rom-com stars Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Mon, Jan 21, 7pm and Wed, Jan 23, 1pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters Documentary on acclaimed photographer. Fri, Jan 18, 7pm and Sun, Jan 20, 4pm. $7. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Live for Life French tale is part of Mort Sahl’s film series. Jan 23, 7:30pm. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The Salt Song Trail: Bringing Creation Back Together Again The Southern Paiute people create a physical and spiritual map of the sacred Salt Songs. Director Philip M Klasky participates in discussion after. Jan 23, 7pm. Free. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Heart Trails

Art from the Heart a massive benefit auction with over 100 artists Now a 29-year-old tradition, this year’s see-and-be-seen Art from the Heart auction at SSU takes place on Jan. 19. Previous auctions have featured goodies donated from local inns and wineries, but this year, attendees will bid strictly on the artworks themselves, generously donated from over a hundred notable sculptors, painters and conceptual creators. Among those is San Francisco’s Ray Beldner, whose 101 Portraits are blurry, lowres amalgamations of exactly that many celebrity Google searches. The misty, nearly faceless results comment on fame-worship in the digital age by silently staring back at viewers with the vapid blankness of someone who’s just looked through 101 pictures of, well, anything. Closer to home, SRJC faculty member Kristine Branscomb will also be featured. Her paintings likewise examine the intersection of media and reality, creating impressionistic, faceless scenes that play on the notion of that two-dimensional, airbrushed reality so often used to sell. If you don’t feel like donning a tie, brushing your hair or whatever dressing up for a fancy gala means to you, a free preview exhibit is held Jan. 16–18, starting at 11am. Art from the Heart is on Saturday, Jan. 19, at University Art Gallery. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 6pm. $25 donation. 707.664.2295.—Rachel Dovey

Task Force on the Americas Three films about migrants and civil rights: “Precious

Knowledge,” “Sin Pais” and “Which Way Home.” Jan 19, 5:15pm. $10-$20.

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First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Wnter Wineland Winetasting, some wineries offering food pairings and tours. see www.wineroad.com for participating wineries. Jan 19-20, 11am-4pm. $35-$45. Wine Road, 498 Moore Lane, Healdsburg.

Lectures Jenny Honnert Abell Artist shares photos and stories from her trip to Senegal as part of her commission with the Art in Embassy program. Jan 19, 6pm. Free. Hammerfriar Gallery, 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

All Roads Lead to Wall Street Discussions, presentations, theater and brainstorming for a new year of the Occupy movement. Jan 17, 5:30pm. Free. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Healing Foods Basics Connect the dots between your health, food, stress, toxins, physical fitness, relaxation and being part of a loving community. Tues, Jan 22, 7:30pm. $15-$35. Ceres Community Project,

7351 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.8295.

How to Garden for Birds Talk by Frederique Lavoipierre of Sonoma State University. Jan 21, 7:30pm. Free. First United Methodist Church, 1551 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

Pruning Workshop Cover the basics and benefits of winter and summer pruning for small, diversified fruit tree orchards. Jan 19, 9am. $35. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

Siddhis & Spiritualism ITPI presents “The Upsurge of the Supernormal in 19th Century America,” with Frank Poletti, PhD. Jan 23, 7pm. $20. St Stephen’s Episcopol Church, 3 Bay View Ave, Belvedere.

Waxing Basics Taking care of your skis and snowboard will help you have a great time on the slopes. Jan 22, 7pm. Free. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.9025.

Winter Fruit Tree Pruning Talk by Paul Kolling, founder of and owner of Nana Mae’s Organics. Jan 19, 10am. $10$15. Sonoma Garden Park, 19990 Seventh St E, Sonoma.

Readings Book Passage Jan 16, 7pm, “She Matters” with Susanna Sonnenberg. Jan 17, 7pm, “Training in Compassion: Zen Teachings on the Practice of Lojong” with Norman Fischer. Jan 18, 7pm, “Whitney Houston: The Voice, the Music, the Inspiration” with Narada Walden. Jan 19, 4pm, “Beyond Bitterroot” with Barbara Davies Hubbard. Jan 22, 7pm, “Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction” with Tracy Kidder. Jan 23, 1pm, “Harold E. Stassen: The Life & Perennial Candidacy of the Progressive Republican” with John Rothmann. Jan 23, 7pm, “The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinking” with Oliver Burkeman. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 23, 4pm, “Imogen: the Mother of Modernism & Three Boys” with Amy Novesky.

140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Theater A Couple of Blaguards Irish tunes and ballads sparkle in this musical comedy about the McCourt brothers’ escape from Ireland to America. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Jan 27. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

‘M’ Staged reading of a new play by Jeannie Barroga. Directed by Norman Gee. Jan 16, 7:30pm. $10-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Menopause the Musical Musical parody set to classic tunes from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s will have you cheering and dancing in the aisles. Jan 20, 3 and 7pm. $50-$70. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

A Pack of Lies Cold War psychological thriller begins when Scotland Yard uses an English couple’s home to observe a Soviet spy ring. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 17. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The Real Americans Connecting the worlds of liberal and conservative. Written and performed by Dan Hoyle. Jan 18, 8pm. $25-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Smokey Joe’s Cafe In an idealized ‘50’s setting, the classic themes of love won, lost and imagined blend with hilarious set pieces and sliceof-life emotions. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Feb 10. $15$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 16

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “If you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it,” wrote 19thcentury poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. “Every arrow that flies feels the attraction of the earth.” This is good counsel for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks, Aries. I suspect you will have a good, clear shot at a target you’ve been trying to get close to for a long time. Make sure you adjust your trajectory to account for the attraction of the earth.

so crazily happy that it exuberantly leaps up into the air, stretching and twisting its body as it flicks and flops its feet. I’m not sure if lexicographers would allow us to apply this term to humans. But assuming they might, I’m going to predict that you’ll soon be having some binky-inducing experiences. You’re entering the Joy and Pleasure Season, Libra—a time when abundant levels of fun and well-being might be quite normal.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) You know

If you learn a novel idea or a crucial new lesson while you are tipsy or outright blitzed, you will probably forget it when you sober up. And it will remain forgotten as long as you abstain. But there’s a good chance you will recall the vanished information the next time you get loopy. I’m telling you this, Taurus, because even if you haven’t been inebriated lately, you have definitely been in an altered and expanded state of consciousness. I’m afraid that when you come back down to earth in a few days, you might lose some of the luminous insights you’ve been adding to your repertoire. Is there anything you can do to ensure you will retain these treasures? It would be a shame to lose track of them until the next time your mind gets thoroughly blown open.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Studying the movements of the planets is my main way of discerning the hidden currents of fate. I sometimes supplement my investigations by reading Tarot cards and the Chinese Book of Changes, also known as the I Ching. To arrive at your horoscope this week, I used all of the above as well as the following forms of prognostication: catoptromancy, which is divination by gazing into a mirror underwater; cyclomancy, or divination by watching a wheel that’s turning; geloscopy, divination by listening to random laughter; and margaritomancy, divination by observing bouncing pearls. Here’s what I found, Gemini: You now have the power to discern previously unfathomable patterns in a puzzling mystery you’ve been monitoring. You also have the ability to correctly surmise the covert agendas of allies and adversaries alike. Maybe best of all, you can discover certain secrets you’ve been concealing from yourself. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

“To be reborn is a constantly recurring human need,” said drama critic Henry Hewes. I agree. We all need to periodically reinvent ourselves—to allow the old ways to die so that we can resurrect ourselves in unforeseen new forms. According to my analysis, Cancerian, your next scheduled rebirth is drawing near. For best results, don’t cling to the past; don’t imitate what has always worked before. Instead, have faith that surrendering to the future will bring you the exact transformation you need.

LEO (July 23–August 22) My readers Paul and Sophie wrote to let me know they have patched together three Latin words to invent a term for a new concept: vomfiabone. They say it means “a curse that becomes a blessing.” Here’s an example of the phenomenon at work in their lives: While driving home from work together, they experienced car trouble and had to pull over to the shoulder of the road, where they called a tow truck. Later they discovered that this annoying delay prevented them from getting caught in the middle of an accident just up ahead. Extrapolating from the current astrological omens, I’m guessing that you will experience at least one vomfiabone in the coming week, Leo. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

I bet that in the next five months you will be obliged to carry more responsibility than you have in the past. You will find it hard to get away with being lazy or careless. I suspect that during this time you will also have the privilege of wielding more influence. The effect you have on people will be more pronounced and enduring. In short, Virgo, your workload will be greater than usual—and so will your rewards. To the degree that you serve the greater good, you will be a major player. As for next few weeks, you should concentrate on the work and service and responsibility part of this equation.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Do you know what a “binky” is? It’s what a rabbit does when it gets

that area on your back that you can’t quite reach if you want to scratch it? It’s called your acnestis. I propose that we make it your featured metaphor of the week. Why? Because I suspect you will have to deal with a couple of itchy situations that are just beyond your ability to relieve. Yes, this may be frustrating in the short run. But it will ultimately make you even more resourceful than you already are. By this time next week, you will have figured out alternative solutions that you haven’t even imagined yet.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “We need new friends,” said essayist Logan Pearsall Smith. “Some of us are cannibals who have eaten their old friends up; others must have ever-renewed audiences before whom to re-enact an ideal version of their lives.” Smith could have been talking about you Sagittarians in early 2013. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, you need some fresh alliances. Their influence will activate certain potentials that you haven’t been able to access or fully express with the help of your current circle.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) A San Francisco writer named Maneesh Sethi decided he was wasting too much time on the internet. His productivity was suffering. So he hired a woman to sit next to him as he worked and yell at him or slap his face every time his attention wandered off in the direction of Facebook or a funny video. It worked. He got a lot more done. While I would like to see you try some inventive approaches to pumping up your own efficiency, Capricorn, I don’t necessarily endorse Sethi’s rather gimmicky technique. Start brainstorming about some interesting yet practical new ways to enhance your self-discipline, please. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “Ronnyjohnson618” is a guy who posts his opinions on a wide variety of YouTube videos. Many times, he claims to be an expert in the field he’s commenting on. Responding to a live music performance, he says he’s a conductor for an orchestra. Offering his opinion about a mimosa plant, he asserts that he is a botanist. Beneath other YouTube videos, he declares he is a meteorologist, chemist, psychologist, soldier and geometry teacher. I love this guy’s blithe swagger; I’m entertained by the brazen fun he’s having. As you express yourself in the coming week, I recommend that you borrow some of his over-the-top audacity. Create a mythic persona. Imagine your life as an epic story. Play the part of a hero. PISCES (February 19–March 20) The earliest performance artist on record was the ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes of Sinope. In one of his notorious stunts, he wandered around Athens with a lit lantern during the daytime, claiming to be looking for an authentic human being. I recommend that you undertake a similar search in the coming days, Pisces. You don’t have to be as theatrical about it. In fact, it might be better to be quite discrete. But I think it’s important for you to locate and interact with people who are living their lives to the fullest—devoted to their brightest dreams, committed to their highest values and sworn to express their highest integrity.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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