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There It Goes Stolen Lambos, Disney deals, nightclub brawls: looking back on 2012’s wild ride p18

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Raising My Hand On the NRA and bipolar disorder BY KRIS MAGNUSSON

I

have not come out and directly expressed this previously, but now it is required of me as a patriot, an advocate for a vulnerable subclass of Americans and a fighter for justice. I have bipolar disorder. I have had it since I was 19, and was diagnosed when I moved to California early this decade. I have had my struggles, but I am a productive member of society. My profile is right there on LinkedIn or Google if you want evidence. So now we are engaging in a national dialogue about guns and mental illness. And it’s gotten ugly. When there’s a mass shooting, inevitably the NRA calls for people to carry more guns, paradoxically. In Newtown, as we all know, a disturbed 20-year-old annihilated almost 30 people, most of them children. The NRA was silent, except to say that they would be making a statement later. Well, the NRA made their statement, and missed a chance for constructive dialogue. “Scapegoating” is the word for what they are doing. In a change in tactic, the NRA is calling for a national database of the mentally ill—me and others like me being rounded up and fingerprinted and our movements tracked. Even The Atlantic’s staff writer Jeffrey Goldberg is nonchalantly considering taking away the Second Amendment rights of the mentally ill who haven’t been charged with a crime or judged mentally ill by the courts. The mentally ill are not sex offenders or parolees. We’re human beings who are doing our best to plod along and maintain relationships and work and live and take care of our families and build careers and get educated just like everyone else in the country. We will not be scapegoated. We will not be tracked and monitored like pedophiles on parole wearing ankle bracelets. Count on us to fight for our rights—we are Americans, only with different brain chemistry than most. That makes us assets, not liabilities. The answer to psychopathic shooters is absolutely not to infringe on the Constitutional rights and privileges of the 1 percent of the population of the United States who take Prozac or Seroquel or go to therapy. That much we will make known—and are making known. Kris Magnusson is a professional writer for a large software company and is the coauthor of ‘Java Enterprise In a Nutshell.’ He lives in Sonoma. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

God, Guts & Guns

Thank you, Ari Levaux, for clearing up a misconception (“American Psychos,” Dec. 26). Not knowing any hunters, I’ve always assumed that they walked hand in hand with the NRA. I hope this inspires other non-NRA hunters to speak out.

NAOMI WILLIAMS Via online

Q: How many NRA members does it take to change a light bulb? A: 4,300,000. One to start changing the bulb until shot dead by a psychotic relative using a weapon bought for the NRA member’s personal protection, and 4,299,999 to claim that the only problem the U.S. has with guns is that there are not enough of them.

Own Star” (Dec. 19) by Daedalus Howell. It is good to hear that Eleanor Coppola is “too earnest to be susceptible to such platitudes” after it’s suggested that she is the de facto grand dame of Sonoma County’s wine scene.

I just can’t escape the idea that the artistic lifestyle she has pursued has been aided by her access to unlimited funds. For example, has she ever had to worry about obtaining healthcare or the balance of her checkbook? I doubt it. And that’s OK, it’s just the idea of her being very close to the 1% of wealth has me wondering whether she would be a working artist Nowhere in the article did it mention giving back to the community or the 99%, unless you count the fact that she would like to share the blend of Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon as a wine. This interview would be the opposite side of last week’s article about the Occupy movement. I found last week’s article more important.

JOHN FLYNN

TOM SCOTT

Napa

Via online

Ari Levaux does not speak for hunters. Every statistic that he quotes is cooked and misleading at best. The kid told the school he brought the gun for safety, but no one at the school believed him, not the other students, not the administration. His bragging actions with the gun and intimidation of other students with it betrayed the real reason. Ari’s claim that armed citizens do not prevent or limit the scale of mass killings is ridiculous. They just cannot completely eliminate the behavior. If any of the six women killed in Sandy Hook had a concealed carry gun, there would have likely been fewer killed. Armed mass killers in Israel don’t kill 30; they kill three to six before the armed populace brings them down.

STEPHEN M. WEISS Via online

Let Them Eat Grapes Just finished the article “Following Her

I am no longer a working artist in this now more and more gentrified mecca of North Bay. In fairness, I must say it has been a long time. I no longer buy Ramen noodles by the case or attend rent parties or compare publishers’ rejection letters over bad coffee. I must say, though, I was sorely tempted to add a speech bubble to the photo of Mrs. Coppola enjoying her latest vintage in the gardens with her youthful foil stating, “If the peasants are starving, let them eat grapes.”

P. LUPUS Santa Rosa

Disarming the World Gun control . . . what a great idea, Mr. President. Why does it take a tragedy in Connecticut to instigate this action? Why did nothing happen after Columbine? Surely it was just as tragic! And will you extend this gun control to

Rants

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 2-8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

our military-industrial complex? I mean, we are by far the biggest supplier of arms to the world as a whole, especially favoring certain countries with despot leaders bent on conquering anything that stands in the way of getting whatever it is they want. I’m quite certain that there are more than 20 children murdered daily around the world by guns which came from the good ol’ U.S. of A.—children who were just trying to live their lives as normally as they possibly could, given their circumstances. Just trying to learn how to read and write, like the kids in Connecticut. Please tell me, Mr. President, why are our children’s lives worth more than those from another country?

MARC GROAH Healdsburg Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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8

Paper THE

CALL FOR HELP No longer will drug users be subject to arrest for calling 911 or bringing overdose victims to the ER.

State of the State New California laws to know for 2013 BY LEILANI CLARK

W

hat better way to prepare for the new year than by familiarizing oneself with what will (and won’t) stir up legal hot water in 2013? In 2012, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a number of bills into law; here’s a select overview of the more relevant ones to take effect on Jan. 1.

Assemblyman Gilbert Cedillo’s AB 2189 allows undocumented immigrants under the age of 31 who fit certain requirements to obtain a California driver’s license. The law applies to those who qualify for President Obama’s new deferred status program, which provides a two-year stay on deportation for people under 31 who were brought to the United States illegally before the age of 16. Federal documents received

in the deferment process will be considered as acceptable evidence for driver’s license applications. Worried about all those party pictures on your Facebook feed? Fear no more. Thanks to internet privacy measure AB 1844, employers are now barred from asking employees and job applicants for the passwords to their social media and email accounts. The California Homeowner’s Bill of Rights, supported by

Attorney General Kamala Harris, addresses the continuing foreclosure crisis by protecting homeowners during the mortgage and foreclosure process. The law puts restrictions on dual track foreclosures, guarantees a single point of contact at the bank and places penalties on lenders that record and file multiple unverified documents, a controversial practice known as “robo-signing.” Homeowners can also turn to the court to help enforce their right to a fair and transparent foreclosure process. Until now, small-scale food producers have been required to work out of certified commercial kitchens, often at a steep expense, in order to sell to stores, restaurants or directly to the public. With the new California Homemade Food Act, fledgling food entrepreneurs will be able to sell certain homemade products in a more streamlined fashion. The approved food product list includes bread, fruit pies, jam, honey and dried nuts, none of which can contain meat or cream ingredients. Requirements still include a foodprocessor course, food labeling and possible inspections by the health department. Two new laws specifically make the lives of women less complicated. AB 2348, known as the California Birth Control Law, allows registered nurses to dispense and administer contraceptives (within specified clinic settings) without requiring a doctor’s signature on each prescription. Sponsored by Planned Parenthood, the bill gives “women the right to control their own destiny,” according to Gov. Brown. Also, AB 2386 expands the definition of “sex” in the Fair Employment and Housing Act to include breastfeeding. If an employer shows prejudice against breastfeeding, this counts as a form of gender or sex discrimination and can be liable for prosecution. Champions of the environment may cheer the new Marijuana Grow Crackdown Law; the bill is aimed squarely at those who grow or manufacture illegal drugs on state forested land. Under AB 2284, law enforcement patrolling unpaved forest roads can stop cars and trucks with visible irrigation supplies to determine whether

Employers are now barred from asking for passwords to employees’ social media accounts. By eliminating fear of arrest for minor drug law violations, the Good Samaritan Overdose Prevention law encourages people to call 911 for help with victims of drug overdose. If someone at the scene possesses small amounts of drugs or paraphernalia, they will not be liable for arrest or prosecution. Concurrently, a new driving law says that DUI drivers can no longer choose between blood test and urine tests to determine blood drug content—blood tests are now the only option. California was lauded this year for being the first state to pass a law preventing therapy that would purportedly change minors’ sexual orientation (also know as “ex-gay” therapies or gay conversion), but the law has been delayed pending a federal appeals trial. On the flipside, Gov. Brown signed quite a few bills in 2012 that apply to veterans, but one is particularly notable: AB 1505 reinstates California veterans benefits for those who were discharged due solely to sexual orientation. The bill will guarantee a lifetime of healthcare and disability compensation for unfairly discharged LGBT vets.

9

Freedom Walker For years, the people of Bil’in, a Palestinian community, have held weekly demonstrations against the building of an Israeli-helmed “separation wall” through the community’s agricultural lands. Iyad Burnat, a Palestinian farmer and nonviolent peace activist, has been a leader in the movement to protest such settlements on Palestinian land. He’s currently on a three-month speaking tour of the United States, telling stories of Palestine and discussing strategies for nonviolent popular resistance, and arrives in Marin on Jan. 8. “Since the 1936 intifada against British occupation, we have been working peacefully for freedom. We don’t know the meaning of ‘freedom.’ We know it’s the most beautiful thing in the world, but we don’t know how it feels,” Burnat told a crowd in Columbus, Ohio, this past December. Hear Iyad Burnat tell his story—along with a showing of 5 Broken Cameras, a documentary by Emad Burnat, the speaker’s brother—on Tuesday, Jan. 8, at the First Presbyterian Church. 72 Kensington Road, San Anselmo. 7pm. Donations accepted. 415.456.3713.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 2-8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

they were legally purchased. If the driver cannot prove that the purchase was lawful, the supplies can be impounded. The law applies to unpaved roads through private timberland of 50,000 acres as well as any roads in the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Department of Forestry and the Department of Parks and Recreation.

SONOMACOUNTYENERGY.ORG SONOM A COUNTYENERRGY.ORG Log on to hear whatt people have ha ve to sa say y and find fin nd your your rreason eason to upgr upgrade. ade.

Happy New Year and Much Love from Your Sisters at

Price of Pot Illegal pot farms take a severe environmental toll on the North Coast, according to an extensive Dec. 24 report in the Los Angeles Times. Growers have clear-cut trees, siphoned hundreds of gallons of water from nearby creeks and streams, poisoned wild animals with a powerful rodenticide called Carbofuran and polluted watersheds with potting soil and fertilizers. The problem has gotten so extreme that scientists have begun to blame unregulated marijuana “supergrows” for a breakout of cyanobacteria in North Coast rivers, a toxic blue-green algae that has been responsible for the deaths of water creatures and dogs.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

Energy Upgr ade California™ fo is a progr am of the Californ fo nia Public Utilities Commission in collaboration with the California fo Energy Commission C California fo GSYRXMIW GMXMIWRSRTVS½XSVKERM^EXMSRW ERH XLI WXEXI´W MRZIIWXSVS[RIH YXMPMXMIW Funding comes from the utilities' ratepayers under the ausspices of the California fo Public Utilities Commission in addition to increm mental funding from XLI(ITEVXQIRXSJ)RIVK]Œ)RIVK]9TKVEHI'EPMJJS JSVRME8V 8VEHIQEVOWEVI TVSTIVX]SJXLIMVVIWTIGXMZIS[RIVW%PPVMKLXWVIWIVZIH

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10

Green Zone

Old Wisdom Anew

Bron Taylor’s ‘Dark Green Religion’ BY JULIANE POIRIER

T

he “new thing” is green religion— which is actually the reappearance of an ancient thing. Can it help place the brakes on Earth’s decline? In his 2010 book, Dark Green Religion: Nature Spirituality and the Planetary Future, environmental studies scholar Bron Taylor examines the rise of earthbased religion as a trend he suspects might be good for the planet.

“When people say this kind of religion is perhaps the oldest,” Taylor tells the Bohemian, “it’s because the earliest roots of the word ‘religion’ mean to be bound to that which ones considers ultimately meaningful and transformative. To feel a sense of belonging to the natural world, and even considering it sacred in

some way, is part of the human emotional repertoire. In fact, these feelings existed before the axial, or world, religions emerged.” According to Taylor, feelings of connectedness to nature can intertwine with traditional faiths, but for the most part they exist separate, because axial religions tend to promote “some kind of divine rescue from this world rather than a feeling of belonging to it.” Taylor’ book defines two categories of nature spirituality: Gaia and animism. Gaia refers to the hypothesis that earth is a living organism; animism is a term used to refer to relationships people have with natural entities, such as pets or other organisms. “Animism can be part of the religion and can be entirely about the perception of intelligence and value in the natural world,” explains Taylor. For some, the Gaia hypothesis is completely scientific, and for others it has a religious dimension—that a divine source is orchestrating all this. “Either way,” says Taylor, “we find increasing numbers of people arriving at these perceptions: that the world is interdependent. Combined with the kinship ethic—that all organisms are literally related— it makes sense to talk about the world as sacred in some way.” Whether this rapidly growing movement will exhibit what Taylor calls the dark side of religion is yet unknown. “Religion involves drawing the boundaries of who or what is included within the moral community,” says Taylor. “The dark side of religion is that those outside the boundaries are not accorded the same levels of respect or care. So if green religions have a dark side, we need to make corrections as necessary.” So far, Taylor is hopeful that green religion may aid all forms of life. “I’m convinced that our species has ethical obligations to other species, and that they have inherent value,” says Taylor. “And whether they are useful to us or not, we ought not to be driving other species off the planet.”

GOT CRABS? If certain culinary fads come west, we’ll soon be feeding on invasive species like the Carcinus maenas, above.

No More Bacon! Local chefs on the year’s dead food trends—and what’s upcoming for 2013 BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

I

n the realm of gastronomy, boundaries are constantly being pushed and new food trends invented. Consider the “invasivore” movement. After realizing the culinary potential of green crabs, a prolific invasive species plaguing the East Coast, New York conservation biologist/foodie Joe Roman

created the website Eat the Invaders, designed to help folks fight so-called alien species “one bite at a time.” Combining the fun of foraging with the practicality of environmentalism, “invasivores” are combing their beaches and backyards for abundant edible delights. Invasive species menus are even cropping up in some restaurants. Local chefs take note: Is there a ragu to be made with Scotch

broom? Perhaps a eucalyptusinfused vodka? Though it may take a while for the invasivore trend to make its way to our coast, certain trends have caught on here in the North Bay (hello smoked water and secret supper clubs!) while others are going the way of the Twinkie (so long giant portions and fattened goose liver). On the cusp of 2013, it’s time to ask local chefs what they foresee as the year’s approaching food trends. Thanks in part to farmers like

Joel Salatin who are fed up with the bureaucratic red tape and high costs of USDA certification, “organic” is no longer the word du jour when it comes to quality food. The growing trend? Local, local, local. “It’s back to the land, know your farmer and know your food,” says Sheana Davis of Sonoma’s Epicurean Connection. Central Market’s Tony Najiola agrees, noting that the more you know about the people farming for you, the better. “If a farmer tells me he’s not spraying, that’s good enough for me,” he says. Of course, the whole “farm-totable” philosophy is how most people all over the world have eaten for centuries. Instead of being trendy, shouldn’t it just be common sense to take advantage of the local abundance of cheese, eggs, wine, apples, meat and vegetables that are produced here in the Bay Area? Indeed, when restaurants tout “farm-to-table,” they usually back it up with a slew of local farms from whom they procure their goat cheese or chicken, giving credence to the label. Let’s hope that the phrase can be saved from the maws of marketing, which have rendered words like “artisanal” (used by the likes of Burger King and Frito Lay) all but meaningless. The “snout-to-tail” movement, which promotes making use of the entire animal, is now being applied to fish and veggies. “We try to use everything, including the little things that often get composted,” says Ryan Fancher, executive chef at Healdsburg’s Barndiva. In this way, filet mignon trimmings and chard stems find their way into burgers and pickling brine. Other chefs note that as far as sustainable practices go, there’s always room for improvement. “We need more local slaughterhouses,” says Lowell Sheldon, owner of Sebastopol’s Peter Lowell’s, “so we don’t have to ship animals across the state before shipping them back to our county to be eaten.” Some restaurants are even taking the local trend beyond the kitchen. If our food is produced in the next ) 13

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Dining

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Sonoma County

& Ple asu res of the Godd es

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www.bikramyogaofsantarosa.com

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Napa County www.camomienoteca.com

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town over, they reason, why not our flatware and plates? “I see restaurants going the custommade route,” says chef Louis Maldonado of Healdsburg’s Spoonbar, whose plates, lights and tables are products of local ceramicists, glassblowers and woodworkers. In fact, the whole nondecorating minimalist approach seems to be on its way out. People may enjoy the stripped-down aesthetic of exposed brick walls, but how many painted air ducts can diners gaze at before craving the eyecandy of some black-and-white photography or psychedelic poster art? In July, California became the first state to ban foie gras, the fattened liver of a goose or duck resulting from force-feeding the bird through a tube. Of course, one animal-rights advocate’s victory is another gastronome’s defeat. As soon as the ban to sell foie gras took effect, many restaurants embraced the “BYOF” loophole: if you supply it, some chefs will cook it, giving rise to the term “foie-kage” fee. No longer relegated to the shameful status of garnish, kale has finally found its rightful place on the plate, thanks in part to its ability to be harnessed into that favorite American snack food, the chip. But with more iron than beef and more calcium than milk per calorie, this easy-togrow antioxidant- and fiber-rich “future food” surely deserves the hype. “I put a baby kale salad on my menu,” says Mark Miller, head chef at the Underwood Bar and Bistro in Graton, “because they’re everywhere.” Everywhere, including the White House’s Thanksgiving dinner this year, which served the greens harvested straight from Michelle Obama’s garden. While most chefs celebrate kale’s ascendance, not everyone is so smitten with bacon’s stronghold. As Maldonado tells me, “The pork craze is just ridiculous.” It’s not that there’s anything wrong with bacon per se. It’s just that, as Jason Sheehan of the Seattle Weekly put it, “bacon has not merely jumped the shark.

Bacon has taken all the sharks, stuffed them with cupcakes, ice cream, sausage, lipstick, alarm clocks and mayonnaise, wrapped them in bacon, deep-fried them, then jumped that. Using a ramp made of bacon.” Most chefs have due reverence for the salty slab, yet within reason. “Bacon is food crack,” says Jason Denton, chef du cuisine at Jackson’s Bar & Oven, “but that doesn’t mean it needs to show up in a latte.” Jack Mitchell, chef and owner of Jack and Tony’s, echoes the sentiment. “I would never serve bacon ice cream,” he tells me, “but a classic like the BLT can’t be beat.” Sheehan is right: “We need to let bacon be bacon once again.” Gluten continues to be the scarlet letter of ingredients, forcing some restaurants, like Graffiti in Petaluma, to create a gluten-free version of their menu. Bad news for bread, but good news for rice, which is the main grain in most Asian food, currently poised to steal the culinary show in the coming year. “People want authentic Asian food,” Miller tells me, echoing a popular contention, “not just Americanized kung pao chicken.” No matter what food captures the Zeitgeist, people will always need to quench their thirst. While “mixologists” continue to garner plenty of attention, gimmicky fads are on their way out, especially after an 18year-old British woman lost her stomach—literally—after imbibing a cocktail made with liquid nitrogen. “I see a return to the classics, like the Manhattan and the Old Fashioned,” says the Underwood’s Frank Dice. “For your last drink on earth, you probably want a mixologist,” he laughs, “but if you’re looking to cut up on a Friday night, you need a bartender.” So will the cake-pop unseat the cupcake as the queen of frosting? Will people really use pork-flavored lubricant? Are invasivores destined to become the new insectivores? As 2013 arrives, one thing is certain: the coming year will surely raise new gastronomical questions, and they’ll probably still be deep-fried and wrapped in bacon.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JANUARY 2-8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Best French Best Frozen Dessert Shop Best Happy Hour Best Indian (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Italian Best Japanese/Sushi Restaurant Best Mediterranean (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Mexican (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Micro Distillery Best Microbrew Best New Restaurant Best Organic Farm Best Outdoor Dining Best Pinot Noir Best Pizza Best Restaurant Best Sandwich Shop Best Sauvignon Blanc Best Seafood Best Server/Restaurant Best Sparkling Wine Best Spot to Dine Solo Best Syrah Best Thai (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Vegetarian Best Vietnamese Best Wine List Best Winetasting Room Best Zinfandel

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 2-8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Buck’s American. $$. Small plates complement classic fare at Guerneville staple. Prime rib weekend nights! Dinner, Wed– Sat; brunch and dinner, Sun. 16440 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.3608.

Chloe’s French Cafe French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

Gary Chu’s Chinese. $$. Fine Chinese food in elegant setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 611 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5840.

941 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.545.2911.

Willi’s Wine Bar Small plates/wine bar. $$$. Bistro dishes and extensive wine list. A terrific place to dine before a show at the Wells Fargo Center. 4404 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3096.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

MARIN CO U N T Y Buckeye Roadhouse

Clean, fresh, exciting traditional Indian food. Chicken tikka masala is indescribably good. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 52 Mission Circle, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.538.3367.

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Roberto’s Restaurant

Easy Street Cafe

Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Pamposh Indian. $-$$.

Simply Delicious Italian/ Mediterranean. $-$$. Tiny cafe with huge flavors. All dishes are homemade, with lots of organics. Fantastic lasagna, margherita pizza and meatball or chicken parm sandwiches. Lunch and dinner daily. 2780 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2083.

Sunflower Caffe Cafe. $-$$. Excellent, satisfying food served cafeteria-style. Breakfast and lunch daily. 421 First St, Sonoma. 707.996.6645.

Tai Yuet Lau Chinese. $$. Atmosphere is nothing to write home about, but the food will bring you back. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun.

507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100. Sol Food Puerto Rican. $. Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Checkers California. $$. Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As

The William Tell House American & Italian.

American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

$$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch.

comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cole’s Chop House

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic

SMALL BITES

Swine & Wine If watching Iron Chef on TV just isn’t cutting it, consider heading to Healdsburg to catch some real live culinary action. In the adrenaline-packed Tournament of the Pig, two teams of high-profile chefs are given a whole pig and two hours to create two distinct dishes using ingredients found in the kitchen at Dry Creek Restaurant. In the Ultimate Pinot Smackdown, four master sommeliers will go head-to-head pitching their four favorite Pinot Noirs to a lucky audience who will get to taste the picks and then decide on a winner. These events and more are part of Charlie Palmer’s eighth annual celebration of Pigs and Pinot at the Hotel Healdsburg on March 22–23. Featured chefs include Elizabeth Falkner, Dean Fearing, Craig Stoll and Iron Chef Jose Garces and winemakers from De Loach, Martinelli and Sea Smoke (among others), whose creations and libations will be featured in a five-course gala dinner on Saturday evening. Comedian and actor Mario Cantone (Anthony from Sex and the City, pictured) hosts the pig tournament, which, like all of the events, will likely sell out quickly (tickets go on sale Thursday, Jan. 10). All proceeds (yopping $110,000 last year!) benefit local charities, as well as Share Our Strength, a national nonprofit devoted to ending childhood hunger.—Jessica Dur Taylor

dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroir-

informed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Wineries

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S O N OM A CO U N T Y Benziger Winery A nontraditional, organic, biodynamically farmed winery. Don’t miss the daily 45-minute tram ride replete with a tour of the vineyard, wildlife sanctuaries and caves. 1883 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 888.490.2739. Claypool Cellars “They call me Mister Knowitall, I sup the aged wine.” Sup on Primus frontman’s Purple Pachyderm Pinot Noir and Rhone-style Fancí Blend in wine country’s cutest caboose, a must-see for rock and wine fans alike. 6761 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. Open SaturdaySunday, 1–5pm. 707.861.9358. Dutcher Crossing Winery Barnlike room offers fireplace to warm the mitts on winter days; owner Debra Mathy leads monthly bike rides in better weather. Try the Maple Vineyard Zinfandel; ask the well-informed staff about the Penny Farthing bicycle. 8533 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 866.431.2711.

Martinelli Winery Only in the 1980s, after hiring a consultant, did Martinelli begin to make A-list wines, but it’s still a funky red-barn establishment at heart. Martinelli Winery, 3360 River Road, Windsor. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.525.0570. Red Car Wine Co. Lay some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Russian River Vineyards The iconic, Fort Ross–styled building may have bats in the attic, but the

remodeled tasting room and restaurant feature crisp, delicious libations and a new menu. Nice Chileno Valley Riesling and Sonoma Coast Syrah. Look for the Bat Blend; proceeds benefit the bats. 5700 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Forestville. 11am to 5pm daily. $5 fee. 707.887.3344.

Sheldon Wines Globetrotting harvest hoboes who caught wine fever like an express train and held on tight. New, industrial Urban Winery Village location; same Rhône-style and offbeat varietals from small, family-run vineyards. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Friday–Monday noonish to sixish; fees $5–15. Food carts join Thirsty Thursdays, 4–8pm. 707.865.6755.

N A PA CO U N T Y Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Round Pond Estate Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc served tableside on the terrace with

scrumptious food pairings. Who can’t imagine cozying up next to the big gas-burning hearth, watching the sun set and savoring that Rutherford dusk? 875 Rutherford Road, Rutherford. Tastings by appointment daily, 11am to 4pm. $25. 888.302.2575.

Somerston Wine Co. Ambitious ranch and winery inclues utility-vehicle “buggy” rides by appointment. The cheese shop and grocery opens in April. All that and wine, too. 6488 Washington St., Yountville. Tasting room open noon-8pm Monday–Thursday; to 9pm, Friday–Saturday; to 10pm, summer. Tastings $15– $40. Ranch tours by appointment, $50. 707.944.8200.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but samplesized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am–6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday– Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Garnet Vineyards

Making sense of scents with Alison Crowe BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

hen we talk about a wine’s perfume, that’s when we lose some people. Where do we get hints of anise, Meyer lemon and, for gosh sakes, Chinese five spice out of a squirt of grape juice? Seriously, those aren’t actually in the wine, like some kind of eau de cologne?

Yes, in a way, they are. “They’re the same compounds, shared between different plant organisms,” Garnet Vineyards winemaker Alison Crowe explains. “One just happens to end up in a barrel, and the other one happens to end up in a bottle of Guerlain Eau Impériale.” Crowe, who pluckily announced that she wanted to be a winemaker at age 16, has a secret hobby. She collects perfume and is fascinated by its history. But ever since graduating from UC Davis, Crowe has worked in vineyards and cellars, where the dress code is sneakers and a fleece jacket, and where no career-minded person wears perfume. “It’s kind of like forbidden fruit,” she muses, “something I can’t indulge in every day.” When she assembles a blend of wine from barrel lots, each having its own characteristics, she sees it as being similar to a traditional perfumer’s task. “You’re taking a perishable, seasonal, organic product, and you’re trying to capture time in a bottle.” Garnet’s 2011 Monterey County Pinot Noir ($14.99) surely captures the essence of carob and nutmeg, while flooding the palate with deep cherry flavor, checked by tense cranberry fruit on the finish. Crowe calls the 2010 Carneros Pinot Noir ($19.99) her “shiny happy people wine.” It’s scented with Christmassy cinnamon, clove and potpourri, the dark fruit brightened with strawberry jam. But her “goth, Tim Burton” 2010 Sonoma Coast, Rodgers Creek Vineyard Pinot Noir ($29.99) gets over its dark, brooding phase after a day uncorked, becoming silky and quenching—bing cherries, rhubarb, licorice, orange zest and cinnamon. Or, you know, their organic chemical kin. Created by Pinot house Saintsbury in 1983, Garnet was sold to Silverado Winegrowers in 2011. Crowe is a partner in the brand, which is nationally distributed to restaurants and retailers. Jill of all trades, she’s tasked with everything from overseeing vineyards to traveling for the brand, while personally responding to customers on Facebook, and climbing barrels—although, with her second son well on the way, she’s had to give that up for a while. Sampled out of ground-level barrels, two different clones of newly fermented Rodgers Creek smell sort of peanut buttery to me—they’re just finishing up malolactic. But Crowe can pick out the dark, fresh fruit aromas lurking beneath. She’s going to enjoy blending this fragrance: 2012 in a bottle. Garnet Vineyards, Sonoma. For wine availability and retail locations, see www.garnetvineyards.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 2-8, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JANUARY 2-8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Gabe Meline

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from the excavation and winery sectors. Both promise to keep their influence away from the editorial board, and we’ll take the dutiful stance that time will tell. Further investors were named closer to the sale’s closure, as employees were asked to hastily sign a new employment contract with pay cuts and new benefits plans: they include Norma Person, widow of Evert Person, who sold the paper to the New York Times in 1985; Jean Schulz, widow of Charles Schulz; and, ho ho ho, Sandy Weill, former Citigroup CEO and orchestrator of the repeal of Glass-Steagall. So, basically, when you see a Press Democrat headline reading “Charlie Brown Loves Gambling Capital Gains from CreditDefault Swaps with PinotSipping Efren Carrillo in Shadow of Beautiful Asphalt Plant,” don’t be alarmed.—Gabe Meline

We Love to Drink

THANKS, LYNN Outgoing congresswoman Lynn Woolsey at the grand opening of the Green Music Center.

So Long, 2012!

Let’s recap the local stories of 2012, shall we? BY BOHEMIAN STAFF It Finally Opened Buy a great bottle of wine now, and it probably will be at its peak in a few years. The Green Music Center at Sonoma State University is that $145 million bottle of wine. The long-awaited center’s grand opening with pianist Lang Lang was held in September after nearly 20 years of fundraising, despite certain phases of the project remaining unfinished. Hopes are being pinned on the stature of the main hall, named for near-billionaire and former Citigroup CEO Sandy Weill, to spur donations toward completion of the smaller student venue known as Schroeder Hall.

Indeed, the only portion of the GMC yet to be funded is the very impetus for the whole thing, a small, acoustically lush choral recital hall for student groups and choirs. As the New York Times put it, reviewing the grand opening weekend against the relatively small music program at SSU, “The proof of the venture’s success will not be whether Mr. Lang and other superstars perform there regularly but whether the Green Music Center will spur enough growth in the university’s music program so that Sonoma State will one day have a student orchestra to play in its expensive new hall.” —Nicolas Grizzle

The Hometown Rag We were thrilled to hear that the Press Democrat was returning to local ownership, then dumbstruck when the two principal owners were named: Darius Anderson, a powerful state lobbyist, and Doug Bosco, former Congressman and current political powerbroker. Anderson has former ties to the Graton Rancheria’s Rohnert Park casino; he also once sued his neighbor for calling the cops on his loud party. Bosco, voted out of Congress for a check-bouncing scandal and a supporter of offshore oil drilling, fancies himself a kingmaker of candidates, able to fundraise

The Bohemian declared the craft beer revolution in 2011, and 2012 continued the explosion. Breweries and pubs opened left and right, while Russian River Brewing Co.’s Pliny the Younger kept drawing block-long lines and being named the best beer in the world. Old Redwood Brewing, a Windsor venture run by a crew of nanobrewers, opened its doors in August. 101 Brewing Co. in Petaluma started catching buzz with its delicious Heroine IPA a few months ago. And Beltane Brewing in Novato held a grand opening in early December, providing access to brewer Alan Atha’s elixir-like hop creations. In Santa Rosa, Heritage Public House announced plans to move to the old Video Droid location on Mendocino Ave., expanding the craft beer pub’s reach geographically and socially (right next to SRJC—smart move, Dino!). Pub Republic, with multiple craft beers on tap and an expansive food menu, moved into Petaluma. Hopmonk Novato opened in November, offering a wide selection on tap. But wait, there’s more! 2012 saw the release of ‘The Northern California Craft Beer Guide,’

The Giants Won the World Series, Sure . . .

May the Low-Income Housing Be with You Yeah, there was that day back in October when everyone and their aunt posted a mouse-shaped Death Star to their Facebook page. But George Lucas hasn’t just been busy pledging to donate his $4.05 billion buckaroos he got by selling Lucasfilm to Disney this year—he’s also turned petulant/charitable locally, depending on whom you ask. In April, Lucasfilm posted a strongly worded letter, stating that after 25 years, it was going to

Michael Amsler

. . . but come on, that 10-run rally by the Petaluma Little League team to force extra innings, are you kidding me? Just try and tell me you weren’t jumping out of your couch and screaming your head off and going totally batshit crazy. Sure, they lost, but those guys—Hunter Pence, Hance Smith, Quinton Gago—are now names eternal. While baseball dominated conversation, cycling hit a thorny patch: Lance Armstrong was stripped of all his Tour de France titles, and Santa Rosa’s Levi Leipheimer, a longtime friend and teammate of Armstrong, confirmed what everyone had long suspected by admitting to doping. (Just after having Barry Bonds as a guest at his Granfondo, at that.) The Tour of California returns to Santa Rosa next year, and Levi’s Granfondo will continue, but both will be very strange, differentfeeling events.—Gabe Meline

pull its application to build a film studio on Marin County’s Grady Ranch. Citing bitterness and anger on the part of local neighborhood groups, Lucasfilm then announced that it would use the space to construct low-income housing, and the residents of Marin all clapped their hands, because 60 percent of the county’s workforce commutes in due to Marin’s exorbitantly high rent. Kidding! No, what actually happened was a story ran in the New York Times where locals said the filmmaker’s move was going to “incite class warfare” and turn the state’s wealthiest county into Syria. In November, he became even more popular in the slowgrowth region with plans to demolish a building from 1945 to make way for a park where statues of Indiana Jones and Yoda will be built. While he’s at it, he should probably finance a Walmart, join the board of the Ross Valley Sanitary District and build a 10story SmartMeter shaped like Jar Jar Binks in a designated wilderness.—Rachel Dovey

Walking Is Still Honest Over 10 people were struck and killed by cars in Santa Rosa crosswalks in the last two years; many more were injured while walking or cycling. This is terrible and should stop, and is made even worse by the wonderful people who are getting mowed down. One comes to mind: the eminently friendly Toraj Soltani from Mac’s Deli, who was chased off the road and onto a golf course before being run over mid-

fairway by an angry driver with a revoked license. Weeks later, Joseph von Merta, a longtime fixture on Fourth Street, was hit and killed on College Avenue in October. You don’t know his name (he often spelled it differently when he talked to us), but you probably know his face. Merta was homeless, in an almost proud defiance of normal life; every time I asked him if he’d found a place to live, he’d pat his sleeping pad and say, “I got it right here.” Known variously as “Prince,” “Siren” or “That Guy Sitting on the Fountain in Front of Ting Hao with the Puppet Stick,” Merta was a quiet but reliable daily presence for over 15 years in Santa Rosa, asking for spare change and little else. Right before he died, he told me he’d just finished a job, was doing OK and planning to visit some family in the East Bay. A week later, he stumbled into the street at 5am and was killed, in the crosswalk, by a car. —Gabe Meline

Donkey Sauce & All I shouldn’t feel bad for a millionaire celebrity chef, but let’s face it, Santa Rosa’s own Guy Fieri had a really shitty year. First, his yellow Lamborghini was stolen from a garage in San Francisco. And by whom? A 17-year-old who was only caught because he reportedly shot a gun at two other teens in a fit of jealousy, leading authorities to discover his storage locker full of stolen goods, Fieri’s Lambo among the loot. (So this kid, Max Wade, right, is sitting in jail the night before he’s scheduled to be transferred, and his friends scale the barbed wire fence at the Marin jail, put a ladder beneath his window and try, unsuccessfully, to break the glass with a sledgehammer. In related news, Marin rappers Brilliant & Timbalias filmed a rap video, “Free Max Wade.” Dude is his own franchise!)

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Bohemian contributor Ken Weaver’s comprehensive and beautifully illustrated guide to our area breweries and beers. And for the one-stop shopper, BeerCraft, a craft beer shop in Rohnert Park, announced that in addition to offering a stellar selection, it’ll be opening a tasting room in the next couple of months. If the selection rivals that of the taproom at the Coddingtown Whole Foods, then we’re in for trouble—of the best kind—in 2013.—Leilani Clark

Anyway, Fieri, who was Lamboless for 10 whole months (I’m sure the insurance paperwork was a nightmare), opens a huge new Times Square restaurant, which seems to be a larger, more bombastic version of the establishments North Bay denizens are, for better or worse, familiar with. It gets unabashedly and hilariously shitted on by the New York Times’ Pete Wells, causing an uproar and response by Fieri on The Today Show. “I stand by my food,” he said, only semi-convincingly. “I stand by my team.”—Nicolas Grizzle

Politics Suck and/or Rule As expected, small-town politics got down and dirty during the 2012 election cycle. Remember ‘Who is Stacey Lawson,’ the anonymous internet campaign that uncovered details about the candidate’s

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JANUARY 2-8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20 Year In Review ( 19

closed last year, a different Italian institution underwent a major transformation in 2012: Canevari’s Deli in Santa Rosa. Ed Canevari is still an owner, but the printouts of Elks Club–type jokes and “COFFEE: 35¢” sign are gone, as is the “O Sole Mio” window. (Ed continues to monitor the recipes.) And to kick off the year, Incredible Records in Sebastopol closed on Jan. 1.—Gabe Meline

Construction Time Again wealth, spiritual guru and New Age–styled writings? Local politico Paul Anderson got about 30 seconds of fame from it, but maybe he was on to something: Lawson didn’t get elected. Lynn Woolsey rode out her last year in style and grace, yet despite a groundswell of grassroots support, anti-war candidate Norman Solomon lost to Marin’s golden boy Jared Huffman. Then there were those last-minute Gary Wysocky robo-calls, funded by the anonymous “Anybody but Wysocky.” The hit-and-run tactic didn’t work, as Wysocky was reelected (just ahead of Don Taylor—whew, close one!). Peace in Medicine director Robert Jacob proved that you could have your medical marijuana-infused cake and eat it too when elected as vice mayor in Sebastopol. (He also had my personal favorite campaign strategy: flyers taped to the beer taps at Aubergine.) It was a onetwo punch in front of a San Diego nightclub when Efren Carrillo went ninja on a man outside a Too Short show for allegedly harassing his lady friends. All charges were dropped; the young Sonoma County supervisor doesn’t seem much worse for the wear. Michael Allen proved that moving to San Rafael doesn’t

guarantee political office when unseated in the Assembly by challenger Marc Levine. Susan Gorin and John Sawyer made nice (hugs, even!) at a December Santa Rosa City Council meeting after Gorin defeated the former mayor for Fifth District Supervisor. And in the midst of Obama’s re-election, Measure Q, which would have ensured fair geographic representation in underserved areas in Santa Rosa, was defeated at the polls. And they say the weak shall inherit . . . ah, but not in 2012.—Leilani Clark

Closing Time It was bad enough that we lost Copperfield’s Used Book Annex in Sebastopol, and then—boom!— River Reader in Guerneville closed its doors as well. Those weren’t the only major closures in 2012, of course: this was Santa Rosa’s first year without the debt-ridden Harmony Festival, or the Handcar Regatta. Drake’s Bay Oyster Farms was forced by the Feds to close after over a hundred years in Point Reyes, and Douglas Keane closed Cyrus Restaurant, probably while muttering something about foie gras and/or bulldogs (and/or landlords). While Traverso’s

Highlights of the development beat in the North Bay this year: Napa got really huffy about an old industrial site on the river, SMART construction kept people up at night and a tribal leader’s ethnic origin was called into question. In other news, a split Petaluma City Council approved the Deer Creek shopping center, which plans to house another branch of Friedman’s. On the not-so-local side of the Petaluma spectrum, there’s construction underway on the 34-acre site of a future Target. And more grapevines will be planted in West County, due to an October approval by county supervisors of the contentious Best Family Winery in Graton. The ongoing Rohnert Park Casino saga, aside from casting the spotlight on Greg Sarris, is finally in the construction phase. The SMART Train moved forward this year, and Napa Pipe proposed putting a Costco on its embattled site, and many, many, many people filed lawsuits about zoning and traffic and other things that are just as exciting.—Rachel Dovey

Don’t Bogart That Joint Medical marijuana was both the biggest winner and the

biggest loser this year. Federal government crackdowns on California dispensaries continued, the most high-profile being the April 2 DEA raid of Oaksterdam University in Oakland. On April 23, federal prosecutors threatened to seize the property that houses two Novato dispensaries, Green Door Wellness Education Center and Green Tiger Collective for violations of federal law and municipal zoning codes; both businesses closed soon afterward. In December, supervisors Valerie Brown and Shirlee Zane’s recommended measure to lower approved limits for cultivation and possession of medical marijuana was defeated, after criticism that the two had not engaged the public before the measure went to vote. Brown told a crowd of patients, lawyers and advocates in her final meeting as supervisor that she had “failed them” and that she was sorry.— Leilani Clark

Press Releases We Received in 2012 “Manifest with Sex Magick—Magical Intimacy With Sexy Challenges.” “Article: Macho Men Prevail.” “Guide to Finding Your Cosmic Mate (For Those Unable to Find a Human One)” “Nudity in America.” “It is total bullshit and an embarrassing waste of time, and I hope you enjoy it.” “Are Black Men Globally Relevant?” “‘From Menses to Menopause,’ Skype-only class, $210.” “My medical records show that I have been urinating blood since 1991.” “Research on the History of Mental Illness in Dolphins and Dogs.” “First Post-Amputation Public Performances Announced!” “Christmas Potluck for Everyone Interested in Secret CIA Mind Control Technology.”—Gabe Meline

THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE

SEBASTOPOL

Deep South

Barbecued ribs, black-eyed peas, sweet potato pie, macaroni and cheese, collard greens, fried chicken—the incredible variety of delicious soul food dishes only begins here. We’re talking serious comfort food, and a menu that lies at the heart of AfricanAmerican cultural identity. But the Southern-based diet, called a “slave diet” by the Nation of Islam, has also been blamed for the high rates of heart disease and stroke among African Americans in the United States due to unhealthy ingredients and a deep, abiding love for the power of the frying pan. ‘Soul Food Junkies,’ a new documentary by Byron Hurt, addresses the health effects of the soul food diet and the way it connects to the socioeconomics of the modern American diet. The program is part of the Rialto Cinemas’ free Community Cinema film series; a discussion panel follows the film, featuring Evelyn Cheatham of Worth Our Weight, James Cason of the SRJC Culinary Institute and Nancy Rogers of the Red Rose Cafe. Upcoming films in the series include The Powerbroker, a film about National Urban League leader Whitney M. Young Jr. (Feb. 12), Wonder Woman! The Untold Story of American Superheroines, which explores how pop culture’s representations of powerful women reflect societal anxieties about women’s liberation (March 12). Soul Food Junkies screens Tuesday, Jan. 8, at Rialto Cinemas. 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 7pm. Free. 707.525.4840.

SEBASTOPOL

Last Tango On a warm summer night, a woman goes to a literary reading, where she’s introduced to a flaxen-haired poet. The poet has left his home in the woods for a night out on the town, and seems immediately enamored of her. After the reading, they go to a nearby restaurant, where they feast on Spanish tapas and drink glass after glass of red wine. The poet, whispering into her ear, never leaves her side; she has become the center of his universe. A band takes the stage. They break into soul-swelling Gypsy swing imbued with the ghost of Django Reinhardt but completely at home in the 21st century. The poet and the

woman dance for hours. That night, she dreams of a lost kiss as the poet’s face recedes into darkness, back to his woods, never to be seen again. Beso Negro whips up a romantic frenzy with the Highway Poets on Friday, Jan. 4, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8:30pm. $10–$13. 707.829.7300.

N A PA

Blues Explosion HE FEELS ALL RIGHT Steve Earle, the last of the hardcore troubadours, plays the Uptown Theatre Jan. 5. See Concerts, p26.

Before the arrival of Ray Manzarek, organs were pretty much limited to either the church or to jazz greats like Richard “Groove” Holmes. Lacking a bassist, Manzarek busted out the Fender Rhodes and the Vox Continental combo with his new band the Doors, and another chapter in rock music history was opened. Nearly 50 years later, the legendary Napa-based keyboardist is still at it, playing with local bands in the area, occasionally showing up to for video cameos with young punk bands in abandoned warehouses, and recording albums with slide blues guitarist Roy Rogers; their 2011 album Translucent Blues mixes the best sounds from Rogers’ Delta Rhythm Kings years, overlaid with Manzarek’s signature keyboard sounds. The resulting blues, jazz and rock hybrid is something that could only be created by these two forces. The Manzarek-Rogers Band gets with the blues on Saturday, Jan. 5, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $20–$25. 707.226.7372.

—Leilani Clark

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Crush CULTURE

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 2-8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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ArtsIdeas c) Gavin Newsom d) Condoleezza Rice

5. Which band from the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s did not reunite in 2012? a) No Doubt b) Spice Girls c) Garbage d) Destinyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Child e) Backstreet Boys 6. A week before his album Channel Orange was released, Frank Ocean posted to Tumblr what admission? a) He recorded the entire album while high on bath salts b) His ďŹ rst love at age 17 was with another man c) He was leaving the group Odd Future due to ideological differences d) He could no longer perform live due to acute agoraphobia

SEA CHANGE Frank Oceanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Channel Orange,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the most critically acclaimed album of the year, was preceded by what news?

2012: Music Quiz How well do you know your year in popular music? BY GABE MELINE 1. At a Hurricane Sandy Relief concert in December, the surviving members of Nirvana performed together for the ďŹ rst time since Kurt Cobainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suicide. Who sang? a) Eddie Vedder b) Tony Bennett c) Paul McCartney d) Courtney Love 2. In December, a certain hit song became the most viewed video on YouTube by surpassing 1 billion views. Which song was it?

a) Carly Rae Jepsen, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call Me Maybeâ&#x20AC;? b) Psy, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gangnam Styleâ&#x20AC;? c) Justin Bieber, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Babyâ&#x20AC;? d) One Direction, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Makes You Beautifulâ&#x20AC;? 3. Amanda Palmer, who raised over a million dollars on Kickstarter for her album and tour, came under ďŹ re in September for what? a) Failing to send digital downloads to the correct email addresses b) Paying her tour musicians in hugs and high-ďŹ ves

c) Plagiarizing lyrics from Radiohead d) Refusing to play a promised house party for a pro-life group 4. On a September mix tape, Nicki Minaj rapped â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a Republican, voting for Mitt Romney.â&#x20AC;? While blogs mostly took the line at face value, which politician correctly surmised that it was a joke, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;She likes to play different charactersâ&#x20AC;?? a) Hillary Clinton b) Barack Obama

7. Which professional athlete, in July, tweeted that â&#x20AC;&#x153;@rushtheband RULES. Period.â&#x20AC;?? a) Tim Lincecum b) Lance Armstrong c) Alex Smith d) Jeremy Lin 8. Which celebrity chef in June publicly praised Vanilla Ice and then, later that night, went to see Nickelback? a) Mario Batali b) Bobby Flay c) Paula Deen d) Guy Fieri 9. In May, the Beastie Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MCA, aka Adam Yauch, died at age 47. What did he stipulate in his will? a) That 100 percent of his music royalties be donated to Planned Parenthood b) That Run-DMC perform at his funeral c) That his music may never be used for advertising d) That the Dalai Lama appear in his place at Bonnaroo

15. Who had the highest grossing tour in 2012? a) Madonna b) Roger Waters c) Van Halen d) Barbra Streisand

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13. What is the hit single from Taylor Swiftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s album Red? a) â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Are Never Ever Getting Back Togetherâ&#x20AC;? b) â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Are Never Ever Dating Me Everâ&#x20AC;? c) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Am Never Ever Dating Anyone For Over a Weekâ&#x20AC;? d) â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Are Never Ever Saying Never Ever Ever Again Everâ&#x20AC;?

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18. At every show of his Wrecking Ball tour, Bruce Springsteen did what? a) Spit on the crowd b) Smashed his guitar c) Crowdsurfed across the audience d) Flipped off a video of Mitt Romney

12) d 13) a 14) b 15) a 16) c

12. Beck released his latest album on which format? a) 8-track b) reel-to-reel c) wax cylinder d) sheet music

17. What is Pussy Riot? a) A Russian punk group whose members were jailed for protesting Vladimir Putin b) A feminist band that hacked into and sabotaged Rick Santorumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s live webcast c) A day of protest when popular music videos were replaced with cat videos d) A Palestinian â&#x20AC;&#x153;vaginacoreâ&#x20AC;? band working to bring birth control to Gaza

17) a 18) c 19) c 20) d

11. Which singer performed â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Will Always Love Youâ&#x20AC;? at the Grammy Awards in tribute to Whitney Houston, who had died the day before? a) Dolly Parton b) Jennifer Hudson c) Alicia Keys d) BeyoncĂŠ

16. Who appeared in hologram form at Coachella? a) Janis Joplin b) Michael Jackson c) Tupac Shakur d) Ronald Reagan

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10. Who among the following was included in Spin magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;100 Greatest Guitarists of All Timeâ&#x20AC;? list, posted in May? a) Jimi Hendrix b) Eric Clapton c) Jimmy Page d) Stevie Ray Vaughan e) Joe Satriani f) Eddie Van Halen g) Jeff Beck h) Kirk Hammett i) Yngwie Malmsteen j) None of the above

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Michael Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb 26th at 7:15 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROUS *, /Ă&#x160;1 

SICKO

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Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu

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Tuneful Memoir â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Blaguardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a musical from â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Angelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ashesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; author BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Angelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ashes . . . the musical!â&#x20AC;?

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a joke. Jim Peterson is searching for a way to describe Cinnabar Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toe-tapping new show A Couple of Blaguards. Written by Frank McCourt (who won a Pulitzer for the heartbreaking memoir Angelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ashes) and his brother Malachy McCourt (actor, politician and bestselling author of A Monk Swimming), Blaguards was ďŹ rst performed by the McCourt brothers in Pennsylvania. In the Cinnabar production, directed by Sheri Lee Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with Peterson as musical directorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; actors Steven Abbott and Tim Kniffin play the celebrated Irish raconteurs as the ultimate survivors, two brothers whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found humor and joy in spite of the

difficult childhood theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve both described in eloquent detail in their books. Only in this one, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly all funny. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are funny guys, guys who love life,â&#x20AC;? says Peterson, â&#x20AC;&#x153;guys who found a lot of life all around them, even in the crushing poverty they grew up with. There are some stories in the show that are a bit heart-rending, but this play is about their journey from childhood to positions of success. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a down story, by any means. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually a very lively story. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are,â&#x20AC;? he grins, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a lot of laughs in this one.â&#x20AC;? And plenty of music, too. Dozens of songs are interspersed between the various stories acted out by the energetic McCourts, each character playing several other characters in the course of telling their tales. All of them are songs that have meant something to the McCourts throughout their lives, from Irish tunes of their childhood, to novelty songs from their adopted country of America. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got the song â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Limerick Is Beautiful,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? lists Peterson, â&#x20AC;&#x153;along with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Barefoot Daysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Irish Rover.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lots of tunes youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll recognize and some you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Some are these sort of interesting Tin Pan Alley tunes, like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No One with Endurance Like the Man Who Sells Insurance.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? In the original production, the McCourts sang to a recorded soundtrack. In the Cinnabar version, Kniffin and Abbott perform with a live band, the local trio Youkali, featuring Roxanne Oliva on accordion, Daniel Kahane on ďŹ ddle and Josh Fossgreen on banjo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are all phenomenal musicians,â&#x20AC;? says Peterson, who plays guitar along with the band. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also borrowing some tunes from their repertoire to use as moments of interlude music, songs like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Red Haired Boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Shebeg Shemoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;beautiful, evocative tunes that help us tell the story. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And this,â&#x20AC;? Peterson adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is a really good story.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A Couple of Blaguardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday through Jan. 20 at Cinnabar Theater. 3333 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$35. 707.763.8920.

Film

25

Saturday, Jan 5 Wed, Jan 2 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Jan 3 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jan 4 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts WEST COAST SWING PARTY lessons at 7:15pm Sat, Jan 5 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther presents STEVE LUCKY AND THE RHUMBA BUMS Sun, Jan 6 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Jan 7 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jan 8 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

PRURIENT PREZ? A miscast Bill Murray is handed an outrĂŠ cousin-seduction.

Hell-a-No, Delano

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hyde Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a very odd thwacking of FDR BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

W

atching Bill Murray play Franklin Delano Roosevelt, one wonders why they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just hire Kevin Kline. Klineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy, shallow Manhattanite manner could have done justice to the conception of FDR in Hyde Park on Hudson: a colorlessly suave man shadowed by a ruthless personal life (he juggled mistresses) and surrounded by forceful, domineering women.

The occasion is a visit from the king and queen of England in 1939, with Samuel West as the stuttering George VI, subject of The Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speech. He and his queen (Olivia Colman) come for an uncomfortable visit to a Dutchess County house unsuited for royals. The uncertain king gets a boost from FDRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world-famous ability to inspire conďŹ dence; the warmest scene is a late-night meeting of the men. This very odd ďŹ lm tries to leech away some of the myth of FDR, and it uses the least interesting person in the room as the entry point, FDRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cousin Daisy (Laura Linney), whom he seduces with banal authority. First Roosevelt shows her his stamp collection; then he takes her for a country ride, parks, clasps her hand and puts it in his lap. FDR may not be a demigod, but this cutting down to size (especially given Linneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meek, slightly bewildered performance) isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t edifying or informative. She narrates, so we hear all the details of her heartbreak when she realizes sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been fed a well-used line by a powerful older man. And as an actor, Murray canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do what he does bestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;exude the air of falseness and dubiousness. Hyde Park is a privacy-invading movie, yet it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make its point about how the lack of privacy keeps us from having the leaders we might have had. It also says FDR spurned Eleanor (nicely played by Olivia Williams), but considering Eleanorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lack of enthusiasm for sex, we might have seen his side of it. And the way the ďŹ lm poster sells this story as a naughty comedy is the last straw. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hyde Park on Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is in theaters now.

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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26

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Buzzy Martin The “Guitar Man” plays as part of the Prairie Sun Recording Studio showcase series. Jan 9, 8pm. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

MARIN COUNTY

Coffee Catz Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Flamingo Lounge Jan 4, Konsept Party Band. Jan 5, ELectric Avenue. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Friar Tuck’s Fri, DJ Mike. Wed, Sat, karaoke. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.792.9847.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Every other Monday, knitting night. Second Tuesday of every month, open mic. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

My Friend Joe Thurs, 7:30pm, Rubber Chicken Open Mic. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano

8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Sunflower Center Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Toad in the Hole Pub

Mon, 6pm, Steve Swan’s Sinatra croonings. Wed, 6:30pm, Don Giovannis. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Northwood Restaurant

Tradewinds

The English Beat

Guerneville Community Church

Thurs, 7pm,Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

There’s a story behind every song by these ska-pop-soulreggae-punkers. Jan 4, 8pm. $25-$40. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jan 8, 7pm, River Choir Performs Music of David Childs and Morten Lauridsen. 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Olive & Vine Cafe

Hopmonk Sonoma

NAPA COUNTY

Jan 4, Bobby Jo Valentine. Jan 5, Cahoots. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Fri, 7pm, live music. Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm, Kefi. Sun, 1:30 and 3:30pm, Greek dance lessons, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Phoenix Theater

Club 101

Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Wed, 8:20pm, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101.

Steve Earle Master storyteller, anti-war activist and softie at heart plays wine country. Jan 5, 8pm. $40. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

ManzarekRogers Band Co-founder of the Doors and the master slide guitarist/ producer together in an unlikely, but stunning pairing. Jan 5, 8pm. $20-$25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. Second Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jam. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Jan 3, Gabe Katz & Friends. Jan 4, Phat Belly, Marshall House Project. Jan 5, Zongo Beat Junction. Jan 6, Laguna Moon. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Hopmonk Tavern Jan 4, Beso Negro. Jan 5, Johnny Downer Tribute. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Jan 4, Susan Sutton and Bill Fouty Duo. Jan 5, David Udolf Trio with Chris Amberger and Alan U’ren. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Inn at the Tides Sat, Maple Profant. Bay View Restaurant. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 800.541.7788.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Wed, Brainstorm. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon Mon, karaoke. Thurs, Open Mic Jam Night with the Boomers. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Sun, Kit Mariah’s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen Thurs, 9pm, karaoke with Country Dan. Fri, DJ Alexander. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Monroe Dance Hall Thurs, Sun, Circles ‘n Squares Dance Club. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Every other Sunday, Songwriter Sessions. 14301 Arnold St, Glen Ellen. 707.996.9150.

Papa’s Taverna

Redwood Cafe Thurs, Open Mic. First Friday of every month, Dginn. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Jan 5, the Detroit Disiples. Jan 6, Motel Drive. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Spancky’s Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez.

Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY

Jan 2, Stratos Trio. Jan 4, the English Beat. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Osteria Divino Tues, Wed, Thurs, Fri, Sat and Sun, Live music. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY

Peri’s Silver Dollar Mon, acoustic open mic. First Wednesday of every month, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Sausalito Seahorse Jan 3, the Mythyx. Jan 4, the Incubators. Jan 5, West African Highlife. Jan 6, Orquesta La Moderna Tradicion. Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Wed, Marcello and Seth. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Jan 3, La Mandanga. Jan 4, Dgiin. Jan 5, Tom Finch. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Brannan’s Grill Fri-Sun, Herb Gibson. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill Fri, Sat, blues. Sun, 7pm, Swing Seven. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Molinari Caffe Thurs, Open Mic. 815 Main St, Napa. 707.927.3623.

Napa Valley Opera House Jan 5, Manzarek-Rogers Band. Second Tuesday of every month, Cafe Theatre Comedy Series. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria

Sweetwater Music Hall Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night

Wed, Gentlemen of Jazz. Sun, James and Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

George’s Nightclub Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Tavern Session Room Jan 4, David Thom Band. Jan 5, Black Market Blues. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-892-6200.

Mama’s Royal Cafe Sun, 11am, Carolyn Dahl. 387 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3261.

Nickel Rose Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

19 Broadway Club Jan 5, Karamo Susso. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, 9pm, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. Sat, Sean Hannan & Friends. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Tourettes Without Regrets Beatboxing, slam poetry, freestyle battles, dirty haiku and plenty more from bizarre brigade. Jan 3 at Oakland Metro.

Anthony B Pan Afrikanist and reggae ruler rarely seen without trademark headwrap. Jan 3 at the Independent.

The Easy Leaves A “Winter Formal” with old-time faves, who’ve hired a party bus for the show. Jan 4 at Great American Music Hall.

Blues Harmonica Blowout Mark Hummel leads tribute to Jimmy Reed with Charlie Musselwhite, Kim Wilson, more. Jan 4-6 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Reel Big Fish Big sideburns, Hawaiian shirts and trombones: these fourthwave ska revivalists will never die. Jan 6 at Regency Ballroom.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Galleries OPENINGS Jan 5 At 3pm. Quercia Gallery, “Free Flight,” paintings and sculptures with no restricted theme or size. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Jan 6 At 1pm. Riskpress Gallery, “Scenic Journey: Sonoma County and Beyond,” series of landscapes by Terry Sauvé. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone. At 2pm. Marin Society of Artists, “Passages (From Representational to Abstract),” non-juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation” features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued from Schulz’s 1966 studio fire. Through Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations” highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays throughout the year and features the history of the Peanutsthemed balloons in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Through Apr 28, “Useable, Loveable Peanuts,” highlights from 33 years of Peanuts products plus the licensing and manufacturing stories behind them. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Feb 2, “Holiday Lights Exhibit and Sale,” Becoming Independent’s two- and threedimensional arts and crafts. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Jan 13, “Prelude 2013,” featuring work by Bruce Hopkins, James Freed, Sandra Rubin and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Museum Through Jan 6, “Magical Toyland,” nostalgic fun for anyone born from 1860 to 1960 featuring toys, games and dollhouses. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 3, “Scenic Route,” featuring colorful land and seascape oil paintings by Linda Sorenson. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Wed-Mon, 10-5. 707.875.2744.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jan 6, “Nature Abstracted” features metal sculpture inspired by nature by Matt Devine, Jon Krawczyk and Rob Lorenson. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 13, “The California Landscape,” exhibition of landscape paintings from museum’s collections. Through Jan 13, “Peace at Sunset,” painting from 19th-century artist Thomas Cole, on loan from the De Young Museum in San Francisco. Through Jan 13, “Wild Land: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Landscape Painting” uses a combination of graphics, immersive environments and images on a journey through Cole’s creative process. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

MARIN COUNTY Book Passage Through Feb 28, “Tom Killion Woodcut Prints,” Marin County artist and owned of Quail Press. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Quercia Gallery

Gallery Bergelli

Jan 4-Mar 30, “Free Flight,” paintings and sculptures with no restricted theme or size. Reception, Jan 5, 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Through Jan 16, Current exhibition features Jose Basso, Alberto Ludwig, Braulio Delgado and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

RiskPress Gallery

Marin Community Foundation

Through Jan 28, “Scenic Journey: Sonoma County and Beyond,” a series of landscapes by Terry Sauvé. Reception, Jan 6, 1pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Rohnert Park Community Center

Marin Society of Artists

Through Jan 7, Photographs by Rich Arik and paintings by Dearca Devo. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.584.7357.

Jan 6-Feb 7, “Passages (From Representational to Abstract),” non-juried member show. Reception, Jan 6, 2pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Through Jan 12, “Actuality, Reminiscence and Fabrication,” new photography by Deborah Sullivan. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Rebound Bookstore Through Jan 10, “Phases of the

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

DIN N E R & A SHOW Welcome Back! Jan 4 DANNY UZILEVSKY Soulful Singer/Songwriter 8:00pm / No Cover Great Dance Band Sat Jan 5 THE RANCHO ALLSTARS Fri

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8:30pm

MIKE DUKE

ADAM TRAUM Jan 6 Outlaw Country Blues Sun

4:00pm / No Cover

Rancho Debut!

BUCK NICKELS AND LOOSE CHANGE Jan 11 New Country Music Rancho Fri

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MYSTIC ROOTS Jan 12 “Creating Positivity Through Music” Sat

High Energy Dance Show Rancho 8:30pm Debut!

Sun

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“Second Sunday Series”

Jan 13 JEREMY D’ANTONIO AND FRIENDS 4:00pm / No Cover

Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Sat

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

Fri

THE TICKETS BAND Jan 19 Locally Grown Rock and Roll 8:30pm

Jan 25

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Through Jan 13, “Trees and Trinkets: Obtainable Art” features the functional tableware of Kalia Kilbana.

& Beer Sanctuary

Sebastopol California

Through Jan 6, “California Photo Adventures,” photographs by Lance Kuehne. Through Jan 6, “Wildlife as Art,” photographs by Jim Coda. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Gallery

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) 28

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Arts Events

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JANUARY 2-8 , 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28 A E

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Moon” features various artists’ found images and abstract works in the many shapes of the moon. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jan 27, “Renaissance on Fillmore” examines San Francisco’s upper Fillmore district through 1955-’65 with the work of 17 artists who either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jan 18, “Atatürk” series, Gordon Huether’s latest work, on display with a selection of Turkish rugs. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Comedy Santa Rosa Comedy Nights Comedy open mic hosted by MC Ricky Del Rosario. First Thurs of every month. Free. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events The Bird Nest Decorate a cozy home for Woodstock and his bird friends. Jan 3, 9am. $20-$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Bird Walk Bird through the wetlands. Jan 3, 8:30am. Free. Ellis Creek Water Recycling Facility, 3890 Cypress Drive Ave, Petaluma.

Cartooning for Kids Cartoonist Evan Falcone shows the basics of cartooning. Jan 4,

9am. $20-$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Come Fly Away Create a colorful kite, beaded dragonfly, and butterflyshaped pretzel. Jan 5, 9am. $20-$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Creature Features Make a cute monster, cuddly animal, or creative creature from your imagination and turn in into a no-sew plush pal to take home. Jan 5, 1pm. $20$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Discovery Days for Kids Kid-friendly activities. Jan 2, pine cone bird feeder; Jan 4, sew what? Wed, Jan 2, 1-3pm and Fri, Jan 4, 1-3pm. $7. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

$20-$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Film Community Cinema Jan 8 at 7pm, “Soul Food Junkies,” documentary on health impacts of soul food, with Evelyn Chatham from Worth Our Weight and others in post-screening discussion. Second Tues of every month. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Madame Butterfly Big screen showing of San Francisco Opera’s performance. Jan 6, 1pm. $8-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

The Pipe

Create art with leaves, rocks, pine cones, and feathers. Jan 3, 1pm. $20-$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Documentary follows a West of Ireland crab fisherman, one of whom steers his boat directly into confrontation with the worlds largest pipelaying vessel. Jan 8, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Public Star Party

Sing Your Song

Outdoor Art

Observatory’s three main telescopes plus many additional telescopes are open for viewing. Jan 6, 6pm. $3. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Puppet Show for Preschoolers Rebecah Freeling’s stories are enhanced by handmade table puppets and simple marionettes. Sat, Jan 5, 11am. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Documentary on Harry Belafonte’s contributions to the Civil Rights movement. Jan 8, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market

Turn trash into treasure with Lynn Roth. Jan 2, 9am. $20$25. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Winter Origami

Crab Feed

Henry Haiku presents a winter Haiku workshop for children ages 6 and up. Jan 4, 2pm. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

While dipping delicious meat in hot butter with the RP Chamber of Commerce, remember that crabs are related to spiders. Jan 5, 5pm. $50-$60. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.584.7357.

3D Recycle Collage

Winter Wonderland Grow a crystal tree, make a winter sun catcher, make ice cream in a bag, and enjoy other hands-on, winter-themed crafts and games. Jan 4, 1pm.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed,

9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

For Kids Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission, $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Carolyn Parr Nature Center Learn about Napa County habitats and birds of prey through tours, dioramas, games, hands-on activities and books. Ongoing. Free. Carolyn Parr Nature Center Museum, Westwood Hills Park, 3107 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. 707.255.6465.

Central Library Babytime, Tues at 10:15. Storytime for toddlers, Tues at 11. Preschool storytime, Fri at 11. Tues-Fri. Free. Central Library, Third and E streets, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Chops Teen Club Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

Petaluma Library Tues at 10, storytime for ages three to five; at 3, read to a specially trained dog from PAWS for Healing. Wed at 10, babytime; at 7, evening pajama storytime in Spanish and English. Fri at 10, storytime for toddlers. Sat at 4, parent-child reading group for ) second- and third-

30

Spank Me

The locally top-selling books of 2012 Copperfield’s Books released its year-end bestsellers this week, and to no one’s surprise, the Fifty Shades and Hunger Games series come out strong. Turns out people like sex and violence—who knew? Here are the year’s bestsellers, compiled from Copperfields’ six locations: 1. Fifty Shades of Grey, E. L. James 2. The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins 3. Fifty Shades Darker, E. L. James 4. Fifty Shades Freed, E .L. James 5. Mockingjay, Suzanne Collins 6. State of Wonder, Ann Patchett 7. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, Cheryl Strayed 8. The Land of Stories: The Wishing Spell, Chris Colfer 9. Catching Fire, Suzanne Collins 10. The Tiger’s Wife, Téa Obreht 11. Bossypants, Tina Fey Other bestsellers of the year include Unbroken: A WWII Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand; The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach; Some Assembly Required by Anne Lamott; Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn; In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror and an American Family in Hitler’s Berlin by Erik Larson; Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver; Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin; Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d’Art by Christopher Moore; The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes; Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern; To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee; The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka; and The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh.—Gabe Meline

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graders. Tues-Wed-Fri. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Quilting with Betty Learn the basic techniques for making a quilt with Betty Bortz. Jan 5, 2-4pm. $15-$20. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Lectures Readings Balance Method Workshop Learn the three myths that are causing back pain. Jan 8, 7:15pm. Free. Sonoma Body Balance, 210 Vallejo St, Ste C, Petaluma. 707.658.2599.

Four Secrets to Successful Money Magnetism Use 50,000-year-old shamanic wisdom from the Q’ero of Peru to create your dreams now. Jan 5, 10am. $5-$20. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Master Gardners Class: Hydrangeas Carlyss Van Ness discusses water saving techniques, fertilizing, pruning methods, varieties, propagating and drying of blooms. Jan 5, 10:30am. Free. Rohnert ParkCotati Library, 6250 Lynne Conde Way, Rohnert Park. 707.584.9121.

Peace in Process Relax with morning meditation. First Sun of every month, 10:30am. Donation. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Barking Dog Roasters First Sat, 5:30 to 7, First Sat monthly at 5:30, UniverSoul poetry and music open mic, Hosted by Juanita J Martin. 18133 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma. 707.435.1807.

Book Passage Jan 6, 1pm, “12th Man for Death” with Greg Randall. Jan 6, 4pm, “Hot Mamalah” with Lisa Alcalay King. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Sausalito Presbyterian Church First Wednesday of every month, 7:30pm, First Wed at 7:30, Sausalito Poetry Night with poets, open mic and chats. 415.332.3790. 112 Bulkley, Sausalito.

SoCo Coffee First Saturday of every month, Poetry Azul, Join Andrew Mayer and friends for evening of poetry on the first Sat of every month, 7 to 9. Free. 707.527.6434. 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

West End Cafe First Wednesday of every month, 7pm, First Wed at 7, open mic poetry evening. 1131 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Theater

Healdsburg Library

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Second Tuesday of every month, 6:30pm, Center Literary Cafe, An evening of shared song, prose, poetry and drama with 3-minute open mic presentations. Free. 139 Piper St, Healdsburg 707.433.3772.

Musical comedy-memoir from Frank McCourt, author of ‘Angela’s Ashes.’ Through Jan 20. Fri-Sat at 8pm; Sun at 2pm. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Hopmonk Tavern First Sunday of every month, North Bay Poetry Slam, Monthly poetry performance competition. First Sun monthly at 7. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Redwood Cafe Jan 8, 9pm, Poetry Slam. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 2

ARIES (March 21–April 19) In 2013, I pledge to conspire with you to increase your mastery of the art of friendship. Together we will concentrate on making you an even stronger ally than you already are. We will upgrade your skill at expressing your feelings with open-hearted clarity and in ways that don’t make people defensive. We will also inspire you to help others communicate effectively in your presence. I hope you understand that doing this work will empower you to accomplish feats that were never before possible for you. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Chickens and alligators share a common ancestor. Seventy million years ago, they were both archosaurs. That’s why chickens possess a gene that has the ability to grow teeth. A few years ago, a biological researcher at the University of Wisconsin managed to activate this capacity, inducing a few mutant chickens to sprout alligator teeth. I predict there will be a metaphorically comparable event happening for you in 2013, Taurus. The “chicken” part of you will acquire some of the gravitas of an alligator.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “People wish to learn to swim and at the same time to keep one foot on the ground,” said French novelist Marcel Proust. An attitude like that is always a barrier to growth, of course, but in 2013 it would be especially ill-advised for you Geminis. In order to win full possession of the many blessings that will be offering themselves to you, you will have to give up your solid footing and dive into the depths over and over again. That may sometimes be a bit nerveracking. But it should also generate the most fun you’ve had in years. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Here’s the horoscope I hope to be able to write for you a year from now: You escaped the chains that kept you enslaved to your primary source of suffering. You broke the trance it kept you in, and you freed yourself from its demoralizing curse. Now you have forged a resilient new relationship with your primary source of suffering—a relationship that allows you to deal with it only when it’s healthy for you to do so and only when you feel strong enough to do it. Very nicely done! Congratulations! Excellent work!

LEO (July 23–August 22) “In this world,” said Oscar Wilde, “there are only two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.” I’m counting on you to refute the last part of that questionable assertion, Leo. According to my analysis of the long-term astrological omens, you will definitely be getting what you want in the next six months. You will receive your prize . . . you will earn your badge . . . you will win a big game or claim your birthright or find your treasure. When that happens, I trust you will make sure it is an enduring blessing. There will be no sadness involved! VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

English poet Alfred Tennyson wrote so many memorable lines that he is among the top 10 most frequently cited authors in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. One of his most famous passages was “’Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all.” When he was on his death bed at age 83, his enigmatic last words were “I have opened it.” Let’s make that declaration your mantra for the coming year, Virgo. In your case, it will have nothing to do with death, but just the opposite. It will be your way of announcing your entrance into a brighter, lustier, more fertile phase of your life. Try saying it right now: “I have opened it!”

DAYLIGHT COME Harry Belafonte’s contributions to the civil rights struggle are

explored in ‘Sing Your Song,’ at the Napa Valley Opera House Jan. 8. See Film, p28.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Back in 1830, it was expensive to stay up and do things in your room after dark. To earn enough money to pay for the whale oil that would light your lamp for an hour, you had to work for 5.4 hours. And today? It’s cheaper. You have to put in less than a second of hard labor to afford an hour’s worth of light. I suspect that in 2013 there will be a similar boost in your ease at getting the light you need to illuminate your journey. I’m speaking metaphorically here, as in the insight that arises from your intuition, the emotional energy that comes from

those you care about and the grace of the Divine Wow. All that good stuff will be increasing.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“I’ve been absolutely terrified every moment of my life,” said Scorpio painter Georgia O’Keeffe, “and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do.” I think her declaration is excellent medicine for you. In 2013, you will have great potential for upgrading your relationship with your fears—not necessarily suppressing them or smashing them, but rather using them more consistently as a springboard, capitalizing on the emotions they unleash and riding the power they motivate you to summon.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “Ambition can creep as well as soar,” said Irish philosopher Edmund Burke. That will be good for you to remember throughout 2013, Sagittarius. Later this year, the time may come for your ambition to soar—in the month of April, for example, and again in the month of August. But for the foreseeable future, I think your ambition will operate best if you keep it contained and intense, moving slowly and gradually, attending to the gritty details with supreme focus.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) In Tom Robbins’ book Skinny Legs and All, one of the characters, Ellen Cherry, has a conversation with a voice in her head. The voice gives her a piece of advice: “The trick is this: keep your eye on the ball. Even when you can’t see the ball.” I think that happens to be excellent counsel for you to heed during the next six months, Capricorn. You may not always be able to figure out what the hell is going on, but that shouldn’t affect your commitment to doing the right thing. Your job is to keep your own karma clean and pure—and not worry about anyone else’s karma. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) I’ll be bold and predict that 2013 will be a time when you’ll discover more about the art of happiness than you have in years. Here are some clues to get you started. 1. “It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere.”—Agnes Repplier. 2. “There is only one way to happiness and that is to cease worrying about things that are beyond the power of our will.”—Epictetus. 3. “For the rational, healthy person, the desire for pleasure is the desire to celebrate his control over reality. For the neurotic, the desire for pleasure is the desire to escape from reality.”—Nathaniel Branden. 4. “Our happiness springs mainly from moderate troubles, which afford the mind a healthful stimulus and are followed by a reaction which produces a cheerful flow of spirits.” —E. Wigglesworth. 5. “Happiness is essentially a state of going somewhere, wholeheartedly, one-directionally, without regret or reservation.”—William H. Sheldon. 6. “We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.”—Charles Kingsley. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

In 2013, I pledge to help you feel at peace and in love with your body; I will do everything in my power to encourage you to triumph over media-induced delusions that tempt you to wish you were different from who you actually are. My goal is to be one of your resourceful supporters in the coming months—to be a member of your extensive team of allies. And I will be working with you to ensure that this team grows to just the right size and provides you with just the right foundation. If all goes well, your extra help will ensure that you finish almost everything you start in the coming year. You will regularly conquer everyday chaos and be a master of artful resolutions.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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