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Bohemian

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 203 Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur Taylor, Elise Guillot, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, David Sason, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers Lynda Rael Jovanovski, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Scott Heath and Ellen Cavalli with son Benny by Sara Sanger. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

GIFT CARDS for the holidays

Visit Simon Guest Services for more information.

nb THE BIKE RIDE: CANCELLED

An official flood watch was called off, but there was still plenty o’ water to go around last week in west Sonoma County.

This photo was submitted by David ‘Big Dave’ Gross of Graton. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘The good news is we still have strong local stores with tremendous service to provide alternatives.’ F EATURE P22 Studies Show: Shopping Local Works T H E PAP E R P 10

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Slow Down, You’re Here

We live in beautiful surroundings; take a breath, and enjoy them BY MICHAEL HOGAN

I

recently returned to Sonoma County after a long stint outside of the U.S.

I managed to create a good lifestyle on a small island off the coast of Auckland, New Zealand, for over a decade. Growing wine, as it turns out. It was idyllic in many ways, but life goes on. Family matters bring me back to West County, and, yes, things have changed. Forget for a moment the 300,000 tons of wine grapes that are now harvested in this county alone each fall, and the exponentially large number of tourists that come here every weekend to enjoy that and other great produce. Or the Redwood Highway “corridor” that serves to feed commuters all the way down to the big city. What surprises me the most is that everyone seems in such a hurry. The unique and charming gems of this county are often missed entirely by those of us who live here—all due to our haste. Taken a ride on the Joe Rodota bike trail lately from Sebastopol to Forestville? Had a beer in the sunny gardens of Hopmonk Tavern or a lazy Sunday brunch in Occidental or Healdsburg? What about the farmers markets dotted all around the county? Absolutely brilliant. We should all count our blessings. My initial impression on return is that many are too busy to appreciate what is here. There are an awful lot of folks screaming around in their large SUVs, no doubt engaged in important business of some kind. If the newspapers are correct, however, a few too many are intoxicated, speeding and knocking over others in crosswalks. Cars and trucks alike back up behind me along Gravenstein Highway, even when I am doing the speed limit. What’s up with that? There is a sign at the car ferry terminal on the island where I lived that reads, “Slow Down, You’re Here.” I often felt grateful for the reminder of just how special the place I was living in was. I get the same feeling here, and hope a similar message can permeate our too-busy lifestyles.

Michael Hogan is a horticulturalist who lives, writes and uses crosswalks in Sebastopol. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Dogs Run Free?

I just saw your photo of “It’s a dogs life” showing three dogs who appear to be offleash, running through the new Laguna de Santa Rosa (Table of Contents, Nov. 28). I was enjoying this new path with my dog (who was on leash) yesterday, and owners who allow “wayward” dogs—as the caption to this photo describes— put others at risk and in danger. My dog, and many others’ when on leash, do not respond well to off-leash dogs, and it creates a very dangerous situation for both owner and canine. The law is leash-only on this path—it would be great when depicting pictures of this wonderful new resource if the Bohemian would show dogs on leash, legally and safely enjoying the beautiful new path. Thank you.

ELIZA HEMENWAY

Home on the Grange

Nice introductory article on the grange by Rachel Dovey (“Estranged Grange,” Nov. 28). The GMO divide is certainly a likely suspect for divisions between California grangers and the national leadership, but perhaps it’s a bit too easy to put all the blame there. What about the events leading up to Bob McFarland’s suspension as California master—his actions in sparking new membership in granges that were about to be officially closed, properties that were about to be sold, with the profits going where? The national trend— everywhere but California—of grange properties being sold off as membership declines must be lining someone’s pockets. Thank you for wading into the fray. Please continue to report on this very interesting conflict.

GINA COVINA Laytonville

via Online

Hi Eliza—thanks for the suggestion. People: leash your dog! We hereby print the below photo, which proves that dogs can still have a wild and crazy time while on a leash.—The Ed.

Schooling at the Un-School I’ve just returned from visiting Nonesuch School at its new location on Watertrough Road in Sebastopol, and am inspired to write this letter. Lynne Koplof, Nonesuch’s director for the past 42 years, recognizes and appreciates the strengths and unique qualities in each of her students, and is dedicated to supporting young people to fulfill themselves and excel. With Nonesuch’s enrollment declining these past few years, Lynne has yearned for the school to continue, and against great odds, Nonesuch is open and thriving. Their new “THINK Curriculum” embodies their educational philosophy based in truth, humanity, interdependence, nonconformity and knowledge. Offering a very specialized education with a strong focus on English and

Rants

social studies, junior and senior high school students are encouraged to investigate, examine and act, a philosophy exemplified in their current project of studying GMOs. Under the expert guidance of teacher Louise Vance, a professional independent filmmaker and video producer, students have visited the Petaluma Seed Bank, Laguna Farms and Andy’s Market, interviewed the managers, and are creating a video showcasing their research and viewpoints. What an excellent endeavor developing confidence, clarity, creativity and a sense of accomplishment. Many students who were not happy at a more traditional school have flourished at Nonesuch. All of my four children attended Nonesuch, some of the lucky ones to participate in this nurturing environment where learning is a celebration and the individual is valued.

JAN ZEITLIN Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Drake’s Bay Oyster Co. shut down; Kevin Lunny files lawsuit to stay open

2

Our Vinyl Vows wins opening slot for Live 105’s Not So Silent Night

3

CBS News in Guerneville, Bohemian file photos used for national broadcast

4

Oh, man: Bazooka Joe gum will no longer come with a comic strip. Cripes!

5 Lil’ William Lantz,

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

PROVING RESULTS Steve Maass and Tom Scott of Oliver’s Market, which participated in a report on shopping locally.

Reinvestment 101 Studies show shopping locally triggers mutually beneficial ‘multiplier effect’ BY LEILANI CLARK

W

alk through any Sonoma County smallbusiness shopping district and you’ll see Go Local signs in many shop windows. Still in its infancy, the movement that exhorts people to shop locally has gained widespread recognition in a relatively short period of time.

But while buying local might make people feel good about themselves and their progressive life choices, the question remains: What does it really mean economically when one purchases something sold, and possibly manufactured, locally rather than the same product sold at a Walmart and manufactured in a fire-prone Bangladeshi factory? “It does have an effect,” says Dr. Robert Eyler, economics

department chair at Sonoma State University. “In nonlocal businesses, the revenue goes away from the local area and any residual left remains outside.” According to “The Economics of Local: Oliver’s Market as Case Study,” a 2011 report by SSU’s School of Business and Economics, for every purchase of local goods at a local store, there is at least a 32 percent larger economic impact on the county.

The bottom line is that the choice of a locally owned store over a big-box can mean a thriving interdependent local economy instead of one where sales taxes are among the only economic benefits that don’t “leak” out of state, into the coffers of whichever corporation is at the helm. “They’re like miners, coming here and taking the gold out of our city,” says Terry Garrett of Go Local, likening corporate chains to “wealth-extraction units.” Keeping the value chain—from supplier/producer, to distribution, to retail sales, to local buyers— contained completely within a local area is key to a strong economy, according to the SSU report. When any part of the chain is broken, “leakage” occurs, meaning money that could have been funneled back into the local economy instead exits the area completely, never to return. “If the local economy buys goods only from nonlocal businesses, none of the business revenue beyond the local expenses remains local,” says Eyler. “It is, however, important to recognize that local economies are best off when exporting the maximum amount of goods and services, but we need flows in and out to provide choice and breadth of goods and services, which means leakages can never be zero. Minimizing leakages where possible is the best economicdevelopment strategy.” The “economic multiplier process” should not be underestimated, says Garrett. When someone makes the choice to buy from a local retailer, the recirculation into the community ends up being around 35 cents for every dollar, he says. This can translate into millions of dollars in business revenue for the county; additionally, recirculation often comes in the form of jobs. “The hiring of accountants, lawyers, graphic designers, public relations people, ad agencies, printers, even cleaning supplies— that’s where the multiplier effect really starts to kick in,” adds Garrett. Tom Scott, vice president and general manager of Oliver’s Market, headquartered in Rohnert Park, says that his company uses

‘Corporate chains are like miners, coming here and taking the gold out of our city.’ Making the economic multiplier viable is the fact that the public reacts well to products manufactured locally. In 2010, Oliver’s began marking locally made items—products made in Sonoma County—with “Made Local” signs. Customers responded with an increase in purchases, and though only 11.5 percent of the store’s 45,000 shelf items are local, these products account for 25 percent of total sales. Also, local sales are growing at a 10 to 15 percent faster rate than nonlocal items, a statistic easily tracked through the SKUs that mark each particular item, says Scott. But like Garrett, Scott agrees that the real power lies in the multiplier effect. “Say you’re buying Peet’s Coffee, which is now owned by a German company. Well, that money goes to Germany,” Scott explains. “The money’s not regenerated here. If you buy the same pound of coffee from Taylor Maid or Bella Rosa, you’re making the same cup of coffee but expect that your neighbor has a job because of that.” The economic incentive to market “local” products has even moved into nonlocal stores, which might be seen as a victory for the movement but has drawn ire from some farmers and their advocates.

Go into the produce section of a local Safeway and, depending on the season, one might see a “Locally Grown” label on oranges or peaches. On Aug. 30, Anthony Cohen, a Santa Rosa attorney, sent a letter to Safeway senior vice president Robert Gordon, alleging possible unlawful competition and consumer fraud. “A Sonoma County jury would be no more likely to find that oranges grown in Bakersfield orchards are ‘locally grown’ than it would be to find that those orchards are ‘locally owned,’” writes Cohen. In September, Cohen received a response from Valerie Lewis, senior corporate counsel at Safeway, who said that Safeway considers locally grown being anything from California, and that small growers couldn’t provide the amount of produce needed by the stores. But the issue isn’t a matter of distribution, but misleading marketing, says Cohen. In a phone conversation, he says that a recent visit to Safeway in Guerneville revealed peaches prominently advertised as locally grown, even as they originated in Reedley, Calif., outside of Fresno. “It’s unfair, because these are deceptive business practices,” he says. Support for local food systems and commerce has become a priority of local government as of Oct. 23, when the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors approved the comprehensive Healthy and Sustainable Food Action Plan created by the Sonoma County Department of Health Services and the Food System Alliance. The section titled “Economic Vitality” contains a call for “expanding the capacity of the local food supply chain to create more jobs in Sonoma County,” along with “building in a preference for purchasing Sonoma County and regional products.” If trends continue, and consumers and local government increase focus on the real economic value of keeping it local, say advocates like Terry Garrett, a change in habits—and a boost in the county’s employment and tax income—could be just the way to boost the local economy.

Domination Game It’s a well-trod story that the rise of Amazon.com has been a major factor in the continued demise of brick-and-mortar stores. But The Amazon Economy, a new series and e-book written by Financial Times correspondent Barney Jopson, reveals additional eye-opening reasons why Amazon’s continued expansion into nearly every sector of retail and commerce should be of concern to consumers, retailers and those who worry about the consequences of one corporation being allowed such a widereaching economic grip. Amazon’s economic influence has lifted beyond Apple, Google and Facebook, and entered the realm of network businesses such as stock exchanges, power grid operators, credit card processors and shipping lines, says Jopson. This means that even those who avoid buying clothing, tools, groceries and the thousands of other products available on Amazon might still be supporting the company when they utilize Spotify, Netflix and Dropbox, all companies that pay to use Amazon’s cloud-computing service. A recent agreement to pay sales taxes in California will allow Amazon to open more warehouses in more localities, cutting delivery time to sameday and further undercutting the ability of brick-and-mortar stores to compete. Amazon has even been known to undercut the retailers that use their website for e-commerce. When Amazon notices a product “flying off the shelves,” it will start selling the same product for cheaper from its own inventory, according to Jopson. It’s all in a day’s work for the largest online retailer and distributor, and one that looks more and more like a monopoly everyday. And, yes, The Amazon Economy is available on Amazon for the low price of $2.99. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

about 107 local ancillary services, from the printing service that handles the paper bags to the place where he buys toilet paper for the bathrooms. In addition, the store pays about 393 full-timeequivalent employees, and 275 more part-time employees.

ųŴ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Breathe Easy at Home

Give the gift of fresh air. Your children will thank you! CELEBRATE SMOKE-FREE SONOMA COUNTY! On January 12, 2013, all residential multi-unit housing goes smoke-free. Learn more at www.sonoma.county.org/BreatheEasy

Tired of the Drive?

Come to Thrive!

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Green Zone

Alex Shantz on Napa Local and the multiplier effect BY JULIANE POIRIER

T

he present Napa City Council doesn’t see why chain stores threaten a quaint downtown. Too bad none of them was present that morning, well over a year ago, when a smiling, hand-holding couple stepped briskly from a new hotel and began walking toward the shops on First Street; after a few yards the woman stopped and stared at the store on the corner. “Talbots,” she said, visibly upset. “I can go to Talbots back home!”

I wondered how far they had come, only to feel duped by the wellmarketed Napa mystique. Locals, too, can feel cheated when officials disregard the value of preserving uniqueness—so much so that the grassroots Napa Local was organized in 2011 to stop Starbucks from claiming part of downtown Napa.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Break the Chain(s)

The downtown retail areas of Napa are the quaint streets off Main, near the Napa River, where nostalgic storefronts of mixed architectural heritage house mainly small businesses selling everything from beads and hand-woven rugs to cigars and retro Western wear. Residents wanted to keep the formulaic corporate stores out of the mix, even if it meant blocking the ubiquitous coffee mammoth. Other North Bay towns, including Fairfax in Marin County and Calistoga in Napa County, have ordinances to block chains and preserve small-town charm. Starbucks already had Napa stores at the north and south ends of town, where chains dominate acres of asphalt omitted from the tourism websites; visitors evidently want to see the stuff they don’t see at home. But apart from aesthetics are economic factors impacting community well-being, according to Napa Local organizer Alex Shantz. “Keeping corporateowned chains away,” says Shantz, “helps strengthen the economic fabric of any community.” But the Napa City Council voted in the coffee giant. Now Starbucks squats on a prominent corner, First and Main, directly across the street from Napa’s only local coffee shop, Napa Valley Coffee Roasters. Napa Local and the 500 petition signers who tried to block Starbucks were disappointed, but not done in. “We haven’t given up on the ordinance,” said Shantz. “But as a totally separate project, we’re putting together a questionnaire for downtown merchants asking what we as members of the community can do to help them. It’s all about encouraging folks to shop local.” Napa Local believes that the local economy depends on residents showing a united front. “When people shop at box and chain stores,” said Shantz, “there are hidden costs. The main reason to shop locally is that you help create the multiplier effect. The money you spend circulates locally. With a corporation, the money goes out of the community.”

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

CIDER LEAN Scott Heath and Ellen Cavalli in front of the namesake tilted shed, while son Benny gets silly with the sheep.

Like Them Apples Getting to the core of the local craft cider boom BY ALASTAIR BLAND

I

n the George H. W. Bush era, on the banks of the Russian River, a small cluster of apple trees was abandoned— blackberry vines crawled over the property, and the small orchard disappeared. Crop after crop of fruit fell aground in the timeless, ancient way of trees, while the world raced forward through the Clinton years,

the craft beer boom and the internet age. Then, in August of 2011, a pair of snipping blades parted the brambles, and two Sebastopol residents stepped into this longlost secret garden, bringing to an end its age of isolation. They were Scott Heath and Ellen Cavalli, aspiring farmers and fermenters hinging their future on the cider business. The quest for fruit, plus a helpful tip from a landowner, had brought them searching in this

overgrown jungle, which had been planted with heirloom apple trees, then abandoned, in a failed cider endeavor at least 20 years ago. “It’s nice to know that someone else had the same idea in mind that we do—to make cider with traditional cider apples,” Cavalli says. “But the market at the time just wasn’t ready.” Now it may be. Heath and Cavalli secured enough fruit of heirloom apple varieties last year to launch their own label, Tilted Shed Ciderworks. Last fall, the

couple—who are also growing two acres of their own trees—produced about 1,400 bottles of cider. This year, they’ve quadrupled their volume, pressing two dozen apple varieties for about 1,200 gallons of juice, scheduled for release in the early summer of 2013 after a slow, cold fermentation and several months of aging. Their ciders include Graviva!, a blend of Gravenstein and several heirloom varieties, and January Barbecue, made with additions of smoked apples. Other local entrepreneurs prospecting in the frontier of hard cider include the Philo Apple Farm, the AppleGarden Farm in Tomales (featured in the April 25 issue of the Bohemian), Apple Sauced Cider and Boonville Cider House. In southeast Petaluma, Murray’s Cyder is also growing. The company was first founded in 1998, then floundered until a man named Wayne Van Loon bought and rebooted it several years ago. Van Loon released his first ciders under the label in 2010 and has since doubled the volume, with 6,000 hand-corked bottles of the 2012 crop soon to appear at local retailers. The ciders, made in the style of Normandy, are dry, tart, complex and not so “easy” to drink as they may be intriguing. Van Loon has high hopes for the future. “The cider market right now is exploding,” Van Loon says. “People were overjoyed once with a can of cold lager. Then someone handed them a bottle of Anchor Steam, and craft beer has seen rising sales almost every year since.” Cider could follow a similar upward trajectory. In just the past year, American apple cider sales jumped by 65 percent, and the rate has increased for several years. For hopefuls in the local craft cider community, however, there is one severe limiting factor on what the future may offer: the local apple supply. The short story is that there’s not enough fruit—that is, not enough fruit of the right sorts. Compared to familiar eating apples, cider-specific varieties are

to America. A 2009 article in Slate Magazine reported that in Massachusetts in 1767 the average per capita cider consumption was 35 gallons. Westbound pioneers brought the apple with them, making the fruit a ubiquitous addition to homesteads across the Midwest. The storied labors of Johnny Appleseed also maintained diversity and availability in Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing apple culture. But mysteriously, cider all but vanished in the late 1800s. Americans would never stop eating the fruit, but we essentially quit drinking the fermented juice of the apple. Now the local cider culture is planting new roots. Sebastopolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ace Cider, for one, burst from a tiny craft house in 1994 into one of the largest cider companies in America. Ace relied on Sonoma County apples for at least a decade before it outgrew local supply and turned, increasingly, to imported juice concentrate, much of it from overseas. Growth may be easy for Ace and other such giants that utilize low-cost imported juice. But for â&#x20AC;&#x153;the 707 cider crew,â&#x20AC;? as insiders call the local craft companies, the future will be an uphill crawl as they seek out the fruit they need, whether by contracting with existing apple farmers or by prowling through abandoned properties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tapped out our local growers, and the challenge is going to be getting those [bitter apples], which are like the holy grail for making the cider style we like,â&#x20AC;? Cavalli says. Van Loon expects the craft cider industry to boom, and soon, whether heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready or not. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that MillerCoors bought Crispin last year means theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken a stake in the future, too,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have no doubt that the cider market will explode. I just need the right trees, and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t grow them myself in a planter box.â&#x20AC;? Look for locally made ciders at Sheltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market in Healdsburg, Andyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market in Sebastopol, both locations of Berkeley Bowl, Paradise Foods in Novato, Petaluma Market, and Upcider in San Francisco.

17

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fraught with tannins and acids that make some of them too tart or astringent to eat but which bolster a ďŹ nished cider with backbone, aroma and complexity. It was the desire for heirloom cider apples that sent Heath and Cavalli bushwhacking into the riverside undergrowth last year to ďŹ nd their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost Orchard,â&#x20AC;? as they now call the grove of two dozen trees. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same need of such fruit that has inspired several other small local farms to graft cider apples onto their existing trees. Now varieties like Kingston Black, Nehou, Muscat de Bernay, Tremlettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bitter, Frequin Rouge, Roxbury Russet, Porterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perfection and dozens of others are available in limited quantity in the North Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s apple orchards. Apple acreage in Sonoma County has been declining for decades as farmers sell their land to developers or, just as often, grape growers. But veteran apple farmer Stan Devoto is venturing in quite the opposite directionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s allotted about a fourth of his small Sebastopol farm to heirloom apples, including many cultivars traditionally reserved for cider making. Devoto says the best money in the local apple industry comes from selling fresh fruit, but he plans to market his blemished â&#x20AC;&#x153;number twosâ&#x20AC;? to hard-cider makers. First in line for the fruit is Apple Sauced Cider, which Devotoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daughter Jolie Devoto Wade owns with her husband, Hunter Wade. Along with their hired cider maker Rick Davis, the Wades released 1,200 cases of pure Gravenstein cider this year. They plan to release a larger volume next year, including blends using Devotoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rare varieties for added layers of complexity and character. Hunter Wade says he â&#x20AC;&#x153;fell in love with ciderâ&#x20AC;? while traveling in northern Spain. The traditional cider of the region is made using blends of local apples and is bottled as a tart and musky beverage almost void of carbonation, a style that Wade believes might not ďŹ nd success this side of the Atlantic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think the American palate is ready for Spanish-style cider,â&#x20AC;? Wade says. Not that cider is new anything

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Lo C Coco’s oco c ’s’ Cucina Rustica

Voted V oted Best Best Italian Italian re staurant of of the the restaurant Nor th B ay. North Bay. —North — North Bay Bay Bohemian B oh e mi an

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue.

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Cafe La Haye CaliforniaFrench. $$-$$$. The very best Sonoma ingredients are married with nouvelle French cooking styles at this comfortable bistro. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.5994.

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Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

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Dierk’s Parkside Cafe American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955.

East West Restaurant California cuisine. $$. Comfortable and casual, Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 557 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.6142.

The Girl & the Fig Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

Healdsburg Bar & Grill American. $-$$ Gourmet burgers and potent cocktails from the owners of Cyrus. It ain’t fancy, but it’s awfully good, with topnotch ingredients and low prices. Lunch and dinner daily. 245 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3333.

Hopmonk Tavern Pub fare. $$. More than serviceable bar food with a menu that hops the globe. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

JhanThong BanBua Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and

$-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. A top contender for best burger in the county. Mike’s will even make you a triple, if you dare. Great beer menu, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Ravenous Bistro. $$. Here’s that secret spot you look for all your life: great food, cheery service and a cozy ambiance. Menu changes weekly, with focus on tapas-style small plates. Dinner, Thurs-Sat; brunch, Sun. 117 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1770.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own

Insalata’s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch and )

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Dining ( 18 dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100. Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

$$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly

N A PA CO U N T Y

Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$.

La Toque Restaurant

Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s Mexican-

California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Cole’s Chop House

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Brannan’s Grill

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Station House Cafe

Fumé Bistro & Bar

American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

The William Tell House American & Italian.

$-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Wineries

21

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Fetzer Vineyards Even as a corporate giant, Fetzer retains its conscience about the earth, the grapes, the land and its wine. Chardonnay is what Fetzer does especially well. The winery also has a small deli and inn. 13601 Old River Road, Hopland. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.846.8637.

Inspiration Vineyards The colorful pastoral depicted on the label does exist, but this small, family-owned labor of love is sensibly located in the Pinecreek Business Park. Stylish tasting room; Chard, Cab and Blanc. 3360 Coffey Lane, Ste. E, Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–4:30pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.237.4980.

Mercury Geyserville No fee, 20 percent discount for Sonoma County residents and 12-pack wooden crates of mini-jug wine; two turntables, an LP record player–put on your winged shoes, it’s time to party in sleepy Geyserville! Also pickled comestibles, jam, peppers–and pretty good Pinot, Cab, Cab Franc, and Merlot. 20120 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–6pm. No fee. 707.857.9870.

Old World Winery Meaning, a simpler time when grapes were trodden under bare foot and wine was made the natural way? Yes. Fun fact: the small, familyowned winery was the original Williams-Selyem location. 850 River Road, Fulton. Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm or by appointment. Tasting fee $5. 707.578.3148.

Russian River Vineyards The iconic, Fort Ross–styled building may have bats in the attic, but the remodeled tasting room and restaurant feature crisp, delicious libations and a new menu. Nice Chileno Valley Riesling and Sonoma Coast Syrah. Look for the Bat Blend;

proceeds benefit the bats. 5700 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Forestville. 11am to 5pm daily. $5 fee. 707.887.3344.

Sojourn Cellars Complex but lissome Sonoma Valley Cab is the star at comfortable tasting salon just off the Sonoma Plaza that’s as comfortable as a living room. No need to fear sit-down, appointment-only tastings; just focus on Sojourn’s lawn chair logo and relax. 141 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Complimentary tasting by appointment. 707.938.7212. Talisman Wine Wineindustry husband-and-wife team play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space. Don’t miss the taste test between the Dijon and Pommard clones. 21684 Eighth St., Sonoma. Limited tasting availability, by appointment. 707.996.9050.

N A PA CO U N TY Brown Estate Vineyards (WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Hall Winery (WC) Craig and Kathryn Hall specialize in “beefy” wines favored by Robert Parker. Intensely modern art and all things Austrian. New tasting room will be by Frank Gehry. 401 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–5:30pm. 866.667.HALL.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

PlumpJack Winery Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10am– 4pm. 707.945.1220.

Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Uncorked at Oxbow Across from the Public Market, this remodeled house in Napa’s historic “Little Italy” is a casual and unaffected joint. Ahnfeldt and Carducci wines include estate Merlot, Syrah, Cab, vinted by Paul Hobbs. Don’t ask about the horse. 605 First St., Napa. Open daily, noon–8pm; winter hours vary. Tasting fee, $10–$20. 707.927.5864.

Wine Wonderland Holiday cheer: sip it, ship it, gift it BY JAMES KNIGHT

G

ot winos—sorry, enophiles—on your list? Put down that mouse. Take your finger off the touchscreen. Take a cue from Homer Simpson, who imagined the dual benefits of fueling up his car with alcohol: “One for you, one for me.” There’s a wine wonderland out there, with fireplaces roaring and wine pouring, far away from the maddening mall. And you’ll have a dreamy little “isn’t it great living in wine country, la la la” story to write on your holiday card. Now, how to get the booze under the recipient’s tree? To ship it legit, shipping stores will do it for a surcharge. Bottles are repacked in styrofoam, same as at discounter the Bottle Barn (3331-A Industrial Drive, Santa Rosa, 707.528.1161), which charges only the cost of the box and the UPS fee. For more attractive packaging, have it shipped directly from the winery. Flying home? Go carry-on. Carol Shelton Wines (3354-B Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.575.3441) offers “Tasting Room in a Box,” a set of six darling little 50 ml bottles ($34.99). At under two ounces, they’re TSA-approved, can double as ornaments, or turn the nativity scene into a wasted scene. Keep away from elves. Or skip the wine. Throughout the year, we groan about tasting room tchotchkes. But where are they when you need them? Look closer, and you’ll find some really quite nice items. Have another taste or two, and they’re downright enticing. At Francis Ford Coppola Winery (300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville, 707.857.1400), gifts for buffs of the film and wine variety, selected and approved by the auteur, are interspersed amid memorabilia like the Godfather desk. Vineyard camo shirts! Just up the road, Geyser Peak Winery’s quieter, few-frills tasting room (22281 Chianti Road, Geyserville, 800.255.9463) has a few well-selected gifts, like a leather wine picnic set or wine trivia game that goes beyond the basics. For your 2012 holiday party hors d’oeuvre table, here’s the 2012 Pinot Grigio ($14) already. From the creators of Clif Bar, Velo Vino Napa Valley (709 Main St., St. Helena, 707.968.0625) is stocked with bike jerseys, blinky lights, bike-themed coloring books and artist cards, along with the requisite wooden gift box and gourmet foods. Right now, Luna Sport clothing is half off. In the scenic bosom of the Valley of the Moon, Imagery Estate Winery (14335 Hwy. 12, Glen Ellen, 707.935.4515) combines a fun visit with a healthy inventory of merch, including prints of their one-of-a-kind artist commissioned labels. Located in venerable stationers Corrick’s, Ancient Oak Cellars (637 Fourth St., Santa Rosa, 707.536.1546) seems to have it all: luscious Zin, crystal decanters, fine pieces from local Art Trails artists, plus holiday cards, gift wrap, and thank-you card sets for after all that. You’re welcome.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

The Money Where Our Mouth Is

Chain stores are boring, shopping online is lonely— and more reasons to shop local BY GABE MELINE

S

hopping locally for me started out as a matter of aesthetics. Unlike other teenagers, I hated the mall and spent my time instead in downtown Santa Rosa, where local businesses thrived at the time on Fourth Street. The big unattractive brick plaza that swallowed 12 square blocks of Santa Rosa and cut the city in half wasn’t even tempting. Shopping on Fourth Street, in stores that had real character, was the obvious choice. Then, the choice to shop local became a matter of dignity. When I was 16, I got a job at one of those chain stores in the mall, and saw firsthand just how little respect corporate headquarters had for the customer. We were forced

to upsell membership programs that couldn’t possibly benefit customers unless they spent $200 a month. We were required to suggest mediocre products from companies that paid for premium placement instead of

products that were better. We were made to destroy thousands of dollars of perfectly fine, sellable merchandise instead of marking it down. All this while claiming that the customer was the top priority. You don’t have to be sharp to see this from a customer’s perspective in the retail world. Think of the superstore that asks for your club card, then your phone number, then for you to sign up for a rewards program that’s really just a front to track your purchases. You’re so distracted by all this while checking out that you don’t get

a chance to say “no bag” and meanwhile they’ve put your five items into five separate plastic bags. Then the checker looks at your receipt and completely mispronounces your last name. December used to be fun. Holiday shopping used to mean running into friends and acquaintances in our vibrant downtowns, and supporting local merchants who showed their appreciation with one-on-one customer service; knowing our preferences and needs firsthand; occasionally saying “no charge” to regular customers; giving our

reminders to our readers about the benefits of shopping locally, drawing on personal experience with the expertise and knowledge of local stores and services. These are the places that we love, the personal institutions that come immediately to mind when someone says “Name a local business you couldn’t live without.” There’s a misconception spread by our local Republicans-indisguise that being progressiveminded somehow means being “anti-business.” That’s absurd. Here are some of the good local businesses—and there are many, many more—that’ve taken care of us over the years. We’ve got no problem reciprocating the love. —Gabe Meline

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

kids their first job; sponsoring community events; going the extra mile to find what we need. Then the chains came, and our local governments were strangely eager to let them in. Corporate chain stores were given tax breaks, waived permit fees, given free road improvements for traffic mitigation and other subsidies, all paid for by you and me. Elected officials fawned over these alleged “economic generators,” conveniently forgetting the other, more destructive costs. And then the American downtown died. The past 15 years have brought us another problem altogether, with online giants like Amazon failing to provide local tax revenue and, until earlier this year, spending millions on lobbying to avoid paying state sales taxes. At times, even our daily newspaper confuses “shopping locally” with “shopping at chain stores,” as long as the shopping is geographically located in the area. But even though brick-and-mortar chains can employ residents and pay regional sales taxes, none of the company’s net profits stay in our community. Zero. There’s more to it than just aesthetics and dignity, too. Walmart and Target are notorious for low wages and difficult hours, and Amazon’s warehouse working conditions have been investigated to be slightly above that of China’s sweatshops. As Leilani Clark’s news story this week explores, shopping locally is also a matter of smart economics, as profits get reinvested in the local economy. Here’s the good news for us in the North Bay: we still have a chance. We still have strong local stores with tremendous service that provide superior alternatives to the drab experience of shopping online and at faceless behemoths with byzantine parking lots and blank stares from underpaid, mistreated employees. We’re also lucky not to live in the rural Midwest, where Walmart has decimated downtowns. In fact, here in print, and online at bohemian.com throughout the month of December, are

M

y husband is a carpenter, my dad is an electrician and I am neither of these things—but I end up tagging along to home improvement stores on many a Saturday. At a certain big, boxy orange-andgray hardware behemoth, I trail beside them through dark aisles of bolts and switches as they mutter under their breath about disorganization, a lack of customer service and the deterioration of the American store. My husband usually peppers his rants with words that I won’t repeat right now, because it’s almost Christmas. Friedman’s Home Improvement is different—last week, before the storm, they gave away sandbags for free. But primarily, for me, because of lawn chairs. If you’ve ever been there, you know— there’s a warehouse-sized area full of lawn chairs. There are also sofas, deck lounges and porch swings with cushions so deep they should be offshore drilling sites. You can read—for hours sometimes!—settled back into one of those babies, just rocking back-and-forth, sweetly oblivious to spark plugs and copper tubing. And the awesome staff won’t kick you out, even while other potential buyers are browsing. Also, I hear their organization and products and customer service are really great. 4055 Santa Rosa

Ave., Santa Rosa (707.584.7811), and 1360 Broadway, Sonoma (707.939.8811).—Rachel Dovey

I

am as artistically inclined as an Arizona pack mule, but when I get the urge to make something with paint, paper, stencils, foil, glue, X-acto knives, foamcore board, canvas, aerosol, double-sided tape or patterned paper, I am always grateful for the existence of Rileystreet Art Supply. Not only do they have everything I could possibly need, I also usually walk in envisioning one project and I leave with the materials for three, thusly inspired. One time I was making a series of custom album covers and, not knowing much about paint, picked out the most professional-looking paint I could find on the shelves. But then I got to talking to a employee about what I was doing, and admitted I wasn’t sure what kind of paint I needed, and she led me to some that was half the cost of the stuff I had in my hands. She actually downsold me, because she knew there was perfectly sufficient

paint for the job that was cheaper, and didn’t want me to waste my money. Talk about service! You gotta love that kind of stuff. 103 Maxwell Court, Santa Rosa, 707.526.2416; 1138 Fourth St., San Rafael, 415.457.2787.—Gabe Meline

I

must have walked past Eraldi’s Shoes & Menswear dozens of times before I even noticed that it was there, sandwiched between the tasting rooms and touristy boutiques of Sonoma Plaza. What’s this, an oldfashioned haberdasher, a holdover from the big-box homogenization of the retail sector that swept third-generation, family-run businesses such as this from Main Street in the latter part of the 20th century? Well, yes. My next thought was, hey, I could use another pair of Levi’s. Founded in 1922, Eraldi’s moved across the Plaza to its current location in 1959. And still looks it. The last thing I expected co-owner Dan Eraldi to say is “You’ve got to change your product mix all the time.” Despite the ) 24 time-capsule aesthetic,

24



Shop Local ( 23

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Eraldi keeps up with trends. He stocks newer brands like Kuhl, for instance; the 1950s-style Pendleton shirtsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;those are the hot, newly reissued retro patterns. If they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t carry it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can order it for you, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a problem,â&#x20AC;? Dan Eraldi calls out across the ďŹ&#x201A;oor to a customer. OK, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all well and good to patronize a locally owned shop that gives back to the community, etc., but isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there a surcharge for that? Not really. My Leviâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;my size and preferred cut were in stockâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;were pretty reasonable. It helps that they own the building, and that Danâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, Don, pitches in on the ďŹ&#x201A;oorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;although at 86, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cut his hours back to ďŹ ve days a week. 475 First St. W., Sonoma. 707.996.2013.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;James Knight



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lifford is not a big red dog. No, the proclaimed viceroy of Loud and Clear Audio Video is a long black dog, and he has always been more than helpful when I am in need of musical instruments or accessories. I knew nothing of ukuleles but knew I needed an upgrade. I had learned four chords on my dolphin-bridged, blue painted toy-like instrument, and my fat ďŹ ngers were bending the strings so much it sounded perpetually out of tune. Cliff and his staff let me play all the ukes in the store, even the $2,500 rhinestoned Tiki-Goddes fourstringer once owned by Bette Midler. He taught me the tuning and differences between soprano, baritone and tenor ukuleles, and

didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t complain when I sat for an hour struggling through the same chords on several instruments. I still play my new uke at least once a week, and have since learned more than four chords. It sounds better, plays better and feels like â&#x20AC;&#x153;the one,â&#x20AC;? like Wayne Campbellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Excalibur (the white Fender Stratocaster with triple single coil pickups and a whammy bar, preCBS Fender corporate buyout). 7886 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati 707.665.5650.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nick Grizzle

A

bout to have my ďŹ rst baby, I was daunted by the impending inďŹ&#x201A;ux of capital-S Stuff. My husband and I live in a tiny house in west Sebastopol with only one bedroom, and I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ďŹ gure out where the co-sleeper, the high-chair, the changing table and all the doll-sized garments were actually going to go. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, I was beset by Left Coast guilt over the thought of spending so many dollars (and asking my friends and family to spend just as many) at low-wage-paying chains like Target. After much Googling, I found Sweet Pea Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boutique in Cotati. It was locally owned and, as a seller of used goods, it was cheap. And it was crammed with ovary-twistingly adorable wares of the shoe and sweater and crib varietyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;things that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look at and think, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I might need it, but I do I really need to cram it in my house?â&#x20AC;? After spending 10 minutes in a haze of tiny, polka dot smocks and swings covered in smiling frogs,

I

t was a necklace emergency! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never had one before, but on the day of my big concert at the Napa Valley Opera House I realized that the only bling I owned was in the wrong color. After calling around in the hope of borrowing something, a friend recommended Bettyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Girl Boutique. I rushed into a shop ďŹ lled with vintage dresses, hatboxes, dressmakers dummies and a sewing machine. Was I in the wrong place? When I blurted my need to owner Kim Northrop, explaining that I had only 45 minutes before show time, she grabbed a collection of rhinestone jewelry and sat chatting me off the ledge as I looked through the box. When I found the right color and sparkle, the necklace was too small. If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been at a chain store, the clerk would have stood there blinking or shrugging vaguely in a substitute apology. But not Kim. She grabbed her jewelry pliers, cannibalized a bit from elsewhere andâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;voilĂ !â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the necklace ďŹ t. And so did the price. I made it to the performance on time with a beautiful necklace, grateful for the creative problem-solving

abilities of a local merchant. 1144 Main St., Napa. 707.254.7560.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Juliane Porier

25 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

I decided to register there which, I soon found out, meant writing down all the things I wanted on a blank sheet of printer paper. I had to be as speciďŹ c as possibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; listing not just the â&#x20AC;&#x153;green shoesâ&#x20AC;? but the â&#x20AC;&#x153;three-month-old green shoes with peas on the toes, $10.â&#x20AC;? When I look at the jumper covered in red ďŹ&#x201A;owers, the brown dress, the co-sleeper in my house, I can immediately tell, by quality alone, that they came from Sweet Pea. 15 Charles St., Cotati, 707.794.1215.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Rachel Dovey

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ow did it all begin? Was it the sheep soap dispenserâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the ďŹ rst sheep soap dispenser? That wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the start of all things sheep to be gifted among my family. No, no. Maybe it was the quail soap dispenser, purchased years ago at an arts and crafts outlet in Duncans Mills. I can guess at how it continued, in any case: a surreptitious peek at the underside of some alreadygifted dispenser or other, signed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;North Eagle.â&#x20AC;? Aha. Gift idea. I wonder if they have anything in. . . cats. Once best known as the animal-soap-dispenser people, Valley of the Moon Pottery, aka North Eagle (long story), has been in business in Sonoma County for 30 years. Owners Wayne Reynolds and Caryn Fried still make their signature collection of crittersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;pelicans, cats, sheep, hippos and frogs; turtles, doves, quail and, yes, owlsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but now only sell direct from their rural gallery. I like them because their designs, from coffee mugs, carafes and other items with everyday uses to statuettes and plates meant only for display, even when whimsical, have a certain sense of dignity. And if you plan your shopping trip ahead, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a twofer: North Eagle is also a â&#x20AC;&#x153;living Christmas tree farm,â&#x20AC;? so-called because trees are cut down to the bottom branches, which are then trained to regrow vertically into a future holiday tree. Speaking of little trees, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got bonsai, too. And, yes, hot apple cider. 6191 Sonoma Hwy., Santa Rosa. 707.538.2554. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;James Knight

I

thought it was odd when my dad insisted I go to Martin & Harris Appliances some years back to buy a new fridge. My parents were never too big on supporting local mom-andpops, ďŹ nding the wholesale warehouse prices too good to pass up. But Martin & Harris not only delivers competitive ) 26

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Shop Local ( 25 prices, its staff is by far the most knowledgeable in Marin. I learned this myself when I finally made it in. Our older sales guy immediately reminded me of the mythic “old days,” where everyone took pride in their work and treated each customer as a king or queen. He spent 20 minutes explaining more than I ever need to know about ice makers, and learning about my food storage habits. He recommended an Amana, which was delivered the same day and has chilled my household from beer to baby formula. It’s no wonder they have such a devoted following, considering all they do is appliances, everything from selling to repair and spare parts. While other homeowner concerns might involve cringeworthy customer-service nightmares, it feels good to know that Martin & Harris have this one major area taken care of. 2158 Fourth St., San Rafael, 415.454.2021.—David Sason

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t’s like being in a big record store in San Francisco,” says Last Record Store vinyl slinger Josh Staples, behind the counter, “but without all the crowds of people looking for the same things.” True to form, the place feels like just the right size: large enough to browse comfortably but small enough not to become overwhelmed. There’s every genre and plenty of obscurities. I have walked out with sealed copies of Ravi Shankar, Isis and Paul Simon records, not to mention “The Contest.” (How can one resist the recording of an international flatulence competition?) This makes the store dangerous, and prevents me from visiting as much as I’d like. But every time I need a certain recording on vinyl (read: I am an audio snob), the Last Record Store is the first place I look. Heading in last week with hopes of selling a bunch of CDs (the store is pretty much only buying vinyl at the moment, to my dismay), I left with a Prince record for just $4—and I didn’t even have time to check out the substantial

$1 record bin. 1899 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, 707.525.1963. —Nicolas Grizzle

H

urray for hobbies and enthusiasms, which would seem to present the gift shopper with a slamdunk. Harken, gift shopper, and beware the hobby: gift not the nerded-out nanobrewer nephew a brew-in-a-bag starter kit. Better to present the budding garagiste with three French hens before the embarrassment of a can of Cabernet concentrate. Those ensconced comfortably deep in the rabbit hole of homebrewing or winemaking know exactly what they want; they don’t have it on account that it’s darned pricey. But that’s where you come in, dear, thoughtful gift-giver. So get a list or look for clues. Is she boiling hops in grandma’s rusty old enamel canning pot? Somebody needs a $200 stainless steel brewing kettle. And if you should stumble on terms like wort chiller or self-adjusting refractometer, seek advice at your local fermentation supply. This is one sector that seems to rebuff the advance of internet retail. Case in point: after a decade of lugging around substandard rented grape destemmer machines, I decided to splurge on one. Well, splurge on a budget, and with a specific, quality-enhancing feature: lobed rubber rollers. Mmm, gentle crushing, but not easy to find. After scrolling through dozens of tiny pictures and woefully brief product descriptions, with one phone call I found that Napa Fermentations had exactly what I wanted, and at a crazy good price. Located in the Napa County Fairgrounds—with plenty of parking—the store is stocked with all manner of gadgets, and staffed with people who’ve been helping to make sugar plum dreams bubble into tasty beverages since 1983. 575 Third St., Napa. 707.255.6372.—James Knight

M

ost of the board games sold in America these days are purchased at chain stores, which are known for having stacks upon stacks of stuff. But just try to ask one of those Stuff-Iz-Us employees

if Pizza Theory is as much fun to play as it sounds. If they even have Pizza Theory—a cool game of logic and cheesy toppings—the odds aren’t good that anyone there has actually sat down and played it. At Gamescape North, in San Rafael, pretty much all they sell is games, from the good old-fashioned board games we grew up with (Monopoly! Scrabble!) to role-playing paraphernalia for Dungeons & Dragons and Magic. And the folks behind the counter can tell you, from personal experience, what they like best about the shape-matching phenomenon Cirplexed or the artsy new card game Murder of Crows. The same is true of Outer Planes, in Santa Rosa (519 Mendocino Ave.), which adds a huge selection of comic books—mainstream, rare and underground—to its selection of games and role-playing accoutrements. Both stores feature demonstrations and host group tournaments—something you’re not going to see at Stuff-IzUs. 1225 Fourth St., San Rafael.— David Templeton

I

t’s overwhelming, visiting that huge, toy-store conglomerate. Bearing down are endless rows of items from the latest movies, shows and other heavily promoted juggernauts that probably don’t constitute the best influence on your young-uns. There are a few educational toys, but by the time you locate them, your little one is fully gaga over the all too common reinforcer of American military aggression or anorexic California-girl

vapidity. Thankfully for parents, Five Little Monkeys on Grant Avenue in downtown Novato feels more like a cozy neighborhood bookstore than an imposing personification of corporate tween culture. The store carefully selects its toys, games and books to be environmentally sound, safe and educational. There’s something charming about their wide selection of wooden train sets and the like, which hark back to a time when imagination trumped the hot new action figure or gadget. The icing on the cake is the personal service by staff, who provide free exquisite gift-wrap and will even spend a half hour with you to find that perfect gift for the kid who has it all. These days, it’s rare to find a toy store that plays so nice with others. 852 Grant Ave., Novato. 415.898.4411.—David Sason

25 Days of Shopping Local There’s more! Every day in December, leading up to Christmas, we’ll be posting more testimonials online to favorite local businesses. G&G! Golden Carrot! Asef’s! Amani’s! Video Bob’s! Napa Music Supply! Flying Goat! Pine Grove General Store! Bedrock Music! Fatty’s Threads! Pet Food Express! There’s simply too many great ones to list here; check bohemian.com each day to keep up.

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27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

sausalito’s ne sausalito’s newest west waterfront hot spot waterf front h ot sp ot

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

The week’s events: a selective guide

Crush CULTURE

MTT! MTT! Michael Tilson Thomas conducts the first performance by the San Francisco Symphony at the Green Music Center on Dec. 6. See Concerts, p33. SEBASTOPOL

MILL VALLEY

SEBASTOPOL

N A PA

Canned Heat

All Good

Prez Revolution

Loosen Up

Sonoma County’s local music scene continues to grow, and this week, a part of this talented pool can be found at the release fundraiser for ‘Real Music: A Taste of Sonoma County, Vol. 2.’ Hosted by Oliver’s Market, the lineup features a true who’s who of local musicians on three different stages, including the Highway Poets, Doug Jayne, John Courage, Buzzy Martin, Baby Seal Club, Alison Harris and the Barn Owls, B. C. Fitzpatrick, Jill Cohn, Frank Hayhurst and the Real Music All Star Band, Josh Windmiller with the All-Star Hoot Band, Tony Gibson, McKenna Faith and the David Thom Band. All proceeds go to the Redwood Empire Food Bank on Friday, Dec. 7, at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 7pm. $10 plus a can of food. 707.795.9400.

At this year’s Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Fest, Primus fans were stoked to see Les Claypool’s latest side project, Duo de Twang, a twisted, honky-tonk acoustic duo with Mirv, aka Marc Haggard. (Earlier that week, at Terrapin Crossroads, the pair had busted out a fun, stripped-down version of ’90s Primus hit “Jerry Was a Race Car Driver” to the delight of the crowd.) Duo de Twang joins Bob Weir and Jackie Greene for a show at 142 Throckmorton this week, with proceeds going to Casa de Milagros, a Peruvian orphanage. Money will also be donated to J/P Haitian Relief Organization, which works to bring sustainable programs to the people of Haiti. The fourth annual benefit show drives so goddamn fast on Thursday, Dec. 6, at 142 Throckmorton. 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $125–$175. 415.383.9600.

Nicki Minaj may have cleaned up at the American Music Awards, but her brand of hip-hop isn’t all that’s out there. Personally, I like mine in the form of Dead Prez, who stepped onto the national radar with the 2000 album Let’s Get Free. Fronted by M-1 and Stic, the group’s revolutionary spirit comes through in lyrics like “Would you rather have a Lexus or justice?” (The song, “Hip Hop,” so impressed Dave Chappelle that he used it as entrance music on The Chappelle Show.) And then there’s “Malcolm Garvey Huey,” which calls out Mumia, Fela Kuti, Malcolm X, Bobby Seale, Huey Newton, Marcus Garvey, Stanley “Tookie” Williams and Nehanda. Now that’s deep. Dead Prez play on Saturday, Dec. 8, at Aubergine. 755 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. $20–$25. 9:30pm. 707.861.9190.

These days, seeing the word “fuck” on an album cover is about as exciting as watching Taylor Swift date a Kennedy, but back in 1969, it was a curse. For ’60s San Francisco band Sons of Champlin and their double album Loosen Up Naturally, according to a Champlin roadie, the offending word was surreptitiously added to the album art proof by a scorned woman looking for revenge. When Capitol Records discovered the hidden “fuck,” it was too late—Loosen Up Naturally had already returned from the printer. Legend has it that the job of scratching out every “fuck” fell to two lowly temps, paid for by the band. They play on Friday, Dec. 7, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $35. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

—Leilani Clark

Ĺ´Ĺť Journey to the Center of Sonoma County Sound

We Have Something For Every Music Lover! Just check this list: J Ukulele ăž&#x17D;

J Banjo J Fiddle J Mandolin J Bass ăž&#x17D; J Guitar J Saxophone J Clarinet J Flute J Drums J Percussion J Keyboards J Dulcimer J Celtic Harp ăž&#x17D; J Harmonica J Music Book ăž&#x17D;

J Recorder J Pan Pipes J Rain Stick J Bamboo Flute J Kazoo J Tule J Bo J African ăž&#x17D; Drums J Nose Whistle ăž&#x17D; J Microphone J Headphones J Mallets J Sticks ăž&#x17D; J Picks J Harmonium

Instrument Sales & Rentals Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Books How-to Videos & Lessons from REAL MUSICIANS!

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greatest Music Storeâ&#x20AC;?

Stage

112/7 2 / 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 112/13 2 /13

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

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MARYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PLACE Reenacting the Bedford Falls story for radio works well at MTC.

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Summer field C in e ma s Summerfield Cinemas 551 Summerfield Summer field Road Road 551 S an t a R osa Santa Rosa 707- 52 2- 0719 707-522-0719

Two â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wonderfulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives onstage this season BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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Ever since author Philip Van Doren Stern published his short story The Greatest Gift 69 years ago, George has appeared, year after year, desperate to be somebody, certain heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth more dead than alive. Made famous by the 1946 Frank Capra ďŹ lm Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Wonderful Life, the character of George Bailey is one of the most iconic, complex and real ďŹ ctional characters ever created. Frustrated by his failed dreams and lack of money, George eventually learns, through the intervention of an unorthodox guardian angel named Clarence, that his unexciting little life in the tiny town of Bedford Falls is worth far more than he ever knew. Whether familiar or unfamiliar with the tale, audiences stand to be entertained and moved by two new stage adaptations, each serving up a wildly different version of Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Wonderful Life. At Marin Theatre Company, director Jon Tracy brings George Baileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story to mesmerizing life through the talents of a late-1940s

radio show troupe, performing a live broadcast from Studio A at Manhattanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s WMTC radio. As snow falls behind plate-glass windows, Tracyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s superb cast of ďŹ ve tackle dozens of voices and characters, thumping and bumping and clapping a parade of clever sound effects, and even harmonizing the vocal soundtrack. Any concern that the emotional impact of the story might be lessened by the layered, thirdperson effect of watching actors playing actors playing many characters each is quickly dealt with. A good story is a good story, and the thrill of MTCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charming and engaging show is in surrendering to the building drama of Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Eve breakdown, while acknowledging the high-wire act being performed by the quintet of supremely talented actors. Even while standing before a microphone, scripts clutched in their hands, the actors weave a colorful quilt of indelible images, transcending the potentially stationary conventions of the radio-show concept.

Meanwhile, at Sixth Street Playhouse, Sylvia Jones and Craig Miller co-direct a new musical version, with memorably snappy songs and lyrics by Marcy Telles, Larry Williams and Janis Dunson Wilson, and a playful book by Williams, who also appears as Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heartless millionaire nemesis Mr. Potter. The cast is enormous, led by Mark Bradbury as George and Natalie Herman as the angel, here transformed into an artfully dodgy female street urchin named Clara, eager to earn her wings and not above picking a pocket to accomplish her goal. Borrowing a trick from Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Christmas Carol, Clara leads the suicidal, bridge-jumping George through his past to his ďŹ nancialcrisis present, showing the shadows of his life, allowing him to step into the key scenes that formed his small-town destiny. It works remarkably well, drawing plenty of sniffles and sympathy right from the get-go. The cast is a bit uneven, with many weak and wobbly voices frequently neutering the melodic appeal of the jazzy songs and poignant lyrics. But even the occasional off-key delivery is not enough to squash the sneaky power of the piece. The story of George Bailey suggests that a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, ďŹ&#x201A;awed or not, is best judged by the impact that person has on others. The same is true of this bumpy but deeply moving show, grabbing the hearts of the audience from its tearjerker of an opening numberâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; with the people of Bedford Falls all praying in song for their aching friend Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;right up to the ďŹ nal throat-catching wallop of a holiday toast: â&#x20AC;&#x153;To George Bailey, the richest man in town!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Tuesday-Sunday through Dec. 16 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Tuesday and Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; Wednesday at 7:30pm; Sunday at 7pm. 2pm matinees, Saturdays and Sundays; 1pm matinee on Thursday, Dec. 6. $36-$57. 415.388-5208. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Wonderful Life: The Musicalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursday-Sunday through Dec. 23 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Saturdays and Sundays. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$32. 707.523.4185.

++++

S E L APELC.” H T Y B I SS YOU GRABS ITCHCOCKK OCBSLEA RV ER LIKERE XAREHED, THE NE W YOR

SARAH ‘Queen Elizabeth’ screens in four reels at this unique program.

Luddites Take Heed

‘Films of 1912’ to feature hand-cranked projector BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

O

ne hundred years ago, cinema was starting to change from a penny-ante novelty to the overwhelming, reality-displacing force it is today. But the technology still hadn’t progressed very far. Films in 1912, for example, still had to be shown on projectors cranked by hand. Giving a sort of séance this week on 1912 film is Randy Haberkamp of the Motion Picture Academy, who’ll be at the Rafael Film Center on Dec. 10, along with L.A.-based musician Michael Mortilla (who just wrote a score for Hitchcock’s first film, The White Shadow) and, yes, a guy who has to stand there and turn an antique crank. Just like the old days. Nineteen twelve was an exciting time. In Italy, Quo Vadis had been released, giving that country the honor of producing the first epic. In America, there was the first coalescing of studios, with the beginnings of Fox, Paramount and Universal. Nineteen twelve also saw the first Keystone comedy, as well as the first “urban” film, D. W. Griffith’s Musketeers of Pig Alley. The first cowboy star, Broncho Billy Anderson, was continuing his productions in the Northern California hills, including the trails around Mt. Tam. The rising power of movies at the time lured Sarah Bernhardt, the world’s most famous actress, to a four–reel biopic about England’s Queen Elizabeth, which

is presented in Haberkamp’s program. The two-hour evening also includes what’s likely the first human-powered projector anyone in the area has seen. Joe Rinaudo, who has a nationally known trade in vintage-styled chandeliers and lighting fixtures in the Glendale area, will be bringing a projector that he restored himself, a device manufactured in 1906 by the Nicholas Power Company of 50 Gold St., New York. In their day, handcranked projectors allowed traveling projectionists to take early movies out into rural hamlets beyond the power grid. But cameramen of the Billy Bitzer era cranked when they filmed, too. Projectionists thus had to duplicate the uneven speeds on their own to make sure the action looked natural on a screen. When you see movies displayed this way, you’re mindful of the sense of exertion to create this illusion, and the trick of persistence of vision that lets movies move. The graceful yet slightly irregular motion makes these old 35mm movies look more alive—it’s rather like the surprise of watching an old film at slow speed and studying the facial expressions revealed, previously hidden by the whirl of frames we’re so used to now, 100 years after these films were made. ‘A Century Ago: The Films of 1912’ screens Monday, Dec. 10, at the Rafael Film Center. 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. 7pm. $12. 415.454.1222.

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Film

31

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Music

DIN N E R & A SHOW

DOUG ADAMZ & BRAVO! Dec 7 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Americanaâ&#x20AC;? Fri

Jon Lohne

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

8:00pm The Coolest Swing Dec 8 STOMPY JONES Holiday Show 8:30pm Sat

DR. ELMO AND THE REINDEER BAND Dec 9 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeerâ&#x20AC;? Sun

6:00pm

THE SUN KINGS Dec 14 A Salute to the Beatles Fri

8:30pm

Sat

Dec 15

T HE COVERLETTES CHRISTMAS SHOW

60s Girl Group Singing Sensations 8:30pm Thur The Legendary Dec 20 WILLIE Kâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHRISTMAS SHOW Willie Kalikimaka 8:00pm Sat

Dec 22

MARIA MULDAURâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHRISTMAS AT THE OASIS Cool Yule Songs 8:30pm

Mon

6TH ANNUAL

Dec 24

GOSPEL CHRISTMAS EVE WITH THE PRIESTHOOD

7:00pm

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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CASTING Darwin Meinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; album is

just one of many released locally on LP this year.

In the Groove

Local bands embrace vinyl in 2012 BY GABE MELINE

Y

ouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve read the trend pieces, and maybe youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been dubious. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official: turntables, which for much of the past 20 years have served as a niche oddity and hipster accoutrement, are now a full-blown phenomenon. According to Billboard, sales of vinyl LPs have skyrocketed by 400 percent since 2008, and are on pace to have another recordbreaking year in 2012. What this means is that you likely know someone with a turntable, either in his bedroom or on this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas list. While more and more mainstream albums are being pressed on vinyl, local bands have always kept the format alive. Why not hip the record-loving music fan to great local music they can see down the street for ďŹ ve bucks by gifting a local bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s album on vinyl?

The debut self-titled release by Trebuchet may be the most accessible of the bunch this year, with melodic songwriting and four-part harmonies. Instruments like piano, cello, ukulele, banjo and mandolin round out the sound, and though the young band is a mainstay of the indie-rock set, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ďŹ t right in at a KRSH backyard concert. Less accessibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or rather the opposite of accessibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SF Dissonance,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; a compilation released by Santa Rosa noise duo Narph/Nader. If names like Merzbow titillate your aural nerves, look no further for harsh frequencies from a roundup of local white-noise makers to transport your imagination and freak out the cat. It comes with a spray-painted cover that smells lovely. You could download Darwin Meinersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; solo album StarďŹ shing for free, sure, but the heavy aqua-blue vinyl, thick lyric insert and cover photo taken in Bodega Bay canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be matched in mp3 form. Produced by David J from Bauhaus and Love & Rockets, the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full of delicate hooks, memorable lyrics and familiar local musicians like Emily Jane White, Judah Nagler and Henry Nagle. When heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not busy playing in HugeLarge, Robert Malta plays in side project Paleophone, whose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like Starsâ&#x20AC;? / â&#x20AC;&#x153;All I Everâ&#x20AC;? 45 captures a dreamy, fuzzed-out sound with local references in the lyrics, and even comes with a jukebox strip. Petaluma punk trio the Connies come correct on Full Round Roger, with blistering songs like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Marinâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Lament Against Apathy.â&#x20AC;? Hand-numbered, with 100 copies on pink vinyl, the recordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a perfect ďŹ t for highpowered rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll fans. Last but not least, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bodega Babeâ&#x20AC;? is just one song title from Starskateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Goodnight Nobody, a guitardrenched slice of loud â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fast California reverb bliss thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equal parts Wavves and Roy Orbison. Comes with a hand-silkscreened cover and multicolored vinyl. All these releases can be found at the Last Record Store, which is starting to live up to its name. 1899-A Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, 707.525.1963.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Chris-Mix A night of acoustic music with American Idolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Casey Abrams, Ryan Star and the Pat Jordan Band. Dec 6, 8pm. $12. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Dick Dale King of the surf guitar still hanging 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;fingers, that isâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;with his verbed-out Stratocaster sound. The Pyronauts open. Dec 6, 8pm. $24. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Dead Prez Revolutionary hip-hop with a gangsta lean. DJ Big G, MC Radioactive, Mad Cow Bombers and Eyezon and Jomial open. Dec 8, 8pm. $20-$25. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

JD McPherson, Emily Bonn & the Vivants Singer-songwriters in free concert for canned food drive benefit. Dec 11, 8:30pm. Free; bring two cans of food. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

John Prine If a picture says a thousand words, every John Prine song is a photomosaic. Justin Townes Earle opens. Dec 5, 8pm. $40$50. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

RBL Posse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Give Me No Bammer Weedâ&#x20AC;? helped this group sell almost a half-million units in the early â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s. Now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing your favorite Rohnert Park pub. Dec 7, 9pm. Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Shotgun Wedding Quintet If bandleader Adam Theis is the godfather of the Jazz Mafia, this is the muscle. Hip-hop and jazz come at you with dominant sevenths and fat beats. Dec 7, 8:30pm. $13. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Sing-Along Messiah Sing along to joyous classical music. No previous experience or vocal ability is necessary. Directed by John Maas. Dec 8, 3pm. $6. United Methodist Church, 500 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Bob Weir, Jackie Greene & Friends Fourth annual benefit for Peruvian orphanage Casa de Milagros featuring Bob Weir, Jackie Greene, Les Claypoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duo De Twang, Lebo and Steve Adams, Jay Lane and James Nash. Dec 6, 8pm. $125-$175. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Justin Townes Earle Winner of the 2011 Americana Music Award for Song of the Year plays late set. Dec 6, 10pm. $24-$30. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Phil Lesh & Friends Featuring Phil Lesh, Warren Haynes, John Molo, Rob Baracco and Jimmy Herring. Dec 6-9, 7pm. $150. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Jill Sobule Story songs about human beings, real and imagined, with a unique and mesmerizing voice. Dec 5, 8pm. $15. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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THE DIRTY DUB BAND

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The premier US male )

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TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary

The New Trust â&#x20AC;&#x153;You ask, Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my motivation? How â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bout your fucking head on a stick!? Now, get moving!â&#x20AC;? Local favorites play with post-rock heavyweights Not To Reason Why. Dec 6, 8pm. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

WEEKLY W EEK EKLY E EVENT VENT

GLITCH G LITCH / DUB DUB STEP STEP / ELECTRONICA ELECTRONICA

KNIGHT K NIGHT R RIDERZ IDERZ & SA SAMPLES MPLES +D DR RD DYLON YLON

$$15 15 ADV/$18 ADV/$18 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 7

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS HIP H IP H HOP OP / JJAZZ AZZ / FFREESTYLE REEST YLE

SHOTGUN S HOTGUN W WEDDING EDDIN NG QUINTET Q UINTET + THE THE JUG JUG DEALERS DEALERS $$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 8

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS JJAM AM / FO FOLK LK / R ROCK O CK

FREE F REE PE PEOPLES OPLES

+ TRAILER TRAILER PARK PARK RANGERS RANGERS JJONATHAN ONATHAN WARREN WARREN AND AND T THE HE BILLY BILLY G GOATS OATS

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 1 10 0

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT $3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM/21+ T TUES UES â&#x20AC;&#x201C;DEC â&#x20AC;&#x201C;DEC 11 11 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT HOSTED HOSTED BY BY E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D DEC EC 1 13 3 W WEEKLY EEK EKLY E EVENT VENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ C ABARET/ VARIET Y

CABARET C ABARET D DE EC CALIENTE ALIENTE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$$44HO HOT T HO HOLIDAYS L ID A Y SERS SHOW HO OAW JJAMESON A M E SO N & O ORGANIC R G AN I C Y YERBA BA M MATE TE COCKTAILS COCK TAILS $$10 10 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

FRI F RI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 1 14 4

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS AMERICANA/FOLK/ROCK A MERICANA / FOLK / ROCK

Occidental Community Choir

DAVID D AVID LLUNING UNING

((JUST J US T D DROP RO P O ON NB BY YC CD DR RELEASE E LE A S E P PARTY) AR T Y )

Join director Sarah Saulsbury and the Occidental Community Choir for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Around This Table,â&#x20AC;? a choral feast. Dec 8, 8pm and Dec 9, 3pm. $12-$15. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.8622.

+O OLD LD JJAWBONE AWBONE AND AND THE TH E C COURTNEY OURTNEY JANES JANES

$$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 15 15

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Posada Navideùa Compaùía Mazatlån Bellas Artes de Sacramento presents this Mexican Christmas production with 28 dancers and musicians. Dec 7, 7pm. $15-$20. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DEC DEC 6

JJUKE UKE JOINTS JOINTS & DOUBLE DOUBLE D PRESENT PRESENT

DJJ JJACQUES D ACQUES & DJ DJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

NAPA COUNTY Cantus

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC M US I C V VENUE ENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

KING COLE George Cole and Eurocana play Gypsy jazz Dec. 8 at Studio 55 in San Rafael. See Clubs, p35.

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

HOPMONK H OPMONK PR PRESENTS ESENTS FFUNK/BLUES/ROCK UNK / BLUES/ R ROCK

DRAGONSMOKE D RAGONSMOKE

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

33

MARIN COUNTY

Music ( 33

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

34 Fri December 7

Sons of Champlin

Pampered Feet Reflexology Center

Special Guest: Tim Hockenberry Trio

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Sat December 8

Taj Mahal

Special Guest: Rowan Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Chris & Lorin SOLD OU

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Fri December 14

Snoop Dogg Sat December 15

Todd Snider with Special Guests Dave Schools & Paulo Bidia plus Nikki Bluhm & the Gramblers

DcZ=djg;ddi IgZVibZci includes arms, shoulders, neck, & back and herbal foot soak

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Sun December 16

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Chris Isaak Fri December 21

Bootsy Collins and the Funk Unity Band Fri January 4 Psychedelic Furs & The Fixx Fri January 5 An Evening with

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Gregg Allman Sat January 19

Merle Haggard Fri February 1 ĹśĹ?ĹśĆ&#x;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ç Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;

Clint Black Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

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THE LAST DAY SALOON 120 Fifth Street, Santa Rosa, CA A Happy Death

+ The Autonomics + DJ K.C. rock | 9:00 pm door | $5 | 21+

12/13 Sonoma Songbirds with Jill Cohn + Katie Phillips + Jen Tucker Band

Wed, Dec 5 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pmSCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Dec 6 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club

12/14 Benefit Concert for the Redwood Empire Food Bank Christmas + Voodoo Saints + Special Guest Jam & DJ

Fri, Dec 7 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther DJ hosts a NIGHTCLUB TWO-STEP PARTY

Sat, Dec 8 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise RAZZMATAZZ FOLK DANCE CLUB

Sweet Leaf

annual 12/21 xmas + ADD/C + Inner Edge party rock | 9:00 pm door | $13/15 | 21+

12/30 Big Fat Year End Kiss Off Comedy Show XX with

Will Durst + Johnny Steele + Debi Durst + Michael Bossier + Mari Magaloni + Arthur Gaus comedy | 7:00 pm door | $20 | 21+

12/31

Wonderbread 5

dance covers | 9:00 pm door | $50 | 21+

707.545.5876 - LASTDAYSALOON.COM

Posada Mexicana Presented by Ballet FolklĂłrico Costa de Oro, featuring 30 dancers and 10 mariachis. Dec 9, 2:30pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372. Blending a festive mix of Western classics, traditional Christmas music and original yuletide carols. Dec 6, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues Arlene Francis Theater

folk rock | 7:00 pm door | $10 donation | 21+

rock | 8:00 pm door | $10 donation | 21+

One of the most prominent and influential figures in late 20thCentury blues and roots music. Chris & Lorin Rowan open. Dec 8, 8pm. $37-$47. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

SONOMA COUNTY

12/8 Holiday Blues Beats & Vibes feat.

Sun, Dec 9 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Dec 10 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Dec 11 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Taj Mahal

Riders in the Sky

Steve Earle Fri January 18

vocal ensemblesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; multimedia show â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Is Calmâ&#x20AC;? recalls the World War I truce on Christmas Day, 1914. Dec 7, 8pm. $45-$50. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Dec 6, the New Trust & Not to Reason Why. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Dec 6, the Outpost, Zion Lion Band. Dec 7, Happy Hour with Plectrum Duo. Dec 8, Dead Prez. Dec 9, the Moonbeams. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Gallery 300 Dec 7, Eclectic Acoustic with Mark Growden & Steve Pile. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212.

Glaser Center Dec 7-9, Amahl and the Night Visitors, Chichester Psalms, Pergolesi Magnificat. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Hopmonk Tavern Dec 6, Knight Riderz. Dec 7, Shotgun Wedding Quintet. Dec 8, Afrofunk Experience. Dec 8, Free Peoples. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Vintage Grease J. D. McPherson shakes, rattles and rolls â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is my old technology teacher!!!!! Go Mr. McPherson!!!!!â&#x20AC;? So says the highest-voted commenter on the YouTube clip for J. D. McPhersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;North Side Gal.â&#x20AC;? But if McPherson has any background in technology, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show. The Oklahoma nativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new album, Signs and Signifiers, is a vintage time capsule of 1950s roots rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll, which he himself calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;an art project disguised as an R&B record.â&#x20AC;? Omnidirectional microphones, reel-toreel tape and vacuum-tube amps are hot on the retro recording-scene now, and Signs and Signifiers would be just another postBlasters blip were it not for the gripping harrow in McPhersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voice. Whatever he did as a teacher, it worked, because his vocal cords drip with belief, clamor and trajectory. Fans of Eddie Cochran, Little Richard and Professor Longhair take note: J. D. McPherson plays for the low admission price of two cans of food on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at the Mystic Theatre. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8:30pm. Free; bring two cans of food. 707.765.2121.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Lagunitas Tap Room

Main Street Station

Dec 5, Dustin Saylor. Dec 7, Royal Deuces. Dec 8, Jinx Jones. Dec 9, David Thom Band. Dec 9, Eric Cornforth & the Hicktown Homeboys. Dec 12, Cascada. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Dec 7, Brulee. Dec 8, Vernelle Anders. Dec 12, Phat Chance. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Main Stage West Dec 7, Prisma Trova. Dec 8, Dave Macnab, John Shifflet & Jason Lewis. 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Mavericks Dec 7, Chris Gardner Band & McKenna Faith. Dec 9, Paulieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garage. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Dec 6, Elaine Dempsey. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Quincy’s Dec 7, RBL Posse. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe Dec 8, Redwood Tango Trio. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Dec 9, Mr December. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Sebastopol Community Center Dec 7, Real Music Vol 2 Release Party. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Sonoma Valley Veterans Memorial Building Dec 8-9, Sonoma Valley Chorale presents: Joylicious. 126 First St W, Sonoma.

Spancky’s Dec 7, Black Zeppelin. Dec 8, Self-Proclaimed Heroes. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Wells Fargo Center

Panama Hotel Restaurant Dec 5, Passion Habenero Trio. Dec 6, Machiavelvets with Craig Herzog. Dec 11, James Moseley Quartet . Dec 12, Joan Getz Quartet . 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Rancho Nicasio Dec 7, Doug Adamz & Bravo. Dec 8, Stompy Jones. Dec 9, Dr. Elmo & the Reindeer Band. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Townes Earle. Dec 7, Keystone Revisited. Dec 8, the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Dec 9, Melody Walker & Jacob Groopman. Dec 11, the Mill Valley Music Band. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Dec 6-9, The Q with Phil Lesh & Friends. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Dec 9, the Human Revolution. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Opera House

Dec 6, Jerry Moore & the Encore Jazz Quartet. Dec 7, Taluna. Dec 8, Gini Wilson. Dec 9, Pa’l Baillador.

Dec 6, Riders in the Sky: Christmas the Cowboy Way. Dec 7, Cantus. Dec 8, Garage Band 101. Dec 9, Posada Mexicana. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Station House Cafe

Silo’s

Sausalito Seahorse

Dec 9, Grandpa Banana. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Dec 8, George Cole & E uorcana with Amy Hogan. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Dec 5, Jill Sobule. Dec 6, Justin

35 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dec 6, Dick Dale. Dec 11, JD McPherson, Emily Bonn & the Vivants. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Dec 5, RobbieG. Dec 6, Kellie’s Lounge. Dec 7, Deborah Winters. Dec 10, Herb Ohta Jr. & Keoki Kahumoku. Dec 12, Tim Hockenberry. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Dec 7, Sons of Champlin. Dec 8, Taj Mahal. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Dec 5, John Prine, Justin Townes Earle. Dec 6, Chris-Mix. Dec 7, Posada Navideña. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

San Francisco’s City Guide

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre

Bloc Party

Dec 5, Gonzalo Bergara Quartet. Dec 6, Bob Weir, Jackie Greene & Friends. Dec 7, Raise the Youth Holiday Celebration. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

After Kele Okereke’s stab at a solo career, the band is back in full force. Dec 6 at the Fox Theater.

Dance Palace Dec 8, Craicmore Celtic Yuletide Celebration. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

George’s Nightclub Dec 8, Kathi Mcdonald Memorial. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Marin Center Dec 7-8, Mayflower Chorus: Winter Tales. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

19 Broadway Club Dec 6, Dynamo Jones Band. Dec 8, Don Carlos. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Polyphonic Spree Zany rock ‘n’ roll choir performs the inevitable holiday show with new album, “Holidaydream.” Dec 8 at Slim’s.

Psycotic Pineapple Cult power-pop favorites with a penchant for misspelling play two vintage sets. Dec 9 at the Bottom of the Hill.

John Cale Founding member of Velvet Underground and iconoclastic composer, with Cass McCombs. Dec 9 at Regency Ballroom.

Future Atlanta rapper with this year’s excellent “Pluto” transforms crushes into fractured, buzzing tracks. Dec 9 at Mezzanine.

Choose Best! the

Empire College School of Law has prepared more than 800 graduates for successful careers in law. Alumni comprise approximately 25% of the Sonoma County Bar and include 9 members of the judiciary in Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lassen and Merced Counties. L Outstanding Bar Exam pass rate L 4-year evening Juris Doctor Degree program Register now for January! www.empcol.edu

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

3035 Cleveland Ave.

707-546-4000 Santa Rosa

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

36

Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Dec 6 At 6pm. Book Passage, “Tom Killion Woodcut Prints,” Marin County artist. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. At 6pm. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, “In Our Family: Portraits of All Kinds of Families,” by photographer Gigi Kaeser. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. At 7pm. Osher Marin JCC, “Traces of Memory,” a contemporary look at the Jewish past in Poland, photography by Chris Schwarz. RSVP required. 415.444.8080. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Dec 7 At 6pm. Epicurean Connection, “Kristin and Shotsie Gorman,” abstract art. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Dec 8 At 5pm. Marin MOCA, “Actuality, Reminiscence and Fabrication,” new photography by Deborah Sullivan. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

SONOMA COUNTY Art Changes Life Through Dec 31, “Deep Listening, Songs from the Earth,” mixed-media paintings by Richard K Bacon; also, paintings by Kristin Gustavson, photographs by Ananda Fierro, encaustic by Caterina Martinico and prints by Linda Shelp. 954 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

work by guild members. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation” features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued from Schulz’s 1966 studio fire. Dec 1, Charles Solomon and Lee Mendelson talk about new book “The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation.”. Through Apr 1, “Peanuts Celebrations” highlights 70 original strips which celebrate the major holidays throughout the year and features the history of the Peanuts-themed balloons in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Epicurean Connection Dec 7, “Kristin and Shotsie Gorman,” abstract art. Reception, Dec 7, 6pm. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Finley Community Center Through Dec 20, “Altered Group Exhibit” features local artists creating alternative and abstract art. Featuring work from Ricky Watts, Sean Nichols, Adam Springer, Saif Azzuz, Roman D’Argenzio and others. Through Dec 20, The work of ceramic artist Kathy Pallie. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Dec 24, “Forward” features the work of 13 contemporary conceptual artists, including Chris Beards, Seymour Bergman and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum Through Jan 6, “Magical Toyland,” nostalgic fun for anyone born from 1860 to 1960 featuring toys, games and dollhouses. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Neon Raspberry Art House

Through Dec 31, “December Invitational,” including new

Through Dec 31, 6pm, “Blind Passenger” fall 2012 show

features Nicole Markoff’s project and new oil paintings from Colorado-based painter Erin Donnelly. Free. 3605 Main St, Occidental. 707 874 2100.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Dec 23, “Members’ Annual Exhibition,” featuring Petaluma artist David Moore. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Museum Through Dec 16, Exhibit tells the story of local vets who served in the Korean War through artifacts and video presentations. $3-$5. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Dec 31, “Sea, Land, City” features the miniature work of 12 artists. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Dec 31, “Last Hurrah” is the final exhibition at the Quicksilver Mine Co. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Dec 23, “Seen, Heard,” photographs by Nick Smith and recordings by Donna Tauscher. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jan 6, “California Photo Adventures,” photographs by Lance Kuehne. Through Jan 6, “Wildlife as Art,” photographs by Jim Coda. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Santa Rosa Junior College Through Dec 13, “Roberto Chavez Mini Blockbuster” features 50 pieces by Getty and Smithsonian-honored artist in the Robert F Agrella Gallery. 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 1.800.564.SRJC.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 13, “The California Landscape,” exhibition of landscape paintings from museum’s collections. Through Jan 13, “Peace at Sunset,”

FELIZ Compañía Mazatlán Bellas Artes de Sacramento presents ‘Posada Navideña’ on Dec. 7 at the Wells Fargo Center. See Events, p37.

painting from 19th-century artist Thomas Cole, on loan from the De Young Museum in San Francisco. Through Jan 13, “Wild Land: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Landscape Painting” uses a combination of graphics, immersive environments and images on a journey through Cole’s creative process. Curator’s tour Dec 7, 11am. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 30, “The Art of Handmade Paper” offers glimpse into historical practice of papermaking with large display of rare Japanese papers. Through Dec 30, “Coastal Echoes” features the new works of respected painter Larry Thomas. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio 428 Dec 8-9, 11am-5pm, Moore Lane Open Studios features six studios on the 400 block of Moore Lane opening their doors with art, music and wine. Free. 428 Moore Ln, Healdsburg. 707.433.6842.

from various artists, plus “performing” sculpture by Mineko Grimmer. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Dec 30, “Slapstick,” vintage Hollywood cinema photography from the collection of Robert Flynn Johnson. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jan 1, “Winter Group Show,” new work by gallery artists Alberto Ludwig, Braulio Delgado, James Leonard and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Marin MOCA Dec 8-Jan 12, “Actuality, Reminiscence and Fabrication,” new photography by Deborah Sullivan. Reception, Dec 8, 5pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

University Art Gallery

Marin Society of Artists

Through Dec 9, “Under Water” features photography, painting, prints and ceramics

Through Dec 16, “Winter Holidays and Gifts” features ceramics, sculptures, paintings,

photography, prints, jewelry and wearable art. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Osher Marin JCC Ongoing, “Traces of Memory,” a contemporary look at the Jewish past in Poland, photography by Chris Schwarz and text by Jonathon Webber. Reception, Dec 6, 7pm, RSVP required. 415.444.8080. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Salami Factory Dec 8-9, “Holiday Open Studio,” possibly the Salami Factory’s last open studio ever. Featuring work by Katy Bernheim, Valerie Hersey and others. 1599 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.457.5150.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Dec 30, “Everyday Saints,” carved wooden figures by Joe Brubaker. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Jan 27, “Renaissance on Fillmore” examines San Francisco’s upper Fillmore district through 1955-’65 with the work of 17 artists who

ECHO Gallery Through Dec 16, “Picture Show” showcases emerging and established photographers. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery Through Jan 18, “Atatürk” series, Gordon Huether’s latest work, on display with a selection of Turkish rugs. 1465 First Street, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Dec 31, “Out of the Woods,” Wood Sculpture for Home and Garden by Freeland Tanner. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Comedy James P Connolly Host of VH1’s Movie Obsessions has appeared on Comedy Central and HBO. Dec 11, 7:30pm. $15. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Santa Rosa Comedy Nights Comedy open mic hosted by MC Ricky Del Rosario. First Thurs of every month. Free. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and upand-comers Tues at 8. $15$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Artisan Boutique Unique holiday goods for purchase. Dec 8-9, 10am-5pm. Free. Pleasant Hill Christian School, 1782 Pleasant Hill Rd, Sebastopol.

Benefit for Napa Food Bank & Toys for Tots Silent auction, raffle prizes, food truck and more. Bring an unopened toy or nonperishable food item. Dec 9, 2pm-12am. $3-$5. Billco’s

Billiards, 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Breakfast with Santa Complimentary photos, music and festive fun. Sat, 9-11am. through Dec 22. Free. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Christmas Tree Grove Snow flurries, 175 decorated trees and holiday music create a holly, jolly atmosphere. Through Dec 31. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Drawing Rally

Holiday Lights Exhibit & Sale “Holiday Lights Exhibit and Sale,” Becoming Independent’s two- and three-dimensional arts and crafts. Reception, Dec 8, 5pm. Dec 8-Feb 2. Gallery of Sea & Heaven, 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Festival of Lights

Indoor Antique Market

Goodies galore up for sale. Through Jan 6, 2013. Free. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

Hanukkah Hootenanny Latkes and libations rule the day in this benefit for the Children’s Health Initiative Napa County. Dec 9, noon. $50. Judd’s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.255.2332.

Help Pete the Cat Save Christmas Scavenger hunt for kids. Dec 8, 3:24pm. Free. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Holiday Crafts Fair Over 35 local and regional artists showcase their special crafts and holiday pieces. Dec 8-9, 10am. Free. Occidental Community Center, 3920 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Holiday Hat Brunch Hosted by movie maven Jan Wahl. Bring a coat to donate to the Ritter Center. Dec 9, 11am. $55. Nick’s Cove, 23240 Hwy 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

$129

Author Rich Gosse demonstrates how to find a friend this holiday season, followed by a dance party. Dec 8, 7:30pm. $10. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Holiday Wreaths for Charity

Handmade for the Holidays

The CASIO CTK-3200 starts with a Touch S Sensitive Keyboard with 61 Piano-Style keys • 400 total onboard Tones, 150 Rhythms and Digital Effects • Stepup Lesson System • audio inputs for a MP3 player p for MIDI • pitch wheel for expressive control 95 • USB port • Impressive features and tone at a very affordable price! fea

Holiday Singles Convention

ArtStart creates the context while the artists create the content of the drawings. Watch art created live, and then bid on it in a silent auction. Dec 7, 6pm. Free. ArtStart Art House, 716 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2345. The North Bay’s biggest Hanukkah celebration features a globally-minded exploration of traditions from around the world. Dec 9, 11:30am. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Play More, Pay Less!

Live music, wine and handmade wreaths on display in an authentic 13th centurystyle castle. Dec 8, 10am-4pm. Castello di Amorosa, 4045 N St Helena Hwy, Calistoga.

Over 70 booths of antiques and collectibles. Dec 8-9, 10am. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

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The TAYLOR BT-1 BABY is a 3/4size Dreadnought guitar with an X-braced solid spruce top matched hed to sapele laminate back and sides es • Ideal as a travel guitar, and great eat for young hands • Really full tone ne • Records beautifully! • Padded nylon Gig Bag is included • Ebony ny fingerboard with 19 frets • Diecast chrome tuners • Arrives with top-quality Elixir® strings installed. 00

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Santa Rosa: 515 Ross Street, Brickyard Center • (707) 542-5588 San Rafael: 1504 4th St, at ‘E’ • (415) 457-7600 OPEN EVERY DAY!

Light up a Life Dec 6, 6pm. North County Hospice, 205 East Street, Healdsburg. 707.431.1135. Dec 7, 7pm. Center Park, Petaluma Boulevard N and B Street, Petaluma. Tree lighting ceremony symbolizes the hopes and dreams of our community. Dec 8, 6pm. Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa. Dec 9, 6pm. Star of the Valley, 545 White Oak Dr, Santa Rosa.

Mill Valley Winterfest There’s a snow slide, arts and crafts, holiday singers, food, hot drinks, a holiday costume contest, and, of course, Santa. Dec 9, 11am-5pm. $3. Depot Plaza, Throckmorton and Miller, Mill Valley.

Posada Navideña Compañía Mazatlán Bellas Artes brings emotive dance in traditional holiday celebration.

Ringing in the Seasons Bring your family and join in the spirit of the season making holiday ornaments and decorating cookies. Dec 8, 2pm. Free. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Santa Kelley Photo-Op Made Local Marketplace cofounder Kelley Rajala dons a Santa suit and ) poses for pictures.

38

@ Santa Rosa High School ArtQuest Shadowing Program Through Dec 7 By Appointment Only: 707.535.4842 ArtQuest Information Night: Thursday, January 17 @ 6:30pm SRHS Multipurpose Room Priority Application Deadline: January 25, 2013 Final Application Deadline: February 15, 2013 1235 Mendocino Ave. www.artquestonline/org 707.535.4842 artquest@srcs.k12.ca.us

37 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

38

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( 37

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Thurs, 3-6pm and Sun, 1-4pm. through Dec 23. Free. The Share Exchange, 531 5th st., Santa Rosa, (707) 331-6850.

Sebastopol Holiday Home Tour Tour of historic Sebastopol homes. Dec 8, 10am. $10$25. Pleasant Hill Christian School, 1782 Pleasant Hill Rd, Sebastopol.

Senior Ballroom Dance Featuring music by Larry Broderick Trio on Dec 7, Steve Balich Band (Holiday Formal Dance) on Dec 12, Steve Luther DJ on Dec 19. Fri, Dec 7, 1pm and Wed, Dec 12, 1pm. $7. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

The Snow Maiden Dance performance presented by Sonoma Ballet. Dec 8-9, 1pm. $12-$22. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Sustainable Fairfax Craft Fair Find unique and creative gifts for friends and family while supporting local artists. Dec 8, 11am. Free. Fairfax Pavilion, Elsie Lane, Fairfax.

West Coast Live Sedge Thomson’s smart mix of music, stories, interviews and humor with guests Peter Gallagher and Mike Greensill. Dec 8, 10am. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Film Community Cinema Oct 9 at 7pm, “As Goes Janesville” by Brad Lichtenstein. Second Tues of every month. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, S ebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Don Quixote Ludwig Minkus’ ballet recorded live from the Amsterdam Music Theatre with the Dutch National Ballet. Dec 8, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Evictions in the Polochic Valley Screening includes talk on genocide against high-ranking government and military

Arts Veterans Sebastopol hotspot expands with a bang Sebastopol’s Center for the Arts is that hidden building on that lonely dead-end street, but it’s behind some of West County’s most exciting events. Tucked away behind Goodwill, the SCA has hosted the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival, the WordTemple poetry series, Art at the Source, Sebastopol’s Summer Music Series and 18 gallery exhibitions, which, its website points out, have displayed 825 works from 550 artists. On Dec. 7, the center celebrates a grand opening in its much more visible new location, the Sebastopol Veterans Building. Executive director Linda Galletta says the new, 17,800-square-foot space will allow the center to expand its performing arts program and children’s programs, with Ives Park and pool next door. She also points out that the much-lauded Documentary Film Festival will be able to show two films at the center, as opposed to one in recent years, while also partnering with the Rialto. This week’s grand opening features a first glimpse at the new Members Show, as well as ceramic, painting and drawing demonstrations, paired with wine, hors d’oeuvres and a live show by local Latin jazz group Batacha. A silent auction will also be held, to help in the arts center’s ongoing effort to raise $800,000 toward refurbishing the new space. Be there for the first sneak peek on Friday, Dec. 7, at 282 S. High St., Sebastopol. 6–9pm. $20–$25. 707.829.4797. —Rachel Dovey

officials of the 1980s war in Guatamala. Dec 7, 7:30pm. $5$10. Redwoods Presbyterian Church, 110 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Lectures The Art of Tracking

Learn to see patterns )

40

Winter Master Dance Class Series

žŝ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 5-11, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Congolese ~

Sunday, Dec 16th 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm

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Locally made gifts, art, food, music & more!

Sunday, Dec 9 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm at the Arlene Francis Center 99 Sixth Street, Santa Rosa

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at the Arlene Francis Center 99 Sixth Street, Santa Rosa

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Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden on a landscape. with Meghan Walla-Murphy. Dec 8, 3pm. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Mastering Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Writing Workshop with Andrea Alban. Dec 9, 5pm. $30. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

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Dec 10, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call of the Wildâ&#x20AC;? with the Redwood Writers. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.544.2491.

Petaluma Library Dec 8, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Queen of Speed: The Racy Life of Mary Petre Bruceâ&#x20AC;? with Nancy R Wilson. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Theater

Master Gardener series Presented by Denny Pedersen. Dec 8, 10:30am. Free. Guerneville Regional Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd.,, Guerneville. 707-869-9004.

Beauty & the Beast

Dec 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rare Earth Elements and Nanocomposite Magnetsâ&#x20AC;? with Karen Frindell-Teuscher. Wed, Dec 12, 6pm. $10. Ions, 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. Dec 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earth: Geological Past and Futureâ&#x20AC;? with Richard Ely; Dec 20, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sacred Marketâ&#x20AC;? with Daniel Osmer and Robert Porter. Thurs, Dec 6, 6:30pm and Wed, Dec 12, 6:30pm. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Readings

Classic story about beautiful maiden Belle and the fierce Beast who holds her captive in his enchanted castle. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm and Sat-Sun, 1:30pm. through Dec 8. $10-$18. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

A Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas in Wales Rebound players present a performance of Dylan Thomasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; holiday play. Dec 6, 7:30pm. $3-$5. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

A Christmas Carol Musical version hews close to the original story. Times vary. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, Dec 9, 3pm. through Dec 15. $12-$20. St Vincentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

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Dec 5, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Royal Cities of the Ancient Mayaâ&#x20AC;? with Barry Brukoff. Dec 6, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Shame and Loveâ&#x20AC;? with Peter Orner. Dec 7, 12pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bouchon Bakeryâ&#x20AC;? with Thomas Keller. Dec 7, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life & Turbulent Times of Joseph P Kennedyâ&#x20AC;? with David Nasaw. Dec 8, 11am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Moment in Timeâ&#x20AC;? with Charlotte Cheng. Dec 8, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yokohama Gaijin: Memoir of a Foreigner Born in Japanâ&#x20AC;? with George Lavrov. Dec 8, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sunset Essential Western Cookbook: Fresh, Flavorful Recipes for Everyday Cookingâ&#x20AC;? with Margo True. Dec 8, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Married at Fourteenâ&#x20AC;? with Lucille Lang Day. Dec 12, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every Day is an Atheist Holidayâ&#x20AC;? with Penn Jillette. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Interactive, read-along version of Charles Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Christmas Carol.â&#x20AC;? Sun, 2pm and Thurs, 7:30pm. through Dec 13. $12-$16. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Fairfax Library Dec 11, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;California Native Gardening: A Month By Month Guideâ&#x20AC;? with Helen Popper.

begin with, but what happens to Scroogeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mean, sour, pruny old business partner after that? Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Dec 23. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Lil & Dash Staged reading of new play by Lynne Kaufman. Dec 12, 7:30pm. $10-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Wonderful Life Musical play based on the classic movie. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Dec 23. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

A rag-tag bunch of Medieval archers defeats the United States in a battle for the Alpine Duchy of Grand Fenwick. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Dec 16. $10-$20. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Nutcracker Marin Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary performance of the holiday classic. Dec 8, 1 and 7pm and Dec 9, 1 and 5pm. $25-$40. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

The Ratcatcher Part town hall meeting, part cabaret, this is an original adaptation of the Pied Piper legend. Music by the Crux. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 5pm. through Dec 16. $15-$18. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

The Santaland Diaries David Yen reprises his role in the David Sedaris story of working as an elf in Macyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Santaland. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Dec 15. $20-$24. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

You Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Take It with You Ross Valley Players presents story about encounter between conservative family and lunatic household. Various times. Through Dec 16. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Wonderful Life Live Radio Play Adapted from the 1946 holiday film, this version premiered in 1996 and has been produced around the country. Directed by Jon Tracy. Times vary. Tues-Thurs-Sun through Dec 16. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Jacob Marleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Carol Jacob Marley was dead, to

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of December 5

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Spencer Silver was a co-inventor of Post-It notes, those small, colorful pieces of paper you can temporarily attach to things and then remove to use again and again. Speaking about the process he went through to develop this simple marvel, he said, “If I had thought about it, I wouldn’t have done the experiment. The literature was full of examples that said you can’t do this.” I’d like to make him your patron saint for the next few weeks, Aries. Like him, you now have the chance to make practical breakthroughs that may have seemed impossible, or at least unlikely. Ignore conventional wisdom—including your own. Trust your mischievous intuition. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) The axolotl is a kind of salamander that has an extraordinary capacity for regenerating itself. If it loses a leg in an accident, it will grow a new one in its place. It can even fix its damaged organs, including eyes, heart and brain. And get this: there’s never any scar tissue left behind when its work is done. Its power to heal itself is pretty much perfect. I nominate the axolotl to be your power animal in the coming weeks, Taurus. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you now have an extraordinary ability to restore any part of your soul that got hurt or stolen or lost.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) In the coming months, I hope that you will get sweet revenge. In fact, I predict that you will get sweet revenge. Keep in mind that I’m not talking about angry, roaring vindication. I don’t mean you will destroy the reputations of your adversaries or reduce them to humiliating poverty or laugh at them as they grovel for mercy while lying in a muddy gutter. No, Gemini. The kind of revenge I foresee is that you will achieve a ringing triumph by mastering a challenge they all believed would defeat you. And your ascent to victory starts now.

according to my interpretation of the astrological omens, you would benefit from the shock of literally hearing how your mind works. Even more importantly: the cheerleading you do, the encouragement you deliver and the motivational speeches you give would have an unusually powerful impact if they were audibly articulated.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In the fairy tale “Beauty and the Beast,” a grotesque humanlike creature hosts the heroine in his home, treating her like a queen. She accepts his hospitality but rejects his constant requests to marry him. Eventually, he collapses from heartache. Moved by the depth of his suffering, she breaks into tears and confesses her deep affection for him. This shatters the spell and magically transforms the Beast back into the handsome prince he originally was. Your life may have parallels to this story in the coming months, Scorpio. You might be tested. Can you discern the truth about a valuable resource that doesn’t look very sexy? Will you be able to see beauty embedded in a rough or shabby form?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) If you thoroughly shuffle a deck of cards, the novel arrangement you create is probably unique in all of human history; its specific order has never before occurred. I suspect the same principle applies to our lives. Each new day brings a singular set of circumstances that neither you nor anyone else in the last 10,000 years has ever had the pleasure of being challenged and intrigued by. There is always some fresh opportunity, however small, that is being offered you for the first time. I think it’s important for you to keep this perspective in mind during the coming week. Be alert for what you have never seen or experienced before.

CANCER (June 21–July 22)

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) I wish I could do more than just fantasize about helping you achieve greater freedom. In my dreams, I am obliterating delusions that keep you moored to false idols. I am setting fire to the unnecessary burdens you lug around. And I am tearing you away from the galling compromises you made once upon a time in order to please people who don’t deserve to have so much power over you. But it’s actually a good thing I can’t just wave a magic wand to make all this happen. Here’s a much better solution: You will clarify your analysis of the binds you’re in, supercharge your willpower and liberate yourself.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “Drama is life with all the boring parts cut out of it,” said Leo filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. By that criterion, I’m guessing that your experience in the coming week will have a high concentration of magic and stimulation. You should be free from having to slog through stale details and prosaic storylines. Your word of power will be succulence. For best results, I suggest you take active control of the unfolding adventures. Be the director and lead actor in your drama, not a passive participant who merely reacts to what the other actors are doing.

AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In his book Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Tom Robbins talks about a gourmet who “gave up everything, traveled thousands of miles and spent his last dime to get to the highest lamasery in the Himalayas to taste the dish he’d longed for his whole life, Tibetan peach pie. When he got there . . . the lamas said they were all out of peach. ‘Okay,’ said the gourmet, ‘make it apple.’” I suspect you’ll be having a comparable experience sometime soon, Aquarius. You may not get the exact treat you wanted, but what you’ll receive in its place is something that’s pretty damn good. I urge you to accept the gift as is!

I would love to speak with you about your hesitancy to fully confront your difficulties. But I will not speak forthrightly, since I’m pretty sure that would irritate you. It might even motivate you to procrastinate even further. So instead I will make a lame joke about how if you don’t stop avoiding the obvious, you will probably get bitten in the butt by a spider. I will try to subtly guilt-trip you into taking action by implying that I’ll be annoyed at you if you don’t. I will wax sarcastic and suggest that maybe just this once, ignorance is bliss. Hopefully that will nudge you into dealing straightforwardly with the unrest that’s burbling.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

One of my spiritual teachers once told me that a good spiritual teacher makes an effort not to seem too perfect. She said some teachers even cultivate odd quirks and harmless failings on purpose. Why? To get the best learning experience, students must be discouraged from over-idealizing the wise advisers they look up to. It’s crucial they understand that achieving utter purity is impossible and unrealistic. Being perceived as an infallible expert is dangerous for teachers, too; it makes them prone to egotistical grandiosity. I bring this up, Virgo, because it’s an excellent time to reduce the likelihood that you’ll be seduced by the illusion of perfection.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) This would be a good week to talk to yourself far more than you usually do. If you’re the type of person who never talks to yourself, this is a perfect time to start. And I do mean that you should speak the words out loud. Actually address yourself with passionate, humorous, ironic, sincere, insightful comments, as you would any person you care about. Why am I suggesting this? Because

PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“Having ‘a sense of self’ means possessing a set of stories about who we are,” according to William Kittredge in his book The Nature of Generosity. He says there are two basic types of stories: the first is “cautionary tales, which warn us” and therefore protect us; the second consists of “celebratory” tales, which we use to heal and calm ourselves. I believe that you Pisceans are now in a phase when you primarily need celebratory stories. It’s time to define yourself with accounts of what you love and value and regard as precious.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Pampering Foot Treatment $25 Women love Jessie Jing`s Pampered Feet Center. 1 hr. only $25. 707.526.1788 jessiejingsmassage.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your pleasure, my business.â&#x20AC;? Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy.

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

Men, women, couples. TLC, massage, Tantra, nurturing mutual touch. William 707.548.2187

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We always seem to have something to do and there never seems to be enough time to relax, unwind and regroup. Using simple meditation techniques, you can introduce some inner space and peace in your life that will help you be more focused and efficient. Mahakaruna Buddhist Center 304 Petaluma Blvd. North, Petaluma 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1pm $25 course fee All are welcome. No prior experience necessary. 707.766.7720 www.meditateincal.org

Meditations of Compassion Wednesdays, 7:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:15 pm, $10.00 Sundays, Prayers for World Peace, 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:45am, Free Saturday, 11:30-12:00, $5.00 Compassion Kadampa Buddhist Center, 436 Larkfield Center (south side near Vet), 707.477.2264, www.meditateinsantarosa.com. Everyone welcome.

Mitch, CMT. Mature. Professional. Relaxing intuitive touch. Private discreet studio. 707.849.7409

Unity of Santa Rosa An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30am 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel:707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

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Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

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