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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur Taylor, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

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the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Kara Brown.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Union City Blue

A tearful wake for Twinkies from a freshly laid-off Hostess employee BY DAVE DULBERG

T

he irony of mockingly sad goodbyes to an unhealthy, fatuous food is not lost on me. But there is no irony to the nearly 18,500 jobs lost— most of them middle-class, union positions—perhaps because one of them was mine. After 25 years of waking before 3am, this Saturday I awoke at my usual time but without a truck to load and deliver. I tried to go back to sleep, but no luck. Like so many Americans, I’m suddenly unemployed, faced with the challenge of where to go from here.

One change: living in west Sonoma County, I will no longer have to deal with the responses to the way I earned my living, which ranged from reticent disapproval to laughter to outright hostility. Only being a drug pusher could have earned me more disdain. Yet often, privately, people admitted their nostalgic, guilty pleasure, a confession to a knowing priest, and I absolved and even indulged their transgressions. Clandestine vanilla Zingers, powdered Donettes, chocolate pies and Texas Toast handed over in hushed reverence. Another irony is that for such a nonsubtle food source, our dissolution was amazingly complex. Numerous corporate buyouts over the course of my tenure, two chapter 11 bankruptcies in eight years, a takeover by vulture capitalists, the cooperation of all unions in accepting harsh cuts except the bakers, who didn’t seem to understand the court-negotiated contract was inflexible. Striking meant liquidation, and they struck anyway. While I was driving home without a job, a baker picketing Oakland’s closed-for-good plant late Friday said, stunned, “I guess they’re playing hardball.” More complexity for those gleeful that Hostess went under: Americans have not had their last Twinkie or slice of Wonder Bread. The labels and recipes will be sold in liquidation; they are still popular across America. What are not popular are unionized workers making a middle-class living. But they play hardball, even with Ho Hos, and they struck us out in the bottom of the ninth. Dave Dulberg lives and writes in Sebastopol. He drove a Wonder bread truck for nearly 25 years. | Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Cover Kudos

Just a quick note to tell you how impressed I was with the Oct. 31 cover. A big thank you to Adam Rosenlund and Kara Brown for imagination and creativity. Thank you also to the Bohemian folks for all you do and say.

GLORIA C. BAGNANI Cloverdale

Feast Without Fear With his recent reelection, President Obama has won the power to pardon more turkeys on Thanksgiving. But each of us can do that, by choosing a nonviolent Thanksgiving observance that gives thanks for our good fortune, health and happiness with a life-affirming, cruelty-free feast of vegetables, fruits and grains. And here are more terrific reasons: • You will stay alert through the entire football game. • You are what you eat. Who wants to be a “butterball”? • Your vegetarian kid won’t have to boycott the family dinner. • You won’t have to call Poultry Hotline to keep your family alive. • Fruits and vegetables don’t have to carry government warning labels. • You won’t sweat the environment and food resources devastation guilt trip. • You won’t spend a sleepless night wondering how the turkey lived and died. • Your body will welcome a holiday from saturated fat, cholesterol and hormones. Our own dinner this Thanksgiving will feature Tofurky, lentil roast, mashed potatoes, corn stuffing, stuffed squash, candied yams, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. An internet search on “vegetarian Thanksgiving” got us more recipes and other useful information than we could possibly use.

STEVE ALDERSON Santa Rosa

Everything Is Up for Sale

If you really want to talk about being dependent on government, talk about $16 trillion in covert bailouts for Wall Street, and not one of those involved in predatory lending, market manipulation or insider trading has gone to jail. The government protects them. Jamal gets caught with a crack bag; he’s going to jail. But Mr. McGillicuddy gets caught on Wall Street; he’s protected by the government. Neither administration— Bush, Obama—has pursued any investigations or prosecutions. So the folks who are really dependent, they get interest-free loans from the Federal Reserve. Wouldn’t it be nice if students could get interest-free loans? We’re living in a society where everybody is up for sale. Everything is up for sale. They have sold their souls for a mess of Obama pottage. Is he going to put himself on the line for poor people? Is he going have an honest conversation about drones? To assassinate American citizens based on executive power?

TED RUDOW Palo Alto

Getting Past the Fiscal Cliff I attended a special meeting at the White House on Nov. 14, 2012, to address the next four years and getting past the immediate hurdle of the federal “fiscal cliff.” The next six weeks will be critical in the effort to raise public opinion regarding the need to repeal the Bush tax cuts for the very rich and to extend tax reductions for the middle class. What is at stake is the stability of the economy, public safety, health reform benefits to increase coverage to millions of Americans and a devastating $176 million reduction in Community Health Center funding which serves 1.5 million Americans. There should be no excuse for anyone in Congress to continue playing partisan games and refusing a balanced approach to prevent a total meltdown of

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our federal budget. For those in the game, this is “sequestrationâ€? or a set of automatic cuts—$54.6 billion in defense and $54.5 billion in nondefense spending over nine years. We get cornered into these unthinkable decisions when the Republicans refuse to raise taxes on the wealthy. Whether or not you believe all the spin of the presidential election, the facts are that the very rich in this country have become richer. In the midst of this recession, the top 1 percent had an 11.6 percent increase in income ($118, 214 increase per person). The bottom 99 percent received an $80 increase in pay per person in 2010. Let us now call upon Congress to acknowledge the will of the people and work cooperatively with the president to reduce the deďŹ cit in a balanced manner.

SHIRLEY HIROTO, CEO, ASIAN HEALTH SERVICES Oakland Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1 Secretary of the Interior

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SONOMA COUNTY

2012 JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

Nicky’s Family NOV 8, 1 & 7:30PM

Reuniting The Rubins NOV 15, 1 & 7:30PM

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2 Joe Montana stops by

NOV 29, 1 & 7:30PM

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Analy High to congratulate undefeated football team

DEC 4, 7:30PM

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SCREENINGS Rialto Cinema 6868 McKinley St. Sebastopol

John Ash, Steve Garner, Curtiss Kim axed from the airwaves; listeners in shock

5 Don’t say they haven’t

accomplished anything: Occupy’s ‘Rolling Jubilee’

Photo ŠJenny Jimenez

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SHOP LOCAL SALES EVENT! Kicks off BLACK FRIDAY, gallops through SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY, cruises through Sunday, and rushes the outer edge on CYBER MONDAY. Here’s what we have for you! Buy 2, Get 1 Free on publisher overstocks! Yes, the publishers print too many! Who benefits? You! Add the Buy 2, Get 1 Free deal to these already low prices on great books, and you’ll be checking off everyone on your list! Stack ‘em up! 20% off all games and puzzles (adults and kids). This includes great selections such as Klutz’s Marvelous Book of Magical Horses, Paper Flying Dragons, Star Wars Folded Flyers, and games such as Smart Ass and Liars Dice. Check it out! Double points for our Rewards Card Holders all weekend! Signed Edition Sale in our Montgomery Village store only and online at copperfieldsbooks.com — We’ve collected the new works of great authors all year and had them signed! We’re talking Kingsolver, Diaz, Boyle, Chabon, King and Moore. Now you can purchase these signed books for 20% off. How’s that for a special gift?

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PETALUMA: Starting November 23, Help Pete the Cat Save Christmas in Petaluma when our Petaluma store hosts another exciting scavenger hunt challenging you to find Pete in 40 local businesses. Prizes, fun, and food await for participants at the shindig on Sunday, December 9. Call or sign up at our Petaluma store! CALISTOGA: During the annual Calistoga Holiday Village Weekend, Nov. 30-Dec. 2, our store becomes a theater once again. On Saturday, Dec. 1 join us for a free showing of a family holiday classic movie at 5 pm. Popcorn and fun! Followed by the 17th Annual Calistoga Lighted Tractor Parade at 7 pm.

INTRODUCING THE INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE’S ANSWER TO THE KINDLE…THE KOBO! Come check out our new eReader devices this weekend! We have the Kobo Mini and the Kobo Glo, both designed to make your online reading easy and fun! AND, 2 DAYS ONLY! JUST $49 for Kobo Mini on Black Friday and Small Business Saturday! PLUS we now offer access to millions of downloadable books for your current device or for the Kobo! Start browsing at copperfieldbooks.com or through your new Kobo device!

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HEALDSBURG: Hotel Healdsburg and Copperfield’s Books invite you to join us for our annual Holiday Fireside Storybook reading for kids on Sunday, from 1:30 to 2:30 pm at the Hotel Healdsburg. Copperfield’s Books booksellers Danica, Hannah and Emily will be reading The Mitten, The Carpenter’s Gift and the The True Story of the Three Little Pigs. Hot cider and holiday cookies provided!

1. Check out our Holiday Picks lists featuring our recommended books for all ages from fiction to cookbooks to stocking stuffers. Available in all stores and online at www.copperfieldbooks.com

SEBASTOPOL: Buche de Noel: Holidays with French Songs performed by Claudine Kopper on December 4, 1:30-3:30 pm

2. Ask our book-loving booksellers who are amazing when it comes to finding just the right book

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE: Buche de Noel: Holidays with French Songs performed by Claudine Kopper, Sunday, Dec. 2, 1:30 -3:30 pm. Annual Holiday Stroll at the Village, Nov. 25 from 10 to 6, Get photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus!

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Paper

In response to this year’s rash of bicycleand pedestrianrelated accidents, the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition has taken matters into its own hands with the proposed Vulnerable User Protection Ordinance. The ordinance aims to reduce harrassment of cyclists and pedestrians while creating greater accountability for perpetrators. The coalition celebrated a victory when the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously on Nov. 13 to study the ordinance after Supervisor Shirlee Zane brought it to the agenda. This week, the Sebastopol City Council also considers the ordinance. Considering Sebastopol’s lack of usable bike lanes, it might be the perfect time to give more protections to cyclists in the area.

Members Only SPEAKING OUT At 78, Barbara Briggs-Letson traveled to the Middle East with a delegation opposed to U.S. drone policy.

An Unheard War

Sebastopol’s Barbara Briggs-Letson returns from Pakistan determined to spread the word about U.S. drone strikes BY LEILANI CLARK

T

he toddler has dark hair. Sitting on the ground, crying, her arm and leg are wrapped in thick bandages. The victim of a missile attack, the child has become a harrowing icon of U.S.-led drone strikes aimed at taking out combatants but which, according to

new reports, have killed hundreds of innocent people in the process. Barbara Briggs-Letson won’t forget the image anytime soon. This fall, the 78-year-old Sebastopol resident experienced the byproducts of drone warfare firsthand as part of a Code Pink delegation to Pakistan, a country that for the past eight years has been hit by U.S.-led drone strikes.

The trip left Briggs-Letson with a numbness that’s transformed into anger, and she returned with a conviction that the use of drones is “wrong on so many levels, both internationally and legally.” “I keep seeing the pictures of these children,” says the retired midwife on a recent afternoon at a Sebastopol coffee shop, wearing a bright pink scarf contrasting with her silvery white hair. “We

) 10

In 2009, the Bohemian covered the story behind the disenrollment of 30 Dry Creek Rancheria Band of Pomo members, including Liz Elgin DeRouen, a former Dry Creek tribal chairwoman. As election time comes back around, the issue has again come to the forefront, with the bloodline legitimacy of two candidates being called into question by tribal chairman Harvey Hopkins and others on the board. To acquire membership status, one must be able to prove that a blood ancestor lived at the Rancheria when it was established in 1915. One also cannot claim membership in any other tribe. For members, disenrollment results in the loss of about $650 a month in payments, much of that earned from River Rock Casino profits, in addition to medical, educational and housing benefits. The issue must be resolved internally, since tribal sovereignty keeps the Bureau of Indian Affairs out of the legal fray.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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had two meetings with survivors. These men had pictures of their loved ones, some of their children when they were alive, and some of them from when the children were dead. Each of these digniďŹ ed men told us in their own words about how my country blew their child to bits.â&#x20AC;? Cloaked in secrecy, the CIArun drone program is currently active in Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen. An eye-opening study released in September 2012 by the Stanford Law School and NYUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School of Law explains that the U.S. began using armed drones to conduct a â&#x20AC;&#x153;covert programâ&#x20AC;? of targeted killings in Pakistan in 2004. Though President Obama has argued that the strikes are executed with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;targeted, focused effort,â&#x20AC;? the study found that the strikes have adversely affected civilians living in federally administered tribal lands on the border of Afghanistan. Touted as a tool for making the United States safer through the assassination of terrorists, with minimal threat to Americans, the method leaves a cloudy trail of confusion and questionable deaths. Because the CIA refuses to release ďŹ gures, the most cited source of data to date comes from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. According to the U.K.-based nonproďŹ t organization, which calls the situation a â&#x20AC;&#x153;covert drone war,â&#x20AC;? drones killed between 474 and 881 Pakistani civilians from June 2004 to September 2012. Of those, 176 were children. The numbers are complicated by the fact that the Obama administration considers any male of militaryage killed in a strike zone to be a combatantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a confusing deďŹ nition in a country without a draft, and where some donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know their exact ages. On Oct. 25, United Nations special rapporteur Ben Emmerson announced that the U.N. had set up a special investigation unit speciďŹ cally to look into the legality of the drone

program and to examine claims of civilian deaths. Medea Benjamin, cofounder of Code Pink and author of Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control, says that entire populations live under terror of drones, which can hover over communities for 24 hours a day, striking without warning. During the recent delegation to Pakistan, she, along with Briggs-Letson and 33 other delegates, heard testimony about the depression, suicide, selfmedication and post-traumatic stress disorder thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become common in the hardest hit communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They said to us, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re waging a war on terror by terrorizing our population,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? adds Benjamin, on the phone from San Francisco. According to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Under Drones,â&#x20AC;? the report released by Stanford and NYU, the number of â&#x20AC;&#x153;high-levelâ&#x20AC;? targets killed makes up only 2 percent of total casualties. Like an advanced and very deadly video game, the drones are piloted from sites like Creech Air Force Base in Nevada, thousands of miles away from targets. According to the Stanford / NYU report, funerals have been bombed, as was a community meeting in which over 40 people were killed. Rescuers have been killed in â&#x20AC;&#x153;double-strikes,â&#x20AC;? when a second missile is sent in soon after the ďŹ rst deadly attack. These actions amount to war crimes, says Benjamin. Supporters of drones claim that this tactic keeps U.S. soldiers safe from harm, while eliminating al-Qaida militants. But Briggs-Letson wonders about the moral implications of this new style of warfare. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is it OK to sit in a dark room, thousands of miles away, to push a button and then go home to eat supper with your children?â&#x20AC;? she asks. In Pakistan, the deaths have left a deep desire for revenge, explains Briggs-Letson. She recounts the story of riding in a caravan to just outside of Waziristan, where the delegation was set to tour areas that had

been hit by drone strikes. BriggsLetson was prepared to speak and apologize to those who had lost family members, but after tribal leaders received credible threats from the Taliban that the Americans were going to be targeted with bombs, the trip was cancelled. Even within the safe conďŹ nes of the compound, the group heard chants of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go home! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a terrorist!â&#x20AC;? explains Briggs-Letson.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;They said to us, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re waging a war on terror by terrorizing our population.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The latest reports question the legal and international ramifications of drone policy, say critics. Considering that the United States isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t at war with Pakistan, what kind of precedent is being set when one country is allowed to kill citizens of another country without being held accountable for whether those citizens are innocents or combatants? Benjamin says that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to call on the U.S. government to end the secrecy and to function with transparency and accountability in the use of drones. This includes holding the Obama administration accountable for its support of the current cloak-anddagger approach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re setting this horrible example of going anywhere we want, killing anyone we want on the basis of secret information,â&#x20AC;? says Benjamin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somehow thinking this is not going to blow back, and that other countries are not going to do the same thing, is crazy.â&#x20AC;?

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Green Zone

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Thurs Nov 29, 5–9pm:

Merchant Open House & Tree Lighting

Enjoy refreshments, shopping, caroling along Main Street, JXekX:cXljg`Zkli\j›Ki\\C`^_k`e^:\i\dfepXk-1*'gd Fri Nov 30, 6–9pm:

Holiday Prince & Princess Dinner At Chef Patrick’s Restaurant Please RSVP at 707.869.9063 by Nov 26 Sat Dec 1, 7pm:

The 12th Annual Holiday Parade of Lights HOLIDAY PRINCE & PRINCESS CONTEST & RAFFLE Raffle tickets are available at sponsoring businesses $

300 CASH PRIZE! For dinner reservations, parade forms or more information, please call the Chamber office at 707.869.9000. Visit our website: www.russianriver.com

40 years training experience

Doggie Day Care 2nd Day FREE! (a $25 value)

Obedience training the natural way

$

100 off Boot Camp

10 acres of safe, country training grounds

3 Private Sessions for $240 (save $45) exp. 11/31/2012

Exceptional for Fear & Aggression issues Strong leadership skills taught

See Us for for owners Doggie Day Care

707-322-3272 www.incrediblecanine.com

Award Winning Dog Training ~ Dog Boarding Doggie Day Care 707.542.2066 2404 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa

www.olivetkennel.com

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Eco Green Certified

Dock in the Arbor Jim Robbins on embracing (and planting more) trees BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

love trees. So naturally, I’m a fan of the 1953 fable The Man Who Planted Trees by Jean Giono. In the story, a shepherd transforms a barren landscape by planting a gazillion acorns; years later, there are forests of lush paradise where humans thrive.

Now science writer Jim Robbins has just released a 2012 nonfiction book with the same name, The Man Who Planted Trees: Lost Groves, Champion Trees and an Urgent Plan to Save the Planet. I am right now buried in a second reading, amazed at how little I really know, how little anyone knows, about trees. Simply put, you must read this book. I suspect it took courage for Robbins to self-consciously cross the boundaries of science to get to the truth: what we don’t know about trees can hurt us. It already has. Science is only part of this

amazing story, but it’s a start. Global forest die-off, attributed to everything from sudden oak death to beetles, may be due to human-induced climate change, supporting proliferation of pathogens. From climate science to mysticism, Robbins’s quest is to find out everything there is to know about trees. Trouble is, very little is known about trees, but what is now being discovered is astounding. Robbins considers trees a form of eco-technology more effective than anything that humans can engineer. For removing toxins from water, for example, there is evidence that a stand of quickgrowing black willows is more effective than a multimilliondollar treatment plant. These trees take up even the nastiest heavy metals and purify water. The clumps of willows look nicer, too, and house wildlife while preventing erosion and turning carbon dioxide into oxygen as sidelines—all free services. Studies suggest that epidemic diseases, from AIDS to swine flu, are effects of deforestation; had the forest ecosystems been left intact, the infectious agents would not have escaped into human populations. Medicinal uses of plants have been around for thousands of years and are still being discovered. This makes the global deforestation going on right now even more tragic. The Champion Tree Project investigated in Robbins’s amazing book chronicles the efforts of layman David Milarch, compelled to preserve the genetics of the world’s largest and therefore most robust specimens of trees. So many old, massive individual trees have been lost that most of the trees with which we are familiar are genetic scrappers, possessing only some of the stout attributes found in the champs— including disease resistance and, well, majesty. The clarion call from the forests is hopeful, and we all can make a difference. Read the story, then plant trees.

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Come to Thrive!

Keep your home smoke-free…

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707.433.4068 707 .4 33.4068

Breathe Easy at Home

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Your pet will thank you! CELEBRATE SMOKE-FREE SONOMA COUNTY! On January 12, 2013, all residential multi-unit housing goes smoke-free. Learn more at www.sonoma-county.org/BreatheEasy County Ordinance No. 5947

.

WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! 21 Day Sugar Detox Each Wednesday 11/28 - 12/12 6:00 – 7:00pm Are you addicted to sugar? It is said that we can change habit in 21 days. Join Misty, our Healthy Eating Specialist, 85 lb. weight loss maintainer and former sugar addict, as she gives you the tools you need to rid yourself of this addictive, highly inflammatory substance that is wreaking havoc on your body systems.

Schedule your Private Store Tour with our Healthy Eating Specialist, Misty Humphrey Tours Available: t7BMVF5PVST t(MVUFO'SFF5PVST t4QFDJBM%JFUBSZ3FTUSJDUJPO5PVST

Kenny G’s Showcase CONSIGNMENT STORE

Black Friday Sale Most Xmas Items are 50% Off

Email misty.humphrey@wholefoods.com to schedule your tour.

Look for sale tags throughout the store. New & Quality Used Merchandise

Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

Specializing in home furnishings, home decor, garden, seasonal items, and collectibles. Something for everyone! 7950 Redwood Dr, Suite 15 & 16, Cotati

$PEEJOHUPXO.BMMt4BOUB3PTB

Store open daily 8am-9pm (707) 542-7411 calendar: wholefoods.com/coddingtown

707.792.2300 kennygsshowcase@yahoo.com Thur ~ Sat, 10–6 ~ Sun, 10–4

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NEW LARGER LOCATION

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MARKETPLACE @ is Now Open! Time to Order Your Holiday Gourmet Gifts… -ÜiiÌÃÊUÊ->ۜÀˆiÃÊUÊ-˜>VŽÃÊ -«iVˆ>ÌÞÊ“«œÀÌi`ÊÌi“Ã

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delicious d elicious - refreshing - alkalizing - naturally energizing energizing - boosts metabolism - promotes healthy digestion - replenishing - detoxifying

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deliciously refreshing kombucha

sustainably created, brewe brewed, ed, fermented and bottled in Son Sonoma oma County

his way SSanta’s anta’s oonn his way to Tomales Bay! Sunday Dec. 16

Visit by Santa Claus: 3–5pm Restaurant hours: 11am–9pm

Come Meet Santa at the Nick’s Cove Holiday Boat Shack Chat with Chat with and and ha have ve yyour our pphoto hoto ttaken aken w ith S anta with Santa Complimentary treats, Complimentary treats, ccider, ider, aand nd h ot cchocolate hocolate hot Special holiday Special holiday menu menu aand nd sseasonal easonal ccocktails ocktails aatt the the restaurant restaurant E njoy a 15% ddiscount iscount Enjoy oon n aany ny ffood ood and and bbeverage everage cchoices hoices tthroughout hroughout tthe he dayy when da when you you bring bring a ccanned anned ffood ood donation donation

707.536.1193

10% of the restaurant’s net proceeds from the day donated to Marin Food Bank

23240 2 3240 H HWY WY 1 1,, M Marshall arshall nickscove.com 415-663-1033 415-663-1033 nickscove.com

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Casa Mañana Mexican.

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bistro 29 Bistro. $$-$$$. Get an honestly prepared plate of excellence, reasonably priced, at this veritable palace of crepes. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sat. 620 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2929. Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Gypsy Cafe Diner. $-$$. Modern comfort food with a transcontinental, healthconscious twist: there’s everything here from vegan tofu and quinoa scramble to burgundy beef pot roast. The gluten-free pancakes are pure Sebastopol, while the Yucatan pulled-pork sandwich crosses borders. Breakfast and lunch, Wed–Mon. 162 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.861.3825. La Fondita Mexican. $. Hearty, filling, very tasty. No glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

LoCoco’s Cucina Rustica Italian. $$-$$$. Authentic rustic-style Italian with a touch of Northern California, and a favorite with those in the know. Get the cannoli! Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun. 117 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.2227.

McNear’s Alehouse. $. Sports bar: barbecue, big

$. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub appetizers, burgers. Lunch and dinner daily. 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Papa’s Taverna Greek. $$. Satisfying food in riverside setting. Sun afternoons, Greek dancing. Lunch and dinner daily. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545. Sizzling Tandoor

fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$. Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

Sizzling Tandoor II Indian. $-$$. Coastal gem offers a great view of the Sonoma Coast. Come for happy hour and stay through dinner. 9960 Hwy 1, Jenner. 707.865.0625.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, WedSun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

N A PA CO U N T Y Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Boonfly Cafe California

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$.

Brassica Mediterranean.

Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

$$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033. Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast,

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of

15

SMALL BITES

Spreading the Wealth If there was ever a good time to eat out, it’s Nov. 29. On that day, filling your belly will have the rare distinction of helping thousands of other people fill their own. This year, over 80 Sonoma County restaurants are participating in Dining Out for Life, an annual dine-and-donate style fundraiser to raise money for HIV and AIDS service organizations in North America. It really is as simple as it sounds: go out to eat, and the restaurant will donate a percentage of your bill to Food for Thought, the Sonoma County AIDS Food Bank. Last year, the event raised over $125,000 in Sonoma County alone. This year, Santa Rosa’s California Thai leads the charge by donating a whopping 75 percent of its food sales for the day. A handful are giving 50 percent of sales, including Forchetta Bastoni, JoJo Sushi, K&L Bistro, Sunshine Coffee Roasters, Trio and Corks at Russian River Vineyards. All others have committed to 25 percent contributions. Find a full list of the 84 restaurants participating at www. diningoutforlife.com/sonomacounty. —Nicolas Grizzle

a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch

and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

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Dining

MA R I N CO U N T Y

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

ANNUAL CRAB FEED SERIES

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5:00pm–9:00pm Includes:

Chilled Dungeness Crab Cocktail Sauce Drawn Butter Tides’ Mustard Sauce Clam Chowder Pasta ~ Green Salad French Bread Crab Feed Reservations 707.875.3652 $

OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS Special overnight Room Rates available at

The Inn at the Tides 800.541.7788

SONOMA CO U N TY Boisset Taste of Terroir Compare local Pinot with Burgundy from Burgundy in French wine magnate’s snazzy tasting salon. 320 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily 10:30am–5:30pm; till 9pm Thursday–Saturday. Fees vary, $12–$100. 707.473.9707.

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Chocolate gift baskets— order yours now! vegan options hostess/corporate gifts Hanukkah chocolates

lubed with spicy extra virgin from California’s first Tuscan olive trees; rare Sagrantino wine is in a different league. Jams, soaps and balm from the farm, too. 766 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 10am-5pm daily except Tuesday. Nominal fee $15. 707.431.8000.

Hauck Cellars Peach-tree state wine fans on a mission to be the “best Bordeaux house in Sonoma County” doing fine so far. Tin-roofed, 1948 Quonset hut off the plaza sports a long bar with plenty of elbow room. 223 Center St., Healdsburg. Friday–Tuesday, 11:30am–5pm; until 7pm, Friday–Saturday. $10 fee; one taste free. 707.473.9065.

Paradise Ridge Winery

4995

plus tax and gratuity

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

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FRIDAY DECEMBER 7, 2012 FRIDAY DECEMBER 21, 2012 FRIDAY JANUARY 11, 2013 FRIDAY JANUARY 18, 2013

Wineries

Voted Best Chocolatier in Sonoma County 6988 McKinley St, Sebastopol (next to Whole Foods) 707.829.1181 sonomachocolatiers.com

A gorgeous, provocative sculpture garden with annually changing exhibits set amid a pygmy forest. Stay for sunset Wednesday evenings April–October. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.528.9463. Paradise also offers its food-friendly wines at an accessible little shack in the heart of Sonoma Valley. Try structured clarets from the estate’s high-elevation Rockpile vineyards; do some time with “the Convict” Zinfandel. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 8860 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.282.9020.

Red Car Wine Co. Lay

The Tides Wharf 835 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.3652 www.InnattheTides.com

some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road,

Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Sonoma Enoteca Locals long-inured to local delights might also find themselves impressed with the wide and varied selection. 35 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open Wednesday– Monday, 10am–6pm; Tuesday, 10am–3pm. 707.935.1200. Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

N A PA CO U N TY Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-toend. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25. 707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809.

Saintsbury A contrarian enterprise in the 1970s, now a hallowed hall of Carneros Pinot Noir. Visitors may linger under shade trees in fair weather or sit down for a serious tasting adjacent the office. 1500 Los Carneros Ave., Napa. Monday– Saturday, by appointment. 707.252.0592. Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am–6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

Vincent Arroyo Winery Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines.2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

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WALT Wines

A meritocracy of Pinot BY JAMES KNIGHT

K

udus to WALT for charging a tasting fee that, if not minimal, is more or less the industry’s modest midpoint. No doubt, this helps to retain the odd ducks who stray up First Street off of the Sonoma Plaza, past the sign that reads “Pinot Noir” under “WALT,” only to profess that they aren’t so hot on the varietal. After sampling the product, one recent visitor exclaimed, “Wow, this is Pinot Noir?” Yes, toots, this is Pinot Noir. This is $40 to $60 Pinot, anyway, with upfront clarity of fruit (thanks to a state-of-the-art optical grape sorter which “learns” to spot bad grapes as the harvest rolls on, ejecting them with bursts of air) and culled from some of the finest grapes on offer from the Santa Rita Hills to the Willamette Valley, with the support of some serious bucks on the back end. The story so far: In 2010, Chardonnay and Pinot specialists Roessler Cellars sold their brand to Kathyrn and Craig Hall, the same that brought you Napa’s Cab-centered HALL Wines. Former United States ambassador to Austria Kathyrn Walt Hall’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walt, natch, are remembered in photographs inside this charming brick and half-timbered Sonoma cottage. The bar is compact, the atmosphere casual, the young fellows running the joint good-humoredly. Guys named Walt get special privileges—or so they tell one such vintage of felt-hatted gentleman, who proceeds to have an absolutely fine time with his party around a small table in the front room. Out back are picnic tables and a grill, which may be fired up whenever a friend of the tasting room saunters over with some tri-tip. Like I said, casual atmosphere. Does the 2010 “La Brisa” Sonoma County Pinot Noir ($40) throw a hint of orange pekoe tea, as tasting notes suggest? Yes. Also strawberry-raspberry compote. The 2010 “Blue Jay” Anderson Valley Pinot Noir ($40) seems wrapped in smoky bacon fat, and the fruit is cool cranberry. Oregonesque. From a sought-after vineyard on the lumpy western slopes of Sonoma Mountain, the 2010 Gap’s Crown Pinot Noir ($60) is brawnier and sweetly reminiscent of strawberry jam and olallieberry wine. Again with the cool-toned fruit, the changeable 2010 Hein Family Vineyard, Anderson Valley Pinot Noir ($60) deepens toward dried black cherry flavors with a splash of cola, spiced with white pepper, vanilla, cinnamon and spearmint. For the white wine crew, WALT offers the 2010 “La Brisa” Sonoma County Chardonnay ($35). It’s nice, but who will be the first to exclaim, “Wow, this is Chardonnay?” WALT Wines, 380 First St. W., Sonoma. Open daily, 11am–6pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.933.4440.

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e all know that there are some tough choices to be made. Where can we cut spending? How can we increase revenue? What sort of reconciliation can be made to avoid the dreaded fiscal cliff? More importantly, how are we going to be able to afford Call of Duty: Black Ops II when it’s the only thing that little Tyler’s been asking for all year? We know the decisions are hard around this time, and just as Obama and Boehner duke it out behind closed doors, so too the little angels and devils on our shoulders duke it out for holiday spending. But not to fear—we’ve got your back in our annual gift guide, this year tiered according to the level of responsibility to which one wishes to adhere. Feeling spendthrift and cautious for the future? Go with our under-$20 gift suggestions. Thinking like your financial planning’s gone well enough to fall in the middle? We’ve got your $20–$100 options right here. Care to say the hell with it, break the bank and be in debt? Luxuriate in the over-$100 category. We know it’s tough out there in D.C. with all that talk about marginal tax rates and Medicare spending, but, hey, we’ve got some decisions to make too. Here, then, is our quick ’n’ easy fiscal-cliff gift guide.

Balance the Budget Now:

I know, I know—buying a diaper as a present is neither glamorous nor fun. It’s hard to bypass the fig-sized shoes and even harder to gift-wrap a thing that has the sole purpose of catching watery poo. But take it from the parent of a four-month old: cloth diapers are expensive, and you really never can have too many. Of course, you should only gift reusable nappies if the mom or dad you know plans to use them instead of disposables. (Don’t—don’t—be the person gift-guilting already-stressed new parents into diapering their child the way you think they should diaper them.) But if they ask for and actually want the colorful cloth bum-sacks, even single diapers make great gifts. Bum Genius are one-size-fits-all covers and inserts, and usually sell for between $18 and $24 each. Diaper pants are both cute and handy and can be found in bundles at Oliver’s Markets for under $20. And a diaper service that actually picks up and washes your smelly rags, like Northern California–based Tidee Didee, is an excellent communal gift at between $16 and $30 a week.—R.D. Some people get through the holiday season by eating their way into oblivion. Others turn to that age-old remedy for social anxiety: a stiff shot of booze from a secret flask. For your friends and family that go for the latter, a gift allowing them to covertly drink booze with greater ease is just the ticket for the holidays and, even better, will provide a fantastic way to drown sorrow if we end up crashing down the dark side of the fiscal cliff in 2013. Binocktails, a company that specializes in this type of trickery, makes a five-ounce camera flask that looks almost like the real thing ($14.99). Not one for taking fake photos? How about a three-ounce cell phone flask ($12.99), the design of which is very 2005, but hey, it’ll still do the job! For those who like to sit in the peanut gallery at basketball games or the opera, there’s the binocular flask ($11.95), sold over at Xtreme Barware. Another way to drink in public without drawing attention is the use of Beer Can Covers ($9.99). Pick up one for your favorite skateboarders, so they can drink PBR at the park to their heart’s content, all the while holding a can disguised to look like an Orange Crush or a Coca-Cola. Of course, as the website warns, “With a close enough look, you can clearly see it is not a real soda.” But who’s gonna get that close? The smarty-pants in your life might prefer the hollow book safe and flask ($55) from Secret Safe books so they can get buzzed at the local public library. The one made by Secret Safe looks like a copy of The Godfather by Mario Puzo, but you can also get a Holy Bible version, if so inclined. Hey, water into wine, right?—L.C.

Sensible Bipartisan Compromises: Gifts from $20 to $100 The Boooooooooooccccchhhh! That’s what we all call kombucha around my house, harking back to the bizarre month when we tried oh-so-earnestly to make it atop our kitchen counter. Every morning, we’d pour our coffee and say hi to the beastly mother-cake-overgrownamoeba-thing; it would snarl back, churning itself into and out of the tea filling our large booch jar, unhappy at our presence and letting its smell permeate the kitchen because of it. Our experiment with the booch did not go so well, perhaps because we received instructions on how to use it from a person who was very stoned. But in the seven years since, kombucha has taken off in popularity, especially among the Portlandia set, so it’s no surprise that you can now buy a number of brew-your-own kombucha sets. Williams Sonoma offers the Kombucha Brooklyn Home Brew Kit ($70), which comes with everything you need to make some homemade kombucha: a variety of teas, sugar, a liquid starter, a big ol’ glass jar and a thermometer. Most importantly, it also comes with the slimy weird mother culture thing, which, if your experience making homemade booch fails like ours, you can always throw into the crowd at a punk show and watch what happens.—G.M. ) 20

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Gifts under $20

Gifting words broadcast over the airwaves or streamed over the internet may seem borderline metaphysical (and intentionally cheap), but for the radio enthusiast in your life, why not? Here’s an idea: get some smartlooking thumb drives, like the Star Wars series from Mimoco ($19.99), and download podcasts from your gift recipient’s favorite shows. This American Life archives are downloadable for 99 cents a pop, and the beautiful left-brain-leaning Radiolab is available on iTunes for free, as is Democracy Now and Planet Money. You can pair WFMU favorites like The Best Show on WFMU with Slate’s lady-centric DoubleX. For the even nerdier radio and book lover, you can get a variety of deals on Other People with Brad Listi, in which the author of Attention. Deficit. Disorder and founder The Nervous Breakdown talks about the writing life with everyone from T. C. Boyle to Alexis Smith. (These “deals,” by the way, range from under $10 to free, so they’re not really deals as much as they are way-too-fucking-cheap-for-somethingso-awesome-like-everything-literary-on-the-internet-which-is-why-sofew-writers-actually-get-paid. But I digress.) Think of this inexpensive but nifty present not as the auditory equivalent of gift-wrapped socks, but as a geekier and far more delightful version of the mixtape, without the obligatory power-ballad. Or put that in there, whatever.—R.D.

Gift Guide ( 19

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For anyone who came of age in the ’90s, it’s refreshing to discover that there’s a whole new troupe of girls coming up in 2012 obsessed with all things that involve either riot grrrl or Angela Chase (Claire Dane’s smart, pensive, red-headed alter ego on the cancelledtoo-early television drama My So-Called Life.) Teenage girls between the ages of 13 and 19 (and probably a boy or two) that lean toward the eccentric, weird or out-of-the-ordinary will likely be more than happy to get a copy of ‘Rookie Yearbook One’ (Drawn and Quarterly; $29.95) in their stockings. The book is essentially an anthology culled from the best of Rookie, an online magazine for teenage girls edited by Tavi Gevinson, the precocious fashion blogger who first gained fame at the age of 13 for her writing on a blog called Style Rookie. At the ripe old age of 16, Gevinson, inspired by legendary teen mag Sassy, has amassed quite a stable of guest writers for Rookie, including Lena Dunham, Sarah Silverman, Zooey Deschanel and Miranda July. Fashion isn’t the only thing that gets the spotlight in this smart publication. Gevinson’s obsession with books—including writers like Joan Didion—movies and photography ensures a well-rounded read for any girl that’s interested in indulging in her eccentricities rather than hiding them under a barrage of makeup, catty jokes and mall clothes.—L.C. How to satisfy the reader in your life with a year’s worth of features, essays or craft projects? By getting her a magazine subscription. A bonus is that many magazines and journals offer special deals around the holidays, so you can get more pages or gigabytes for less. One can always go with the big players: The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Nation, Mother Jones. You can get any one of these print heavyweights for under $40 right now, with the best deal going to Mother Jones, currently offering a year’s worth of visceral storytelling for only $12. But why not patronize some of publishing’s smaller gems? There’s Tin House, a literary journal thick with fiction, nonfiction and actually-not-remotely-boring poetry, now offering four novel-sized issues for $24.95. For the book-savvy parent, Brain, Child is an Utne Readerand Pushcart Prize-lauded journal that’s featured essays by Barbara Kingsolver and Susan Cheever over the years, currently going for $22. Bust, a DIY women’s mag that won’t ever lecture you about cellulite or pleasing your man, is offering yearlong subscriptions for only $15. Since most of these tomes usually go for upwards of $5 a pop over the counter, you’ll look generous and save enough to get yourself a year of great reading as well.—R.D.

Is your “friend” struggling with a recurring dream in which a bustier-clad Jerry Brown lays next to her begging her to “raise those income taxes real nice?” Then the high-tech Sleep with Remee mask ($95), which promises to allow users to control their dreams, is for her. The blue, black, red, yellow or cream-colored eye shield uses LED light patterns to throw wearers into a state of “lucid dreaming” in which they can supposedly control their unconscious-self’s actions. On their Sleep With Remee website, creators Duncan Frazier and Steve McGuigan invite buyers to use the mask for everything from flying through the galaxy on a giant kitten to having a roundtable discussion with their ego and id. Does it actually work, you ask? With the potential of harnessing your, er, your friend’s subconscious and finally kicking out all those inappropriately dressed politicos for good, isn’t it worth the risk?—R.D.

Hell, Worry About It Later: Gifts over $100

How many times have you been to a family gathering, only to find that everyone in the room, including Grandma Dottie, has their face and fingers stuck to individual tiny screens? Tired of eating turkey beside the glow of a million iPhones and iPads? The Wii U, Nintendo’s latest console, aims to remedy the slow burning disconnect of modern-day life with a focus on party and group-type games. Priced at $349.99 for the Wii U Deluxe, or $299.99 for the more basic version (and fewer gigabytes—not

) 22

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Looking like a million bucks doesn’t have to cost that much. Start with the shoes, the crux of any good outfit. JC Penney’s Stafford Camlin boots ($60) are a beautiful brown, lace-up, wingtip boot that looks like it should cost double. Uniqlo just launched a store in San Francisco (the company’s third in the States) in September, and an online store last month—their Japanese denim jeans ($49.95) look and feel like designer pants, and there are several different cuts and fades from which to choose. This would look great with a V-neck tee or a slim-fit noniron button-down shirt ($10–$33), and finish it off with a stunning, buy-itfor-life belt from Orion Leather Company online ($40) to match the shoes. Get ready for the onslaught of double-takes.—N.G.

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appealing to more serious gamers) the new system works with the motioncontrol remotes from the original Wii, while also featuring a Game-Pad touch-screen controller. In a world of increasingly complicated gaming, the user-friendly touch screen makes it easy for everyone in the family, including Grandma Dottie, to take part in the fun. This is the system to bust out at Thanksgiving and Christmas, bringing all the cousins, aunts and grandpas together in a rousing session of Sing Party karaoke. Like the Microsoft Kinect, it also offers a streaming service with Netflix, Hulu and Amazon.—L.C. Admittedly, a blanket map may or may not be something that’s been featured on Portlandia. Like hand-stitched bird napkins or mustachioed liberals, it fits right into that uncomfortable gap between amazing and twee. But—bottom line—it’s a blanket and a map and, thus, will probably go over well under the tree. San Francisco–based Soft Cities sells colorful fabric printed with gorgeous maps—of the place your child was born, or your friend’s favorite neighborhood—for $175. Brooklyn-based Haptic Lab sells a quilted and more expensive version, offering multi-colored atlas-throws made

of patches, complete with exquisitely detailed topography and roads. For your crafty friend, the latter company also sells DIY map quilting kits for under $100, giving everyone a chance to learn this probably-unnecessarybut-still-very-decorative skill.—R.D. You owned every single Beatles album on vinyl, right? And then you bought them all on 8-track for your Mazda, and then again on cassette in the early 1980s for the family station wagon. But then CDs came along, and one by one, you picked up every title, from Please Please Me to Abbey Road. In 2009, those long-overdue remasters came out; shortly thereafter, the Fab Four’s entire discography finally hit iTunes. With consistent upgrades, chances are you’ve bought Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band at least three or four times already. Alas, everything old is new again, and those crazy kids with their Urban Outfitters catalogues have spawned a vinyl revolution; sales of LPs have increased a staggering 400 percent since 2007. Here, then, comes the Beatles Stereo Vinyl Box Set ($350), comprising the 12 original U.K. versions of each album, the U.S. release Magical Mystery Tour and the two-LP set Past Masters. The records are pressed on 180-gram vinyl, mastered at Abbey Road studios and are accompanied by original artwork and a 252-page hardbound book. Even the weird poster from inside the White Album is included. Need to recapture the feel of dropping the needle on “Taxman”? Need to illuminate your teenager, crouching in the corner with a Neutral Milk Hotel LP on his new turntable, to the wonders of “Norwegian Wood”? This is the way to do it fully and completely.—G.M.

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Purge the Panettone Food gifts outside the Hickory Farms box

G

iving the gift of food seems easy. Who doesn’t like a bottle of wine or a hunk of gourmet cheese? But that’s no fun. Nobody’s face really lights up upon opening these gifts, because wine and cheese are like elbows—everyone’s got ’em already.

Whether it’s the main course or simply a side dish, culinary gifts can be fun to give. They can be useful, extravagant, healthy, artery-clogging, unique, pedestrian, large or small. It doesn’t matter, because food is life, both literally and in that hyperbolic, metaphorical, companies-that-want-to-sell-stuff kind of way.

Accoutrements Jam takes a long time to make and often yields frustrating results. But it can be so, so good when done right. Local, smallbatch jams can cost upwards of $10 a jar, but they’re worth the extra dough because they taste like fruit rather than corn syrup. Sonoma County’s Kozlowski

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

Farms ($6.25) makes 17 different kinds of boutique spreads, from fig and Muscat wine preserve to chipotle and jalapeño jam. Try a gift basket combining surefire hits with unexpected novelties. Hot sauce can be a staple of one’s culinary diet or just a good gag gift. For flavor, try Secret Aardvark Habañero ($5.75). It’s hot enough for daredevils but with a sweet and sensitive side. For fun, give something with a clever name (Ass Blaster, anyone?) or, if you dare, Cajohn’s Trinidad Scorpion, the sauce that’s made with the world’s hottest pepper.

Spices can be intimidating. What makes a good steak rub doesn’t always make a righteous rib rub. What goes with fish? And don’t even start with Indian food—it’s so good when done right, but when made at home it, can be an atomic gut bomb in a pot. Let the experts put together a package based on personal preference. Savory Spice shop in Santa Rosa has 10-jar gift sets ($37–$55) for different cooking styles, and can make an even more personalized set in-store. ) 24

Gift Guide ( 23

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Beverages

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Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of good beer bubbling to the surface in the Golden State, thanks to the exploding popularity of microbrews. Instead of trying to ďŹ nd the â&#x20AC;&#x153;tastiestâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;rarestâ&#x20AC;? beer, go with the biggest one. A threeliter bottle of Arrogant Bastardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Double Bastard ($90) comes with a padlock and a message on the bottle berating those who believe themselves worthy of such a treasure. Aging it for one year only enhances the ďŹ&#x201A;avor, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enjoyable now, too. And at 11.2 percent ABV, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to share with a friend (or six). Not into the suds? How about coffee? Sacramentoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Temple offers a coffee subscription ($84 plus shipping) with six monthly deliveries. This boutique, awardwinning small batch coffee is always fresh, and this is a good chance to turn someone you know into a coffee snob. For the Mormon (or children) in your life, beverage gifts might include caffeine-free soda. But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne, because there are plenty to choose from. Grown Up Soda ($4.99 per six-pack) makes ďŹ&#x201A;avors like dry pomegranate, and Belvoir Fruit Farms elderberry pressĂŠ ($10 for 16.8 ounces) is wonderful. Fentimanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is just cool, with ďŹ&#x201A;avors like dandelion and burdock, mandarin and Seville orange jigger and their famous Curiosity Cola. A six-pack sampler set ($25.99) wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break the bank and makes a desirable alternative to a Harry & David gift box.

James Bondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen Browsing in places like Sur La Table or Williams Sonoma is like being in the MI-6 kitchen laboratory, if there were such a thing. I half-expect that OXO avocado slicer ($10) to also cut a perfectly round hole through bullet-proof glass, or those RSVP grilling goggles ($20) to shoot lasers powerful enough to cut through steel. But, no, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just semi-useful toys that solve

the least troublesome First World problems. I mean, reallyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Progressiveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tuna press ($4) and Pizzacraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pizza cone set ($20) tackle the dangers of draining ďŹ sh from the can and the nuisance of ďŹ&#x201A;at pizza. Though there are some very silly doodads for the kitchen, there are also plenty great gift ideas for this part of the home. Cooking is so much easier (and safer) with a good, sharp knife. WĂźsthofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Epicurean six-inch chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knife ($100) feels great and looks beautiful. It seems superďŹ&#x201A;uous, but Peugeotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electric pepper mill ($100) is the Ferrari of pepper mills, and makes adding fresh pepper to every dish excitingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even got a little ďŹ&#x201A;ashlight. For a stocking stuffer, the NexTrend garlic twist ($15) makes mincing garlic easy and keeps the oils from sticking to your ďŹ ngers. To put all these gadgets to good use, a subscription to a cooking magazine might be in order. David Changâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lucky Peach magazine ($28), a quarterly offering from McSweenyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, is not only beautiful fun, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full of damn good recipes and cooking tips.

Experience A personal subscription to a delivery club can be a life-changer, like membership in the Black Pig Meat Company Community Supported Bacon Club ($129), which literally brings the bacon home every month for a whole year. Inspiration wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be hard to come by with a constant stream of please-cook-me at the doorstep. For noncooks, give the gift of a dining experience. There are plenty to choose from in Northern California, but you can always decide to blow someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mindâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Thomas Kellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s French Laundry in Yountville offers â&#x20AC;&#x153;experience cards,â&#x20AC;? metal credit cards in a fancy gift box that offer a special dinner for two at different price points ($750â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$2,500). Bear in mind, dinner for one at this landmark restaurant is about $300, and the cards do not guarantee reservations. Those, dear reader, are harder to come by than a positive review of a Guy Fieri restaurant.

The week’s events: a selective guide

SA N R A FA E L

The Big Wheel

I’d like to cut you in, old man. There’s nobody in Marin County that I can really trust, and we’ve always done things together. When you make up your mind, I’ll send you a message, any place, any time. And when we do meet, old man, it’s you I want to see, not the police. Maybe we could meet up on a Ferris wheel in Vienna, old man, where’ll I’ll complain of indigestion, before opening up the door in a mildly threatening manner high above the dots—you know them as people—talking of Anna, false death and the futility of human existence. For I’m Harry Lime, old man, and one thing I know for sure is that the great Orson Welles film ‘The Third Man’ screens on Sunday, Nov. 25, at the Rafael Film Center. 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. $10.50. 7pm. 415.454.1222.

S A N TA R O S A

Trapt Under Ice As a genre, hard rock means different things to different people. For your Midwestern Uncle Pete, Van Halen’s “Panama” might be the epitome of the genre. For your mom, it’s probably Whitesnake or Winger. Los Angeles–based Trapt, on the other hand, come from the Pantera school, all growling vocals and cranked up, sharp-edged Gibson guitar riffs with plenty of bombastic drumming. But there’s an accessibility around Trapt’s edges, and they scored a hit in 2002 with “Headstrong,” which was featured in multiple video games and used to promote the short-lived television show Redneck Island. See where they’re at now when Trapt play with Venrez, Shotgun Harlot and Our Vinyl Vows on Tuesday, Nov. 27, at the Last Day Saloon. 120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $15–$18. 707.545.2343.

SA N R A FA E L

Free & Dead The Deep Dark Woods hail from Saskatoon, where frozen nights can make a day feel like a year, and they’ve channeled that icy inspiration into a cozy roots-prairie-goth sound. On Nov. 28, the band helps Phil Lesh kick off a two-week extravaganza to celebrate the debut of the Grate Room at Terrapin Crossroads. Moreover, it’s free! (Tickets for the rest of the fortnight’s shows run up to $150.) The spankin’ new Grate Room boasts a world-class sound system and promises to be a diverse venue with trivia nights, big-band and salsa dance nights and, of course, tons of live music. Get there early, because Dead fans will be lining up at the door on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at Terrapin Crossroads. 100 Yacht Club Drive, San Rafael. 8:30pm. Free. 415.524.2773.

M I L L VA L L E Y

Snow Shoes World Series games are inherently tension-charged, but when you add a dramatic, last-minute rescue into the mix, things really reach fever pitch. That’s exactly what happened during the 2002 World Series, when Giants first baseman J. T. Snow plucked three-year-old batboy Darren Baker (son of Dusty Baker) up from home plate. The little boy had wandered onto the field at probably the worst time ever—just as Giants baserunner David Bell was heading full speed toward home plate. In addition to being a quick-thinking, one-man child-rescue team, Snow was a solid first baseman who even once successfully executed the famed “hidden ball trick.” See Snow in conversation with Bruce Macgowan on Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 142 Throckmorton Theatre. 142 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 7:30pm. $12–$15. 415.383.9600.

—Leilani Clark

BAREFOOT GOLD ‘The Athlete’ screens at the Jarvis Conservatory Nov. 24.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Crush C CULTURE

25

Stage

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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ALL TOGETHER NOW David Yen

leads a read-along â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Christmas Carol.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Carolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Santalandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: community spirit meets subversion BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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t ďŹ rst glance, one wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; heartwarming fable A Christmas Carol would make a fitting companion to David Sedarisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gleefully mean-spirited Santaland Diaries. Actor David Yen feels otherwise. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think one is pretty much the mirror image of the other,â&#x20AC;? says Yen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re different styles of telling a similar story, but each revolves around a character undergoing a major change, a transformation that turns them into a different person.â&#x20AC;? Beginning next week, Yen launches an appealing double-whammy of a holiday event, alternating performances of Santaland (this will be Yenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ fth straight year

appearing in the popular one-man show) and something he calls Do It Yourself Dickens, wherein theatergoers are invited to read from an adapted script of Carol, everyone sitting in a circle as Yen portrays Scrooge, ricocheting back and forth as the entire group brings the words of Dickens to life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done this before with A Christmas Carol,â&#x20AC;? says Yen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always fun to watch people walk in, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just here to watch!â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Then they agree to read some small part, and by the end, they are totally into it.â&#x20AC;? Yen notes that there are roles suitable for children, whom he encourages to join in, simply requiring them to be reasonably strong readers. As adapted by Yen, there are as many as 40 possible roles in Carol, including a number of narrators. Warm holiday drinks are served throughout the show to give it an extra holiday feel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not expecting an Emmy or Oscar performance out of anyone,â&#x20AC;? laughs Yen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just doing this for fun. Nonparticipating people are welcome to join the circle as well. Ultimately, the goal is for everyone to leave the theater with a feeling of togetherness and community spirit, a feeling of coming together to create something special with friends and strangers. After all, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what everyone hopes to feel at this time of year, right?â&#x20AC;? Santaland Diaries is quite the opposite. Children are decidedly not recommended, as the story of an unemployed actor forced to play an elf at Macyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s department store is hilariously prickly and decidedly non-Dickensian. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a brief moment where everything seems to end the way it should in a Christmas story,â&#x20AC;? Yen says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then it backpedals to something sort of deliciously nastyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as if Sedaris went, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;OK, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go too far into the nice stuff. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leave â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em with a real zinger.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Santaland Diariesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, Dec. 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;15, at the Spreckels Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. All shows at 8pm. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$24. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; Do It Yourself Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdays and Sundays, Dec. 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;16, also at the Spreckels Center. Thursdays at 7:30pm; Sundays at 2:00pm. $12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$16. 707.588.3400.

Film

27

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Life of Piâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is Ang Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phastasmagorical meditation BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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ife of Pi claims it will make viewers believe in God, but it can also be taken as a hell of a rousing open-boat adventure. In particular, the computer graphics represent a milestone of the technique. Pi (Irrfan Khan) is a demurely friendly professor in modern Montreal, who is lunching with an avid, even moist-eyed American (Rafe Spall), whose last novel was stillborn. Pi tells the story of his singular voyage to the Newer World from his middle-class home in the French colony of Pondicherry. The son of a man who believes only in logic, Pi becomes pious in all the religions, in passages that director Ang Lee envisions as a handsome pastiche of ďŹ lmmaker Satyajit Ray. Dad runs a zoo; when the money runs short, the family must sell the critters to overseas collectors. The animal freighter sinks, and the young Pi (Suraj Sharma), the sole human survivor, is stranded on a 20-foot-lifeboat with a wounded zebra, an orangutan and a hyena. Then, out of the waves comes the zooâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tiger. When the fur stops ďŹ&#x201A;ying, Pi and the tiger are the lone shipmates. Lee ďŹ nesses the predicament, from its outlandish humor to its poignant side. Worn down by weeks of certain doom, Pi puts his trust in providence. The seas are sometimes so mill-pond ďŹ&#x201A;at and mirrorclear that you could walk on water, or they boil with phosphorescence, making the boat appear to be ďŹ&#x201A;oating through space in reďŹ&#x201A;ected stars. The ďŹ lm didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make me a believerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except maybe in the god of stories. Life of Pi seems more excitingly pagan than anything else, though the godless might be touched with a wave of Hindu pity for the sorrowful carnival of the world, the cycle of eating and being eaten. The ďŹ lm also deploys some Deepak Chopraâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;style bromides, such as the old wheeze that â&#x20AC;&#x153;science can tell us about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out there, but not whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in here.â&#x20AC;? But whatever Life of Pi is trying to say about the wheel of suffering, it at least says it much more interestingly than Cloud Atlas.

bohemian.com/northbay/freeStuff

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People’s Music

“The World’s Greatest Music Store”

Music

Journey to the Center of Sonoma County Sound

We Have Something For Every Music Lover! Just check this list: J Ukulele 㾎

J Banjo J Fiddle J Mandolin J Bass 㾎 J Guitar J Saxophone J Clarinet J Flute J Drums J Percussion J Keyboards J Dulcimer J Celtic Harp 㾎 J Harmonica J Music Book 㾎

J Recorder J Pan Pipes J Rain Stick J Bamboo Flute J Kazoo J Tule J Bo J African 㾎 Drums J Nose Whistle 㾎 J Microphone J Headphones J Mallets J Sticks 㾎 J Picks J Harmonium

Instrument Sales & Rentals Repairs • Books How-to Videos & Lessons from REAL MUSICIANS!

J Gong J Bodhran 㾎 J Dumbek J Indian Drum J Rattle J Shaker J Tambourine J Shakeree J Mark 㾎 J Strings J Sheet Music 㾎 J Kalimba J Tuner 㾎 J Metronome J Slide J Hoytus

J Chris J Cowbell J Cleaner J Swabs J Autoharp J Cases J Jews Harp J Cords 㾎 J Straps J Shakers J Alastair J Reeds 㾎 J Eggs J Frogs 㾎 J Laughter J Pins J Oil J Charts 707-823-7664 J Expertise 122 N. Main St • Sebastopol 㾎 J Advice www.peoplesmusiconline.com J Ruth

SHINING BRIGHT It’s not too hard to love the music through the madness.

Flip the Switch

Separating Rihanna from Chris Brown, again Thur November 29

The Mickey Hart Band Fri November 30

Glen Campbell

The Goodbye Tour plus Victoria Ghost Sat December 1 Bestselling Author of Bird by Bird

ŶŶĞ>ĂŵŽƩ ^ƵŶĞĐϮͻSPECIAL CHILDREN’S SHOW!

The Elves and the Shoemaker Fri December 7

Sons of Champlin Special Guest: Tim Hockenberry Trio

Sat December 8

Taj Mahal Special Guest: Rowan Brothers–Chris & Lorin

Fri December 14

Snoop Dogg Sat December 15 Todd Snider with Dave Schools of Wide Spread Panic Special Guest Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers

Fri December 21

Bootsy Collins and the Funk Unity Band Fri January 4

Psychedelic Furs & The Fixx Fri January 5 An Evening with Steve Earle

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

BY GABE MELINE

I

know how it is. You’re drawn magnetically, like Ron Swanson to a box of black market Twinkies, to the new Rihanna album. Unapologetic, out this week, is the Hostess with the mostest, promising pretty piano ballads (“Stay”), lurking love duets (“Loveeeeeee Song”), and a phenomenal re-up of Ginuwine’s “Pony” with dripping choruses and Skrillex-style brostep drops (“Jump”). But there’s that nagging discomfort. There’s no other way to say it: in public, Rihanna has basically forgiven Chris Brown for beating the hell out of her. I’m all for guilty pleasures, but the “guilty” part takes on a whole new meaning when buying Rihanna’s

new album; you’re sorta co-signing on forgetting about that whole slamming-her-head-against-thewindow, punching-her-in-the-lefteye, beating-her-mouth-until-itfilled-with-blood thing. I love this new Rihanna album, which ranks among the most engaging pop music being made currently, but in the same way that I love Elia Kazan films: I flip the switch in my brain that connects an artist’s personal decisions with his or her output. Why deprive yourself of On the Waterfront or A Streetcar Named Desire simply because 60 years ago, Kazan named names in the House Un-American Activities Committee hearings? Flipping that switch is a very easy and grownup thing to do; almost as grown-up as making a personal decision to forgive someone who did terrible things to you and hoping, in vain, it turns out, that this decision can be a private one. And really, Rihanna’s only transgression is setting a questionable example for your 13-year-old daughter and forcing you to have an uncomfortable but serious talk about the dangers of domestic violence. Kazan, well, he destroyed entire careers and livelihoods. One could make a case that Elia Kazan is worse than Chris Brown (but with better hair). Luckily, Brown’s music is so phenomenally awful that there’s no temptation to flip the brainswitch the way one can do with On the Waterfront. Unapologetic, on the other hand, all but dares you to shut it off; four or five bona fide, inarguable hits fly by before Chris Brown charges in with a middle-finger-to-the-haters duet, “Nobody’s Business.” And if you can’t reconcile this kissing-and-making-up between Rihanna and Brown with the brutal police report from Feb. 8, 2009— you want to point your daughter in the direction of other artists, or you yourself want some non–Katy Perry dance jams—a new crop of singers like Elle Varner, Sky Ferreira, MNDR, Solange Knowles and Jessie Ware are more than happy to rush into your self-inflicted vacuum. But before that, give “Loveeeeeee Song” a shot. Don’t ask Rihanna what the extra six e’s are for—some personal things are better left unexplained.

Concerts Clubs & SONOMA COUNTY Venues Elvin Bishop Local-boy-made-good is quite possibly the new hardest working man in show business. His response? Aw, shucks. Nov 24, 8pm. $30-$40. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

El Radio Fantastique This eight-piece group is inspired by a spectrum of musical styles crisscrossing genres and eras, from Junkyard hymns to New Orleans cabaret. Nov 23, 8:30pm. $12. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Trapt Stand Up and get Headstrong with the So-Cal rockers. Venrez, Shotgun Harlot, Our Vinyl Vows and Couteaux also play. Nov 27, 7:30pm. $15-$18. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

MARIN COUNTY Tommy Igoe Big Band

SONOMA COUNTY

Flamingo Lounge Nov 23, Midnight Sun. Nov 24, Sugarfoot. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HONORABLE BEST HONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

French Garden Nov 23, Solid Air. Nov 24, Honey B and the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

WED WED – NOV NOV 21 21

JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE U N K / B O O GI E B BREAKS/GYPSY R E A K S / GYP SY D DOODLE O O D LE

ANNUAL A NNUAL P PRE RE T THANKS HANKS

Aqus Cafe

Hopmonk Tavern

Nov 23, Saffell. Nov 24, Mark Growden. Nov 25, Vanilla Kiss. Fourth Wednesday of every month, Bluegrass Jam. Third Wednesday of every month, West Coast Singer Songwriter Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Nov 21, West County Boogie Ensemble. Nov 23, El Radio Fantastique. Nov 24, Steve Pile Band. Nov 26, Lion D, Ras Tewelde, Jah Sun. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

+W WEST EST C COUNTY OUNTY B BOOGIE OOGIE E ENSEMBLE NSEMBLE

Hotel Healdsburg

Arlene Francis Theater

Nov 23, Si Perkoff and Gary Digman. Nov 24, Adam Schulman Trio with Eric Markowitz and Jimmy Gallagher. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

ELL RADIO E RADIO FANTASTIQUE FANTAS A TIQUE

Nov 21, Mud, the Blood & the Beer, Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children MacNuggits, Elephant, Semi Evolved Simians, Decent Criminal. Nov 23, Sunday Gravy with KellytheSinger. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Nov 23, Smoov-E. Nov 24, Dginn, Soul Union. Nov 25, Future This, Couteaux, the Business End, Nate Lopez Jazz Band. Mon, Art and Music with Stanley Mouse. Last Sunday of every month, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

((FEAT. FEAT. M MALARKEY ALARKEY / C CHANGO HANGO B / IINI) NI) $4 ORGANIC $ 4 JAMESON JAMESON & O R G AN I C YERBA Y ERBA MATE MATE COCKTAILS COCK TAILS FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM/21+

FRI FRI – N NOV OV 23 23

JJUKE UKE JJOINTS OINTS PR PRESENTS E S E NT S VAUDEVILLE V AUDEVILLE / R RAG AG TTIME IME / SSWING WING

+S SHOVELMAN HOVELMAN

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT SAT – NOV NOV 24 24

HOPMONK H OPMONK PR PRESENTS E S E NT S BLUES B LUES / C CLASSIC LASSIC / R ROCK OCK

STEVE S TEVE P PILE ILE BAND BAND

Jasper O’Farrell’s

+ THE THE LAST LAST BUFFALO BUFFALO & AND AND MADRONE M ADRONE BROS. BROS.

Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 77:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ WEEKLY W EEK EKLY E EVENT VENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MON M ON – NOV NOV 2 26 6

Lagunitas Tap Room

REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT

Nov 21, Emma Lee. Nov 23, Jinx Jones. Nov 24, Jason Bodlovich. Nov 25, David Thom. Nov 28, Brian Bergernon. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Nov 21, Undercover with Pat Jordan.

) 30

Drummer Tommy Idoe and his Birdland Big Band have held a Friday residency at the iconic Birdland Jazz Club in New York for the past six years. Nov 24, 8pm. $25-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

LLIVE IVE F FROM ROM IITALY: TALY:

BIZARRI B IZARRI SOUND SOUND WITH WIT TH

LLION ION D D,, R RAS AS T TEWELDE EWELDE & JAH JAH SUN SUN Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW 1st Annual “Leftovers Party” Nov 23 A M AD HANNANS REUNION WITH THE JERRY H ANNAN BAND 8:30pm Fri

Sat

THE FABULOUS

Nov 24

BUD E LUV ’S 8th Annual Holiday Party 8:30pm

Sun

DAVID LAFLAMME/ PHIL LAWRENCE ENSEMBLE

Nov 25

It’s A Beautiful Day (Unplugged) 4:00pm / No Cover Dance Party! Fri Nov 30 THE MUDDY ROSES Harmonious, Rockin’ Country/Blues 8:30pm

NAPA COUNTY Boz Scaggs Texas hit-master visits Napa with his band. Nov 21, 8pm. $65-$80. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

SHANA MORRISON Dec 1 Singer/Songwriter Sat

8:30pm

DOUG ADAMZ & BRAVO! Dec 7 “Mr. Americana” Fri

Clark Sterling’s Broadway Holiday The best of Broadway and the holiday season with Broadway veteran Clark Sterling. Nov 24, 8pm. $25-$30. The best of Broadway and the holiday season with Broadway veteran Clark Sterling. Nov 25, 3pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

29

Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

8:00pm The Coolest Swing Sat Dec 8 STOMPY JONES Holiday Show 8:30pm

DR. ELMO AND THE REINDEER BAND Dec 9 “Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer” Sun

6:00pm

Reservations Advised

BARE BONES Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children

MacNuggits play Nov. 21 at the Arlene Francis Center.

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

$3 RED $3 RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$10/LADIES 10 / LADIES FFREE REE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

TUES T UES – NOV NOV 27 27

WEEKLY W EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT HOSTED HOSTED BY BY E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

THUR THUR – NOV NOV 29 29

HOPMONK H OPMONK & KRSH KRSH PRESENT PRESENT IINDIE NDIE / R ROCK OCK

MILO M ILO G GREEN REEN

((FREE FREE KRSH KRSH EVENING EVENING CONCERT) CONCE E RT ) +S SPECIAL PECIAL FREE FREE EVENING EVENING SHOW SHOW FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 6PM/21+ 6PM /21+

THUR THUR – NOV NOV 29 29

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT

DECADANCE D ECADANCE & JJUKE UKE JJOINT OINT PR PRESENT ESENT BEAT B EAT / HIP HIP HOP HOP / ELECTRONICA ELECTRONICA

PHUTUREPRIMITIVE P HUTUREPRIMITIVE + INI INI & Z ZACK ACK D DARLING ARLING

$$10 10 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI FRI – NOV NOV 30 30

HOPMONK H OPMONK PR PRESENTS ESENTS JAM JA M / FOLK FOLK / AMERICANA AMERICANA

GRANT G RANT FARM FARM & HUCKLE HUCKLE FARMAGEDDON F ARMAGEDDON TOUR TOUR 2012! 2012 ! +M MR R DECEMBER DECEMBER

$$10 10 A ADV/$12 DV/$12 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

SAT SAT – DEC DEC 1

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

SSINGER INGER / SO SONGWRITER NGWRITER / ACOUSTIC ACOUSTIC

JJONATHAN ONATHAN RICHMAN RICHMAN A $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

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Music

Barley & Hops Tavern

Music ( 29

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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TAP ROOM

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER &2)s0-$//23s$25 s COUNTRY ROCK

NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

4(52s7PM DOORSss!,,!'%3 COUNTRY/FOLK

WILBER

3!4s8PM DOORSs!$6$/3s ROCK/POP

THE CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD

Come see us!

DICK DALE

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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4(52s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s SURF ROCK PLUS

THE PYRONAUTS

Nov 26, Phat Chance. Mon, Greg Hester. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Nov 23, Bellyfull. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

IRIS DEMENT

AN EVENING WITH

Main Street Station

Nov 24, Mitch Woods and his Rocket 88â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

40 OZ TO FREEDOM PLUS JASON

Nov 23, The Pulsators. Nov 24, Tainted Love. Nov 27, Trapt. Mon, karaoke. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Monroe Dance Hall

3!4s0-$//23ss SUBLIME TRIBUTE BAND

Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Nov 21, The Gentleman Soldiers. Nov 23, Dan Martin & Noma Rocksteady. Nov 24, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Nov 25, David Aguilar & Peter McCauley. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Nov 23, New Riders of the Purple Sage. Nov 24, 40 Oz to Freedom. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm,Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Phoenix Theater

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet WED )NOV 21 )9PM

BLACK WEDNESDAY PARTY!:

CAMBO & THE LIFE THUR )NOV 22 )9PM

THURSDAYS HIP-HOP NIGHT FRI )NOV 23 )9PM

FORRO BRAZUKA SAT )NOV 24 )9PM )FREE

STEPPIN UP SATURDAYS WED )NOV 28 )8PM

SAM ANDREW BAND THUR )NOV 29 )9PM

AFRICALI

FRI )NOV 30 )10PM

MARSHALL PAYNE

OFFICIAL ALBUM RELEASE PARTY SAT )DEC 1 )8PM

PROJECT X

HOT UPCOMING ACTS 12/21 12/31 1/11 2/15

TEA LEAF GREEN MONOPHONICS ANTONY B QUEEN IFRICA, TONY REBEL

19BROADWAY.COM MUSIC HOTLINE 415.459.1091

TICKETS AVAILABLE WWW.19BROADWAY.COM

MITCH WOODS and HIS ROCKET 88s Saturday, Nov 24

Nov 24, the Jacka, Husalah, J Stalin. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Raven Theater

Wed, Nov 21 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pmSCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Nov 22 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Nov 23 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther DJ hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK 'N ROLL Sat, Nov 24 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with 12:30pm Gary Thomas 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm Steve Luther hosts MITCH WOODS AND HIS ROCKET 88'S Sun, Nov 25 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Nov 26 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30-5:30pm; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Nov 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Nov 24, Elvin Bishop. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Redwood Cafe Nov 23, Andre Thierry & Zydeco dancing. Nov 24, 8:30pm, Beso Negro. Thurs, Open Mic. Fourth Sunday of every month, Old Time Music. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;est Fantastique El Radio Fantastique turn up the antique radio Hail to the riffraff of El Radio Fantastique, part modern-day vaudeville stage show, part fascinating menagerie of musicians from the tiny village of Point Reyes Station. Like a peculiar music box from a forgotten dime museum, the eight-member revue contains nearly two dozen instruments, including accordions, theremins and whistles led by giant marching drums and glockenspiel. And no industrious orchestra should be without junk percussion and a jaw harp. Vintage elements of klezmer fused with big band rumba conjure up old-time circus freaks, fire dancers and burlesque. Songwriter Giovanni Di Morenteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful voice brought El Radio Fantastiqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dark and sinister odyssey of sound to life while living in New Orleans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a storyteller,â&#x20AC;? says Di Morente. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I write the music first and mumble into a recorder along with the melody. I then listen to match the syllables with wordsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it naturally turns out a weird story. I found a way to tap into my subconscious. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite make sense how it works, but you have to wonder.â&#x20AC;? Join El Radio Fantastique as they revel in their new album, Walking Dead, on Friday, Nov. 23, at Hopmonk Tavern. 9pm. $12. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacquelynne OcaĂąa

Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Russian River Brewing Co

Thurs, 9pm, DJ Dray Lopez. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Nov 25, Ian Franklin. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Toad in the Hole Pub Nov 24, Manzanita Falls. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Nov 23, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Nov 24, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Nov 28, Justin Brown. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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''Who feels like being social when they know they may have an embarrassing accident at any moment.'' Simple things such as bending over, coughing, sneezing, or laughing,

STRESS URINARY INCONTINENCE

can cause urine leakage in women who suffer from Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI).

If you are a woman age 21 to 70 who is suffering from stress urinary incontinence, you may qualify for a clinical research study examining a device for the management of SUI. Compensation of up to $275 is available for time and travel to those who qualify. Call for more e information

707.542.1469 707.5 42.1469 9

1221 FFarmers ar mer s Lane, Suite 500, San Santa ta Rosa, Rosa, CA www.radiantresearch.com w w w. r a d i a n t r e s e a r c h . c o m Find Us On O Facebook

We Can't Do It W We Without ith ithout YOU! YOU! O

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Galleries OPENINGS Nov 21 From 6 to 8pm. Downtown Napa, “Art on First,” the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists. Downtown Napa, First Street, Napa. 707.257.2117.

Nov 23 Heldsburg Museum, opening of “Magical Toyland,” nostalgic fun for anyone born from 1860 to 1960 featuring toys, games and dollhouses. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.3325.

SONOMA COUNTY Art Changes Life Through Dec 31, “Deep Listening, Songs From the Earth,” mixed-media paintings by Richard K on; also, paintings by Kristin Gustavson, photographs by Ananda Fierro, encaustic by Caterina Martinico and prints by Linda Shelp. 954 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.824.8881.

Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through Nov 30, Second annual art collective features the work of Jane Kelly, Arielle Lemons and others. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. Tues-Wed and FriSat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 707.829.7256.

Calabi Gallery Through Dec 31, “Extraordinary” features the work of various artists on the narrow theme of life and death. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, “The Art of Peanuts Animation” features 16 never-before-displayed Peanuts drawings and cels, including five cels rescued

from Schulz’s 1966 studio fire. Dec 1, Charles Solomon and Lee Mendelson talk about new book “The Art and Making of Peanuts Animation.” 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Nov 26, Lauri Luck’s paintings feature landscapes, dogs and abstract patterns. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Doorway Gallery & Artists’ Studio Through Dec 31, “Reno Confidential: All In” features paintings, ceramics, prints and works in stone by Darryl Ponicsan. 254 First St E, Sonoma. 415.309.7440.

EarthRise Center Through Dec 21, “Intimations” features works on paper by Carol Duchamp. Free. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. 707.781.7401.

Finley Community Center Through Dec 20, “Altered Group Exhibit” features local artists creating alternative and abstract art. Featuring work from Ricky Watts, Sean Nichols, Adam Springer, Saif Azzuz, Roman D’Argenzio and others. Reception, Nov. 29, 5-7pm. Through Dec 20, The work of ceramic artist Kathy Pallie. Reception, Nov. 29, 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Nov 24, “Did It AnyWay” features the work of Becoming Independent artists in a variety of media. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery

Seymour Bergman and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum Nov 23-Jan 6, “Magical Toyland,” nostalgic fun for anyone born from 1860 to 1960 featuring toys, games and dollhouses. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

Neon Raspberry Art House Through Dec 31, 6pm, “Blind Passenger” fall 2012 show features Nicole Markoff’s project and new oil paintings from Colorado-based painter Erin Donnelly. Free. 3605 Main St, Occidental. 707 874 2100.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jan 6, “Nature Abstracted” features metal sculpture inspired by nature by Matt Devine, Jon Krawczyk and Rob Lorenson. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Dec 23, “Members’ Annual Exhibition,” featuring Petaluma artist David Moore. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

are filled with incredible art displays, opens Nov. 21 in Napa. See openings, adjacent.

Santa Rosa Junior College Through Dec 13, “Roberto Chavez Mini Blockbuster” features 50 pieces by Getty and Smithsonian-honored artist in the Robert F Agrella Gallery. 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 1.800.564.SRJC.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Jan 13, “Trees and Trinkets: Obtainable Art” features the functional tableware of Kalia Kilbana. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum

Through Dec 31, “Sea, Land, City” features the miniature work of 12 artists. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Through Jan 13, “The California Landscape,” exhibition of landscape paintings from museum’s collections. Through Jan 13, “Peace at Sunset,” painting from 19th century artist Thomas Cole, on loan from the De Young Museum in San Francisco. Through Jan 13, “Wild Land: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Landscape Painting” uses a combination of graphics, immersive environments and images on a journey through Cole’s creative process. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Quicksilver Mine Company

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Dec 16, Exhibit tells the story of local vets who served in the Korean War through artifacts and video presentations. $3-$5. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery

Through Dec 2, “The Great Basin” features landscapes of Nevada’s high desert, mountains and wildlife refuges. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Through Dec 31, “Last Hurrah” is the final exhibition at the Quicksilver Mine Co. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Nov 25, “Form” features the work of Oakland-based figurative artist Fernando Reyes. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Through Dec 24, “Forward” features the work of 13 contemporary conceptual artists, including Chris Beards,

STREET SEEN The latest installment of Art on First, in which empty storefronts

RiskPress Gallery

Through Dec 30, “The Art of Handmade Paper” offers glimpse into historic practice of papermaking with large display of rare Japanese papers. Through Dec 30, “Coastal Echoes” features the new works of respected painter Larry Thomas. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

University Art Gallery

Marin Civic Center

Through Dec 9, “Under Water” features photography, painting, prints and ceramics from various artists, plus “performing” sculpture by Mineko Grimmer. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Through Dec 10, “Marin Society of Artists: 85 years,” a nonjuried member show. 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.499.6400.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Nov 30, “Shadow and Light” features works of contrast by Chris Shorten. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Bolinas Museum Through Dec 30, “Slapstick,” vintage Hollywood cinema photography from the collection of Robert Flynn Johnson. Artist talk, Dec. 1, 2pm. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Cafe Arrivederci Through Dec 6, “Shreds,” paintings by San Francisco artist Nea Bisek. 11 G St, San Rafael. Hours: Sun, 4:30 to 9:30; Mon-Sat, 11:30 to 9:30. 415.453.6427.

Marin Community Foundation Through Feb 5, “Works on Water” features the work of 30 artists exploring the aesthetics and politics of water. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum Through Nov 30, “Justice and Judgment” features vintage police car on display. Free. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin Society of Artists Through Dec 16, “Winter Holidays and Gifts” features ceramics, sculptures, paintings, photography, prints, jewelry and wearable art. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Dec 5, “Small Stories” features works by Mike Goldberg. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Through Nov 29, “Marin” features artistic impressions of a very special place. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Gallery Bergelli

Osher Marin JCC

Through Nov 21, “A Moment in Flight” features new paintings by Greg Ragland. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Through Nov 30, “You Did What to My Comics!?!” papercuts by Isaac Brynjegard-Bialik. )

Elsewhere Gallery

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200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Rebound Bookstore Through Jan 10, “Phases of the Moon” features various artists’ found images and abstract works in the many shapes of the moon. 1641 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.

Fr om P Wit etaluma, h Lo ve

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

11am- 5pm

Other Holiday Eveents to Enj Enjoy: njoy: Events

Saturday, S at u r d ay, D Dec ec 1 Horse & C Horse Carriage arriage Rides Rides FFamily amily EEntertainment ntertainment Dozens Open D ozens of Merchant Merchant O pen Houses Pictures with Santa Claus Pict ures w ith Sa nta C laus aatt the the Lan Mart Mart Building Build ding Great G reat SShopping! hopping!

Santa’s Riverboat Santa’ Riverboat Arrival Arrival 11/24, 11 /24, 11am to to 1pm 1p pm Lighted Boat Parade Li ghted Bo at P arade 12/8, 6:30pm 12/8, 6: 30pm Theatre The atre Square Square Tree Tree LighƟng LighƟng 12/1 12/1 & FesƟval FesƟval of of Trees 12/7-8 Trees 12/1 12/1 & 12 /7-8

Wishing Wi W i sh i n g Y You ou H Happy appy H Holidays! olidays! 707.762.9348 70 7.762 .9348 PetalumaDowntown.com P etalumaDow wntown.com

Quicksilver’s Quicksilver’s Last L ast A Annual nnual

Psst! Your girlfriends are doing it.

Through Nov 27, Solo exhibit of the figure drawings and etchings of Daryl Grossman. Through Nov 28, Solo exhibit in the Maurice del Mue galleries features the works of MOT. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Nov 29, “Playland,” paintings by Michael Cutlip. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Toby’s Feed Barn Through Nov 28, “Pastels” features the work of Nancy Stein and “Woodcraft” features the work of Victor Larson. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Mon-Sat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.

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Holiday Holiday Open O pen House House &C Community ommunity Tree T ree L Lighting ighting

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Sunday, S u nd ay, N Nov ov 25, 25, 4–6pm 4 – 6 pm

Always Professional, Always Affordable

Through Jan 27, “Renaissance on Fillmore “ examines San Francisco’s upper Fillmore district through 1955-’65 with the work of 17 artists who either lived or worked in the building at 2322 Fillmore. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

707.331.0631

Downtown Napa

Featuring: F eeaturing: The T he SSusan usan Comstock Co m stock SSwingtet wing tet

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Nov 21-30, “Art on First,” the third annual exhibition bringing art to empty storefronts in downtown Napa. Includes work by 13 Bay Area artists. Reception, Nov 21, 6-8pm along First Street. Downtown Napa, First Street, Napa. 707.257.2117.

ECHO Gallery Through Dec 16, “Picture Show” showcases emerging and established photographers. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Grand Hand Gallery

MARGERY SMITH, CMT 707.544.9642

Through Dec 31, “Out of the Woods,” Wood Sculpture for Home and Garden by Freeland Tanner. 1136 Main St, Napa.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

Napa Valley Museum Through Nov 30, “Tidal” and “As Above, So Below” is a twoperson exhibit featuring the paintings of Gail Chase-Bien and the photographs of Roger Jordan. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Silverado Museum Ongoing, tribute to Robert Louis Stevenson includes original letters, manuscripts, photographs and memorabilia. 1490 Library Lane, St Helena. Tues-Sun, noon to 4. 707.963.3757.

Comedy Jay Alexander Magician and comedian has appeared on the “Today Show” and “Good Morning America.” Nov 23, 8pm. $18$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance The Nightmare Before Christmas Nov 28-29, 7pm, Classical & Contemporary Dance with Tamara Grose presents the Tim Burton film in ballet form. $15-$20. Spreckels Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 707.588.3400.

Pickleweed Park Community Center Fourth Sunday of every month, 2pm, English country dance, get your Elizabeth BennetDarcy on with live music and experienced country dance teachers. $10-$12. 50 Canal St, San Rafael.

Events Books & Tea: A Holiday Gift Books Review Elaine Petrocelli leads a discussion of books for the holidays. Nov 28, 1pm. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Forgotten Felines Mobile Adoptions Altered, vaccinated, healthy cats and kittens ready to take home. Sat, 10am-3pm. $60. Oliver’s Market, 560 Montecito Ctr, Santa Rosa. 707.537.7123.

Pete the Cat Saves Christmas Scavenger hunt for very worthy cause: saving Christmas. Nov 23, 3:24pm. Free. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Preschool Storytime A lap-sit program for infants, one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Puppet Show for Preschoolers Rebecah Freeling’s stories are original and drawn from the folk and fairy-tale traditions, including handmade table puppets and simple marionettes. Nov 24, 11am. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Resource Clinic Get info on housing, transit, food stamps and Medi-Cal. Wed, 11am-1pm. Free. Petaluma Health Center, 1301 Southpoint Blvd, Petaluma. 707.559.7500.

River Friends Book & Bake Sale Buy used books and eat baked goods. Nov 28-Dec 1. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Toddler Storytime High-energy storytime for toddlers 18 months to three years old. Fri, 10am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Turkey Trot Two-mile run to burn off those Thanksgiving calories. Prizes awarded at the finish line. Dogs welcome. Nov 24, 9am. $10$15. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Wait, Wait Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Tell Me

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 21-27, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

P.J. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke, Mo Rocca and Peter Grosz from the hit NPR program â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wait, Wait, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Tell Meâ&#x20AC;? in a lighter pre-holiday program. Nov 26-29, 8pm. Note: Admission is part of a series and is subscriptiononly. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Winter Wonderland

Altered Images

Forty tons of snow make up a sledding hill on A Street and a holiday marketplace provides opportunities for shopping. Light parade at 5:30pm Friday. Nov 23, noon-8pm and Nov 24, 9am-12pm. Free. Downtown San Rafael, Fifth and A streets, San Rafael.

Finley Center spotlights underground artists

Film

For years, underground art shows like Kaleidoscope, Gallery and the Well-Fed Artists League have thrived in Santa Rosa at nightclubs, abandoned storefronts and private houses, and though all have merited mention in these pages, official recognition proved elusiveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;until now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alteredâ&#x20AC;? is a group exhibit at the Finley Center sponsored by the city of Santa Rosa, and its lineup is a whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who of artists who usually show in under-the-radar gettogethers replete with loud DJs, cheap beer and, sometimes, skateboard ramps. Its aesthetic is determinedly outside the usual Sonoma County conďŹ nes, but as the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elaine Gutsch says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re deďŹ nitely excited about more experimental stuff.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alteredâ&#x20AC;? features work by Ricky Watts, whose spraypaint art and cityscapes have earned longtime acclaim; Adam Springer, who paints large-scale Lichtenstein-like situational imagery; Saif Azzuz, owner of Pleasant Skateboards, who has a contagious cartoon-like artistic approach; Roman Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Argenzio, host of the monthly Kaleidoscope series; and Sean Nichols, a reliable presence at Gallery whose dark themes contrast with ďŹ ne lines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is, I feel, kind of extreme for the city,â&#x20AC;? says curator Rafa Fujii. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I feel like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna be something exciting and new.â&#x20AC;? Fujii says despite their history of showing underground, the artists in the show are excited for the exposure, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of people that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go to these underground shows are going to be able to see what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing for years now.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alteredâ&#x20AC;? runs Nov. 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dec. 20 with an opening reception Nov. 29, 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm, at the Finley Community Center. 2060 W. College Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

The Athlete The story of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first Olympic double gold marathon runner, Abebe Bikila. Nov 24, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

The Third Man Filmed on location in postwar Vienna, this 1949 tale of black marketeers, friendship and betrayal stars Joseph Cotten, Valli, Orson Welles and Trevor Howard. Nov 25, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Xanadu Olivia Newton-John stars in this musical as a Greek muse who visits Earth as a human and inspires a young artist to open a glitzy disco roller rink. Nov 27, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372. %%"/$&)"-- 3&(("& 40$" 4," $"-:140 "/ $ & )"- - 3 & ( ( "& 4 0 $ " 4 , " " $ " -:1 4 0

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Cooking with Vegan Artisan Cheeses Chef Miyoko Schinner presents

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tasting and lessons from her cookbook “Vegan Artisan Cheeses.” Nov 28, 6:30pm. $15. Sonoma Cutlery, 130 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.6433.

Friday Night Bites Interactive classes with tastes every Fri at 6. $75. Fri. Cavallo Point, 601 Murray Circle, Fort Baker, Sausalito. 888.651.2003.

Harvest Market Selling local and seasonal fruit, flowers, vegetables and eggs. Sat, 9am-1pm. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am-3pm. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sonoma Farmers Market Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Fri, 9am-noon. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.538.7023.

Totally Truckin’ Thursdays Four food trucks park in the O’Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected nonprofit. Thurs. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

Vegan Thanksgiving Pot luck dinner of vegan foods. Nov 22, 3pm. Free. Monroe Dance Hall, 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

For Kids American Canyon Library Preschool storytime. Tues, 10:30am. Free. American Canyon Library, 3421 Broadway

(Highway 29), American Canyon. 707.644.1136.

Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission, $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Calistoga Library Storytime with “Library Grandparent,” Mon and Thurs at 2:30. Bilingual storytime for ages three and up, second and fourth Wed at 10:30. Ongoing. Free. Calistoga Library, 1108 Myrtle St, Calistoga. 707.942.4833.

Carolyn Parr Nature Center Learn about Napa County habitats and birds of prey through tours, dioramas, games, hands-on activities and books. Ongoing. Free. Carolyn Parr Nature Center Museum, Westwood Hills Park, 3107 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. 707.255.6465.

Central Library Babytime, Tues at 10:15. Storytime for toddlers, Tues at 11. Preschool storytime, Fri at 11. Tues-Fri. Free. Central Library, Third and E streets, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Children’s Garden Whimsical environments for kids’ exploration. Hours: Mon, noon to 4; Tues-Sun, 9 to 5. Ongoing. Free. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Chops Teen Club Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

Corte Madera Library Wed at 10 and 11, preschool storytime. Wed, 11am. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Guerneville Library Wed at 11, Preschool storytime. Wed, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Healdsburg Library Babytime and preschool storytime. Tues, 10am. Free. Healdsburg Library, 139 Piper St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3772.

Museum Mondays Children ages one to five and their families are invited to enjoy storytime, arts, crafts and museum activities. Fourth Mon of every month, 10am. Free-$5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Petaluma Library Tues at 10, storytime for ages three to five; at 3, read to a specially trained dog from PAWS for Healing. Wed at 10, babytime; at 7, evening pajama storytime in Spanish and English. Fri at 10, storytime for toddlers. Sat at 4, parent-child reading group for secondand third-graders. TuesFri. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Readers of the Pack A chance for new readers to get together. Tues-Sat. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

St Helena Library Free film series, story and craft time. Tues-Wed-Fri. St Helena Library, 1492 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.5244.

Windsor Library Preschool storytime and storytime for babies and toddlers. Tues-Wed. Free. Windsor Library, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

Lectures

Cloverdale Library

Divorce Options Workshop

Tues at 10:30, preschool storytime. Ongoing. Cloverdale Library, 401 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.5271.

Volunteer group of attorneys, financial specialists and mental-health professionals offer four-hour workshops on )

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divorce. Last Sat of every month, 9am. $45. Family Service Agency, 555 Northgate Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.9444.

Home Energy Workshop Learn about utility improvements that can save thousands of dollars. Fourth Wed of every month, 6pm. Free. Sonoma Mountain Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park.

Theater

Holiday

It’s a Wonderful Life Live Radio Play

Holiday Open House

Adapted from the 1946 holiday film, this version premiered in 1996 and has been produced around the country. Directed by Jon Tracy. Times vary. TuesThurs-Sun through Dec 16. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Nutcracker

Former Giants first baseman in conversation with Bruce Macgowan. Nov 28, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

North Bay Performing Arts Center and Contessi Ballet’s performance of the traditional holiday favorite. Nov 24, 7pm and Nov 25, 2pm. $15-$25. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Mindful Parenting

Toast of the Town

LifeWorks presents weekly parenting classes. Thurs at 6:30. $10. Prestwood Elementary School, 342 MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.568.2300, ext 19.

Variety show harks back to the era of the 1930s, featuring the voice crooner Jeff Gilbert. Nov 25, 2pm. $12-$15. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Parenting Workshops

You Can’t Take It with You

Ongoing lectures help parents raise happy kids and stay sane. Registration required. Ongoing. California Parenting Institute, 3650 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.585.6108.

Ross Valley Players presents story about encounter between conservative family and lunatic household. Various times. Through Dec 16. $20-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

JT Snow

Sebastopol Senior Center

Eclectic selection of antiques and collectibles, from beautiful jewelry and vintage books to rusty farm relics and unique garden art. Nov 23-25, 11am-5pm. Free. FFT Antiques & Collectibles, 2701 Gravenstein Hwy S, Sebastopol. 707.823.3101.

Tree Lighting & Holiday Open House Crafts, gifts, activities for kids and more in this holiday celebration culminating in the annual tree lighting in Courthouse Square. Nov 23, noon-7pm. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Talks and events. Free unless otherwise noted. Mon at 2:30, help for caregivers. Tues at 1, beginning conversational Spanish class. $6; at 1:30; at 2, intermediate conversation Spanish class, $6. Wed at 5, qigong, $6. Thurs at 11:15, yoga, $6. Ongoing. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of November 21

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “Don’t think about making art, just get it done,” said Andy Warhol. “Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” I encourage you to adopt that minimanifesto for your own purposes in the coming weeks, Aries. If you’re not an artist, simply substitute the appropriate phrase for “making art.” It could be “creating interesting relationships,” “exploring exotic lands,” “changing corrupt political institutions,” “fixing environmental problems” or even “making money.” The main point is, focus on doing what drives your quest for meaning, and forget about what people think of it. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

A Jungian writer whose name I have unfortunately misplaced made the following observations: “In a man’s psyche, the unconscious is experienced as chaotic, filled with violent and irrational processes of generation and destruction. But to a woman’s psyche, the unconscious is a fascinating matrix of sacred images and rituals which in their wildly contradictory meanings express the secret unity of all life.” After analyzing the astrological omens, I suspect that you Taurus men now have an unprecedented opportunity to experience your unconscious as women do. As for you Taurus women, you have the chance to get a vivid, visceral understanding of how true this description of the female unconscious is.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Let’s talk about the Decision. I’m referring to the choice you have been dancing around and fretting about and analyzing to death. By my estimate, there are at least 15 different solutions you could pursue. But just seven of those solutions would meet the requirements of being intelligent, responsible and fun. Of those seven, only four would be intelligent, responsible, fun and enduring. Of those four, only two would be intelligent, responsible, fun, enduring and the best for all concerned. I suggest you opt for one of those two. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

I’m not necessarily asserting that you need to edit yourself, Cancerian. Only you can decide that. But I will state unequivocally that if there is in fact any editing needed, now would be a good time to do it. You will have extra insight about what aspects of your life might benefit from being condensed, corrected and fine-tuned. It’s also true that the rectifications you do in the coming weeks will be relatively smooth and painless. So look into the possibilities, please. Should you calm your blame reflex? Downsize a huffy attitude? Shed some emotional baggage?

LEO (July 23–August 22) How many times have you been in love, Leo? Just once or twice? Or have you dived into the depths of amorous togetherness again and again over the years? Whatever the case may be, I bet you have strong ideas about the nature of passionate romance and profound intimacy. That’s natural and normal. But I’m going to ask you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about all that stuff. I invite you to become innocent again, cleansed of all your mature, jaded, hopeful and resentful thoughts about the game of love. In my astrological opinion, there’s no better way for you to prepare for what will come next.

Readings Arlene Francis Theater Nov 24, 5pm, Tribute to Tomas Vera. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa 707.528.3009.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

A medical research journal reported on a British woman who accidentally swallowed a felt-tip pen. It lay there in her stomach for 25 years. When surgeons finally removed it, they were surprised to find it still worked. I am not suggesting that anything remotely as exotic or bizarre will be happening to you, Virgo. I do suspect, though, that you will soon have an experience with certain metaphorical resemblances to that event. For example, you may retrieve and find use for an element of your past that has been gone or missing for a long time.

Book Passage Nov 26, 7pm, “The American Lawyer” with John Martel. Nov 27, 7pm, “The Art of Procrastination: A Guide to Effective Dawdling, Lollygagging, and Postponing” with John Perry. Nov 28, 7pm, “Far from the Tree” with Andrew Solomon. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Astrology

FREE WILL

CAMPING OUT ‘Xanadu’ screens at the Napa Valley

Opera House on Nov. 21, heaven help us. See Film, p35.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “Sapiosexual” is a relatively new word that refers to a person who is erotically attracted to intelligence. Urbandictionary. com gives an example of how it might be used: “I want an incisive, inquisitive, insightful, irreverent mind. I

want someone for whom philosophical discussion is foreplay. I want a sapiosexual.” In the coming weeks, Libra, I suspect you will be closer to fitting this definition than you’ve ever been before. The yearning that’s rising up in you is filled with the need to be stimulated by brilliance, to be influenced by wisdom, to be catalyzed by curiosity.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In 2007, the band White Stripes did a tour of Canada. One of their final gigs was outdoors in St. John’s, Newfoundland. They came onstage, played one note, a C sharp, and declared the performance over. It was the briefest rock show in history. Judging from the current astrological omens, Scorpio, I’m thinking it would be a good time for you to do some almost equally pithy things. You have the potential to be extremely concise and intense and focused in all you do. I urge you to fulfill that potential. Pack every speech, gesture and action with a concentrated wealth of meaning.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Your redesigned thrust vectoring matrix is finally operational. Love those new nozzles! Moreover, you’ve managed to purge all the bugs from your cellular tracking pulse, and your high-resolution flux capacitor is retooled and as sexy as a digitally remastered simulation of your first kiss. You’re almost ready for take-off, Sagittarius! The most important task left to do is to realign your future shock absorbers. No more than a week from now, I expect you to be flying high and looking very, very good.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The plot twists will be intriguing. The actors may be unpredictable, even erratic. Blossoming and decay will be happening simultaneously, and the line between wisdom and craziness could get blurry. There’s not nearly enough room in this little horoscope to describe the epic sweep of the forces working behind the scenes. Are you willing to confront uncanny truths that other people might regard as too unruly? Are you brave enough to penetrate to the depths that others are too timid to look at, let alone deal with? I hope you are, Capricorn, because that will give you the power to ultimately emerge from the drama with your integrity shining and your intelligence boosted. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Psychologists have done studies that suggest we subconsciously adopt the qualities of fictional characters we read about or see in movies. That’s not a problem if those characters are smart, ethical, highly motivated people whose ideals are similar to ours. But if the heroes of the stories we absorb are jerks who treat others badly and make messes wherever they go, our imitative urges may lead us astray. Right now is a crucial time for you to be extra careful about the role models you allow to seep into your imagination. You’re especially susceptible to taking on their attributes. I say, be proactive: Expose yourself intensely to only the very best fictional characters who embody the heights you aspire to reach. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“The fates guide him who will; him who won’t, they drag.” So said the ancient Greek philosopher Seneca, and now I’m passing it on to you. It’s an excellent time for you to think about the issue. Ask yourself: Have you been cooperating with fate so that it has maximum power to shepherd you? Have you been working closely with fate, giving it good reasons to consistently provide you with useful hints and timely nudges? Or have you been you avoiding fate, even resisting it out of laziness or ignorance, compelling it to yank you along? Spend the next few weeks making sure your relationship with fate is strong and righteous.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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