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the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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nb BYE BYE BABY! Verily, we do decree on this day henceforth and forever that across the land it shall be known: GO GIANTS.

This photo is but a small talisman of hope for the 2012 World Series. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘When writers write about the death of the American male, they’re writing about me.’ COVER STORY P16 Remembering Chris Stevens T H E PAP E R P 8

Church Ladies: The Real Borscht Belt DI N I N G P 12

Brushing Up on Those Ghost Stories STAGE P 2 3 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Green Zone p10 Dining p12 Wineries p15

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Center of Attention Elite class folly at Sonoma State BY PETER PHILLIPS

T

he Sept. 29 opening of the Green Music Center (GMC) at Sonoma State University was nothing less than a grand celebration of wealth and privilege. Beaded dresses, tuxedos and political elites blended in a glorious aristocratic coming out.

Built in a time of an economic recession, and including $47 million in public bonds, the $150 million GMC represents one of the most opulent, expensive building projects in the history of Sonoma County. The website for the GMC claims it is “destined to become one of the most sought-after music and arts venues in the world. . . . All three floors of Weill Hall are filled with handcrafted, European steamed beech maple seats, which remain acoustically neutral whether occupied or empty.” An A-level seat for the first eight concerts costs $626 and B-level concerts are $459 for the same. A single ticket for the first concert was $81. One attendee was reported to have remarked, “The bathrooms were nicer than my whole house.” While SSU is suffering tuition increases, declining facultystudent ratios and widespread institutional cuts, the corporate media fell over itself with acclaim for SSU president Ruben Armiñana’s “vision,” vaunting magniloquently his personal drive. Presidents of state colleges, with the approval of the California State University trustees, have total financial control over their institutions. Therefore, an administrative manager of a publictaxpayer-supported university can cozy up to the regional elites and pro-growth forces to build a Taj Mahal without any democratic process with the stakeholders inside the institution or the public at large. This unilateral control is as much about why 73.4 percent of the SSU faculty in May 2007 voted no confidence in President Armiñana as was the issue of allocation of resources to instruction. The extravagance of the GMC means SSU faculty, students and staff will continue to suffer lost resources long into the future due to continuing expenses in excess of income, all due to the willingness of regional elites and the CSU trustees to support and accept the megalomanic vision of a single individual with far too much power. Peter Phillips is a professor of sociology at Sonoma State University and president of Media Freedom Foundation. www.projectcensored.com. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Romney’s Past

Geoffrey Dunn’s story (“The Book of Romney,” Oct. 10) presents information so important in this election, information I haven’t seen anywhere else. I hope you are able to distribute it to print sources in battleground states ASAP!

ALICE MACONDRAY Santa Rosa

Double Yes Vote Many people are (justifiably) confused about which one of the dueling education tax revenue propositions, Proposition 30 or Proposition 38, to support at the polls. One measure relies mainly on increasing sales taxes to fund the sorely strapped educational system. The other measure relies on increasing income taxes to do the same. There are other, relatively minor, differences. But here is the rub: each proposition needs a majority vote to win, and if each one gets more than 50 percent, the one with the most votes triumphs. Conventional wisdom says vote yes for the one you like and no for its competition. But voters beware: voting yes for one measure and no for the other vastly increases the probability that both measures will lose! The logic is simple. Assume that 60 percent of the electorate wants to increase funding for education. But, influenced by hair-splitting campaign mailers, the voters split down the middle, and 30 percent vote for Proposition 30 and 30 percent for Proposition 38, and both lose. Or they skew 45 percent vote for one measure and 15 percent for the other, and both lose. If education supporters split the proeducation vote, both measures are almost certain to lose! They only way to reasonably ensure that funding education succeeds is to vote for both propositions. Then, assuming that most people support education, one

proposition will win majority approval by a small number of votes, which is vastly superior to both propositions losing. Get it?

PETER BYRNE Petaluma

Around the Way I really do not understand this nostalgia (pre-nostalgia, actually) for standard intersections controlled by traffic signals (“Hail Traffic Control,” Oct. 17). They are far more dangerous than roundabouts. Studies show that roundabouts reduce injury accidents by 75 percent. Vehicle through-put is improved, too.

ZAL MOXIS Santa Rosa

More on Proposition 38 The proponents of Proposition 30 claim that if we don’t vote yes on 30 and no on 38, billions of dollars in education funding will be “cut” from the state budget. This is inaccurate. The truth of the matter is that the state passed an unbalanced budget in which expenses exceed revenue by about $6 billion. Proposition 30 seeks to raise $6 billion in revenue so the budget will then be balanced. The defeat of Proposition 30 will not result in “cuts,” because the state can’t cut something that it doesn’t have. If Proposition 30 doesn’t pass, the Legislature will be forced to live within its means and pass a balanced budget. Proposition 38 also seeks to raise revenue, but unlike Proposition 30, the money raised by 38 goes into a special fund that can only be spent on specific expenses, such as K–12 education. Schools would receive funding above and beyond currently mandated amounts. So even if the $6 billion reduction in general fund spending were to occur, the revenue generated by Proposition 38 would make up the difference.

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow



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Top Five If you really want to help increase funding for schools, vote yes on Proposition 38.

CHRIS WENMOTH Santa Rosa

Dept. of Beans A photo of the Petaluma Gold Rush bean in our Oct. 10 issue was printed without credit; let it be known the photo was taken by David Baldwin. Incidentally, Baldwin owns the Natural Gardening Co. in Petaluma, where one can purchase the fabled bean, along with many other organic plants and seeds, locally. See www.naturalgardening.com.

THE ED.

At Harvest Time

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Lance Armstrong tarred, feathered, sentenced to watch Gigli forever in shame

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at old Sawyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s News spot, English tea room on the way Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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FOLLOWING DREAMS Chris Stevens, left, and cousin Matt Reynolds, backpacking together.

Fallen Hero

Santa Rosa’s Matt Reynolds remembers his cousin Chris Stevens, the Libyan ambassador killed in Benghazi BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

n ancient cities and villages, the marketplace was once people-based, a colorful, exciting meeting point marked by risk-taking and exposure to foreign ideas. So centrally did the marketplace once feature in human cultures that the word “ignorant” first

described “one who did not go into the marketplace.” When Matt Reynolds, cofounder of Santa Rosa’s Indigenous, entered the marketplace to sell clothing woven by artisans in poor countries, he was already steeped in marketplace wisdom learned from his father, a Stanford professor and progressive social economist passionate about the

inequities between rich and poor. “My father was an optimist,” says Reynolds. “He believed things could be better if we had the humility and patience to listen and accept points of view of other cultures.” Not only was Reynolds’ own path influenced by his father’s optimism, but so was that of his cousin Chris Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to Libya who was

slain last month in an attack on the U.S. embassy in Benghazi. “Chris said my father was influential in his decision to become a diplomat,” says Reynolds. “He encouraged Chris to follow his heart.” In turn, Stevens influenced Reynolds by exposing him to the land of ancient marketplaces, the Middle East. Reynolds says he found his calling on a nine-month journey that concluded with a visit to Stevens, then residing in Egypt. “That trip was a huge part of the force that got me to leave mainstream America and jump into emerging markets,” says Reynolds. With fun-loving Stevens as guide, it was an action-packed visit that included snorkeling in the Red Sea and hiking up Mount Sinai under a full moon. During the hike, Reynolds injured himself. “I cut my hand open and I was freaking out because I’d just arrived from Germany, and there I was in the middle of the desert, jet lagged and with no bandages or antiseptic,” Reynolds remembers. “But Chris said, ‘Don’t worry.’ He took out antiseptic and poured it on my hand.” Reynolds was in awe of Chris’ preparedness and cool. But when the men stopped near the summit, Reynolds was taken aback to see his cousin open the antiseptic, pour it into a cup with some juice and take a big sip. “Chris said, ‘Matt, vodka is the best antiseptic.’” Reynolds recalls that experience as golden, drinking vodka cocktails on Mount Sinai with the cousin who would become the U.S. diplomat to Libya. “He was a beautiful character, always cracking jokes,” says Reynolds. “He was a great listener and had an abiding passion for the Middle East. When people would bring up the dangers, Chris would tell them it was as dangerous as East Oakland. He loved the Middle East, and made many of us love it as well.” On visits to the States, Stevens would stop by Indigenous and cheer on both Reynolds and cofounder Scott Leonard. “Chris was a big supporter,” says Reynolds. “I have a picture of him wearing our stuff in

‘Chris won friends for the United States in far-flung places.’ The paternal optimism bequeathed to son and nephew seems to permeate the clan, along with Stevens’ passion for that culture. The family bears no rancor toward Libya. It was Stevens’ adopted home, where he ate in cafes with Libyans and routinely ran for exercise in the streets. “He had guards with him,” says Reynolds, “but he wanted to be with the people. He really felt love for them.” According to Reynolds, Stevens is being revered by some as a hero of Libya. In fact, a Libyan Muslim honored Stevens at a memorial service in San Francisco, underscoring an observation made by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton: “Chris won friends for the United States in far-flung places. He made those people’s hopes his own.” If Stevens’ own hopes live on, it may be in part due to the family optimism that in any country—or any marketplace— things can get better. “We are just hoping some good will come of Chris’ death, that it helps promote understanding between Western and Arab worlds,” says Reynolds. “He was such an incredibly caring person, so respectful to everybody, and really trying to make a difference in the world. Chris inspired me in so many ways to follow my dreams. Dreams do come true. Good people are out there.” For more, see www.rememberingchrisstevens.com.

9

Twitter Scuffle

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Jerusalem.” On the Indigenous website, product descriptions are outnumbered by references to marketplace justice and to the concept of literally wearing one’s commitment.

Lisa Maldonado, executive director of the North Bay Labor Council, is no shrinking violet when it comes to her Twitter presence. On a daily basis, especially with the onset of election season, she takes to task candidates like John Sawyer and Marc Levine for what she says are questionable campaign donations and pro-business politics. But a series of tweets about Sonoma County Supervisor Efren Carrillo, after he voted against a lateSeptember proposal to ensure that county construction jobs were union jobs, may have had repercussions beyond the socialmedia realm. “Supervisor Carrillo still mum on why he stabbed workers in the back and supports big business over local hire. No details—just like his arrest,” tweeted Maldonado on Sep. 26. Jack Buckhorn, president of the North Bay Labor Council, says that Carrillo called him in early October to complain about some of the tweets that Maldonado had posted. At an Oct. 9 meeting, Carrillo voted against a recommendation to continue Maldonado’s position on the Workforce Investment Board, of which she’d been a member for over two years, stating, “I don’t think she represents the interests of organized labor.” Supervisors David Rabbitt, Valerie Brown and Mike McGuire agreed. On Oct. 11, Maldonado received a registered letter informing her that she had not been reappointed. Maldonado tells the Bohemian that in her opinion, the situation is an ethics and free-speech violation, calling it an “abuse of public office.” Buckhorn sees it as a case of censorship, and says that he’s shared this opinion with a couple of the supervisors. Carrillo could not be reached for comment. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

71 Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa 707.576.0861 Mon-Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 11am-4pm • www.wbu.com

Birdseed . Feeders . Birdbaths . Optics . Nature Gifts . Books

Green Zone

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10

Kernel of Wisdom .

WELLNESS

Sebastopol California

BY JULIANE POIRIER

CENTER

Fast results for busy women

Health Starts Here! .BTTBHF8FEOFTEBZTtBNoQN Free 10 minute massages provided by Students from the National Holistic Institute. 3PTFO.FUIPE#PEZXPSL Relaxation through Touch 8FET toQN Experience how touch releases chronic tension, reduces pain, increases aliveness and restores deep connections. Whole Kids Nutrition Club 4BUVSEBZ toQN Children 6-12 learn how to take charge of their own nutrition for a life time of good health. Parent participation and space reservation is requested. e-mail: misty.humphrey@wholefoods.com Cracking the code on Eating and Weight JO&BTZ4UFQT 5IVSTEBZtoQN Experience a take home, step-by-step system to become a happier and healthier you. Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

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Author William Davis stalks the demon in wheat

Camps offered: 5:15am & 9:00am

FALL BACK TO BOOT CAMP begins Oct 15

707.217.3795 www.SebastopolBootCamp.com

A

s the Obama administration improves schoollunch guidelines, replacing frozen pizzas with vegetables, the predictable response from the right is something akin to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wah! Gimme back my Cheetos!â&#x20AC;? Absurdly, conservative politicians are defending studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; right to eat junk in school cafeterias, an organized tantrum that Mother Jones dubs the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tater Tot rebellion.â&#x20AC;? But aside from the predictable preference that kids (and politicians funded by processed-food purveyors) seem to have for junk over good food, children and adults alike may unknowingly be ďŹ ghting for the right to fuel an addiction triggered by wheat. The dark side of wheat is explored by physician William

Davis in Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health. In the wake of so many low-carb diet books, the title made me suspect that the book would be no more revolutionary than the USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recently (and slightly) improved plate symbol replacing the nutritionally incorrect, industryderived food pyramid. But I was wrong. Davis does not advise simply reducing our intake of carbs. Instead, his message amounts to an absolute avoidance of wheat products, doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s orders. When wheat is eliminated, weight loss is merely a happy outcome of a much more critical achievement: conquered addiction and reduced threat of disease, ranging from diabetes and heart disease to arthritis and irritable bowel syndrome. Many are susceptible to the demon in wheat, says Davis, not only those with gluten sensitivity. Davis himself was once among the victims of wheatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dark agent, gliadin. A protein component of gluten, gliadin is like bread loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heroin; it breaks down during digestion into polypeptides that hook up with opiate receptors in the brain. The result is addiction and a triggered desire for carbohydrates. Davis claims that what many consider a sweet tooth is actually a wheat tooth (and, due to crossbreeding, a rye tooth as well); itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the gliadin in the wheat (and now rye) that leads the compulsive charge back to the doughnut box. Succumbing to addictive cravings for more carbs leads to obesity and to spikes in blood sugar that can ultimately result in diabetes and a host of related health problems. In present political food ďŹ ghts over cafeteria lunches in a nation where child obesity is epidemic, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see Davisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; research placed squarely on the table.

킬킬 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining Nicolas Grizzle

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

TAKING A CHANCE Who among us hasn’t found an amateur community cookbook and thought, what the hell?

Holy Holubka! Traditional Russian recipes fill the house with the smell of cabbage BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

M

y cookbook collection is obscure, to say the least. The World Encyclopedia of Cheese and America’s Test Kitchen sit next to three spiral-bound copies of the Chicken of the Sea Tempting Tuna Cookbook. So when I came across St. Mary’s Russian Orthodox Church of Minneapolis’ Our Traditional

and Favorite Recipes at a garage sale, it only seemed natural to take it home. A slice of 1970 American Midwest life, it features 195 pages of recipes, 75 of which are desserts. Apparently there were 1,000 of these printed, in two editions. How did it get to Santa Rosa? I don’t care. I just want some gloopy cabbage goodness. Most of the recipes measure ingredients by can size. The drink “Summer Cooler” features two ingredients: one can concentrated

lemonade and ginger ale. Guess how it’s made? This book is absolutely full of recipes like this: ham patties with sour cream; deep dish corned beef hash (with canned corned beef); braised liver casserole; and my personal favorite, shrimp Chinese (calling for cans of water chestnuts, mushrooms and even chow mein noodles). Looking for something more American? How about chili con wiener? Prune whip? Easy date dessert? (To my dismay, it actually contains dates.) These recipes have been crafted

by what I envision as sweet, loving grandmas who thought their horrible casserole that took hours to make was the best thing ever because nobody had the heart to tell them otherwise. But what really made me pull the trigger on the $1 purchase was the collection of traditional Russian and Czechoslovakian recipes. Piroshki, pierogi, head cheese, machanka (mushroom soup with sauerkraut juice, with or without fish), studenina (jellied pig’s feet) and other unpronounceable delicacies litter the pages. Of course, I was compelled to make something from this book, but in the interest of not wasting food, I searched for something edible. Page 23 contained my answer: Mrs. George Nepsha’s Holubka. These ground beef-and-rice-stuffedcabbage rolls looked like something I’d had at the Glendi food fair in Santa Rosa—at least there was precedent for edibility, and cabbage, ground beef and rice are cheap. I ended up going with Mrs. Leonard Soroka’s variation of canned tomato instead of vinegar covering the holubka while it baked. The result was, in fact, edible— borderline tasty, even. They were little Russian enchiladas, and took about as much effort to make. Had I this mindset going into the hourlong preparation, they would have turned out much better. I would have sauced the cabbage like a tortilla, rolled them open-ended and pressed them flat. This would have taken less time, but I don’t think that was a concern for the authors of this book. Many facets of these recipes require translation. The holubka recipe simply said to “bake for an hour or so,” no temperature or pan specified. I’m also pretty sure the recipe was referring to minute rice, because mine took significantly longer to cook through than suggested. I have returned from garage sales with chandeliers, broken turntables, a box of undated alcohol from around the world and countless other curiosities. Luckily this time, it only ended with holubka. And I can’t wait until Christmas Eve, when the time will finally be right for lima beans with prunes.

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bear Korean Restaurant Korean. $$.

burgundy beef pot roast. The gluten-free pancakes are pure Sebastopol, while the Yucatan pulled-pork sandwich crosses borders. Breakfast and lunch, Wed–Mon. 162 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.861.3825.

Authentic Korean home cooking in informal setting. Exciting array of side-dish condiments add extra oomph. Lunch and dinner daily. 8577 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati. 707.794.9828.

JhanThong BanBua

Bovolo Italian/

Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue.

Mediterranean. $-$$. Slow Food from Northern California-sourced ingredients. Fabulous made-in-house pork sandwiches, pizzas and salumi, Lunch and dinner daily. 106 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2962.

Caffe Portofino Italian. $$-$$$. Great flavors and some eclectic dishes at this Santa Rosa institution. 535 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.1171.

De Schmire Hearty continental. $$-$$$. Informal, with emphasis on seafood. Generous portions, open kitchen, outside dining. Dinner daily. 304 Bodega Ave, Petaluma. 70.762.1901.

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner Wed-Mon. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

French. $$$$. A splurgeworthy, romantic inn with an extensive wine list and highly polished service. Dinner, ThursSun. 7871 River Rd, Forestville. 707.887.3300.

Gypsy Cafe Diner. $-$$. Modern comfort food with a transcontinental, healthconscious twist: there’s everything here from vegan tofu and quinoa scramble to

$-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Sizzling Tandoor II Indian. $-$$. Coastal gem offers a great view of the Sonoma Coast. Come for happy hour and stay through dinner. 9960 Hwy 1, Jenner. 707.865.0625.

Sushi Hana Japanese. $$. Popular sushi destination offers delightful treats. Dollar sushi night on Wed and Sat really packs ’em in. Lunch and dinner daily. 6930 Burnett St, Sebastopol. 707.823.3778.

Three Squares Cafe Cafe. $-$$. Home-style cooking in iconic Railroad Square location. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, Tues-Sun. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4300.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

TRA RADITIONAL R A DITIONA IT I O NA L + U NI NIQUE N IQUE IICE C E CREAM CREA C R E A M & PALETAS P PA PALET A LE ET TAS TA

GRATIS SCOOP WHEN YOU ORDER TWO!

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub

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fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

OWN JO NT E W

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Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant California-

Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

MA R I N CO U N T Y

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

) 14

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

photo: Marilee Koll

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

DO

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Dining

13

executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

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14

CELEBRATE THE ARRIVAL OF DUNGENESS CRAB SEASON IN TOMALES BAY ng Benefiti ma lu the Peta al on ti a c u d E tion a d n Fou

Everyone Invited!

Do you love to catch crab?

Join us for a day of fun on Tomales Bay! Each participant receives a commemorative T-shirt and Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cove water bottle.

November 11 Competition begins at 10:00 am Prizes awarded by 4:00 pm

SPECIAL EVENTS ALL DAY! Crab-catching Competition Cooking Demonstration Dungeness Crab Tasting Menu

Hosted by CBS TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liam Mayclem, host of

For more info and to register: http://crabcatch.eventbrite.com

Dining ( 13 Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Tommyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

N A PA CO U N T Y Brassica Mediterranean.

WEDNESDAY W EDNESDAY BY B Y THE T HE W WAVES A AVES S TA RT E R S STARTERS Great G r e at P Pumpkin umpk in S Soup, oup, P Pepitas, e p it a s, C rème FraĂŽche F r a ĂŽc he Crème o a r ro aand nd Organic Orga n ic Beet Be e t S a lad orr F Farro Salad MAIN M A I N PLATES P L AT E S Niman Ranch Lamb N iman R a nc h L amb Shoulder Shoulder Shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s S hepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pie Pie orr P o Pan an Roasted Roasted Wild Wild Coho Coho Salmon S a l mo n DE S SE RT DESSERT Mocha M ocha Chip C h ip P Profiteroles rofiteroles orr P o Pear ea r aand nd Raspberry Raspber r y C Crisp, r isp, Housemade H ousemade Honey Honey Ice Ice Cream C r ea m $

29 pper er p person e r son

Excludes Taxes Excludes Taxes and and Gratuity. Gratuit y. Not Not valid valid with w ith oother ther ooffers. f f e rs.

Wednesday Wednesday October O ctober 331, 1, 22012 0 12 55pm pm iin nD Drakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 66pm pm in in The The Duck Duck Club Club

T ON IGH T â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ 5 F TONIGHTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FEATURES E AT U R E S Bloody Bloody M Martini a r t ini Souvera in Chardonnay, C ha rdon nay, Souverain Alexander A lex a nder Valley Va lley 22009 0 09 Rosenblum Rosenblum â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Old V Vineâ&#x20AC;? i ne â&#x20AC;? Z Zinfandel, in fa ndel, Sonoma S o no m a C County ount y 22009 0 09 Corkage iiss w Corkage waived aived oon nW Wednesday e dn e s d a y nights Sonoma County Wines n ights ffor or aall ll S o no m a C ount y W ines Executive E xecutive C Chef hef JJeff ef f R Reilly eilly

Award Winning Hand-Crafted Pinot Noir, Zinfandel and Syrah too!

Thank you Sonoma! Best Syrah Best Winetasting Room Honorable

Open Thurs thru Mon 10:30 to 4:30 www.woodenheadwine.com 707-887-2703

Busterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;for a reason. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot!â&#x20AC;? Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Compadres Rio Grille BVS2 cQY1ZcP@SabOc`O\b BVS2cQY1ZcP@SabOc`O\b !1]Oab6WUVeOg=\S0]RSUO0Og1/'"' !1] O a b6 WU VeOg= \ S0 ] R S U O0 Og1 /' "' ! 4]`2cQY1ZcP`SaS`dObW]\a 4 ]`2 cQY1ZcP`SaS` dObW]\a  ^^ZSOaSQOZZ%%&%#!# ZSOa SQOZZ%% &%# !# #

Woodenhead

5700 River Road Santa Rosa

$$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

SMALL BITES

Bacon Bacchanalia

Bacon has become the Brangelina of food. No longer relegated to Sunday brunch, this culinary celebrity has infiltrated everything from sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mores to baklava to martinis, even wrapping its way around tofu. So it makes sense that the KSRO Good Food Hour is featuring the sumptuous slab in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 26th annual recipe contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of an ingredient that generates such passion when you mention it or excitement when you hear it sizzle,â&#x20AC;? says co-host and chef John Ash. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truly natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfect food.â&#x20AC;? Previous contests have profiled tamales, almonds, coffee, potato salad and, in its very first year, fruitcake. Between 50 and 100 participants are expected, especially â&#x20AC;&#x153;given how saturated the bacon market has become,â&#x20AC;? says Good Food Hour co-host Steve Garner. Four lucky finalists will bring their bacony dishes to G&G Supermarket in Santa Rosa on Saturday, Nov. 3, for the Good Food Hour broadcast and taste-off with Garner and chef Ash. Between 11am and noon, a panel of celebrity judges will select the winners, who stand to receive prizes that include gift certificates, cookbooks, wine and cooking classes. Email, fax or mail your original recipe entries to KSRO Recipe Contest, PO Box 2158, Santa Rosa, CA 95405. Fax, 707.571.1097; email, steve@ksro.com. Deadline for entry is Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 5pm.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jessica Dur

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Wineries

15

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Cellars of Sonoma Topshelf winos will want to roll down the tracks and check out this Railroad Square coop that serves product from six small family wineries. The attractive shop features the massive wood bar from the old Mixx restaurant, constantly shifting scenery on an array of flat panel screens ensconced in wine barrel heads and aroma seminars. Check out the dry Gewürtz and Estate Pinots. 133 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Sunday–Wednesday 10am–5pm, Thursday– Saturday 10am–7pm. $10 fee. 707.578.1826.

Freeman Vineyard & Winery Rundown, trashed—this little winery had seen better times when the Freemans found it. With a spotless crush pad and new horseshoe-shaped cave, it’s giving back the love. Pinot Noir from top West County vineyards. 1300 Montgomery Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only. 707.823.6937.

Inman Family Wines Unique, single-vineyard Russian River Pinot Noir is a good reason to visit Inman Family Wine’s new winery and tasting room in genteel vineyard location; don’t miss the Thorn Road Ranch Pinot. 3900 Piner Road, Santa Rosa. Open 11am–4pm Thursday through Sunday. 707.293.9576.

Martin Ray Focus is on mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila

and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.

5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Portalupi Wine Husband-

Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-toend. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25. 707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

and-wife team went the distance, selecting Barbera cuttings from the Italian alps: their Barbera was named best in the world. You’ll also find Vermentino, Pinot, and rusticchic two-liter milk jugs of “vino di tavola” in comfortable downtown lounge; wine education classes for groups. 107 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–7pm. Tasting fee, $5–$12. 707.395.0960.

Roadhouse Winery Dudes abide at this casual, fun spot. Pinot, Zin, Grenache are hot. 240 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily 11am–7pm. 707.922.6362.

N A PA CO U N TY Beringer Vineyards (WC) This historic winery offers some seven daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels. Open daily, 10am– 6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Chimney Rock Winery International beverage man Sheldon S. “Hack” Wilson built this winery in a Cape Dutch style. Now owned by the Terlato Group, produces distinctive Bordeaux-style wines. 5350 Silverado Trail, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm. $20–$30. 707.257.2641.

Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and wineryexclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30-yearold family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am–

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809.

Old Redwood Brewing Company On holiday from the grape BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

oday in Old Downtown Windsor, the pop-up development styled equal parts Mediterranean, Mayberry and Old West, there’s more than tumbleweed drifting down the street. This morning, the sweet smell of beer mash wafts down the street. In a prime corner location across from the train station—where, say, a saloon and hotel would be in a real back-lot set—four partners on the frontier of nanobrewing have set up shop.

“We got an awesome deal on the rent,” says Robert Anderson, while brewing a new batch in the humid, one-and-a-half-barrel brew room. Good thing, too, because the front of the house, run by friend Adam Derum, is spacious but furnished only with a small bar, bar stools and a few barrels. This is no brewpub, not even in the making. Old Redwood is built on the winetasting model and geared toward signing up beer-club members, who receive a new release each month, bottled in 750ml, flip-top bottles. No surprise, cofounder Dominic Foppoli is brand manager of his family’s several wineries and adept at networking with other local tasting rooms. A recent afternoon found Foppoli, behind the bar, trying to set up a group of women on a winetasting tour while they, in turn, thrust iPhones over the bar, trying to set up the 30-year-old with a likely prospect. Co-brewer Mike Stewart rounds out the team. Anderson and Derum, both from Sonoma County, didn’t meet until they were assigned the same dorm in military training, in 2000. Back home after several tours, Anderson tried his hand at homebrewing. Luckily, the first batch went well. Self-taught, he’s scaled up to a one-and-a-half-barrel operation successfully; in September, they ran out of beer. “It’s all fun and games until you try to make a business out of it,” he laughs. They reopened midOctober. The Windsor Wit ($23) is dry and pale pink, lightly flavored with fresh raspberries. The Compromise ($13) (so-called for the brewers’ meeting in the middle of their favorite styles, Belgian and IPA), served up in a mini-Belgian style glass, has a fruity hop aroma, sweet body with shades of apricot nectar and a bitter hop finish. The Highway ($19) is a robust, nutty, malty IPA, while the caramel and chocolate-flavored Fortress imperial stout ($22), is spiced with a good helping of piney hops. These brews are diverse, flavorful, and well-made And a darned refreshing break from wine. Old Redwood Brewing Company, 9000 Windsor Road, ste. A, Windsor. Open Wednesday–Sunday, noon–7ish. Tasting flight, $10, four four-once pours. 707.836.3186.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Stud in the Mud One man takes on the world of mud racing and lives to tell the tale BY SCOTT KENEALLY

S

ee that guy there? The one wincing? That, dear reader, would be me—a hundred feet from the Tough Mudder finish line last fall. You’d think that after enduring two-dozen military-style obstacles over 11 miles of high-altitude hell at Squaw Valley, I’d be thrilled to be so near the end. Instead, I’m locked in a full-body cringe, terrified of the curtain of electrified wires that hang between me and a free Dos Equis. “Electroshock Therapy,” with its promise of a 10,000-volt jolt, is the obstacle I’d most feared. And that right there is the pained expression of a man wondering, What the fuck am I doing here?

Maybe this wasn’t such a good idea after all. Especially for a guy like me. If you haven’t heard about Tough Mudder or read about it or at least seen Facebook pics of your friends doing it, here’s a quick snapshot. It’s a 10- to 12-mile mud run that employs extreme obstacles like ice, fire, electricity and barbed wire to sensational, almost sadistic effect. And it’s insanely popular, with 35 events in 2012 that, by year’s end, will have drawn an estimated 500,000 Mudders and $70 million in revenue.

I’ve never thought of myself as particularly tough. While I was one of the biggest guys on the football squad during my senior year in high school, I was also one of the softest. Whereas Tommy Tremarco and Anthony Cacase played with casts covering broken bones, I’d sometimes ask to sit out wind sprints because of “chronic shin splints,” a self-diagnosed condition. “Maybe if you’d actually hit someone instead of just pussyfooting around all the time,” said one coach, “your shin splints would go away.”

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These people all thought me a pansy, though I preferred to think of myself as pain averse. Regardless, not much has changed in the years since. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been known to sniffle at Applebeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercials, cry while watching The Voice, sob during Glee and squeal at the sight of spiders. When writers write about the death of the American male, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re writing about me. Which, incidentally, is why I was so shocked by what happened after watching my ďŹ rst Tough Mudder promo video.

At ďŹ rst, I was mortiďŹ ed by the montage of obstacles â&#x20AC;&#x153;designed by British Special Forces.â&#x20AC;? Just watching it made me want to pop a Vicodin. But there was something disarming about seeing all the costumed crazies conquering the course. Tough Mudder, with its festival atmosphere and countercultural vibe, seemed to be doing doughnuts at the intersection of fun and ďŹ tness. It looked exactly as promised: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ironman meets Burning Man.â&#x20AC;? And its mottoâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Probably the Toughest Event on the Planetâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was a call to arms for the alpha inside. So without pause or ponder, I decided right then and there to run the next NorCal event, just three months out. Never mind that I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen the inside of a gym or run 10 milesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;totalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in the previous three months. That video and the many others I watched ďŹ&#x201A;ipped a switch, and for the ďŹ rst time since I realized that a career as a linebacker for the New York Giants wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in my cards, I trained as if it were. I ran. I set daily pull-up goals. I did side planks during commercials. And I spearheaded a few healthy initiatives Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d largely avoided. Like eating greens. And drinking less. I thought about going raw, but then I realized I had no idea what the hell I was talking about. This was all welcome news to my super-ďŹ t wife, Amber, of course, a personal trainer who serves as the yin to my sin. I became a regular at her circuittraining classes, even though said classes seemed largely designed to make me puke. I got stronger, strengthened my core. I got to the point where I could do a plank for 30 seconds without my whole body shaking like a Magic Fingers mattress. I ran the same Lake Sonoma loop, ďŹ ve miles a day, day after day, and kind of started loving it. I did interval sprints up steep trails, and sometimes screamed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fuck yeah!â&#x20AC;? at the top. I was a man on ďŹ re. But I knew Mudder wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just about strength and stamina; it was about mental toughness and grit. And since I will stop a trail run dead in its tracks to ) 18 pick out even the tiniest

18 Mud Running ( 17 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Brightroom.com

ELECTROSHOCK THERAPY The author forges through the final electrifying stretch of this insane race.

pebble in my sock or shoe, I knew I needed to harden up in a hurry. I needed to steel myself like Rocky Balboa might, so I started agitating my routines. I swam in the lake with my sneakers on. I ran up fire roads with stones in my toes. And in anticipation of the ice water obstacles, I took cold showers every once in a while. (Well, maybe just once—but it was for a good 20 seconds or so.) Slowly but surely, bit by bit, I amassed a thin layer of grit, which I tried to shellac with a viewing of Rocky IV the night before the race. I rented the flick in hopes of psyching myself up. I felt that familiar adrenaline flash when Rocky went to Russia to fight Ivan Drago. In fact, I was so worked up by the Vince DiCola-scored training-montage scene of Rocky running through snowdrifts that I wanted to charge the course

that night. Tough Mudder was my Drago, and I wanted to take the evil S.O.B. out. Unfortunately, however, the intoxication didn’t last long. In the very next scene, when his wife Adrian shows up unannounced to support him, I started snot-bubbling so fervently you’d think I was watching The Notebook. My hard-won mental grit was now crumpled up in Kleenex. I had a long way to go, obviously, but there was no time to go anywhere but sleep. By some strange magic, I sprang out of bed the following morning full of confidence. I dropped down for 20 pushups, beat myself in the chest for effect and declared to the man in the mirror, Today, I will be William Fucking Wallace. And I meant it. This vibration intensified upon arriving on the scene, spiked when I signed my death waiver and reached a fever pitch while

reciting the Tough Mudder pledge in the starting corral. “I will not whine—kids whine!” we chanted, though within moments of the gun going off, as we began the steep, initial ascent, I found myself looking longingly at the gondola. Who would know? Twenty-five lung-busting minutes later, after dragging myself in a mud bog beneath barbed wire, I came across one of the most dispiriting things I thought I’d ever seen: the first mile marker. “MILE ONE,” it announced, simple and direct, like a middle finger. Panic rushed forth: I’ve got 10 more miles of this? If there was one thing that set my mind at ease, however, it was the camaraderie on the course. It didn’t feel competitive as much as collaborative, reflecting the pledge, “I understand that Tough Mudder is not a race but a challenge.” And true to

word, Mudders were always helping other Mudders out. Most people were not concerned with their course times, like the “Gockasauras” team that carried an inflatable T. rex. This was just fine with me, as I couldn’t run up the hills at this altitude anyway. Instead, I adopted a run-when-Ican strategy, picking my spots and pacing myself, which, if I’m being honest, is another way of saying that I only ran when the trail was level or going down. Of course, the obstacles are the big sell here, and while they weren’t all “tough,” they were all uncomfortable. Some, like carrying logs, were physically taxing. Others, like crawling through tunnels filled with rocks, were just annoying. And a few were kind of depressing, like the monkey bars that illustrated just how little upper body strength I have. But the worst ones for me were the cold ones. The shock of leaping from a 12-foot platform into a snowmelt pond, for instance, left my head feeling like I’d just mainlined a milkshake—though it paled in comparison to “Arctic Enema,” a plunge through a dumpster filled with slushy ice water that taught me the difference between a simple brain freeze and a full skeletal shudder. That paralyzing cold was hard to kick, too, since I had no chance to move around and warm up before walking up to an obscenely long, 30-minute bottleneck at the next obstacle, “Everest.” Still, I felt like there was nothing on this course I couldn’t handle. Until the seven-mile mark that is, when my knee nearly buckled in stabbing pain. I didn’t know this at the time, because I’d never heard of an IT band, but I was sure that with each step, some tendon or muscle—something—was sawing into the lateral part of my knee. The intense friction made it difficult to put much pressure on it, forcing me to limp when the trail was level, and lock my good knee and skip when descending. I knew it looked graceless (at best), like I was galloping on an invisible broomstick, but for once in my life I had little bandwidth for vanity. I just wanted to cross the finish

as mud runners love showing photos of themselves looking like Navy SEALs at these events, we love telling you all the gory details. And let’s face it, the story about how I deliberately avoided getting shocked just doesn’t woo at the water cooler as much as the one about the moment of impact. This is what I told myself, at least—over and over—until finally summoning the courage to charge ahead. And while I may look less like Rambo in this pic, and more like the Boy Who Cried Shin Splints, as I left Squaw I knew I’d earned something I didn’t have before charging into the fray: the pride that only comes when you can look yourself in the mirror and say, Today, I WAS William Fucking Wallace. The 5k and 10k Russian River Mud Run, a race similar to Tough Mudder, runs Sunday, Oct. 28. Registration is sold-out, but a race festival is scheduled from 9:30am to noon at 3200 Rio Lindo Ave., Healdsburg. Free. www.russianrivermudrun.com.

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Last fall, I journeyed to Tahoe with hopes of writing a funny, experiential essay about doing my first Tough Mudder. After reading up on the company, however, I chanced upon a riveting scandal in the comments sections of various news stories, blogs and YouTube clips: Tough Mudder was being slammed for stealing the idea from the Tough Guy Competition, a popular obstacle race in the U.K. What’s more, they claimed that Will Dean, Tough Mudder’s 31-year-old CEO, did so while studying for his MBA at Harvard. I wasn’t exactly sure where this would lead, but I dove headfirst into the mud pit anyway, and by some magic or miracle, I sold the pitch to Outside magazine. After a year of research and reporting, writing and rewriting, my 5,600-word investigative feature about the scandalous origins of Tough Mudder is its November cover story, on stands now. Given the CEO’s Harvard pedigree, and the popularity of his company, the exposé has garnered widespread attention and generated headlines, including in the Huffington Post, which asked, “Is (Will Dean) the Mark Zuckerberg of Mud Runs?” You can find the story on newsstands now, or read it online, but in the meantime, I wanted to take this opportunity to share the story I initially set out to tell—the one about Tough Mudder and me.—Scott Keneally

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line on my own two feet. And though the final four miles went by excruciatingly slow at times, as I limped, lurched and skipped forward, I’m sure that when I arrived at “Electroshock Therapy,” I forgot all about the knee. I didn’t know what 10k volts felt like yet, but after watching dozens of YouTube clips of people faceplanting in the mud and hearing the screams of those ahead of me, I knew it wasn’t going to be a party. Some people slowly needled through, careful to avoid any wires, while others crawled beneath reach. There was a rumor going around that once a wire was triggered there was a refractory period while it recharged. If the theory held, you could avoid getting shocked by running behind someone. But none of those options seemed appealing. As I stood there, pondering how to best attack this final challenge, I realized that I secretly wanted to get shocked. I didn’t want to willingly shortchange the experience. I’d come all this way, and at the end of the day, as much

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

CULTURE

Crush The week’s events: a selective guide

GUERNEVILLE

Occupy Books Learning about the closing of another independent bookstore is one of the most heartbreaking things to hear as a book lover. So it’s with heavy heart that we watch the River Reader, Guerneville’s only independent bookstore, shut its doors at the end of October. “Despite my best efforts and your support, I am going to have to close,” says Susan Ryan, the store’s proprietor. Fortunately, October events will go as planned, including a reading by Daniel Coshnear, award-winning Guerneville writer whose latest collection, Occupy and Other Stories, is out this month on Kelly’s Cove Press. Coshnear reads Thursday, Oct. 25, at the River Reader. 16355 Main St., Guerneville. 7pm. Free. 707.869.2240.

FA I R FA X

Anarchy in Marin There’s no arguing that in the realms of punk-rock history, the Sex Pistols were superimportant. Glenn Matlock was the bass player until he was kicked out in 1977, replaced by Sid Vicious. More than 30 years later, he continues to tour as “Glenn Matlock of the Sex Pistols.” Interestingly, PiL, Johnny Rotten’s “other band,” plays the same night in San Francisco. Perfect opportunity for a clandestine, midnight Pistols reunion at the midway point of the Golden Gate Bridge! Glenn Matlock shows off punk rock’s ancient history on Thursday, Oct. 25, at 19 Broadway. 17 Broadway Blvd., Fairfax. $10–$12. 9pm. 415.459.1091.

P E TA L U M A

Walking Dead The cool thing about zombies is you can get totally creative with them. For example, last year my Halloween costume was Zombie Laura Ingalls. The costuming possibilities abound! Zombie Buster Posey! Zombie Mitt Romney! Zombie Beyoncé! In honor of Halloween, Copperfield’s Books hosts two Zombie Walks through Petaluma and Sebastopol, where people have permission to terrorize humans in the farmers market and lumber through town moaning, “Brains! Brains!” Make sure to stay for the party afterwards and get some treats and maybe an award or two. The zombies walk on Saturday, Oct. 27, at Copperfield’s Petaluma (140 Kentucky St., Petaluma; 2pm. 707.762.0563) and Sunday, Oct. 28, at Copperfield’s Sebastopol (176 N. Main St., Sebastopol; 11am; 707.823.2618).

N A PA

Steppin’ Out

WHO’S YER BUD? Collie Buddz plays the Mystic Theatre Oct. 31. See Clubs, p26.

The music scene in 1965 London must have been a mind-blowing thing to witness. That’s when Peter Green, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Steve Winwood began to discover the blues of American greats like John Lee Hooker, Sonny Boy Williamson, Buddy Guy and the like. John Mayall, with his vicious multi-instrumentalist talents and ear for the blues, was at the head of the pack. Just listen to the classic album John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton and be transported back to a bloody good musical epoch. At almost 80 years of age, Mayall continues to rock the stage, backed up by decades of experience. He plays Friday, Oct. 26, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $30–$35. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

—Leilani Clark

EARRINGS! Board president Caitlin Childs says KWTF is hoping to add to the radio landscape, not compete with it.

WTFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s with KWTF? A college-radio-style blitz from a dedicated core hopes to get on the airwaves with some decidedly subversive call letters BY LEILANI CLARK

A

s a teenager growing up on the outskirts of Los Angeles, college radio changed my life. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d tune in to KXLU, the radio station broadcast from Loyola Marymount University, late at night, listening to obscure punk rock that made my brain spin out into the wee hours.

Pre-internet, I was lucky that the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful transmitter allowed the precious sound waves to reach my bedroom in Whittier. And if the dedicated volunteers at grassroots effort KWTF, a new public radio station, have it their way, listeners from Bodega Bay to Santa Rosa to Windsor will soon have access to the same intimate, sometimes lifechanging, community-based radio experience.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma County really doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anything approaching a college station, or a station thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s putting out independent music, in the same way that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re starting to do,â&#x20AC;? says KWTF board president Caitlin Childs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;KRCB is a really great station, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not looking to compete with them, but one station canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put everything out; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just hoping to add to the landscape.â&#x20AC;? Music is only one facet of the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programming. Eventually,

KWTF board members and volunteers plan on raising enough funds to build a local newsroom, expressly for the production of locally focused shows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a demand for that,â&#x20AC;? add Childs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It might be a crazy plan, but I hope itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to do.â&#x20AC;? There are already a signiďŹ cant number of low-power and noncommercial radio stations in Sonoma County, including KOWS out of Occidental, KGGV out of Guerneville, KBBF, one of the ďŹ rst bilingual stations in the country, and, of course, KRCB, the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NPR affiliate and home of much of the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local programming. On the AM dial, KSRO broadcasts locally produced news and publicaffairs content. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is not to steal anybody elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pie; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just to make more pies,â&#x20AC;? says KWTF station manager Ben Saari. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to be complementary and collaborative with the other community media outlets that already exist, not to poach anybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s listeners or content.â&#x20AC;? KWTFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ultimate goal is to create a wide-reaching community radio presence, one that combines the strong publicaffairs programming of KPFA with the eclectic and highly curated music programming of KALX, the college station out of UC Berkeley. The story of KWTF began in 2007, when the FCC opened up applications for new stations; 88.1-FM was available, and the New College became a sponsor, a responsibility that couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be fulďŹ lled when the school closed its doors for good that same year. Local radio fans behind the effort approached members of Free Mind Media, including Saari, Childs, Desiree Poindexter and Leanne McClellon, to see if they were interested in taking on the task. Thus, KWTF, with its unique call letters, was born. )

22

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KWTF( 21 Elbert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Manâ&#x20AC;? Howard, Carole Hyams and Sabryyah Abdullah are other founding members. Since getting FCC approval for a 420-watt license in 2010, the station has hosted regular fundraisers for the ultimate goal of a transmitter and an antenna to potentially reach up to 250,000 listeners. But the ďŹ rst step is to raise at least $6,000 to buy a transmitter thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get KWTF, currently streaming online, on the terrestrial airwaves. An Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign ends Nov. 13, and as of Oct. 19, the station had raised $2,069 toward the goal. The next step for KWTF is the purchase of an antennaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at a cost of about $40,000. With a deadline of March 2013, when the FCC license expires, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not much time to get all the ďŹ nancial ducks in a row. Childs, with a tenacity common to many of the KWTF volunteers, says that no matter what, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be on the air in March, even it means not buying the full-strength equipment. That would limit the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coverage area, but would allow the permit to stay open. Of course, original programming is already available for listening at www.KWTF.net. The station currently plays eight hours of new programming Monday through Friday; on weekends, it drops to six. According to Saari, the stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only paid employee, 40 percent of KWTFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schedule is made up of local programming. The rest is ďŹ lled out with freely distributed programs speciďŹ cally for community radio stations and content produced for KWTF, but which comes from more than a hundred miles away. Syndicated shows include Democracy Now! in Spanish, CounterSpin (produced by a team from Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting) and Free Speech Radio News. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to have as much local origination as possible,â&#x20AC;? says Saari. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We also want to have a 60â&#x20AC;&#x201C;40 split between music and talk radio.â&#x20AC;? Current locally produced programs include Sneaker.net,

hosted by two Sonoma County techies and focused on technology and geek culture; Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spaces, hosted by Elaine B. Holtz, with a focus on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;needs and talents of womenâ&#x20AC;?; and Pillow Storm, an offbeat, often hilarious music show hosted by stalwart indie-scene supporters Josh Drake and Josh Staples, who made the move from KCRB over to KWTF this fall. Vinyl-O-Matic, hosted by Sebastopol-based musician and graphic designer Will McCollum, plays on weekdays. McCollumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been creating the showâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a journey from A to Z through his 900strong record collectionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;since March 2012 in a home studio using Audacity software. His inďŹ&#x201A;uences include WFMUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teenage Wasteland with Bill Kelly and KALX shows like Sex 14s, Pop Goes the Weasel and Tiger Lily. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been an avid, free-form radio fan for the last 20 years,â&#x20AC;? says McCollum, who has no previous hosting experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been rewarding to host my own show, because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been able to get further in touch with the community at large in Sonoma County by going to different KWTF events and getting to know the people involved in the station.â&#x20AC;? Once the transmitter is in place, McCollum plans on bringing in different members of the community to share their own favorite songs and records on the air. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an example of how key â&#x20AC;&#x153;localâ&#x20AC;? is to the KWTF mission. Station organizers are always on the lookout for new programmers from the area, and the KWTF website contains more information about how to pitch show ideas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been great seeing people come up with ideas for shows and then doing them,â&#x20AC;? says Childs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something really cool about facilitating a way for people to tell more stories and get their music out in the world.â&#x20AC;? After all, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that what community-based, grassroots radio is all about? As Saari adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Local radio is an important way to reach a local audience. We want to be part of a more vibrant and diverse public community radio landscape in Sonoma County.â&#x20AC;? For more, see www.kwtf.net.

Stage

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IN DA PUB Brandon Wilson, center, practices his wild Irish brogue.

Ghost Stories

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Weirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perfect storytelling for October BY DAVID TEMPLETON

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

T

ongue twisters!â&#x20AC;?

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how actor Brandon Wilson warms up his newly acquired Irish accent, which he uses in director Sheri Lee Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of The Weir, opening this weekend at Main Stage West. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never done an Irish accent in a play before,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m feeling pretty comfortable with it now, but I have found that the best way to warm up is by reciting tongue twisters in an Irish accent.â&#x20AC;? In the award-winning play by Conor McPherson, a group of friends, all men, meet in an Irish pub. In an attempt to impress a young woman, they begin to tell stories of the supernatural: ghosts, fairies, graveyards. Eventually, the woman tells a story of her own, changing forever how everyone sees her, and themselves. Wilson, viewed as a rising star in the local theater community, had never heard of The Weir until he was asked to play Jimmy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love this character,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very talkative with his pals, but as soon as the young woman shows up, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s silent for most of the rest of the play. And then suddenly, he lets loose with this story, out of nowhere. I love it.â&#x20AC;? Also featuring John Craven, Keith Baker, Peter Downey and Ilana Niernberger, McPhersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative play is essentially plotless, revealing the characters less through action than through the stories they tell. But for all its mention of ghosts and graves, Wilson says The Weir is not a scary play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really about the ghost stories,â&#x20AC;? he explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The stories are just something that springs up out of the relationships between the characters. The play is about people and the things that haunt them. We are haunted by our own pasts, and our memories, in a way, are their own kind of ghost story.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Weirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Nov. 11 at Main Stage West. 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 5pm matinees on Sundays. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.823-0177.

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BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

f I walked out of Cloud Atlas, what good would it do? If this movie is correct, I’d just be back watching it 50 years from now, only wearing a frightwig, a putty nose and joke-shop teeth. The Wachowskis and co-director Tom Tykwer try to get a handle on David Mitchell’s vastly ambitious novel of interlocking eras and eternal recurrence. But thanks to literally dozens of wobbly makeup jobs (looks like Halloween came early this year!), the shuttle back and forth between the 1800s and a post-apocalyptic futures is, ultimately, ludicrous.

One could argue the film’s ideas—slavery and cannibalism are evil, and love endures for all time. But is this entertainment? There’s some barbarian muscle when Tom Hanks, a tribesman of “140 years after the Fall,” fights off a tribe of horseback-riding ogres while dealing with a futuristic anthropologist (Halle Berry in one of six roles). Something can be said for Keith David dressed like Shaft and Berry attractively togged out as ’70s TV detective Christie Love, together in the barely written episode about a suspicious nuclear power-plant in 1973. The strange sequence about a publisher (Jim Broadbent) interned in an awful old folks’ home under the care of a Big Nurse is meant for Ealing Comedy laughs, though its attempts at humor are depressing. The draw to fans is a future-oid episode, about the tears of a clone (Doona Bae) enslaved at a New Seoul restaurant. This doesn’t transcend the trap of the literary-fiction writer delving into sci-fi; stripped of the prose, the plot is as bald as the oppressors of the future. Race-change makeup reinforces the reincarnation theme, and in visual terms, this means seeing what Hugo Weaving would have looked like if he’d played Dr. No. The scene of a critic being messily killed in a movie is always a tip-off that someone sensed trouble. The temporal switches actually limit the involvement with these centuries’ worth of characters. Rather than a cumulative impact of a symphony, Cloud Atlas is like watching six bad films at once. ‘Cloud Atlas’ opens Friday, Oct. 26, at the Roxy Stadium (85 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa) and Airport Stadium (409 Aviation Blvd., Santa Rosa), 707.522.0330.

GAME CHANGER No rap album sounds like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;good kid, m.A.A.d. city.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

For the City

Kendrick Lamar rewrites Compton BY GABE MELINE

A

sk most suburbanites over the age of 30 about what daily life in Compton is like, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re likely to get a recycling of the N.W.A. album Straight Outta Compton from 1988, which on the strength of its exaggerated stories of the hood has sold over 2 million copies. Part of Straight Outta Comptonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appeal is its caricature; it keeps one tongue twisting incendiary wordplay and another tongue twisting into the cheek. But its design is sensationalistic, and while young white teenagers across America have for over two decades reveled in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;realityâ&#x20AC;? of the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s characterization of daily life in Compton, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an underlying sense throughout of what Madonna would suggest,

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

two years after its release: strike a pose, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing to it. Old ideas fade, and good kid, m.A.A.d. city, the new album by 25-year-old Kendrick Lamar, released this week, is poised to recontextualize the city of Compton for good. Described in its subtitle as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a short ďŹ lm,â&#x20AC;? it trades not in over-the-top posturing but in the game-changing aspects that have become more prevalent, nearly required, in hip-hop in the last few years: introspection, uncertainty and sensitivity. In â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Peer Pressure,â&#x20AC;? Lamar confesses his indiscretions are the product of being impressionable while riding around with friends and blasting Young Jeezy; in contemplative standout â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bitch, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Kill My Vibe,â&#x20AC;? Lamarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s antagonist isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a female but rather the trappings of commercial attention and his own distraction by it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to keep it alive and not compromise the feeling we love,â&#x20AC;? he raps in a low, measured tone, â&#x20AC;&#x153;you trying to keep it deprived and only co-sign what radio does.â&#x20AC;? In â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sing About Me, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Dying of Thirst,â&#x20AC;? the young rapper even adopts the voice of a woman whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lost her brother to gun violence, turns tricks and is angry at being included in Lamarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own songs. Though the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cover photo shows a young Lamar on the lap of his dad, who throws a gang sign, he asserts that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been gangaffiliated: title track â&#x20AC;&#x153;M.a.a.D. Cityâ&#x20AC;? even hints that this fact could get him killed. But the goals here are higher than a gritty portrayal of life on the streets: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safe to say that our next generation maybe can sleep with dreams of being a lawyer or doctor,â&#x20AC;? he raps, â&#x20AC;&#x153;instead of boy with a chopper that hold the cul de sac hostage.â&#x20AC;? The resonant history of his hometown of Compton isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lost on Lamar, and the albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive producer is none other than Dr. Dre, the mastermind behind Straight Outta Compton. (A 45-year-old MC Eiht guests as well, linking the two generations.) But in whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure to be one of the most acclaimed rap albums of the year, Kendrick Lamar is rewriting his cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history with a sharp, eloquent pen.

TM

0F.LQOH\6WÂ&#x2021;6HEDVWRSROÂ&#x2021; Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;}>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;i`Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;"VĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows /Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;>Â?Â?iĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thu, April 22nd Âş"Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;½Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;-iiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;9i>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

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Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Concerts SONOMA COUNTY John Adams Master American composer guest conducts International Contemporary Ensemble in program of Stravinsky, Glass and Adams, with Jeffrey Kahane performing Gershwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rhapsody in Blue.â&#x20AC;? Oct 27, 8pm. Green Music Center, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. $20-$70. 866.955.6040.

Cantiamo Presents Ubi Caritas A cappella concert features Carol Menke and the works of Rutter, Hogan and others. Oct 28, 4pm. $15. Church of the Incarnation, 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2604.

Cirque du Sebastopol Halloween Soiree Night of live folk outside and dub inside features Nit Grit, Nastynasty, Jug Dealers, Easy Leaves and Cabaret de Caliente. Oct 27, 8pm. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jazz It Up Wine & Jazz Series Ferrari-Caranoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seasons of

the Vineyard invites guests to sip wine and enjoy series of Saturday jazz concerts, featuring Benny Barth Trio, Judi Silvanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indigo Moodsâ&#x20AC;? trio and many others. Oct 27. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

Kathy Kallick Lauded singer-songwriter plays with her bluegrass band. Oct 28, 7pm. $18-$25. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Kraddy LA DJ and founding member of Glitch Mob plays Halloween with Dynamics. Oct 31, 8pm. $17-$20. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Joyce Yang Pianist guests with Modigliani Quartet in program of Schubert, Haydn and Schumann. Oct 28, 3pm. $20$70. Green Music Center, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

MARIN COUNTY Bill Kirchen Grammy nominated guitarist plays with Austin de Lone

and Heidi Clare. Oct 26, 8pm. $23-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Glen Matlock One-time bass player for the Sex Pistols, the Rich Kids and Dead Men Walking brings original punk to Marin. Oct 25, 9pm. $10-$12. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Marin Symphony Symphony kicks of its 60th Season with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Viva Italia.â&#x20AC;? Oct 28, 3pm and Oct 30, 7:30pm. $10-$70. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

NAPA COUNTY Clannad Acclaimed Irish family band blends strains of music from the northwest coast of Ireland. Oct 25, 8pm. $45. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

John Mayall Grammy lauded British blues heavyweight sings in Napa with the Dani Paige Band. Oct 26, 8pm. $30-$35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Parker Quartet Grammy award-winning quartet plays classics on the strings. Oct 24, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Vienna Boys Choir Famed choir sings Austrian classics and a variety of other angelic tunes. Oct 27, 8pm. $25-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372. 11016-"3%"/$&.64*$1*&$& 0 1 6 - " 3% " / $ &. 6 4 * $1 *& $ &$ $07&3 07&3

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Aqus Cafe Oct 26, Tonewoods. Oct 27, Greenhouse. Oct 28, Rusty String Express. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

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Aubergine and the Last Record Store this week.

Oct 25, Jon Gonzales String Band, Mr. December, Los Dos. Oct 26, Bermuda Triangle, Chelsea Set and BC Fitzpatrick. Oct 27, Dead Wonderland with Z-Man, MC RadioActive, Chango B, DJ Beset, Mad Cow Bombers and Decomposers. Oct 28, Alan Watt. Oct 30, Odd Bird and the Cabin Project.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Foundation. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

27

Oct 26, Solid Air. Oct 27, Honey B and the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Hopmonk Tavern Oct 25, Juke Joint Mustache Bash. Oct 26, Spyralites, Smokehouse Gamblers. Oct 27, Cirque du Sebastopol with Nit Grit, NastyNasty, Jug Dealers, Easy leaves and more. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg

Crazy Rhythm John Adams returns to Sonoma County The American composer John Adams is no stranger to Sonoma County; indeed, many of his works have been composed at Brushy Ridge, his forest home on Meyers Grade Road, north of Cazadero. And yet Adams rarely appears here. Ten years ago, in 2002, he conducted the Santa Rosa Symphony with Jeffrey Kahane performing his piano concerto Century Rolls, and he finally reprises that pairing at the Green Music Center this weekend. Adams, conducting the International Contemporary Ensemble, holds the baton for works by Stravinsky and Glass, as well as his own Son of Chamber Symphony, while Kahane serves as pianist yet again, this time for Gershwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rhapsody in Blue.â&#x20AC;? A major force in modern composition, Adams is often personable and chatty in a live setting; one long-ago performance with the Santa Rosa Symphony of his epic work Harmonielehre began with Adams earnestly revealing his dreams to the audience. See the acclaimed composer conduct an allAmerican program on Saturday, Oct. 27, at the Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 8pm. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$70. 866.955.6040. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Oct 26, Susan Sutton and Bill Fouty Duo. Oct 27, Mark Levine Trio with Adam Gay and James Gallagher. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct 25, Michael Ratikan. Oct 26, Top Rankinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Reggae Showcase. Oct 27, Good Hip-Hop with Spends Quality and DJs Fossil and Big John Stud. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Oct 24, Smokehouse Gamblers. Oct 25, Rivereens. Oct 26, Jason Bodlovich. Oct 27, Pulsators. Oct 28, Danny Montana. Oct 31, Saffell. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Oct 26, Halloween bash featuring Zepparella, Kerouac and Dgiin. Oct 27, Ruckatan and Room of Voices with Mingo Lewis and DJ Smokey. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Last Record Store Oct 27, 2pm, Jon Gonzales. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Main Street Station Oct 24, Phat Chance. Oct 24, Phat Chance. Mon, Greg Hester. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Church of the Incarnation

Christyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Square

Oct 28, Cantiamo presents: Ubi Caritas. 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2604.

Oct 25, Reckless Kind, Manzanita Falls and Shelby Cobra. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8565.

Flamingo Lounge Oct 26, Poyntlyss Sisters. Oct 27, Halloween Party with Groove

Oct 27, George Heagerty. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377. Oct 25, JayDub and Dino. Oct 26, Midnight Sun Massive Halloween Party. Oct 27, High Country. Oct 28, Cynthia Carr and the Carrtunes Halloween Party. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Oct 26, Mother Hips, Huckle. Oct 27, Wonderbread 5.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

French Garden

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

Oct 26

MARK HUMMEL , LITTLE CHARLIE, & ANSON FUNDERBURGH

The Real Deal Blues 8:30pm

THE RANCHO ALLSTARS Oct 27 FEATURING TAKEZO Sat

Great Dance Band 8:30pm

TED & KAYE Oct 28 Acoustic Folk Sun

Music ( 27

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

RODDEN

5:00pm / No Cover

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE Nov 2 Celebrate “Day of the Dead” 8:00pm

Sat

Rancho Debut!

BOB MALONE Nov 4 John Fogerty’s Exciting Pianist Sun

4:00pm / No Cover

Sat

Nov 10 Thur

Nov 15

LINDA IMPERIAL BAND

WITH SPECIAL GUEST DAVID FREIBERG

8:30pm

RANCHO NICASIO’S 14TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW

8:00pm

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Phoenix Theater Oct 25, This or the Apocalypse, Dakota, To Play at Arms, Heavy Hearted and Osasuna. Oct 27, Pulsators. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope, live art and DJs. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Fri

STEFANIE KEYS Nov 3 Americana/Rock 8:30pm

Oct 28, Groundation, Thrive and WBLK. Oct 31, Collie Buddz, New Kingston and Los Rakas. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Songbird Community Healing Center

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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Oct 26, Evening of Kirtan. 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Spancky’s Oct 27, CounterBalance. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds Oct 24, Madrone Brothers. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Vino di Amore Oct 25, Bobby Lee and Hugh Harris. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Wed, Oct 24 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pmSCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE YOUTH AND FAMILY 7–10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Oct 25 8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Oct 26 7–11pm Sat, Oct 27

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK’N’ROLL 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise

Sun, Oct 28 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 1:30–3:30pm VINTAGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 5pm–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Oct 29 8:45–9:45am; 4:30-5:30pm; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Oct 30 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

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Peri’s Silver Dollar Oct 24, Johnathan Best. Oct 25, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Oct 26, Liquid Sun Day. Oct 28, Friends of Finch. Oct 30, Continentals. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 31, Halloween jam with Phil Lesh, Rob Barraco, Barry Sless, John Molo and Peter Rowan. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

San Geronimo Golf Course Oct 26, Halloween fest with Ductor Ezra. 5800 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.4030.

Sleeping Lady Oct 24, Judy Hall. Oct 25, Rhythm Addicts. Oct 26, Fenton Coolfoot and the Right Time. Oct 27, Texas Hurricane. Oct 28, Namely Us. Oct 30, Steve Wolf, Teha Bell, David Smadbeck and Iseult Jordan. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Oct 26, Epicenter Sound System. Oct 27, This Old Earthquake. Oct 31, Midnight on the Water. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 24, Mark Karan. Oct 26, Danny Click. Oct 27, Country Joe. Oct 28, Matt Eakle Band. Oct 31, Ghosts of Electricity Halloween Bash. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Mon, Tues, Alvon. Wed, Fri, Tom Duarte. Thurs, Taylor Brown. Sat, Sun, Lloyd Gregory. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Oct 26, Highwater Blues. Oct 27, Kerouac. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley Opera House Oct 24, Parker Quartet. Oct 26, Inti-Illimani. Oct 27, Vienna Boys Choir. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Oct 27, Laurie Morvan Band. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Oct 25, Clannad. Oct 26, John Mayall. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Oct 25, Pacific Guitar Ensemble. Oct 26, Bill Kirchen. Oct 27, House of Floyd. Oct 28, Mariah Parker. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Fairfax Library Oct 30, 7pm, Margaret Miles CD release. 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

George’s Nightclub Oct 26, Thriller Halloween Party. Oct 27, Rudy Colombini & the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Oct 31, Pride and Joy. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club Oct 24, Gail Muldrow & the Rockin’ Blues Band. Oct 24, Ray Brock Experience. Oct 25, Glen Matlock. Oct 26, Old School Marin. Oct 27, Heart Breakers Ball. Oct 28, Judy Hall and Bill Vitt. Oct 31, Fenton Coolfoot and the Right Time. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

San Francisco’s City Guide

A$AP Rocky Harlem rapper named after Rakim still floating on breakout single “Peso.” Oct 24 at the Fox Theater.

PiL John Lydon and the reformed gang play in support of first new album in 20 years. Oct 25 at Regency Ballroom.

Gilberto Gil Brazilian legend and cofounder of Tropicália visits for a trip through history. Oct 25 at Paramount Theater.

Ron Carter With possible exception of Ray Brown, the most recorded bassist in jazz history. Oct 25-26 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

Converge Relentless hardcore innovators on victory lap for comeback album, “All We Love We Leave Behind.” Oct 26 at Slim’s.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

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Galleries OPENINGS

features work exploring the subjects of grief and loss. Opening reception, Oct 27 at 6pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Oct 26

Hammerfriar Gallery

At 5pm. City Hall Council Chambers, Lauri Luckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings feature landscapes, dogs and abstract patterns. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Through Dec 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forwardâ&#x20AC;? features the work of 13 contemporary conceptual artists, including Chris Beards, Seymour Bergman and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Oct 27

Just for You Gallery of Fine Art

From 11am to 4pm. Marin History Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Justice and Judgmentâ&#x20AC;? features vintage police car on display. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8538. At 6pm. Gallery 300, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Day of the Dead Juried Exhibitionâ&#x20AC;? features work exploring subjects of grief and loss. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212. At 7pm. ECHO Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Picture Showâ&#x20AC;? showcases emerging and established photographers. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

SONOMA COUNTY Buddhaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through Nov 30, work of Jane Kelly, Arielle Lemons and others. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 707.829.7256.

City Hall Council Chambers Oct 26-Nov 26, Lauri Luckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings feature landscapes, dogs and abstract patterns. Reception, Oct 26 at 5pm. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Nov 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Did It AnyWayâ&#x20AC;? features the work of Becoming Independent artists in a variety of media. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery 300 Through Nov 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Day of the Dead Juried Exhibitionâ&#x20AC;?

Oct 26-Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma Wonderlandâ&#x20AC;? features paintings of legendary lead singer of Jefferson Airplane Grace Slick inspired by time in the wine country. 115 Plaza Street, Healdsburg. 707.395.0322.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lyrical Complexities,â&#x20AC;? sculpture by Charles Fahlen, who died in 2010. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going Going Gone,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Christine Kierstread; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invitational Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring work from 16 different artists; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vintage Portraits Tell Their Stories,â&#x20AC;? contemporary vintage photography by Stephanie Hamilton-Oravetz. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma County Museum Through Nov 4, Offerings and shrines for DĂ­a de los Muertos on display. Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death and Taxes in Fantasylandia,â&#x20AC;? 2-D work by Enrique Chagoya. Through Nov 4, Exhibit by Bay Area artist offers satirical slant on recession. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Dec 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Handmade Paperâ&#x20AC;? offers glimpse into historic practice of papermaking with large display of rare Japanese papers. Through Dec 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coastal Echoesâ&#x20AC;? features the new works of respected

painter Larry Thomas. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

MARIN COUNTY Gallery Route One Through Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artists of the West Marin Reviewâ&#x20AC;? features the work of artists who have appeared in the award-winning literary journal. Through Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dualityâ&#x20AC;? featuring the collaborative and individual work of Zea Morvitz and Tim Graveson. Through Nov 11, GRO presents the work of Will Thoms in the Annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin History Museum Oct 27-Nov 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Justice and Judgmentâ&#x20AC;? features vintage police car on display. Grand opening reception, Oct 27 from 11am to 4pm. Free. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Through Nov 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legends of the Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;? features the work of San Francisco artist David Maxim. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ravelingâ&#x20AC;? features the work of Lisa Kokin. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY ECHO Gallery Oct 27-Dec 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Picture Showâ&#x20AC;? showcases emerging and established photographers. Opening reception, Oct 27 at 7pm. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Grand Hand Gallery Through Oct 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drawn from Nature,â&#x20AC;? drawings and sculptures by Maash Pascal and Patti Wessman. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

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Arts Events

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BLIND FAITH ‘Corpo Celeste,’ an Italian film about a 13-year-old girl wrestling with Catholicism, screens Oct. 26 and 28 at SSU. See Film, below.

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Fri of every month. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Boat Rides & Barbecue Fundraiser and community builder for Cass Gidley Marina Sausalito Community Boating Center with live music by the Waterfront Pickers. Thurs, Oct 25, 4:30pm. Free. Dunphy Park, Napa and Bridgeway, Sausalito.

Brazil Day Learn the Brazilian art forms of capoeira, a combination of dance and self-defense, and samba batucada, the percussion music heard at Carnival. Oct 27, 2:30-10pm. $8-$15. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Costumes for a Cure Twenty-first annual Napa Valley AIDS Walk invites participants to don Halloween garb and partake of treats in the Veterans Park in downtown Napa. Oct 27, 10am. Free. Downtown Napa, Main and Third streets, Napa.

Day of Nonviolence Minimizing Occurrences of Violences in Society sponsors a luncheon honoring Verity, Sonoma County’s rape crisis and healing center, with the Bob Trunks Peace Award. Oct 26, 11:45am-1:15pm. $25 with RSVP. Osake Sushi Bar & Grill, 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.524.1900.

Discovery Day Science festival features more than 40 hands-on experiments, demonstrations and exhibits including the opportunity to launch a catapult, extract DNA, drive robots and eat liquid nitrogen ice cream. Oct 27, 11am-4pm. Free. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Howl-o-Ween Dog Parade 12th annual Dog Parade benefits the Healdsburg Animal Shelter. Oct 27, 12pm. $10 per dog. Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg. 707.431.1044.

Marin Singles Halloween Party Dance to oldies and newbies, dress up and meet other single professionals. Oct 27, 8pm12am. $10. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael.

Monster Ball Dance and costume party features haunted maze, tarot readings and food by La Condesa. Oct 27, 8pm. $45. Native Sons Hall, 1313 Spring St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

Run for Your Life Tug McGraw Foundation

presents 5k costumed race with proceeds benefitting brain-tumor research and PTSD awareness. Halloweenthemed after-party follows. Oct 27, 4:30pm. $20-$100. Downtown Yountville.

Singles Mixer Society of Single Professionals invites untethered adults to meet new friends. Oct 28, 6pm. $10. Plaza Bistro, 420 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.4466.

Zombie Walk Dress like an undead corpse, terrorize the town and return to Copperfield’s for Halloween treats. Oct 27, 2pm. Free. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563. Dress like an undead corpse and terrorize the town. Oct 28, 11pm. Free. Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books, 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Film Corpo Celeste A 13-year-old wrestles with Catholocism in this Italian film. Oct 26 at 7pm; Oct 28 at 4pm. $6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, Sonoma State University. 1 801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Escort in Love Italian film follows Alice, who has to learn the tricks of the world’s oldest trade when her husband leaves her penniless. Oct 27, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Film Festival on International Issues

Jewish Film Festival Series has a theme of music. Films include “Kaddish for a Friend,” Oct 25. 7:30pm; “God’s Fiddler,” Oct 30, 7:30pm. $15-$66. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Sleepwalk with Me Mike Birbiglia’s comedy about comedy. Oct 27, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Food & Drink Ancient Oak Cellars Weekend-long celebration of grand opening at Corrick’s with live music, raffle drawings, and special two-for-one tastings of awarding-winning estate Siebert Ranch Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel. Oct 27, 11am and Oct 28, 5pm. $10. Ancient Oak Cellars, 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.536.1546.

Benefit for Global Student Embassy Latin American fusion cuisine and live bluegrass music accompany an evening highlighting the work of GSE in Sonoma County, Nicaragua and Ecuador. Oct 27, 6pm. $45. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Harvest Dinner Dinner features chefs Tony Ghilarducci and Sheana Davis with wines from Hamel Family Vineyards and Idell Family Vineyards. Oct 25, 6:30-8:30pm. $65. Epicurean Connection, 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

For Kids Adventures in Anatomy Marin Mammal Center’s Whale Bus comes to Fairfax library and invites teens grades 6-12 to assemble the skeleton of

Harvest Festival Bring the whole family for a day of farm activities, including a livestock meet-and-greet, garden tours, hotdogs and snow cones. Oct 27, 11am2pm. Free. Connolly Ranch, 3141 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. Benefit for Waldorf-inspired program features Smithsonian Folkways recording artist Elizabeth Mitchell & You Are My Flower. Oct 27, 11am-4pm. $5-$8. Lagunitas School, Lagunitas School Road, San Geronimo.

Trick-or-Treat Day Corte Madera town center invites all super-heroes, fairy princesses, vampires and others to receive complimentary trick-or-treat bag and go around collecting goodies. Oct 28, 12pm. Free. Corte Madera Town Center, West side of Highway 101 at Tamalpais exit, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

Winnie the Witch Puppet Art Theater Company presents spooky show with black lights. Oct 27, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Andy Z Kids singer and storyteller presents Halloween costume party “Grand Scream of Things.” Oct 27, 11am. $5. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Science & Nonduality Conference Yearly gathering of scientists, teachers and philosophers includes keynotes from Adyashanti, John Hagelin, AH Almaas and others. Oct 24-28. $55-$495. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael.

Building a Strong Community of Women Diana Ruiz, founder of the Women’s Global Leadership Initiative, facilitates a dialogue on healthier ways for women to express interpersonal conflicts. Oct 24, 7pm. Free. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Kepler: Then & Now Series looks at Kepler’s work and his three laws of planetary motion. Various times. Fri, Oct 26. $8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

!

Science Buzz Cafe Oct 25, “Fungi Rule the World: Mischievous Molds and Mushrooms” with Philip Harriman. Thurs, 7pm. through Nov 8. $4. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Live Performance Join Grammy nominated jazz pianist David Benoit and author Derrick Bang for a musical journey through Vince Guaraldi’ ’s life and work.

Teen-Dating Violence Training aims to increase the capacity of service providers in Marin County to respond to teen-dating violence. Oct 26, 9:30am-3pm. $30. Four Points Sheraton, 1010 Northgate Dr, San Rafael. 415.479.8800.

Readings Book Passage Oct 24, 7pm, “And Life Rejoicing: Chapters from a Charmed Life” with Huston Smith and Phil Cousineau. Oct 25, 7pm, “The Magical Path” with Marc Allen. Oct 26, 7pm, “Ten Girls to Watch” with Charity Shumway. Oct 27, 1pm, “Uncommon Sense for Parents With Teenagers” with Dr. Michael Riera. Oct 28, 4pm, “How the French Invented Love” with Marilyn Yalom. Oct 30, 7pm, “A Working Theory of Love” with Scott Hutchins. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Downtown Bodega

Lectures

David Benoit

Saturday, Nov 3 at 4:00pm

Oct 28, 2-4pm, Halloween Poetry Reading, story telling and open mic session held under the Halloween tree in Bodega, behind the Organic Cotton shop. $5. Bodega Hwy, Bodega.

$10 for adults Q$5 for seniors, youth 18 and under Free for Museum members and children 3 and under ^^ĞĂƟŶŐĨŽƌƵŶƌĞƐĞƌǀĞĚƟĐŬĞƚƐŝƐůŝŵŝƚĞĚĂŶĚŽŶĂĮƌƐƚͲĐŽŵĞ͕ ĞĂƟŶŐĨĨŽƌ ƵŶƌĞƐĞƌǀĞĚ ƟĐŬĞƚƐ ŝƐ ůŝŵŝƚĞĚ ĂŶĚ ŽŶĂĮƌƐƚͲ ĐŽŵĞ͕ ĮƌƐƚͲƐĞƌǀĞĚďĂƐŝƐ͕ƐƚĂƌƟŶŐĂƚϭϬ͗ϬϬĂŵ͕EŽǀĞŵďĞƌϯ͘ Į ƌƐƚͲƐĞƌ ǀĞĚď Ě ĂƐŝƐ͕͕ƐƚĂƌ ƟŶŐĂƚϭϬ͗Ϭ ϬĂŵ͕EŽǀĞŵďĞƌϯ͘ 2 3 01 H 2301 Hardies a rd ie s LLane, a n e, S Santa ant a R Rosa osa w w w.S c h ulzM u s e u m.o rg Q 707.579.4452 7 0 7. 5 7 9. 4 4 5 2 www.SchulzMuseum.org

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Napa Copperfield’s Books Oct 27, 11am, “The Adventures of Harry Krinkle” with Stephanie Carrier. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa 707.252.8002.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Oct 28, 5pm, “The Napa River” with Nancy McEnery. Oct 29, 4pm, “The Halloween Kid” with Rhode Montijo. Oct 30, 7pm, “Devil Said ) Bang” with Richard

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31 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 24-30, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

“The Blue Gold” and “The Economics of Happiness” sponsored by the United Nations Association. Oct 27, 15pm. $8. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

a pygmy sperm whale. Oct 27, 4-5pm. Free with reservation. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 707.457.5629.

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 24-3 0, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Kadrey. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Petaluma Library Oct 27, 2pm, “Joy After Fifty” with Connie Clark. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Oct 25, 7pm, “Apocalyptic Planet” with Craig Childs. 11445 Shoreline Highway, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

River Reader Oct 25, 7pm, “Occupy and Other Love Stories” with Daniel Coshnear. 16355 Main St, Guerneville 707.869.2242.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Oct 24, 7pm, “Enchantment: New and Selected Stories” with Thaisa Frank. Oct 29, 7pm, “The Heart of Money” with Deborah Price. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Theater August: Osage County When the family unexpectedly reunites after Dad disappears, their Oklahoman ways are rocked by repressed truths and unsettling secrets. Thurs-Sun through Nov 4. $20-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Einstein & the Polar Bear Curtain Call Theatre presents romantic comedy by Tom Griffin. Various times. Through Oct 27. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe Porchlight Theater Company presents Gothic Halloween party in honor of morose writer featuring refreshments and audience participation. Oct 31, 8pm. $15-$20. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Hansel & Gretal Golden Gate Opera presents larger-than-life staging of classic fairytale. Fri, Oct 26, 7:30pm and Sun, Oct 28, 2pm. $15-$35. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Harvey Raven Players present classic about gigantic, invisible

Letts’ Best Bet ‘August’ excellent family drama Critics throw the word “classic” around a little too easily. Many a play has been dubbed “an American classic,” only to fade instantly in our memories. Few plays in the last decade have been as deserving of the “classic” title as Tracy Letts’ sprawling comedy-drama August: Osage County. Winner of the 2008 Pulitzer Prize, the complex, multi-character play launched Letts (Bug, Killer Joe) from the ranks of upand-coming playwriting oddity—his works were hyperviolent examinations of criminals and psychotics—into the stratosphere of fullblown American geniuses. August: Osage County, now playing at the Sixth Street Playhouse, is deserving of the praise. Simultaneously intimate and expansive, the play takes place at the house of a once-famous poet, whose unexplained disappearance brings his far-flung family back to the family home. Ruled over by the caustic, pill-addicted matriarch Violet Weston (local legend Mollie Boice), the outrageously dysfunctional family experiences parallel discoveries, betrayals and self-discoveries. It’s a rollercoaster of unsettling emotions and surprisingly textured laughs, a ride well worth taking. August: Osage County runs Thursday– Sunday through Nov. 4 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Friday– Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $20–$32. 707.523.4185.—David Templeton

rabbit. Various dates and times. Through Nov 4. $23. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

How the Other Half Loves This comedy of employment

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of October 24

manners and affairs follows the Fosters, the Philips and the Featherstones. Fri, Oct 26, 8pm, Sat, Oct 27, 8pm and Sun, Oct 28, 2pm. $15-$18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

ARIES (March 21–April 19) In the coming days, many of your important tasks will be best accomplished through caginess and craftiness. Are you willing to work behind the scenes and beneath the surface? I suspect you will have a knack for navigating your way skillfully and luckily through mazes and their metaphorical equivalents. The mists may very well part at your command, revealing clues that no one else but you can get access to. You might also have a talent for helping people to understand elusive or difficult truths. Halloween costume suggestions: spy, stage magician, ghost whisperer, exorcist.

Paranormal Activity You’ll wish this staging of the spooky film were only make believe. Oct 29-31, 7:30pm. Free. Fire Escape Productions, 2800 Cleveland Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.526.6465.

Rabbit Hole When a life-shattering accident turns their world upside down, a couple is left drifting perilously apart. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Nov 11. $15$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

So Nice to Come Home To This World War II musical comedy is a world premiere. A middle-aged woman is determined to become part of America’s war effort. Dates and times vary. Oct 26-Nov 11. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Topdog/Underdog 2002 Pulitzer winner follows brothers Lincoln and Booth, trapped in a dangerous sparring match fueled by poverty, face, family history and even their names. Various times. Oct 28-21. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The Wier Conor McPherson’s dark, lyrical play set in a Dublin pub stars Peter Downey, Ilana Niernberger and others. Various dates and times. Oct 26-Nov 11. $15-$25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Thriller Night A guide to Halloween bashes in the North Bay Originally, Halloween was a night when the veil between the dead and the living became less pronounced; now, it’s become a time to feel wildly, spastically alive. For kids, this happens through the power of sugar overload. For adults, it comes in the form of drunken parties and extreme costume adventures. Here in the North Bay, the opportunities are plenty. On Friday, Oct. 26, the Last Day Saloon hosts a Halloween bash starring alllady Zeppelin cover band Zepparella, along with Kerouac and Dginn (120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa; 9pm; $15). The same night, George’s throws its Thriller Halloween Costume Party, featuring ’80s cover band the 85’s (828 Fourth St., San Rafael; 9:30pm; $15–$20). On Saturday, Oct. 27, at Aubergine, get dressed up in your best sexy Zombie Kim Kardashian and head over to Dead Wonderland, w/Z-Man, MC Radioactive, Chango B and DJ Beset. (755 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol; 8:30pm; $15). Down the road on Oct. 27, Hopmonk hosts the Cirque de Sebastopol Halloween Soiree, which promises a seemingly incongruous mix of barnyard folk and heavy bass beats, with Nit Grit, NastyNasty, Jug Dealers, Easy Leaves and Cabaret de Caliente (230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol; $20-$30; 8pm). Feeling mellow on Oct. 31? Check out the Halloween Jam with Phil Lesh at Terrapin Crossroads. The night includes a buffet dinner, late night snacks (brains?) and costume contest (100 Yacht Club Drive, San Rafael; 6:30pm; $75). And over at the Sweetwater Music Hall, it’s the Ghosts of Electricity, a tribute to Bob Dylan, plus a costume contest! Zombie Joan Baez, perhaps? (19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley; 8pm; $22).—Leilani Clark

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) The coming week could have resemblances to the holiday known as Opposite Day. Things people say may have meanings that are different or even contrary to what they supposedly mean. Qualities you usually regard as liabilities might temporarily serve as assets, and strengths could seem problematical or cause confusion. You should also be wary of the possibility that the advice you get from people you trust may be misleading. For best results, make liberal use of reverse psychology, freaky logic and mirror magic. Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who you really are.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) I don’t have a big problem with your tendency to contradict yourself. I’m rarely among the consistency freaks who would prefer you to stick with just one of your many selves instead of hopscotching among all nine. In fact, I find your multilevel multiplicity interesting and often alluring. I take it as a sign that you are in alignment with the fundamentally paradoxical nature of life. Having said all that, however, I want to alert you to an opportunity that the universe is currently offering you, which is to feel unified, steady and stable. Does that sound even vaguely enticing? Why not try it out for a few weeks? Halloween costume suggestion: an assemblage or collage of several of your different personas. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

An avocado tree may produce so much fruit that the sheer weight of its exuberant creation causes it to collapse. Don’t be like that in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Without curbing your luxuriant mood, simply monitor your outpouring of fertility so that it generates just the right amount of beautiful blooms. Be vibrant and bountiful and fluidic, but not unconstrained or overwrought or recklessly lavish. Halloween costume suggestion: a bouquet, an apple tree, a rich artist or an exotic dancer with a bowl of fruit on your head.

LEO (July 23–August 22) I hope your father didn’t beat you or scream at you or molest you. If he did, I am so sorry for your suffering. I also hope that your father didn’t ignore you or withhold his best energy from you. I hope he didn’t disappear for weeks at a time and act oblivious to your beauty. If he did those things, I mourn for your loss. Now it’s quite possible that you were spared such mistreatment, Leo. Maybe your dad gave you conscientious care and loved you for who you really are. But whatever the case might be, this is the right time to acknowledge it. If you’re one of the lucky ones, celebrate to the max. If you’re one of the wounded ones, begin or renew your quest for serious and intensive healing. Halloween costume suggestion: your father. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Do you know how to tell the difference between superstitious hunches and dependable intuitions? Are you good at distinguishing between mediocre gossip that’s only 10 percent accurate and reliable rumors that provide you with the real inside dope? I suspect that you will soon get abundant opportunities to test your skill in these tasks. To increase the likelihood of your success, ask yourself the following question on a regular basis: Is what you think you’re seeing really there or is it mostly a projection of your expectations and theories? Halloween costume suggestions: a lie detector, an interrogator with syringes full of truth serum, a superhero with X-ray vision, a lab scientist.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) I am officially protesting you, Libra. I am staging a walkout and mounting a demonstration and launching a boycott unless you agree to my demand. And, yes, I have

just one demand: that you take better care of the neglected, disempowered and underprivileged parts of your life—not a year from now, not when you have more leisure time, but now! If and when you do this, I predict the arrival of a flood of personal inspiration. Halloween costume suggestion: a symbolic representation of a neglected, disempowered or underprivileged part of your life.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“It’s so fine and yet so terrible to stand in front of a blank canvas,” said French painter Paul Cézanne. Many writers make similar comments about the excruciating joy they feel when first sitting down in front of an empty page. For artists in any genre, in fact, getting started may seem painfully impossible. And yet there can also be a delicious anticipation as the ripe chaos begins to coalesce into coherent images or words or music. Even if you’re not an artist, Scorpio, you’re facing a comparable challenge in your own chosen field. Halloween costume suggestion: a painter with a blank canvas.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) As you contemplate what you want to be for Halloween, don’t consider any of the following options: a thoroughbred racehorse wearing a blindfold; a mythic centaur clanking around in iron boots; a seahorse trying to dance on dry land. For that matter, Sagittarius, I hope you won’t come close to imitating any of those hapless creatures even in your nonHalloween life. It’s true that the coming days will be an excellent time to explore, analyze and deal with your limitations. But that doesn’t mean you should be overwhelmed and overcome by them. Halloween costume suggestions: Houdini, an escaped prisoner, a snake molting its skin.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “Does anyone know where I can find dinosaur costumes for cats?” asked a Halloween shopper on Reddit.com. In the comments section, someone else said that he needed a broccoli costume for his Chihuahua. I bring this up, Capricorn, because if anyone could uncover the answers to these questions, it would be you. You’ve got a magic touch when it comes to hunting down solutions to unprecedented problems. Halloween costume suggestion: a cat wearing a dinosaur costume. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) The Live Monarch Foundation made a video on how to fix a butterfly’s broken wing (tinyurl.com/FixWing). It ain’t easy. You need 10 items, including tweezers, talcum powder, toothpicks and glue. You’ve got to be patient and summon high levels of concentration. But it definitely can be done. The same is true about the delicate healing project you’ve thought about attempting on your own wound, Aquarius. It will require you to be ingenious, precise and tender, but I suspect you’re primed to rise to the challenge. Halloween costume suggestion: herbalist, acupuncturist, doctor, shaman or other healer. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

It’s not a good time to wear Super-Control Higher-Power Spanx, or any other girdle, corset or restrictive garment. In fact, I advise you not to be a willing participant in any situation that pinches, hampers or confines you. You need to feel exceptionally expansive. In order to thrive, you’ve got to give yourself permission to spill over, think big and wander freely. As for those people who might prefer you to keep your unruly urges in check and your natural inclinations concealed, tell them your astrologer authorized you to seize a massive dose of slack. Halloween costume suggestions: a wild man or wild woman; a mythical bird like the Garuda or thunderbird; the god or goddess of abundance.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Legal & Public Notices

Employment $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1.800.405.7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com

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Huge Moving Sale Oct. 27—selling everything! Well-kept furniture, household & kitchen items, rugs, etc. 8 Halsey Ave., Petaluma off Mountain View. 707.996.8997

Notice of the Initiation of the Section 106 Process: Public Participation AT&T Mobility LLC plan to install a telecommunications facility at: 1717 Yulupa Avenue Santa Rosa, CA 95405 The project consists of the modifying the existing telecommunications facility by relocating 3 panel anten-

nas & installing 3 new antennas inside church steeple behind transparent screen walls. Associated equipment will be installed inside equipment shelter. No alternatives to the project were identified. Public Comments for this project should be forwarded to: Brian Powers Bechtel Corporation 2633 Camino Ramon #160 San Ramon, CA 94583 bepowers@bechtel.com 925.983.2335

g Professional Services Private Investigation

Best Friends Detectives (BFD)

Computer Market LAPTOP, Computer, LCD Panel

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Holistic tantric masseuse. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. *Custom Massage* Mon-Sat. Fall Discount. Certified Therapist Kneads Please call after 10:30am. You! Private incall. Blondie. 707-793-2232. 707.322.7230.

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Psychics

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De-Stress

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We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone.

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Donate Your Auto 800.322.4234

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not. Live operators—7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation Confidential Program. 707.576.1919 provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

2 for 1 Entrees Buy 1 entree + 2 drinks, receive a 2nd entree for free. Lunch or dinner. Mention Bohemian special. Ganesha Indian Restaurant, 535 Ross St, Downtown Santa Rosa, next to Bananas Music.

Church Holiday Boutique 1100 University Ave, Healdsburg. Saturday Nov 3, 9:30–3

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE 707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at – www.PeaceinMedicine.org

ArtWalk Napa presents "Momentum: Art that Moves (Us)" Oct-April 2013; Free interactive public art exhibit First St. & Town Center, Napa 707.257.2117

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Warren Miller FLOW State pre-party Wed, Nov.14! The Bohemian, Warren Miller and Lagunitas are cohosting a free pre-party. FREE pre-party raffle giveaways include movie tix for the Nov. 17 film at Marin Center, Heavenly trip for 2, Spyder Jacket giveaway, winter snow gear, Lagunitas swag, and more. Pint specials all night long! Party with our ski babes and dudes! Wed, Nov. 14, 6–8pm at Lagunitas Tap Room & Beer Sanctuary. 1280 N. McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. info: 707.527.1200.

• Providing Treatment since 1984

Rebound Bookstore "Phases of the Moon" through Jan. 10. 1641 Fourth St,. San Rafael 415.482.0550

Guitar Lessons w/ Hank Levine formerly w/Collins & Levine Band

JCC Presents 2012 Jewish Film Festival

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Tickets/Information www.jccsoco.org or call 707.528.4222

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

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Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St

The 15th Annual Boho Awards! Join us as we celebrate this year’s recipients of our Boho Awards, honoring those making significant contributions in the arts in the North Bay. Boho Award honorees are announced in our Nov. 7 issue, with a party that same night on Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Christy’s on the Square (96 Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa). Food, drinks, speeches, toasts, and... you! Runs from 5:30-7pm, and it’s free!


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